American Cicero

In an apocryphal exchange between F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, Fitzgerald said, “The rich are different from you and me.” To this Hemingway replied, “Yes, they have more money.” This gets repeated a lot, because it tickles the egalitarian sensibilities of most Americans. A big part of what has kept America together since the Civil War is the myth that ours is a classless society. Some people have more money and power than others, but that’s entirely due to merit, not class and connections.

Like the exchange itself, this belief is completely false. Every society has an elite and that elite uses its influence and connections to perpetuate itself. The daughters of rich guys marry the sons of influential guys. Their children are groomed to take up positions in the elite, mostly due to their family connections in the elite. Just as important, a floor is placed under members of the elite, protecting them from reversion to the mean. It’s how the Kennedy family has been in politics for four generations, despite their deficiencies.

What used to be unique about the American elite is they had a strong connection to the rest of America. This is a big, continent sized country, composed of man nations. That regional diversity, which is driven by biological diversity, made for a national elite that was really just a collection of local elites. This greatly reduced the distance between the elites and those over whom they ruled. Therefore, the American elite tended to be less elite, relative the Europe, and much more connected to the people.

In this interview on C-Span, Tucker Carlson explains some of the themes in his book and how he had this epiphany about what is happening in America. It’s an amazingly frank interview about how he and his fellow elites know pretty much nothing about the country over which they rule. At around the seven minute mark, he makes the point that he and his neighbors don’t know things like how much gasoline costs. The reason is, they have lots of money and the price of staples is simply unimportant.

Carlson is in many respects, a throwback. He’s what the WASP elite used to be like in previous generations. That is, he grew up in privilege, but had plenty of exposure to the common people and developed some common habits. In that same interview, he mentions that Claiborne Pell drove a beat up old car, despite being from old money. It was partially an affectation, but it was also a sensibility. American elites not only did not want to look like elites, they wanted to make sure they were a responsible elite.

That’s the interesting thing about Carlson’s book. It’s being bought and read by the hoi polloi, but it is aimed at his neighbors in Georgetown. It is a warning to them that they better start paying attention to what’s happening on the other side of the great cultural wall that separates us and them. What’s even more interesting is the people who should be reading it, are not reading his book. Instead they are attacking Carlson for it. They want his severed hands to be put on display in the Capitol rotunda.

The fact is, the Trump phenomenon is showing that the time for reform has passed and whatever comes next is unavoidable. That’s a truth about all reform efforts. Once a reform effort gets going, it is almost always too late for reform to work. The entrenched interests are too strong to overcome. Democracy moves quickly from a point where corruption is too minor to be of any concern to a place where corruption is too rampant for the system to confront it. Systemic failure is the core code of democracy.

You see this in late empire America. The ruling elite is composed of many parts, none of which has a reason to care about public welfare. The so-called deep-state is thoroughly beholden to global interests, many of whom are foreign. The semi-permanent administrative state is composed of people who hold the rest of us in contempt and people happy to not be subjected to the vagaries of the dreaded private sector. The mass media is a collection of propagandists and court jesters, mostly stupid rich kids.

The political class is always the main focus of reform, which is why many Americans are flirting with the sort of radicalism circulating in dissident politics. These well trained actors run for office on well-designed appeals to bourgeois sensibilities, then immediately begin speaking in tongues when they get to Washington. To follow modern politics, as a normal person, is to see the movie They Live over and over, thinking there can be a different ending, that the aliens will come around to our side.

The reason for this is the political class is just a collection of hired men. The plutocrats, who control both parties and the administrative state, have found that it is a lot easier to hire actors to stand in for them in office. That means every election, the choice is between two actors hired by the same people, playing different carefully scripted roles. When they get to Washington, they are given a different script. It is why so many of them are quite dumb. Stupid people don’t ask too many tough questions.

The defining feature of our modern elites is that a big part of who they are, their sense of identity, comes from not being us. The cultivated contempt from FBI functionaries like Peter Strzok and Lisa Page is part of the dress code of these people. In the same way a rich guy will sport an understated, but expensive watch or article of clothing, the people who rule over us wear a contempt for Americans, especially white Americans. The dying white middle-class is especially despised by the administrative state.

This is why reform is impossible. We see this with Trump and we would have seen it if Bernie Sanders had scored the upset. It’s not about the old ideological framework. It is about the new cultural framework. The people who rule over us see themselves as different from us, at war with us. They are defined by that sense. While it is amusing to see Carlson play the jocular Cicero role, it is important to remember the fate of Cicero as Rome succumbed to authoritarianism. No one should buy him gloves for Christmas.

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Ed
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Ed

Pretty grim analysis. But systemic failure isn’t just limited to democracy, right?

Seems like it’s part of the human condition.

FaCubeItches
Guest
FaCubeItches

It’s more part of life – everything is finely balanced; change even one or two variables and what worked yesterday collapses tomorrow.

Lance_E
Member

Democracy undergoes systemic failure faster than any other system, because it positively incentivizes factionalism and internal conflict.

Democracy in a multi-ethnic/multi-racial empire decays even faster, because all voting eventually occurs along tribal lines.

If history is any guide, multi-ethnic dictatorships survive longer than homogeneous democracies. Regardless, America is the worst of both worlds.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Explain Switzerland then.

The point here being that the problem is more complex than just saying “Derp! Dumbocracy!!”

Switzerland – does not invade other countries (removes a plaything from the elites)

Switzerland – has a military more akin to the structure that the American Republic had at it’s inception (armed citizens keep the politicians honest)

Switzerland – didn’t give women the vote until 1971. (kept the poz at bay for a number of decades farther along than most other “western” countries)

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
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Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

Switzerland is a decentralized state. Also, it’s ethnically homogenous.

Nathan
Guest
Nathan

Switzerland isn’t homogeneous—they have four official languages, different European ethnic groups in different areas. Being decentralized keeps the peace between the different peoples. We Amerikwans just see Huwyte since we’re Euromutts for the most part.

Herman Snerd
Member

@Nathan,
Switzerland is homogeneous in more important ways than national groups (ethnicities) or language. I haven’t been there for several years but most Swiss are Caucasian and most Swiss, even if they are now post-Christian non-theists come from generations of Christians. They have those “worth of the individual” and “Protestant Ethic” values going for them.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Exactly my point. Decentralized state. Run by MEN (at least until 1971) – and has survived for HUNDREDS of years in a relatively stable form. They’ve also famously rejected refugees and immigrants over and over and over again. Back in the Clintoon years they took a huge amount of shite for keeping the borders closed to WW2 refugees (Jews in particular). I remember reading some accounts of that where the Swiss defended the practice by explanation of having to protect their own citizens FIRST – and not become a refugee camp for a world gone mad. My sense is that… Read more »

Lance_E
Member

Getting really tired of hearing “Switzerland!” over and over again. They have a population of under 9 million and a land area of under 40,000 km². That’s two full orders of magnitude smaller than the United States, virtually no defense spending, and they *still* have collapsing fertility and IQ and now more than 25% foreign-born population.

Stop romanticizing the Swiss. They’ve just never been militarily powerful enough to project force, and are at a slightly earlier stage of cultural decline.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

We’re not “militarily powerful enough” to prevent an ongoing invasion – or even protect our own borders.

Your point is what exactly?

Member

Who could Switzerland successfully invade? Liechtenstein?

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Umm – so , the ability to invade other countries is still something you guys are using as a dick measurement yardstick – even though THIS country is now being invaded – by all the diversity – which is largely coming from countries WE have invaded in the past?

Congratulations on completely missing the point.

Mcleod
Guest
Mcleod

Rome may have succumbed to authoritarianism, but it also collapsed and the elite were sold into slavery. I know you don’t, but I still feel tech will be the great equalizer. I’m not talking about Facebook or Google, I’m talking about the bump stock ban. Who do they think they’re kidding? A bump stock can be made without any trouble in 90% of the one garage door shops in dirt land. The equipment is cheap and getting cheaper. I designed a part for and oil rig recently, sent it to them electronically, and it popped out of their equipment on… Read more »

Member

The parts and modifications to turn any AR or AK into a select-fire weapon aren’t technically difficult to produce, either. The risk vs. reward just isn’t there. If that calculus ever changed….

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

The concentration on whether civilians can own machine guns is a bit retarded. Anybody who is in the know about infantry tactics and especially guerilla tactics – knows that access to full-auto is a “who gives a shit” . The left has a paranoid woody for machine guns – and guns just because they’e black. The reality is that your civilian AR or AK is likely a better quality weapon than what the military issues to it’s troops – and many civilians are actually better shooters than their military counterparts. The thing that civilians lack is training in tactics and… Read more »

Lance_E
Member

Unfortunately, while it’s both de facto and de jure legal to own firearms, it is definitely NOT de facto legal to organize a militia.

You can practice and train all you want by yourself or with a couple of friends, but the second that state or federal authorities catch any whiff of an actual, organized civil militia, you’ll be labeled a “hate group” and they’ll come down harder on you than Hillary Clinton on a singing witness.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

The point here is that if you bring up the subject of how the military is organized in this country – and you mention that we USED TO have a militia – then something like 98 out of 100 so-called conservatives are going to start screaming about how the National Guard IS the militia. Which is patently not true. Along with a whole host of other corruptions of the original forms of the Republic – the militia was morphed into the National Guard – and tweaked to serve the interests of the power structure. The old militia was most definitively… Read more »

Lance_E
Member

What we used to have is completely irrelevant. America is what it is: a former superpower in steep decline, filled with third-world “citizens” and transitioning to a third-world system of economics and law enforcement.

I don’t care how things used to be. What matters is what’s possible today.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Bullshit. The past is relevant because it gives you an example of what worked. If what used to be worked because it was not filled with third world “citizens” – well then that is also a relevant piece of data from the past. And if the past is totally irrelevant – then what the hell are we doing here in the first place? Shouldn’t we all just be giving up on this whole white privilege thing and embrace the semi-brown globohomo future – and accept our female overlords? “Completely forget the lessons of the past” – is not something I’ve… Read more »

Reed Hill
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Reed Hill

My old granddad taught me that when you got lost you re-traced your footsteps back to the last place you were before you became lost. Was he wrong?

Mysteerious Roohian Vooman
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Mysteerious Roohian Vooman
Primi Pilus
Guest
Primi Pilus

@Lance_E & Calsdad: Gentlemen — Actually, there are two (2) levels of American militia — organized and unorganized. Check out Title 10 USC Sect 246. The militia is all males between 17 and 45 yrs etc, and all female National Guard members. National Guard and the few state Naval Militia are the organized militia. Those males not members of the National Guard are members of the unorganized militia. So we are already militia. It is out there, whether people know it or not. Spent some decades in the organized militia. Found that few even high ranking officers or NCOs understood… Read more »

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

I understand the difference. I believe many are missing the point here: the way the militia was organized prior to the institution of the National Guard – prevented it’s usage as a tool of the globalists to project power beyond the shores of the United States. The original militias also were comprised of members who kept their firearms WITH THEM – not down at the local National Guard armory. Like a lot of the other pieces of the Republic that have been twisted and manipulated by the left to suit their own ends – most Americans still believe that the… Read more »

Drake
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Drake

I used to shoot with a guy who had a bicycle shop. He built a homemade 9mm Sten in his repair shop. It was easy.

Mcleod
Guest
Mcleod

Years ago there were dozens steps between pencil on paper to an actual part or, more accurately, the tooling. Now, there is one step between the drawing and the part. You don’t even need a machinist with 30 years experience on the back end. What would once require a large well financed company now requires one guy with a decent machine. Expand this decentralization to medicine or education and you have a loss of central control.

Alex
Guest
Alex

Bump stocks are ridiculous gadgets made for people who’ve never held or used a fully automatic weapon. Fully automatic rate of fire is really only useful for massed fire to suppress targets from moving positions or raising their head for aimed fire. For most folks, fully automatic fire is useful for burning through mags of ammo and having fun doing it, but that is it. That being said its a dangerous precedent to begin banning parts of weapons or firearm technologies. As Zman has pointed out before, the NRA has resisted Conservatism Inc because of their unwillingness to give in… Read more »

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

LOL.

To the hard core gun rights crowd – the NRA gives in all the time.

Guzalot
Guest
Guzalot

The NRA has already caved on bump stocks but Gun Owners of America (GOA) is fighting it. GOA >NRA

LoveTheDonald
Guest
LoveTheDonald

The day of the rope approaches …

Snoopy
Guest
Snoopy

Damn, Mister Z, that was a very well written and thought provoking post.
Do you think I could get college credit if I read your posts (and the links) on a daily basis?

Member

Ha Ha, it is to laugh.

Member

I just noticed this in an article I read this morning.

https://www.claremont.org/crb/basicpage/diversity-and-demonization/

Almost no White Gentiles are referenced in the article. It’s all Jews, Blacks and Asians arguing over the fate of a university built by White men.

Ris Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris Eruwaedhiel

Members of the Coalition of the Fringes fighting among themselves.

Member

Nope, your concept of who constitutes “the Coalition of the Fringes” is broken if you think it includes, say, Thomas Sowell or Clarence Thomas.

Member

Are there any White Gentiles in particular that you are butthurt that Minowitz ignored?

The Rude Dude
Guest
The Rude Dude

Actually, people don’t like Tucker Carlson because he is a racist. The “deep state” agents you bemoan are committed to fighting against racism and white supremacy. The fact that you think that is a negative says a lot about you.

On a more humorous note: It seems that support for Trump and Trumpism correlates with with white dudes with small penises

wjkathman
Guest
wjkathman

Obvious troll is obvious. “Racism” and “white supremacy” do not have objective meanings. Why the hell should any of the rest of us accept your definitions of those terms?

Member
Felix_Krull

There’s nothing wrong with being a racist, and ‘fighting racism’ is a code word for white genocide.

Tax Slave
Guest

Feel free to shout those very same words as the .45 round from my 1911 flies towards your pretty face. It’s exactly what you’re asking for by mouthing such mindless drivel.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

Apparently, the Left is fighting fire with fire…
they’re fighting Racism with even more Racism of their own.
The Left are some of the most Racist and
Classist people I’ve ever met.

Member

It’s okay to be white. By the way, we hate your guts.

Ryan
Guest
Ryan

I want to think Zman is the next big thing, but if this is the quality of the trolling coming at him I fear he’s destined for mediocrity.

Please don’t let this get you down Z, me and your triple digit number of acolytes will still happily drink the Kool-Aid whenever you say the spaceship is in orbit.

Tax Slave
Guest

^Jonah Goldberg or Bill Kristol? What’s your guess?

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
Guest
Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

I’m thinkin’ Ben Shapiro. They’re giving him Savage’s radio broadcast come January 7.

Hoyos
Guest
Hoyos

Can you prove he’s a racist or a white supremacist? Or are we just saying words?

Wolf Barney
Guest
Wolf Barney

Racist, Schmacist. Who cares.

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

Racism is by an large a reflection of loyalty to your people.

To a multi-ethnic empire this is the ultimate sin as that kind of state devours all under it and demands loyalty only to itself

LineInTheSand
Guest
LineInTheSand

As Z notes, there will always be an elite. The fundamental problem of politics is how to ensure that the elite care about the majority of the non-elite. Ethnonationalism is the best solution to this problem, although no solution is perfect.

Ris Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris Eruwaedhiel

Every society has an elite, it’s just a question of what kind of elite rules – warriors, wealthy landowners, merchants, etc. In a homogenous society, the elite will be of the same bloodstock as the great mass of ordinary people. Easier to develop a sense of obligation towards their fellow citizens and the country as a whole. Zman has aptly compared our elite to a foreign colonial masters. I would add that some of the British had a sense of noblesse oblige towards their colonial subjects and tried to improve their lives. Every organization has an elite, even social clubs.… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
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Citizen of a Silly Country

Yeah, I’ve felt for awhile now that a mid-sized nation-state is your best chance at reasonable government. Your elites need to see the people as members of their family. I mean, love them or hate them, family is family and you put their interests above others.

It also makes the immigration debate quite easy. “Is this person who wants to come into our country related by blood and culture?” No, well, they can’t come here.

That said, Europe was full of nation-states 75 years ago and look at them now. As you said, no solution is perfect.

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
Guest
Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

“Yeah, I’ve felt for awhile now that a mid-sized nation-state is your best chance at reasonable government. […]”

Here’s what Montesquieu said about that:

” […] Republican form of government is possible only in a state of small size; monarchy suited the moderate-sized state while a big country or an empire must have despotic government. Real democracy is possible only ion small city-state. France of Montesquieu’s time was too large for a republic form of government, Monarchy would suit her best. Montesquieu declared monarchy, a worst form of government and he unlike Machiavelli discarded the doctrine of aggrandizement and expansion. […]”

https://www.scholarshipsads.com/montesquieus-views-on-forms-of-government/

Bartleby the Scrivener
Guest
Bartleby the Scrivener

OT. I tend to lurk on the edges at Z Man. Today I browsed Unz, and in the comments, a person was positing comments that had to be purposefully whacky. When I looked at the poster, it was none other than “Tiny Duck”, a person who is referenced occasionally here.

Is that guy for real? Or a simple attention grabbing troll?

His comments where, to say the least, mind boggling.

Random Dude on the Internet
Guest
Random Dude on the Internet

Tiny Duck is a troll. Occasionally he will forget what race he is, the size of his penis, etc. He’s made the rounds on a number of various comment sections on various sites. I begrudgingly give respect to someone who has kept the troll going for so long.

Member

Tucker is an interesting man and I have watched him from his early bow tie days. He seems genuine and seems to not like a lot of the fellow privileged. Maybe that is why he has taken to hunting and fishing, chewing tobacco and the like.

Even if the book was written by a snob, Charles Murray’s Coming Apart does describe well the classes of white society from decades ago and how they are severely stratified, never to know the other.

Rod1963
Guest
Rod1963

BTW Tucker does recommend Murray’s “Comming Apart” as essential reading.

SidVic
Member
SidVic

The bow tie was extremely off-putting for me. Started warming to tucker when he dropped that pretension. BTW-Charles Murray’s bubble test: https://www.pbs.org/newshour/economy/do-you-live-in-a-bubble-a-quiz-2
is topical to zmans post.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Murray is an interesting character. Hard to call him a coward after all of the arrows that he’s taken over his career, but he sure does seem unwilling to follow the logic of his own research. Every time his research would lead any thinking person to at least consider that multi-racial states might not be a good idea or that Western culture needs, you know, white people to survive or that immigration might not be such a great thing, he retreats into the safety of libertarianism. Then there’s his bizarre hatred of Trump, though that may be as much because… Read more »

Saml Adams
Guest
Saml Adams

Murray is useful because his research methods are meticulous. No one I’ve seen has done a refutation of “The Bell Curve” that was anything other than a polemic. Bell Curve and “Coming Apart” were useful intros for two of my kids (so far). And yes, he’s had the balls to keep going despite being hurled to the void. More than I can say for myself.

Chaotic Neutral
Guest
Chaotic Neutral

America is still very meritocratic though. A boy from a lower to middle middle class family can claw his way to wealth or elite status by dint of hard work and some modicum of ability, as most of us here have, I assume. (White privilege is imaginary; other forms are not.) it’s a hard road, and nobody is standing there to bail us out if our aspirations crash and burn. This is also sadly true of minorities promoted beyond their abilities because of aa. The elites by birth and connection are definitely real, like those described hilariously in the first… Read more »

Issac
Guest
Issac

Merit advancement is ending. Hence the first signs of trouble. There are vanishingly fee opportunities for white men of intelligence to align the stars they need to make it. Admissions for whites to good universities is down. Competition for career making first posts is obscene due to diversity hiring and global rackets for labor. The economy of thr US is also increasingly centralized. Small business is dying while the fortune 100 grow due to the latter’s ability to lobby. The traditional ways a prole with wit cut his teeth snd made it are by in large closed or closing. Within… Read more »

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
Guest
Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

One of the main problems that we face now–and maybe the most important problem of all–is that there is no law. Not merely that the law is unequally applied, because when law is unequally applied, then in effect there is no law. And you’re right that we still have something of a meritocracy, but how long can that survive when there is no law?

Random Dude on the Internet
Guest
Random Dude on the Internet

It’s harder and harder for sure. STEM is not the land of milk and honey that people have been promoting. Part of it is that the H1Bs and other various programs are taking over but a lot of it is that the glut of STEM majors will bring an impetus to start cutting wages, slashing benefits, and making it easier for fresh out of school STEM grads to be interchangeable. The new STEM grad class thinks that the answer lies in more certifications and more educations. Their first instinct is to get an MBA but every one of their peers… Read more »

Ris Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris Eruwaedhiel

At a barbecue, a man told me that growing up in Tewksbury, NJ, his family was comfortable, but not wealthy. The kids at school from newly rich families taunted, “We’re rich, you’re not, what’s the matter with you?” He went on to say that the old money people were different: they wore old clothes, drove old trucks and would talk to him while standing in line at the supermarket checkout. Compare corporate execs from the “Greatest Generation” who frequently had a sense of responsibility towards their employees and communities versus the Boomers who replaced them beginning in the 1980s. I… Read more »

c matt
Guest
c matt

Very rarely do you see a business where employer and employee share goals. I doubt it could exist in a business of any moderate size, much less the large ones. And small businesses, where it does happen occasionally, are disappearing (except, perhaps, in the professions).

Ryan
Guest
Ryan

The law firm I work for has this going for it. As an example, our health insurance package changed a couple years ago to a higher deductable. So firmwide email comes out from our general partner saying “sorry the deductable went up by $1,000, in response we’re giving everyone a $1,000 raise.” Hierarchy is the natural state of human society, and upward loyalty coupled to downward loyalty is the definition of good.

thekrustykurmudgeon
Guest

really – I always felt it was more different. The new rich with there mcmansions and SUVs are only a generation removed from proledom – while the “old money” of places like Scarsdale or Darien are more insular in there tastes.

Saml Adams
Guest
Saml Adams

Worked for a firm that in the early days of my career was still run by a family fairly well known around your parts. The then patriarch still drove to work in a beat up station wagon from their “farm”. He and his wife were simply delightful people. Would talk to anyone at company event. After he retired but still kept an office down the hall from mine he’d invite you in to sit down and talk about “how the company was doing”.

Member
Felix_Krull

The defining feature of our modern elites is that a big part of who they are, their sense of identity, comes from not being us. The cultivated contempt from FBI functionaries like Peter Strzok and Lisa Page is part of the dress code of these people.

You can see this when some actor washes out: the humiliating lengths they’re ready to crawl to, in order to regain just a tiny morsel of Cloud life.

Member
Felix_Krull

Top shelf column, by the way. You’re on a roll.

JZs
Guest
JZs

Nice work, Z. Sure helps me rationalize why Trump essentially ended any chance of being re-elected yesterday with his whiny abandonment on building the wall. In fact, Trump is doing just the opposite of building walls. He’s tearing down existing walls of justice to let felons go free. Not what I voted for In the least. We’re fucked.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

Conservatives have to get used to seeing themselves as what they are: a despised ethno-cultural minority, rather than the “Silent Majority” of the latter half of the 20th century. Non-whites the world over believe they are delivering “cosmic justice” for 500 years of imperialism. An attitude of humility on our part is unavoidable, we are not going to win a war even if the people were willing to fight.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

Most people are conformist sheep by nature, which is not a bad thing as a society of nonconformists (as we are) would be unstable. This works against the ability of (white) conservatives to transmit their values, as the vast majority of upper-middle class people are marinated in a university and corporate culture that induces guilt and publicly shames anyone reckless enough to challenge it. What we need is our own “Hillel House”, long before we can dream of an Israel.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

I’ve been arguing for that strategy for years. We need a home base. However, we have to start extremely small, or it’ll get killed in the crib. Or we could co-opt existing white ethnic clubs such as Irish or German-American societies. Right now, those places are just a meeting place for older guys who put on cultural festivals every once in a while. Maybe they could be used for organizing some defense of whites.

Either way, whites have to find a way to organize. It’s the only way forward.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

If you think I am exaggerating, just read this:
https://twitter.com/rubyhamad/status/1074911037307011072

Issac
Guest
Issac

You should save that first sentence and plaster it far and wide. That and the iron law of oligarchy are crucial to understanding any politicial issue and how you must organize to affect change or evade the worst consequences therein.

Chad Thunderkoch
Guest
Chad Thunderkoch

Stop being a faggot, JZ.

johnmark7
Guest
johnmark7

What Trump fails to realize is that the Wall is more than a useful barrier, it is the prime symbol to half of America that the ship of state can be slowly turned toward reform away from disaster. No wall and the people will quit on electoral politics and simply wait for Caesar to come.. If there’s no wall, why bother trying to fix anything since the country has already and clearly been lost?

Member
Felix_Krull

That means every election, the choice is between two actors hired by the same people, playing different carefully scripted roles. When they get to Washington, they are given a different script.

Power is like a violin. You hold it with your left hand, and play it with your right.

Ris Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris Eruwaedhiel

A friend compared the two parties to a two-headed snake.

Member

It’s looking like Trump will turn out to be the American Gorbachev – a reformer who tried to save a doomed system, but found that his well-intentioned efforts were simply too little, too late. The real blackpill out there isn’t “OMGTRUMPBETRAYEDUS!!11!!!!” or even that Trump can’t get anything done because of “The Swamp”, but that our late imperial government is so rusty, sclerotic, and dominated by inertia and entrenched interests that basically nobody can get anything done. Obama got nearly nothing done during eight years in office, either, and his voters didn’t really get any more of what they wanted… Read more »

Ris Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris Eruwaedhiel

Pres. Trump isn’t a Pinochet, as we hoped, but, a Gorbachev, as you said.

I realized that Obama was just a puppet. Blacks in particular love to be “fronts,” while some white guys do the work. See a lot of that in business. Michelle Obama made some 300K a year “working” at a do-nothing job with the University of Chicago Medical Center.

Wilson McWilliams
Guest
Wilson McWilliams

Michelle was Vice President for Community Affairs at UC Medical Center, a post which was abolished once she was elevated to First Lady.

One wonders which Soros puppet donated the annual 300K to fund Michelle’s “job”, while little Barrack was being groomed for “leadership”.

Member

Obama got nearly nothing done during eight years in office, either

The harm of the Obama administration wasn’t so much what happened in law, it was what happened to the culture.

Lance_E
Member

Democrats are the party of government. When one is elected President, it is literally his job to do nothing and let the actual government do its thing.

Republicans, of course, get this funny idea in their heads that they’re actually steering the ship, and are soon disabused of that notion. It just took Trump longer than most presidents to figure it out.

Issac
Guest
Issac

¿Por qué no los dos?

Dirtnapninja
Guest
Dirtnapninja

The contempt for deplorables amongst the Baizuo comes from an identity crisis. These people have no real sense of who they are and where they came from. The Strzoks grew up in a white refugee camp (ie a suburb). They lived lives where everything was transitory. They gained their cultural knowledge from TV. They left for university in some distant place, shattering the few bonds they had, and were dutifully programmed. They then left university and found work in an office where nothing tangible is produced. They have few attachments to anything lasting. Since they have no sense of identity… Read more »

Tim
Guest
Tim

I like the use of the word Baizuo. It’s succinct, and does the job.

TomA
Guest
TomA

All true, but the elites are not immune to the wasting disease that is killing us all in slow motion. They have derivative power through mechanism of wealth, but would not long survive in a jungle environment. Their sense of security is founded on the LEOs they own and the mercenaries they can purchase, but are oblivious to how technology has rendered both obsolete. The billionaires club is very small in number, and need not fear an uprising of pitchforks. Rather, the comeuppance may well arrive from the ether.

Ris Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris Eruwaedhiel

It’s been discussed on this blog that the elite depends on the police, security guards and the walls of their gated communities to feel safe. How many of the male members have ever been in a brawl much less are adept in the use of firearms? Brett Kavanaugh once threw ice at someone in a bar while in college. I was disappointed to read that – I expected that someone named Kavanaugh (hint, hint, Irish) would throw a punch. That was considered shocking to The New York Times. Sheesh. “Rather, the comeuppance may well arrive from the ether.” Do you… Read more »

Nathan
Guest
Nathan

It aggravates me to no end the soft, smug ruling class that has so much power over us yet wouldn’t last 10 minutes in MadMax world. Look at Rod Rosenstein for example. If he misses the last flight to Tel Aviv on the DOTR how would he fare? The easy life of the modern world has bred a class of parasites. It would not be so bad if they were limited to the ‘hood, but they infest all the pressure points of the system.

TomA
Guest
TomA

“Do you mean other”

The dictionary defines “ether” as the upper reaches of the atmosphere beyond the clouds, but the colloquial meaning is out-of-the-blue (meaning unexpected or unanticipated). You’re not going to beat the Deep State with citizen militias, firearms are for self-defense. WWII was won by the GI squad sergeant who brought nimble innovation to the front lines. That is how tyranny will be defeated.

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

That’s tactics which win fights.

Ideology gives the will to fight and the Right doesn’t have one. When blog folk can tell me in detail what they are willing to risk their family being tortured to death fin reprisal raids for and there are enough of them, they can win.

As it is we react, we don’t create something new and better.

To paraphrase The Big Lebowski “Say what you want about cultural Marxism, it least it an ethos”

Saml Adams
Guest
Saml Adams

Many years ago while researching my mothers family came across a recount of how her gggg-grandfather and his brothers all walked onto the village green in their NY town and openly signed the oath of allegiance to the Continental Congress in 1775. Took real balls. All served as militia officers in the war with many of their sons serving in the Continental Line. Do we have the same stuff?

Tax Slave
Guest

Trump is a Boomer. He believes he can “heal” the country and “end racism.” If he only knew the best thing he could do is burn down the Capitol, Wall Street, the Fed, the FBI, etc. and commence with 24/7 public executions.

Burger Pattie Joe
Guest
Burger Pattie Joe

The selloff has been going on for a little over a year now. The plebs remain asleep. They never wake up until it’s too late anyway. Interest rates are too low to use as a tool. InstaHos who’s husbands are in jail for drug trafficking command more attention than teachers. NGOs continue their ability to rip off tax payers. Cops and teachers aren’t allowed to enforce standards of decency anymore. Standards of decency aren’t allowed in public anymore. The public sector no longer functions in the interests of the silent majority. ConsumerCorpUSA only uses and then disposes of; Nice jerks… Read more »

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
Guest
Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

Two things:

1. Biohistory: https://www.biohistory.org/

2. The current Grand Solar Minimum (the Eddy GSM) and the concomitant global cooling (droughts, catastrophic crop failures, increased volcanic and earthquake activity, population collapses, and population migrations–southward).

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

One of the best parts of the GOP tax law was the tax on university endowments. But being the typical GOP, they didn’t put the revenue in an escrow fund for student loan relief. And the GOP did nothing to tax the similarly large “foundations” that are slush funds for leftist causes. It may be too late for the average conservative voter to realize that it isn’t 1978 anymore, and “tax cuts” are no longer a winning message. To say nothing of the elite who have a New Zealand bunker or a Tel Aviv condominium waiting for them if things… Read more »

Ris Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris Eruwaedhiel

A friend of mine, a retired hedge fund manager, said that foundations should be abolished because they were tax dodges for the rich.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

I’ve read that most foundations could be “spent down” by mandating expenditure of 10% per annum, rather than the current 5%. Another silly part of the tax law revived the “Enterprise Zone”, it would be beneficial to mandate that foundations have to spend the vast majority of their donations in these Zones in order to maintain their tax-exempt status. Sackler art museums should not receive a tax benefit unless located in a ghetto. Of course all Sackler wealth should be given the Ramaphosa treatment.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

Interesting older piece about the Enterprise Zone scam, apparently the original variant was about repealing labor and environmental laws to create “maquiladoras in the ‘hood”. Not a surprise that it went nowhere as a concept.

https://www.city-journal.org/html/why-enterprise-zones-will-not-work-12612.html

Member

And Trump may end up like the Gracchi. This article is a very good example of what is meant by the term, “culture war.” Your average voter doesn’t understand this term, thinking it vaguely involved with high-brow stuff he is not interested in. This article would enlighten John Doe. If he bothered to read it. There again, people may not be interested in the culture war, but the culture war is interested in them.

avib
Guest
avib

Either our traitors masquerading as leaders succeed in replacing heritage Americans, or we succeed in replacing them with real leaders.

Tom
Guest
Tom

I’ve said here several times before that I’m more temperamentally inclined to reform than revolution.
But I find this argument very persuasive.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Guess who’s the Financial Times “Man of the Year”? George Soros.

https://www.ft.com/content/2bd12012-01e4-11e9-9d01-cd4d49afbbe3

“The philanthropist has become a standard bearer for liberal democracy, an idea under siege from populists”

You have to give the other side credit. They make the choice very clear.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

The Soros Foundation can put an immense number of people on its checkbook, so much that non even Soros himself knows where all the money is going to. They also have the benefit of Soros and his family are retired from work and devoted to subversion full-time. By contrast, the Koch Brothers are still running and growing the size of Koch Industries.

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

The Koch Brothers are allies of Soros more than us. And ye sure they are more capitalist than he might be, its moot

The Right is obsessed with economic systems when in reality so long as its not outright Communism any system is fine. Its our spirit and our ethnos that make up the West. Capitalism a newcomers had jack to do with it

And if you doubt that, tell me with a straight face that the Middle Ages with a tightly controlled economic system and little social mobility was somehow not “Of the West”

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

Eh, it was more a comparison about efficiency. The Kochs don’t get as much bang for their buck when it comes to politics. Politics is something they are into in order to lower their tax burden, and increase profitability. The Kochs hated Ron Paul, and never even found covert ways of backing him. Soros probably funded Svoboda.

Member

They’re master semanticists as well.

Drake
Guest
Drake

A century ago, the elite still served in the military during wars, still did manly things in their youths. I’ve learned to despise his politics, but Teddy Roosevelt personal life was an exaggerated version of many elite men – in their youth they were tutored in life by rough men. They understood and formed ties to the rest of us. The above comments about the upper middle class are true. Most seem pampered and soft while looking down on actual work with incredible arrogance. (Although I met a few who rejected that mindset and enlisted in the Marines)

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

In the Netflix series “The Crown” – the way Philip is portrayed he comes across as an “elite” that genuinely gets along with the “subjects” . They make a point of illustrating that Philip’s royal family was hounded out of their position when the people under them grew tired of the escapades of royals and hunted them all down. I don’t recall if they did this thruout history – but during my lifetime the males of the British royal family were expected to have military experience (of a sort). In this country we don’t even expect our clouds to be… Read more »

Drake
Guest
Drake

I think that in the South, young men enlist more often for a career – and the Army has more career opportunities and faster advancement than the Marines. In New England, the young crazies (like me) join up to test themselves and – whether they know it or not – reject the weakness all around them. A neighbor’s son here in NJ dropped out of college a couple of years ago to enlist in the Marines. He’s a really bright kid, but much happier as a demolitions specialist in the Infantry than he was as an English Major at some… Read more »

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

Both the current UK princes are combat vets, Prince Harry in particular is a born killer with a pretty good gunnery record or so its said. He is still married to an aging half black actress of middling worth. As far as I can tell these men still hold the customary views of their wealth and station What makes the elite so insulated is wealth. They (the 10% or so) have kept up with inflation GDP growth and the like and while are in their own way precarious , have a buffer. To break that buffer you need economic measures… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

100% estate taxes for everything over $1 million per blood born child. That’ll fix ‘em up. And I don’t want to hear about family farms, that canard has been used forever.

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

I second this with tweaks though income taxes that make it so people don’t accumulate toxic levels of wealth and laws that prevent foreigners, investors and banks from turning people into serfs are an essential part of such things.

Babe Ruthless
Guest
Babe Ruthless

“In the same way a rich guy will sport an understated, but expensive watch or article of clothing, the people who rule over us wear a contempt for Americans, especially white Americans.” This raises the issue of unearned status in politics. Just as a regular guy can throw a Rolex on his credit card to look more successful than he really is, some people start spouting left-wing political cliches so that they can look down on “those awful racists.” I’ve got a female cousin, 40-something, no kids, slovenly, still renting, who is one of these people. When she posts stuff… Read more »

Lester Fewer
Guest
Lester Fewer

“Chekhov,” he sighed, “is a /very/ perceptive artist.”
— William Gerhardie, “Futility”

I am a reasonable man… but there’s limits.
— Brendan Behan

Ancient history: in the 1980s as a young man, I recall reading “The Cherry Orchard” and “Three Sisters,” and thinking to myself, “Ya know, if we don’t start paying more attention, this exact same shit is going to happen to us.” And now here we are at the bus stop.

“Back when there were bicycles, I begged you for one. You told me to go to hell. Now there are no more bicycles.”
— Samuel Beckett, “Endgame”

pimpkin\'s nephew
Guest
pimpkin\'s nephew

— at a garden party, among the hyacinth and tangerines
I heard silky nothings talking incessantly
of soggy pastries and bright machines…

-Thad Borealis

Ryan
Guest
Ryan

Over under on Carlson being unpersoned? November 4, 2020 seems like a good starting point.

Member

“The ruling elite is composed of many parts, none of which has a reason to care about public welfare. The so-called deep-state is thoroughly beholden to global interests, many of whom are foreign. The semi-permanent administrative state is composed of people who hold the rest of us in contempt and people happy to not be subjected to the vagaries of the dreaded private sector. The mass media is a collection of propagandists and court jesters, mostly stupid rich kids.” Exactly. And it does no good to fire every bureaucrat and media hack in DC. There are endless supplies of these… Read more »

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

This is why “liberty” focused reforms would fail. They require a moral freedom hungry population to work. However a state that we use say en loco parentis to treat pozzing under 21’s as a felony and one that didn’t bother with trials or courts for an emergency period could succeed. If we as a society doesn’t want our sons and daughters pimped out whether on the street or to Jizz Bang 2020 or whatever than we have lock people who produce this crap If we want some semblance of a functional economy we have to regulate and make sure that… Read more »

SWG
Guest
SWG

I enjoy watching Mr. Carlson, but part of me wonders if he is just positioning himself to make a political run. I would like to think that his ideas and opinions are pure. But in the back of my mind I have my doubts.

Wolf Barney
Guest
Wolf Barney

This is exactly what Christopher Lasch wrote about in his 1996 book, “The Revolt of the Elites.” Lasch was one of a few who saw all of this coming.

Member

I just got that book from our library, it sounds like a pretty prophetic work.

Wolf Barney
Guest
Wolf Barney

I remember being impressed and influenced by it at the time. I should probably re-read it.

Yves Vannes
Member

For a few centuries now we’ve been replacing a naturally evolved elite with a sense of duty to its inheritance (peoples, nation…whatever you want to call it) with an elite that is basically jumped up white trash: the worst of all classes driven by avarice. Civilizations evolve with ‘Estates’ that are more or less symbiotic. They are complex and far from perfect, but it is these estates that set the foundations and over millennia build a high civilization. The military and church were the typical path that allowed some bright boy to rise above his station. Once these ‘Estates’ where… Read more »

Drake
Guest
Drake

I grew up in Massachusetts – our elites (the Kennedys) were just jumped up Irish trash mobsters. While constantly raising our taxes, they were busily hiding their own ill-gotten fortune in Fiji.

Issac
Guest
Issac

If you think political functionaries are your elite, you have misunderstood the way an oligarchy masqurading as republic works. Kennedies (politicos in general) are like lawyers for the elite, political retainers who can be relied upon to go deal with an acute issue of prole unrest or sell the proles on a new elite venture.

ganderson
Guest
ganderson

Who’s going to be Titus Pullo? (I know, he wasn’t a real guy, and he didn’t really kill Cicero, but….)

brucecharlton
Guest

Things are Much worse than you say! Yes, there are bits of reality here; but the analysis is so wrong-focused and misleading as to be *essentially* untrue. It is just a modified Marxist materialism – tracing all major ills to economics/ class and power. If this analysis captured the essence of what’s happening; things would look very different from what they do. Why would the elites have (long since) stopped reproducing themselves, almost stopped reproducing altogether – and doing their best to destroy normal procreative sex and promote… anything else, *in themselves* as well as the masses? Why would they… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

I suspect that many of the elites are autistic or aspergerish, overlaid with sociopathy and psychopathy.
Powerful mix of self-centeredness and uncaring for others.

Lance_E
Member

Not really diggin’ the demonic-possession angle here. A poisonous ideology combined with breathtaking incompetence and cultural isolation is really all it takes to cook up this level of failure and contempt.

If you really want a spiritual explanation: the retreat from Christianity to pure secularism has created a vacuum into which pre-monotheistic paganism is flowing. Diversity and Inclusion, the “Climate”, Globalism, magic dirt, LGBT-worship… these are all various forms of idolatry. Paganistic tribalism is man’s natural state of being, absent any other ruling order.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Even more simple than that, the elites are transactional in their human relationships, and the language of their peer group is all of that crapola. They simply want to fit in, and have no fixed morals or ethos to live by. They are the wanna-fit-in rich kids of junior high, all grown up and living in a wealthy bubble.

Joshinca
Guest
Joshinca

Pre monastic paganism would be superior to the progressive religion that animates our elites. Instead, they’ve got some bizarre perversion of Christianity that retains the crazy bits – original sin, self abegnation, a millinerian view of history and apocalyptic fantasies; while rejecting the redeeming elements – social stability, grace, redemption and heaven.

Isssc
Guest
Isssc

As I said above, elite fertility is and has been above replacement and isnt dropping. Its the useful idiot upper middle striver class that has no children and a cat. They are soulless materialists, no doubt. The elite are simply self-interested. The flare for comicbook evil comes from their unending desire to spite middle class christian sensibility (or what they imagine it to be).

Dupont Circle
Guest
Dupont Circle

“The elite are not working in their own long-term – or even medium-term – interest, but in the long-term interest of purposive supernatural evil.”

True. They believe in nothing but their own egos and careers. They do it because they can. Emptiness and irony. Certainly not a return to paganism.

Member

My hypothesis is that the answer to the Fermi Paradox is that they’re already here and running things, i.e. “They Live” is a documentary. That hypothesis being most commonly dismissed as coded antisemitism, which then leads one to re-examine why every theory of how the world works is somehow antisemitic.
What I can agree with @brucecharlton on is that science isn’t going to give us an answer whatever.

Carrie
Guest

Bruce:
The elites are NOT servants of supernatural evil.
They are simply self-centered sociopaths (some are psychopaths) who willingly –with their free will given to them by our Creator– chose to do these types of things, i.e. be more and more detached from the concerns of the “dirt people.”
Just like Nunnya Bidnez pointed out.

Dan
Guest
Dan

So…..what you seem to be saying is since it’s too late for reform if we want to end the willful push to globalism and the end of a free America sought by the left we are going to have to act…..with “prejudice”. We are going to have to round up and hang not just hundreds (or thousands) of politicians, bureaucrats and media talking heads we are going to have to ferret out all the Rockefellers, Vanderbilts etc who holds the strings to this ongoing sedition and hang them also.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

One of the best and most important Z posts and comment threads of all. I have nothing to add, it is all being articulated better than I could do.

AldoP
Member
AldoP

Agreed, the only thing I’ll add- “I’m here to take names, kick ass and chew bubblegum….. and I’m all out of bubblegum”. I rarely post here ‘cause you, TP Doc & Dave Wright usually do it better than I ever could.

Matrix
Guest
Matrix

I remember hanging with the kids of doctors and lawyers and you would have never known it. They lived in these post WW 2 bungalows, we were all white, and know one went on spring vacation. You just didn’t flaunt what you had.

SebastianX1/9
Guest

Middle class insecurity is what fuels the anti-white working class ire of the New Class of non-elites. By using the term “elite,” a word used in this context only in late-stage sociology, you’re making things worse. Elite means the best or top-shelf, period. Our problem is that we do not have an elite but a class of mediocre usurpers who have their positions precisely because they are NOT elite. No, they are insecure, aspirational Americans who are petrified of their won class status. That is the opposite of an elite.

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

I’ve always felt that this era, deep down, has an “end of an age” feel. A sort of madness in the air. Whatever the world looks like in even five or 10 years will be much different. I think the next five years will be having to live through something awful without becoming a victim of circumstance.

FaCubeItches
Guest
FaCubeItches

In line with the old “regional elite” thing, the elites used to have differing opinions on a lot of things because they were very different people. New England elites had Ivy League educations, but Southern elites went to Southern schools , either their state university or a local private school like William & Mary, etc. Midwestern elites went to Midwestern schools, etc. Now, all the elites go to the same dozen or so schools, and usually more than one. Harvard BA/Yale JD, etc. Thus, there is now a uniformity of thought that previously did not exist. The family fortunes also… Read more »

Lance_E
Member

Many of these elites are not only beholden to foreign interests, they are foreign themselves. And we all know what eventually happens when you have a ruling class made up of foreigners.

Christopher S. Johns
Guest
Christopher S. Johns

They despise you. They’re laughing at you. They cherish every opportunity to rub your face in their contempt for you and your powerlessness to do anything about it. And then they smirk about it. From Comey’s testimony 12/7/2018 (p. 227): Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-TX): All right. So, I guess as I try and summarize what I’ve heard today, Hillary Clinton mishandled classified information more than a hundred times. She made false statement about it. FBI was aware that at least one of her aides also mishandled classified information. And one of the folks employed on behalf of Secretary Clinton intentionally… Read more »

Member

This post reminds me of a trip I took back in the late ’00s. I was working in retail banking managing a small branch and one day we were giving loans to anyone with a pulse and the next day we weren’t approving anything as the “Great Recession” hit. My branch closed and we were forced to relocate from a great house in the wilds of northern Michigan to a suburb of Detroit. People that were able to were fleeing Michigan in droves. Anyway, at the worst of the crisis I took a trip to D.C. to see my sister… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

I was creeped out by a family trip to DC in 2007. The place was oozing with wealth, with no visible means of support, intellectual or practical. Other than the tourists, the people didn’t seem human.

Dupont Circle
Guest
Dupont Circle

I always felt that way about the suburbs. Aside from there being no tourists.

Saml Adams
Guest
Saml Adams

Have spent a lot of time in Bethesda in social visits and had clients in DC at one point so was there frequently. It is other worldly. Period.

the Russians
Member

When my rodent counterpart and I take over the world, nation capitals will be eliminated. I’ve considered this a major problem for decades.

Dr, Dre
Guest
Dr, Dre

A family member was with the US Dept of State for a 40 yr+ career, so I had visited their modest home in D. C. suburb several times in 1960s. Sort of like military housing compared to the good NY suburbs I had grown up in. Then a college friend and her husband who was an early computer geek ended up in DC in the 1970s. Dual incomes, even with kids, were essential to maintain the lifestyle. Scary home prices — $300,000 for a house with no driveway/garage. My little starter home in a far-out Boston suburb was $35,000 during… Read more »

Dupont Circle
Guest
Dupont Circle

“thanks to the money they steal from the states.”

Hold it right there. You get the money back and then some with all kinds of grants and transfers. The money in DC comes from debt. DC’s the pusher and your the junky.

Shane
Guest
Shane

This has been a sequence of really great articles. Thank you Z. As an aside from someone on the other side of the Atlantic, there does seem to be a certain insanity to this present time which does seem to be the end of an era. Maybe it’s the last hysterical headrush of the Boomer left as it’s universalist fantasies crash against the craggy cliff face of reality. You can’t help but notice the lesser calibre of our current elite. They tend to remind us of the nitpicking school Marm. In Europe it does seem as that Macron/Merkel are in… Read more »

House of Pancakes
Guest
House of Pancakes

Part of the problem is that most people do not understand, or else refuse to admit, a fundamental fact: the United States has been successfully invaded, occupied and colonized by a foreign invading force. The weird thing is, a substantial part of the invading army consists of former Americans who simply switched sides. The left could with complete accuracy be called Vichy America. One of the ways the invasion succeeded was by hypnotizing people into believing the ludicrous idea that anyone on Earth could be an American just by filling out some forms. Saying “we are a nation of immigrants”… Read more »

Carl B.
Guest
Carl B.

Shack.

House of Pancakes
Guest
House of Pancakes

Think about what the government has acted and sounded like for the past 20 years… BUSH 2000: Hey everybody! I know you just voted for an evil White racist Republican, so here’s an idea, let’s invite all of Mexico to come stay with us! AMERICANS: NO!! We don’t want that! BUSH: Fine, I’ll do it anyway when you’re not looking. How are we all going to get rich unless we keep selling houses to foreigners? It’s not like we have any real jobs left any more. BUSH 2001: Hey, you see how our biggest city just got blown up by… Read more »

the Russians
Member

Zman describes our overlords as the Rolex class and that pretty much nails it from my side of the aisle. What would it take for the other side to understand the me? The price of ground beef and a gallon of 87 octane is actually a pretty big deal to me…. For all the virtue signaling of my betters, they’ll never understand that.

The Usual Suspect
Guest
The Usual Suspect

Very well stated, I approve and like.

Member

“Carlson is in many respects, a throwback. He’s what the WASP elite used to be like in previous generations.” -thezman This quote ties in nicely with your last essay, and how you got it completely wrong. You don’t seem to understand the nature of collapse and the purpose it serves. You imagine it serves no purpose and is something to be avoided if at all possible, or at least that is the take away I got from “The Coming Crisis”. Crises serve an important function. They are fitness tests for the ruling class, and if the ruling class fails then… Read more »

Maus
Guest
Maus

I suppose that based on my net worth and excessive post-secondary education, I would be one of these “regional” elites. But I drive a ’95 Chevy pickup with 200K+ miles; and I bought my suits off the rack, when I wore them daily as a professional necessity. Unlike Trump, however, I like my ribeye steak rare; and I wash it down with Coors Banquet or cheap bourbon. My point is that instead of demonizing elites versus deplorables, it seems wiser to judge people by their character and their actions rather than by their consumer choices or their potentially disingenuous words.… Read more »

Member

You aren’t part of the elite, and you probably don’t even qualify as Nouveau riche. You sound like an egalitarian boomer-con who had a nice job, but is now retired.

Maus
Guest
Maus

Well, you’re entitled to your opinion. I am certainly not a 1%er (though my brother is); but my great grandfather owned the largest grocery store in Council Bluffs and my father was a bank president. I never had to work because of the trust fund, but I enjoyed the chess game that is trial litigation. Old school wealth prefers to fly under the radar and hates to make money an issue in human relations. I imagine Tucker and I would get along swimmingly. And I certainly don’t consider Zman or any other Dissident Right thinker anything less than astute gentlemen… Read more »

C Hayden
Guest
C Hayden

Maybe you are Maus, but your defensive rxn is exceedingly boomerish and misses the point. This isn’t about vilifying elites. It’s about how America’s elites have gone astray – they’ve lost the sense of purpose and mission which defined them, or at least defined their class ethos, in prior epochs. Assuming you specifically are the subject in question, and pointing out your steak preferences and your choice of transport to show you’re not one of “thoe bad elites” is the epitome of boomer “me” culture.

Maus
Guest
Maus

My take is boomerish because I’m a late Boomer. I mention the steak and the truck because I (mistakenly) rely on humor rather than rancor to make my points. You are correct that many elites have lost the communitarian sense of noblesse oblige, perhaps from the narcissism and greed that our current culture celebrates. I am fortunate to live in a place that has not completely abandoned the communitarian ethos and to have been raised in a family that inculcated the virtue of charity. If you choose to attack all Boomers for their supposed failings; I am not offended but… Read more »

C Hayden
Guest
C Hayden

Welp, I’m sure you’re a lovely person Maus. I believe there was something about coming of age in the 60s/70s that turned ppl into certain behavioral routes; if you’d been born 5 yrs later you might not have these particular idiosyncrasies. Not really your fault you’re a boomer, but these idiosyncrasies rub a lot of us the wrong way.

In the end the most important is that we all show up when the bugle sounds. For our homes, our wives and our children, our people and our God.

pimpkin\'s nephew
Guest
pimpkin\'s nephew

I suppose that based on your net worth (unknown) and your excessive post-secondary education (also unknown, like Obama’s), that you are a special person indeed, imbued with that ancient humility we admire in the traditional ruling class. As a dirt person, I prefer my steak ‘au point’ and my bourbon top-shelf. Can’t afford such things much, lacking that net worth and post-secondary education that allows one to choose, like Samantha Stevens choosing to wash the dishes by hand rather than twitching her nose and being done with it. No one is here to judge you. We’re talking the rulers here… Read more »

Juri
Guest
Juri

People of Poland choose shipyard electrician for their leader. Because they considered all educated people rotten beyond repair.
Btw, Maus in Nazi language means mouse and when mouses grow too big, then people will call them rats. Squeak. Or considering our political viewpoints, DAS squeak. Had anybody listened U 96 soundtrack ?