Boomer Cons

During World War II, there was a great debate among the Allies about the use of bombing raids against German cities. Collateral damage was the concern. The Germans built their munitions plants near population centers. There were those in the high command who said that if the Allies used aerial bombardment against these facilities, then they would be no better than the Germans. It would be much better to maintain their principles and lose than win and be judged as morally equal or even similar as the Germans.

Of course, that never happened. There was some debate about the morality of certain tactics, but only in so far as they would result in retaliation. That was the lesson of the Great War. The use of poison gas, for example, just resulted in the use of gas by the other side. As Greg Cochran pointed out, the Soviets may have resorted to germ warfare against the Germans, but fear of retaliation certainly shaped their thinking. If they used biological agents, it was out of desperation and covered up after the fact.

The point here is that in war, the first priority, the overriding priority, is winning. You do that first and worry about morality later. Principles are the things the winners create after they have secured victory. Principles are the way in which the winners consolidate their gains after victory in a war. Imagine if the Civil War had gone the other way and the South had won. Would anyone today tremble at the accusation of racism? Obviously not, because the victors would have had no reason to make racism a mortal sin.

The obsession with principle has always been the central defect of what the kids now call “Boomer Conservatism.” The BoomerCons accept, without argument, the principles and moral framework of the Left and then they try to out-righteous the other side in a pointless game of virtue signalling. It is the basis of the DR3 meme. Even if you are able to “prove” that the “Democrats are the real racists,” all you have done is prove they are right and that racism is the worst thing ever. Even if you win, you end up losing.

And yes, I know, not all Boomers think like this and many younger people fall into the same trap. Lots of young people like the Rolling Stones and The Who, but it is still Boomer music. The cultural upheavals going on today are due to the cultural upheavals that went on yesterday, when the Boomers tossed over the culture they inherited and created the prevailing orthodoxy of today. All of us now live in Boomer Land, which means we live in the moral structure created by the Boomer generation.

Now, the folks with the tricorn hats and “heritage not hate” signs can be forgiven for not seeing the folly of their tactics. They came of age when the general consensus said that the goal is a color blind society. If the bad honkies would just open up their hearts to the black man, all the race stuff would melt away. It was all nonsense, but a whole generation was raised on it and now they struggle to let it go. For most Boomers, egalitarianism is their heritage, so it is understandable that they cling to it.

Of course, the libertarian boomers have turned their love of principle into a ready excuse for not getting into a serious fight with the Left. You see it in this post on the American Conservative.

This month, three conservative protesters rushed onto a New York City theatre stage—and briefly into the national spotlight—enraged by the mock-execution of a character dressed to look like Trump. As a New Yorker fond of civilization I was alarmed at this barbaric behavior because this is how cultures unravel.

Well, that’s how culture wars work. Each side tries to impose their cultural preferences on the other. If you are in opposition to the prevailing culture then what you seek, by definition, is an unraveling of the culture. That’s how you win. Otherwise, you confine yourself to tactics that will never work. For guys like Todd Seavey, principle is a coffin they think will give them comfort as the Left lowers them into the grave.

Again, the Boomer generation can be forgiven for clinging to their principles even if it means defeat. They came into an America that was the colossus, standing astride the world as the defender of freedom and the exponent of economic prosperity. The principles they inherited were cooked up by people who conquered the world. America in the 50’s and 60’s was a society that was sure it had things figured out. If you were ten years old in the early 60’s, truth, justice and the American way made perfect sense.

The last fifty years, however, have proven to be a cultural disaster for America, one that will have to be addressed by the coming generations. In order for that to happen, a counter culture must form that is willing to be called unprincipled as they rush the stage or shout down the people with the megaphones. What ponytails and recreational drugs were for the Boomers, fashy haircuts and race realism will be for the next generations. The young who are rebelling are rebelling against those vaunted principles the Boomers cherish.

The only way a counter culture gets any traction is if it is indifferent, or even hostile, to the prevailing morality. There are two types of principles a people live by. There are those that precede their demise and those they create after they triumph. The people desperately clinging to their principles, lecturing those willing to do what it takes to win, will be buried with those principles. The winners, meanwhile, will be busy crafting a new morality. That’s the lesson of history. The people with a future get to write the past.

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Member

The Prussians, who last time looked were some kind of Kraut, used germ warfare against the Parisians in 1871 or so.

Al from da Nort
Guest

Source_? Did they use tribochets to fling dead plague victims into Paris like the Moslems did in the middle ages_?

Doing actual germ warfare requires knowing about germs. The germ theory of disease was not even widely known or accepted until 1880 or so: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germ_theory_of_disease

Karl Horst
Guest

@ Al from da Nort – Evidently it doesn’t take that much knowledge of germ warfare to hand out blankets infected with smallpox to know the results.

Al from da Nort
Guest
So Karl; Why change the subject_? The point at is whether your folk, the Prussians, handed out infected blankets to the French in 1870 or not_? I _think_ the answer is ‘no’ for any such thing. It was, by modern – WWII-type – standards, a pretty ‘civilized’ limited war fought for modest objectives. And given the degree of hatred at that time, I’m pretty sure if the French had _any_ evidence, they would have blared ‘germ warfare’ to the world (if anybody could have understood the concept at the time) and never let go of it. Just like certain individuals… Read more »
Al from da Nort
Guest

…point at _issue_ …. Grrrr. I hate the spellchecker

Karl Horst
Guest
@ AFDN – I’m not changing the subject, just making a point that “germ warfare” isn’t limited to those who with an formal education in immunology and biology. Just like internment camps in the US with Japanese Americans, the Brits had already done it to the Boer civilian women and children. I’m sure there are other civilizations, nations and countries who did horrible things to their neighbors too long before the US and Europe were doing these things. With respect to history, we’re still the late comers on this planet. But to your point, I wouldn’t say ‘no’ to any… Read more »
Member

I believe it was rabid animals.

walt reed
Guest

The idea of precision bombing in WWII is not reality. I doubt hitting one side of the street, but not the other, was discussed very often. The bombing of cities, by all sides, was considered an instrument of all out war. We Boomers put President Trump in office. The Silent Majority are Boomers. Every group has its’ diseased portions. You are generalizing greatly. Again. Very best regards.

Roulf
Guest
Boomers did not ‘put Trump in the White House’ as much as they were dragged kicking and screaming along for the ride by those in the Alt-Right after your NEOCON heroes Bush, Rubio and Cruz were exposed as frauds and sanctimoniously dismissed. For months core Trump supporter put up with arrogant displays of smug indignation and rants of moral outrage from boomers over Trump’s supposed ‘shocking’ behavior on the campaign trail. Boomers fretted, frowned and wrung their soft hands, but given Hillary was the only other option – you had no choice. On election day, just enough of you showed… Read more »
Member

The Flight 93 Election was the essay that put Trump over the top. That was most certainly not written by a boomer. It was written to them.

Ryan
Guest

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Anton

Born 1970. Story checks out. If anyone hasn’t read the essay, it’s still worth reading just as an example of how to be persuasive:

http://www.claremont.org/crb/basicpage/the-flight-93-election/

Alzaebo
Guest

Wow. Wow. That essay says it all.

Member

And BEST of all… that author… accepted a position in the Trump administration. Winning.

walt reed
Guest

Roulf, with respect, my heros are unknown to you. You are mind reading at best. To repeat. To state the obvious: No group is monolithic. Labeling people with broad tags Alt Right etc is simply lazy, shallow depictions without a trace of factual representation. Boomers were born between certain dates. The good, the bad, and the ugly. Just like all other Americans. I suppose being in a pact and disliking another pact assuages tribal impulses to some degree. Thank you for your response. Very best regards.

Roulf
Guest
Walt, when I wrote ‘your heroes’ I thought it was clear I was referring to your generation’s heroes. Why else would such self-serving, devious men continue to be elected year after year? Also, you are a member of a ‘pact’ (as you put it) whether you realize it or not. Everyone is. And I would even point out that a staunch unwillingness to admit or acknowledge this or even speak on these terms without being dismissive or condescending is one of the deep fallacies of your generation. This leads us into the ‘No group is monolithic’ cop-out. One may as… Read more »
Paul Bonneau
Guest

Anyone who goes on about boomers and other generations is indulging in collective-speak – not a very reliable path to the truth. Some of us are not collectivists.

Dutch
Guest

Given that the other choice was Hillary probably gave Trump enough extra votes to grab the ring. Look at France, where a pretty boy with no history and no platform other than “change” and some vague form of “make France great again” has swamped the elections. The squishy political middle is drooling all over the guy.

The Dems are just figuring out that Russia! and Impeach Trump! are political dead ends. I would personally prefer that they keep up the freak-out rather than toning it down and trying to schmooze the political middle again.

Member

No no no, why would the Milleniums and GenX put a BOOMER in the White House? That’s what President Trump IS, you know.

Damn, there’s some convoluted “reasoning” here!

Roulf
Guest

Except I didn’t write that Millennials and GenX put Trump in the White House, did I? I wrote that boomers reluctantly tagged along behind the forces of the Alt-Right and coalesced enough in the end to get the job done.

notsothoreau
Guest

Excuse me, but I was likely a Trump supporter before you were. Taking a 20 year period and saying that everyone born in that time frame thinks the same is a dumb idea. And I repeatedly told people Trump could win it, long before he was the nominee. It was a change election.

George True
Guest

Roulf: yes, we boomers ARE indeed the ones who put Trump in office. We boomers were the Tea Party. And after being demonized by the Democrat-Media complex, and betrayed by the very Republicans who WE put in office, we morphed into.the so-called ‘Alt-Right and subsequently elected Trump.

The boomers you speak of who had to be dragged kicking and screaming are commonly referred to as THE LEFT. Just sayin’.

Member
This column probably needed to be written, but most of us are past the point that it represents. The right is congealing into a bloc that will have to be accounted for, and which is building a culture and infrastructure that will facilitate its ability to function without having to use that owned or converged by the left, and thus outside its control. They and the cucked right see this happening and are desperate to stop it, but are unable to. The final form it takes is slightly in question, but as long as it is not jewed up, so… Read more »
Eclectic Esoteric
Guest

Race fascism meets race realism pretty quickly if everyone spends 99 bucks at ancestry.com to have an ethnicity analysis done. Race will lose its political value from this perspective.

Sharrukin
Guest

Not really.

I am part Native Indian.

I also know what works and what sort of society I would want to thrive and survive and that would be true even if they wouldn’t have me around.

Member

Ditto.

Eclectic Esoteric
Guest

I have now experienced the thrill of having committed a thought crime, and can never go back. The contact paranoia from the down arrows is making me wonder if ancestry.com is a front group for law enforcement, and I am having second thoughts about sending in my sample.

A.B. Prosper
Guest

Companies like ancestor sell your genetic information to whoever wants it, mostly companies that find unique genes and patent them though I’m sure if Law Enforcement wanted them, they’d sell them

Member
If it is a just war, then winning is the most important thing, though the ends still don’t justify all possible means, or even many evil means. If Germans wanted to use their civilians as hostages (or a mid-east terrorist wants to put a WMD lab below a children’s hospital), it is double effec – you must destroy the enemy, but to do so you can’t avoid collateral damage. As to the AmCon libertarian, they seem to only have one eye open if they can’t see the alteration so they do a mock assassination of the current sitting president each… Read more »
Garr
Guest

You don’t think there’s a Heavenly Blueprint (“Natural Law”) that might include ethno-states with varying “natural” political systems, e.g. NWEuropean more individualistic with women at the dinner table?

Slumlord
Guest
No one can accuse Curtis LeMay of sentimentality, especially when it came to the death of civilians, yet even he recognised that the deliberate targeting of civilians was morally wrong, collateral damage, however, he recognised was unavoidable reality in war and had to be accepted as a matter of regrettable fact. In one of his books he admits that the excuse of military targeting was pretty thin but it was always there. He recognised that it was no use winning the war if you become what you despise. The post war Strategic bombing survey was pretty damning when it came… Read more »
Sharrukin
Guest
If you don’t survive then what you believe does not matter. Ask the Aztecs about that. Having “We Were Better Than Them” chiseled on your gravestone may be compensation enough for those training for the priesthood, but for most it is no comfort at all. Morality is a luxury that we can often afford, but we shouldn’t lose sight of the underlying realities. Do you really believe there is no use winning a war if you become what you despise? Would you fight a war that required the extermination of 800 million Muslims with anthrax, nerve gas, and wholesale slaughter,… Read more »
A.T. Tapman
Member

I believe you must crush your enemies by any means necessary. I am sure I would feel remorse after the deed is done, but as Elisabeth did, I would have persisted and would wear a shirt that said so.

George Orwell
Guest

As a character in Lucifer’s Hammer observed, a society has the ethics it can afford.

Sometimes the purse becomes threadbare.

Oldfart
Guest
“Would you fight a war that required the extermination of 800 million Muslims with anthrax, nerve gas, and wholesale slaughter, or just surrender to Sharia and avoid all that brutality?” We are already engaged in a third World War – to believe otherwise is little more than idiocy. Each of the last two such wars were decided less by the numbers of soldiers killed than by the numbers of civilians killed and dispossessed of their homes. So long as casualties are limited to those who are forced to actively fight a war can go on forever. When those who inactively… Read more »
Member

Lemay remarked that if the Allies lost the war he would be one of many charged with warcrimes. He accepted his guilt in the war.

Slumlord
Guest

People quote LeMay’s comment without understanding it.

All the allied generals would have been charged with war crimes if the axis won.

LetsPlay
Member

IF, the Axis had won, they would have welcomed our Generals just as we accepted theirs. Only the very worst were judged at Nuremberg and fewer faced execution for “war crimes.” Joining the winning side would have been palatable to many because that is human nature.

james wilsonG
Guest

You are correct. LeMay had no capacity for guilt. That is neither a criticism of the man or a recommendation.

Member

General Sherman made the same remark.

Ryan
Guest

I wonder how thought out British strategy was at the start of WW2. The German air force was very effectively bombing British air bases and manufacturing facilities. At some point they may have had to sue for peace because the RAF wouldn’t have existed anymore.

But then they adopted terror bombing of German cities. It went on for a while with the Germans simply denouncing them as evil to the world. Eventually the Germans let off the RAF and started retaliatory terror bombings. The diversion of resources is what allowed the RAF to survive.

Member

Ryan, your point about the Germans making a tactical switch is correct, but I read awhile back that the Lufewaffe was unable to dent British aircraft production… as it was spread out. It was the attrition of German planes that lead to the switch to try and maximize destruction on British psyche. I’ll try and find the book I read that speaks to this… but credit goes to the Brits for cranking out fighters for the fight of their lives. They persisted! Heh.

Ryan
Guest

Thanks for the info sir.

Robert
Guest

I’m a pre-boomer, born in 1938. Someone once said there was at least a hundred years between 1940 and 1945. At least. I’ve watched the spawn of the returning Greatest Generation, raised on Dr. Spock, TV, and the Pill gradually destroy the morality of this nation. It is my unoriginal belief that no nation survives without that morality. We are about to see.

ChiefIlliniCake
Guest

The Boomers are loathsome, to be sure, but they didn’t raise themselves.

It was the “greatest generation” that shit the bed in the parenting department.

Sorry, but it needed to be said.

Member

Liberal Boomers came from liberal GGers.

Bunny
Guest

Yes, I don’t know why the decline is perceived as a generational thing when it’s been left vs. right (or fake right) all along.

Driftwood
Guest

I agree. Born in 1947 visited nam in 68 came back to a different America.

TomA
Guest

Cultures typically evolve over relatively long periods of time, and they tend to change slowly. The exception occurs when a barbarian horde invades another land, kills all the males, enslaves and impregnates the women, and then imposes their way of life. There hasn’t been many barbarian hordes running around lately, so technology has stepped up to provide a new paradigm for conquest. It’s called the smart phone, and it’s the perfect covert tool of memetic reprogramming. If you want to change a culture quickly, forget the militaristic tactics and switch to high-tech brainwashing.

Rod Horner
Guest
The argument ad technology has never jived with my experience. I saw the TV revolutionize media from the radio era and the computer/smartphone since. Propaganda really does have diminishing returns and I think that point was reached long ago. My little township has men my age who never even bothered with TV and yet many of them are just as cucked as they come. Thing is, we’ve lived under the rule of progressive culture for so long, it’s anomalous to find anyone who still remembers the wisdom that was torn away from us in the 1960s, much less anyone who… Read more »
Zeroh Tollrants
Guest

I have never “fit in” with a group. I wish the South had won the War. I’m teaching my 8 Generation Z grandkids to be as red pilled as I possibly can, behind their squishy late Gen X/early Millennial parents’ backs.
I hope I can convince them to let me teach all of the kids to shoot, fish, cook, sew, household repairs, basic auto repairs, etc.,
I just want what I teach them to win out, over the white noise.
Who knows? It just might. Grandma has some really, really interesting stories to tell.

Member

“The people with a future get to write the past”

Great line. I will use that.

Guest
Guest
“Again, the Boomer generation can be forgiven for clinging to their principles even if it means defeat. They came into an America that was the colossus, standing astride the world as the defender of freedom and the exponent of economic prosperity. The principles they inherited were cooked up by people who conquered the world. America in the 50’s and 60’s was a society that was sure it had things figured out. If you were ten years old in the early 60’s, truth, justice and the American way made perfect sense.” Equally important is that the Boomers came of age in… Read more »
Dutch
Guest

It may be a bit of a shock, but they seem to be rolling with it, or simply pretending it doesn’t exist. The human capacity for self-deception is extraordinary.

Dutch
Guest

Always remember that if you don’t follow their lead, many of them want you dead. Never forget that.

George Orwell
Guest

There’s been interesting arguments on all sides of the dissident Right regarding the Julius Caesar ruckus. One way to see it is: is it effective? Does it work? Perhaps that is the only pertinent question. If the Right’s constant civil deference to CultMarx offensives is reciprocated by the Left with constant platform denial and black bloc violence, the deference hardly seems worth the effort in forbearance.

Myself? At this point I’m less interested in Consistent Conservative Principles than winning. Win first. All else can wait.

ronehjr
Guest

‘this is how cultures unravel’
One of the buzzwords in the 80’s and 90’s was multi-culturalism. Isn’t that just a word for an unravelling culture?

Joey Junger
Guest
We are seeing some violence in the culture war in America, but for the most part it is still a Cold War. In other words, I don’t think it’s so much that the people on the right who adhere to Boomer Con morals do it because they want to curry favor with those people or fear social ostracism (which is a real fear), but they don’t want to get fired from their jobs. Unless you live in a gold-plated fortress in Manhattan or Florida (like Trump) or you live beyond both the Cloud’s blandishments and their reach, you have to… Read more »
TLeaBoomer
Guest
Not all Boomers are into the libtard stuff. Many of us never were. I saw the change coming as a kid (I’m a late Boomer) and well – even then, I realized things were changing for the worse. Now? It’s not a far leap to see the Left wanting to kill us. It’s rather scarily thinkable. And the kicker? Those of other generations who blame all of us for what happened. The change began with the Silents and their Dr. Spock crap and it’s still happening today. I don’t blame the Silents though. Hell, they just wanted to do the… Read more »
Joey Junger
Guest

I’m not sure about the Silents but one thing I’m sure of is that what people think of as the revolution that happened in Berkeley in the 60s happened in Germany in the 30s. It was a mistake to allow Marcuse and co. to come to American and teach.

Member

The Frankfurt School was invited to the US in 1935 and supported (with a home at Columbia U.) by a wealthy Jewish financier. See the article in Wikipedia. The school re-opened in Frankfurt in 1953. They’ve almost completely destroyed the German sense of nationality and pride.

Al from da Nort
Guest
As said obliquely above, there’s no understanding the Boomer Phenomenon without looking at the effects of WWII. Dr Spock et. al. were university-based experts. Had not university-based experts provided the technological means that won the war_? Should not, then, university-based experts guide the raising of this post-war generation now being born_? To our parent’s generation the question answered itself. We now know that much of post-war social ‘science’ was fraud cloaked in ‘physics envy’. If PC/feminism/multi-culturalism has taught us anything, it is that. Many of us saw that it was BS even in the ’60’s* but thought it basically a… Read more »
Al from da Nort
Guest

Forgot the *endnote: At that time, IIRC, there were something like five contradictory theories about personality formation. I didn’t take a 5 Sigma IQ to realize that this meant that, at most, only one could be right, and the likely true answer was, ‘none of the above’. The Berkley answer from the ’60’s to evade this little unpleasantness was that it didn’t matter, since there is no ‘truth’. Genius_!

Bunny
Guest
Well, if we are going to revisit what the Boomers did and didn’t do… If you like the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Immigration Act of 1965 and the War on Poverty, you can credit LBJ and MLK, not Boomers. If you like feminism, you can credit Betty Friedan and Simone de Beauvoir, not Boomers. Like sex, drugs and rock ‘n roll? Credit Timothy Leary, Gloria Steinem/Hugh Hefner/Helen Gurley Brown and Elvis, not Boomers. The environmental movement? Credit Rachel Carson, not a Boomer. Youth culture? Time magazine, 1944. Boomers were not the editors. Boomers just happened to be… Read more »
Andy Texan
Guest

If you look at Europe for the avant garde of cultural transformation you will see the change from the 19th century empire ethic to the 20th century equality ethic occurring during the 1920’s. WWI killed off the confidence of Christian empire building and introduced female voting. The elites adopted Marxist attitudes which have become dominant in all the white countries. The boomers in the 60’s only adopted the prevailing chic of Marxist attitudes. They did not invent them.

Rabbi High Comma
Guest
I take some small joy in informing boomers of the ovens planned for them by those unfortunate enough to be born more recently. They inevitably proclaim “But it wasn’t me pushing these things”. I tell them “No one cares. The debt will be paid.” I even like some of these Boomers, but we are reaching a bifurcation. The SWPL faggots will die. The neo-Norse will survive. And the White race will survive the semitic culling with the best of our genes passing through the needle. The future shall be populated with Whites innoculated against (((cunning lies)), and it shall be… Read more »
Member

One takes note that not all “dreamers” are necessarily illegal aliens. “Neo-Norse”? This calls to mind the communes of the 60s replete with role-play, but this time in bearskins and horned helmets instead of injun get-up.

Paul Bonneau
Guest

There is a difference between informing boomers of their supposed fate, and delivering on it. Everybody dies, and boomers know that more intimately than others. Beware of people with nothing left to lose. They may die while taking a few assholes with them.

A.B. Prosper
Guest

You mean like the boomer (68) who just shot a Congressman?

In any case no one is going to harm the Boomers, they are too old to worry about and will not be much an issue in a decade or two.The anger is there but the political will isn’t

Why would anyone bother when the people you don’t like are 65 and older.

No if a war is fought it will be aging Gen X , Sane Gen Y and Gen Z with a tiny smattering of the youngest Boomers thrown in

Member

The source for understanding (((their))) methods…

http://www.theoccidentalobserver.net/tag/kevin-macdonald/

Alzaebo
Guest

We Principled Libertarians stand behind you!… way, way, way back there behind you!

Member

That’s why we wear our body armor backwards.

karl hungus
Guest

we noticed

Ron
Guest
Principles DO matter in war, becasue its possible to win the war, and lose the peace, if one is callous about the body count and damage done. There are major flaws both justifying and the effectiveness of indiscriminate bombing in WW2. When Hitler decided to bomb London, it was a huge mistake. It saved the British RAF airfields that were getting worn down by constant attacks, and allowed the British to replace their dwindling pilot pool, so on Eagle Day, the RAF was stronger than ever to meet the Luftwaffe’s big push. Allied bombing did create bottlenecks, and indirectly won… Read more »
Al from da Nort
Guest
As one who has studied the matter both professionally and as a hobby, I agree with almost everything you said except for the last paragraph. IMHO, W’s biggest mistake was in supposing he/we had enough time to transform a Muslim culture (even assuming it could be done) into something like a democracy without first doing a drastic cull of the previous elite such as was done in Germany and Japan both during and after WWII. Heaven knows, there were human rights abuses aplenty to provide rhetorical cover. If he/we were unwilling to do this*, knowing that the utterly unprincipled Progs… Read more »
Ron
Guest
“That is, install a more compliant strong man, set up a base or two with secure logistics” Perhaps. But in South Korea we installed Rhee, who was a very temperamental and twitchy leader, using US resources to go after his political foes. In south Vietnam, we removed Diem and replaced him with Minh,who wasn’t much better in winning the hearts and minds of his people, the majority of whom lived in rural villages and only held allegiance to their head chief. Any strong man we could have installed in Iraq would have been little better, if not likely worse, than… Read more »
Al from da Nort
Guest
Ron; Agree. Paying for the privilege of being ‘world cop’ is beyond stupid from a citizen’s point of view. Unless, of course, you’re a member of the globalist elite (aka the Cloud). Then it’s all good at Davos. Imperialism is using your military power to take over somebody else’s cash flow. It is an economically logical policy, but it’s morality is open to question. And, as you say, there is always the possibility of error and blowback. Under the Clintons we embarked on ‘reverse imperialism’, which is using our military power to take over other countries’ welfare caseload. Makes no… Read more »
Dutch
Guest

Yes, it’s all about the NGO “skim”, starting with the Clinton Foundation for the biggest skim at the front of the line. Very farsighted of that guy to figure it out and set it up.

Member
Al, regarding ’43.. Could it be that State Dept screwed the pooch in Iraq, by immediately trying to do a “new thing”? Having Gen Franks oddly retire within a few months of the overthrow to write a book and kick back, basically allowed for trouble in leadership, IMO. When Turkey blocked the 4ID, that was a big deal, and to me, that’s where ’43 committed a major blunder, in not ( to my knowledge) bending Turkey over a barrel and getting that done. Then, the inability to secure the Iranian border b/c we were scared. Hello! This was Korea or… Read more »
LetsPlay
Member
You have some good facts but your conclusions are all wrong. Bombing multiple sites was of value because while the Germans moved some manufacturing to distributed remote sites, they still have others in the middle of cities using the civilian population as human shields. The military has the job of winning and ending the war. At the point that we crossed the Rhine, we were invading Germany and Germans, like Japanese were going to fight hard and cost many lives if ways were not found to end the fighting in a faster manner than direct frontal assault. As Gen. Sherman… Read more »
Ron
Guest

You mentioned the betrayal of the Kurds, by Bush Sr. That made a sea change in my political views, and from then on I loss trust in the GOP. Years later when my Republican congressman voted twice for TARP, that was the last straw, and I since stopped calling myself a Republican, and become politically independent. I saw the power status quo for what it was between both parties, and how they abandoned their principles and lied to their constituents for power sake.

Member

’41 lost me when he told the Baltics to stuff it. Bush’s decisions lead directly to the Serbian War too , IMO. His hands might have been tied, but he was not willing really do any big things sans Kuwait. ’41 never thought the wall would come down. He was dumbfounded by those events… and arguably not very prescient of where to put influence.

Karl Horst
Guest
@ LetsPlay – Germany never used our civilians as shields, nor was manufacturing “moved”. The majority of most German factories have always been in small, family owned companies and often far from the major cities. This is still true today in the case of Baden-Württemberg – Stuttgart might be the major city, but most of the parts they assemble at Porsche and Mercedes comes from the Schwarzwald (Black Forrest). Back in 1938-1945, European aircraft of the time were made primarily of wood. And any skilled cabinet maker or wood worker can quickly and easily built subcomponents. Multiply that by thousands… Read more »
Sam J.
Guest

“…Back in 1938-1945, European aircraft of the time were made primarily of wood…”

I don’t believe that’s true of the Germans. It was true of the British which made the de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito a great plane made of plywood.

james wilsonG
Guest

Adolf didn’t just decide to bomb London. The Brits were desperate to detour the German attack on airfields. Directly after a few stray German bombs were unloaded on London, which was not a target, Winston goaded Adolf into civilian bombing with a serious raid on Berlin. The plan worked.

Member

Despite the bullshit the most bombed city in Britain wasn’t London, it was Liverpool.

karl hungus
Guest

but no one cares about liverpool because all the people there are inbred shite.

Ryan
Guest

One has to wonder if the British decision to conduct terror bombings in Germany was a deliberate provocation designed to have Germany divert resources from their attack on the RAF in retaliation.

Ryan T
Guest

Boomer cons are the character who betrays the rebels and begs to be plugged back in to the matrix

Severian
Guest

I did learn one valuable lesson from the Boomers (my folks’ generation): It is right and natural for kids to do the opposite of what their elders tell them.
This is why, if you see me out on the streets, you’ll say “hey, there goes Professor Goodfeels. Wonder what xhyr pronouns are today?” I’m relying on the natural rebelliousness of kids to do my sabotage for me. I will be so, so sad when my kids all turn out to be shitlords. 😉

Severian
Guest

Has anyone seen Karl Horst and Herzog lately? Their perspective could be really interesting here. Last I saw, Karl was out west in the USA… I wonder if Frau Merkel got him at the border.

Shelby
Guest

I’m not sure where Doug went either. But I agree , Karl and Herzog are also missed.

Karl Horst
Guest
@ Severian – Frau Horst and I had a wonderful time in the US. We put 3,500 miles on the rental car wandering through the back roads of the Midwest you call “fly-over country”. On one occasion my wife and I were actually the very first Germans they had ever met! As to this post, we really don’t have an equivalent to your baby boomers in regards to how our cultural norms have been affected. Generally speaking, Germany, and most of Europe, tend to be about 15-20 years behind the US on these issues. The US and the UK probably… Read more »
Severian
Guest

Karl! Glad to see you made it home ok, and great to hear you had a good time in America. As always, thanks for the German perspective.

Karl Horst
Guest

Danke und bitteschön! 🙂

karl hungus
Guest

ever hear of the V3?

YIH
Guest

”The BoomerCons accept, without argument, the principles and moral framework of the Left and then they try to out-righteous the other side in a pointless game of virtue signalling.”
Perfect example, just listen to Sean Hannity’s radio show. Daily you’ll hear ”Muslims don’t permit women to drive! They throw gays off of buildings!”. Considering what else they’re doing such as driving vehicles into crowds, slicing and stabbing any ‘infidels’ they can get ahold of and shooting up concerts, women driving and ”gay rights” are rather minor issues don’tcha think?

Paul Bonneau
Guest
Not sure why the usual attack on libertarians here. The sole thing that distinguishes libertarians from others is subscription to the Non-Aggression Principle. Libertarians may counter aggression, and guess what? There is nothing out there but aggression. Self defense is already permitted to libertarians. In that respect they are no different from white nationalists or alt-right. Where things might get sticky is later, assuming the right has won. Will they then seek to impose their own view of ideal government on libertarians? If some form of Panarchy is not put in place, we might find libertarians subsequently opposing alt-right too.… Read more »
Member

Libertarians are potential allies in the same way that a boulder sitting on top of a mountain with every route of descent blocked is potential energy, and just as worthless.

Dutch
Guest

The guy who said “let’s you and him fight” was probably a libertarian.

Not that there is anything wrong with that….

Member

I am a Libertarian I will not initiate violence. If however, you fuck with me and mine I will fuck you up,

karl hungus
Guest

do you like to wear black leather chaps? it sounds like you do…

Duke of Deploraville
Guest
Great posting, Z. What disturbs me most isn’t the loony left rage in once-sane magazines and websites (e.g., New Yorker) — although that can be hard to take sometimes. The thing that really blows my fuse is when “respectable” conservatives argue from the same premises as their supposed opponents. Take this cartoon from The Burning Platform (a few items up from the republication of “Boomer Cons”: https://www.theburningplatform.com/2017/06/26/youre-a-racist-2/ Pure cuckservatism: “hit” back by accusing Democrats of being racists in 1860. Yeah, that’s telling ’em. An argument over who gets to wear the cloak of white guilt. Same thing with comments about… Read more »
Karl Hungus
Guest

OT: Trump trav el ban re-instated at the SCOTUS. Nice pick up for The Don. Looks like he will get his second SCOTUS pick this year, too. The left is going to shit themselves blues, when they see all the court seats filled up without a fight (or a compromise) — thanks to Dirty Harry Reid. Thanks asshole, couldn’t have done it without you!

Dutch
Guest

Still not tired of all the winning. Not even close.

Ryan
Guest

A bit of time on Google has led me to believe that the English language does not have an adequate antonym for the word disappointment. So I’ll just say that so far Gorsuch has been the opposite of a disappointment. For example he joined Thomas and Alito in saying the entire injunction should be lifted re: travel ban.

Guest
Guest
Busy today so no time for a well-thought out comment so I will make it quick. The electoral map of 2016 is an absolute wash of Red when compared to the electoral map of 2008–at all levels of government. We are winning, particularly at the local and state levels where culture issues really drive elections and where governments can’t print money in unlimited quantities to buy votes. I am optimistic in the short term, i.e., 8-12 years. After 2028 Democrats will hold the Presidency on a permanent basis and will govern through Executive Order to drive their agenda. The only… Read more »
Member

“If the bad honkies would just open up their hearts to the black man, all the race stuff would melt away. It was all nonsense, but a whole generation was raised on it and now they struggle to let it go.”

You keep insisting on this, but the overwhelming evidence is that this crap started with “The Greatest Generation”. And here is Shelby Foote (born 1917) opining about how this wonderful relationship with blacks was suppressed for such a long period of time. I especially direct your attention to the remarks in the last half of the interview…

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cBFMFTxyIx0

Ryan
Guest

I often wonder how much of the success of the 60’s counterculture revolution was due to the fact that the music was actually very good.

Garr
Guest

I think that the music was very good because solid folk/gospel source material was being developed by extremely intelligent people (Jagger, Iggy Pop); people got further and further from the source material (the connection’s been entirely severed now) and the pop-stars got stupider and stupider. I watch Youtube Let’s Play videos and commentaries with my kid sometimes, and I think that if people like Jagger, Iggy Pop, Bowie, Johnny Rotten were 22 today this is what they’d be doing — making Youtube videos.

Karl Horst
Guest

@ Garr – YouTube is simply a revised version of MTV with easier access. To your point, if bands from the 80’s had to rely on YouTube, we’d probably never know about them.

Garr
Guest
Karl, I don’t mean music videos. I mean videos about computer games and movies and the science of games and movies and that kind of thing (stuff my kid watches). There’s this whole huge genre of Youtube videos called “Let’s Play” with hundreds of thousands of subscribers; these Youtubers are very bright and remind me of people like Mick Jagger and Johnny Rotten. (Basically you watch them play computer games while they make funny comments on what they’re doing. It sounds stupid but this is what all the kids who would have been going to see the Beatles in 1965… Read more »
Dutch
Guest
’60s musicians learned to take the musical heritage and fill their mostly derivative work with musical “hooks”. Accomplished jazz and big band musicians before them also employed lots of hooks in their music to popularize their work. Before the listening audience became a bit overwhelmed and immunized against musical hooks, the rock songs became anthems and part of the familiar. IMO that is why current popular music doesn’t get much traction versus the 30 to 50 year old work. The ear prefers the familiar. (If you are looking for an extreme example of musical “hooks”, listen to what Jimi Hendrix… Read more »
Rob De Witt
Guest
As difficult as it may seem, several of us here watched the advancing tide of the Boomy Babers – with increasing horror – from the other side. I was born, to a recently deceased Army vet, in the waning days of WWII – and therefore by definition NOT a Baby Boomer. It was apparent to me by the late ’50s that there was something deeply wrong and disturbing about the crowd only a few years younger than me. By the ’60s it became a thing of nightmares; why would anybody wish to be only a part of a multicelled organism?… Read more »
Al from da Nort
Guest

Like da yoot of every age, we were pushing on the door. We were shocked and exhilarated at the same time to find out that it was actually open because the GGen elite had pulled back the bolts of duty, custom and standards. Had the door even resisted, much less held, as we early Boomers half expected, things could have been very different.

Garr
Guest

Speaking of “fashy haircuts”, Richard Spencer seems to disagree with you on “Free Speech is good” grounds, and Ben Shapiro is on Spencer’s side here. The stage-rushing girl feels that Spencer’s against her because she’s a Jewess. I discovered all this at Bloody Shovel (Spandrell) — Spandrell thinks that the stage-rushers are self-promoting “Alt Lite” psychopaths — where I commented that Zman, “a good guy”, disagrees with Spandrell + Shapiro + Spandrell on this issue.

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