How Long?

There are two rules of modern life, with regards to how public debate is conducted, that are are always good to keep in mind when thinking about any issue. One is the Opposite Rule of Liberalism. Whatever the Left is howling about at the moment, imagine the opposite and you’re probably getting closer to the truth. The other rule is that cops rarely arrest a first time offender. Usually, someone caught in some sort of skulduggery has been at it for a long time. The law of averages simply caught up with them.

The first rule is an easy one, as we see with the FBI corruption case. Progressive fanatics accused the Trump people of colluding with Boris and Natasha to undermine the election, but it looks like it was the Democrats who were doing deals with foreigners in an effort to subvert the election. It’s hard to know if this is just a very elaborate cover for the Uranium One deal or simple sedition, but the FBI, CIA and at least one Democrat Congressman were willing to cut deals with the Russians for dirt on Trump.

The second rule is the one that it may be time to start pondering. What’s clear at this point in the FBI scandal is that Comey, McCabe, Strzok and Page were dirty. They cooked up a scheme to game the FISA court, so they could start rummaging around in the lives of Trump and his people. What is unknown is the complete narrative and the role of each player in the scheme. Another thing that is clear is they were exceedingly cavalier about what they were doing. Their recklessness is astonishing for people in their world.

Maybe they were just true believers who became increasingly berserk with passion for the task. Despite their titles, these people are career middle managers and this was their first taste of real action. On the other hand, the image that emerges from the texts between Strzok and Page suggests they did not see this caper as that big of a deal. There’s no trace of a guilty mind or any sense they were breaking the law. Instead, even in their cover-up efforts, you see just the bureaucrat’s concern for petty office politics.

Then there is the General Flynn issue. The whole case has been weird from the start, as Flynn is a guy thought to be a straight shooter. Yet, he gets charged with lying to the FBI, over something innocuous. Now we’re are learning the FBI and possibly Robert Mueller sandbagged Flynn, using fake FBI records to compel a guilty plea. This “new information” used by the Federal judge does not appear to have come from Mueller, but rather the Inspector General. This means Mueller is either a dupe or a crook.

Even if Mueller is just a dupe, and that seems increasingly implausible, it means he staffed his team with dirty cops from the FBI. It also means he staffed his team with dirty lawyers and political hacks from the former administration. After all, those lawyers had to be aware of what the FBI was doing to entrap Flynn. The picture emerging here is of an FBI and a DOJ stocked to the gills with people who struggle to understand the difference between a lie and the truth. It’s been a rotten precinct for at least the length of one career.

That brings us to the title of this post. How long has this sort of thing been going on and what other scandals are there? We know the Obama administration weaponized the IRS in an elaborate scheme to undermine Republican groups. We also know the whole thing was broomed by the FBI and DOJ. Knowing that those two organizations have been corrupt for a long time now puts the IRS scandal in a new light. What we may have seen was a cover-up in plain sight, with one dirty agency covering for another dirty agency.

What about the 2012 election? We know that Team Obama was very nervous about re-election after the debacle of the 2010 midterms. There were meetings immediately after to figure out how to get Obama a second term. One result was the overt use of the race card that eventually led to the plague of murders carried out by black lunatics, under the banner Black Lives Matter. How do we know the Feds were not also playing games with Team Romney. Maybe that computer crash was not just bad design after all

Then there is the one story that has never made any sense. That is the case of Judge Roberts reversing course in the ObamaCare decision. He writes an opinion striking down the individual mandate, circulates it around and then suddenly changes course and supports the mandate. It was a such a bizarre turn of events that the dissent just used his brief as the basis of the dissenting opinion. People who investigate blackmail and extortion schemes look for these sorts of anomalous changes in behavior.

One of the lessons of Watergate is that the sort of shenanigans the Nixon people were doing had become so commonplace, they were getting reckless and brazen. The Kennedy clan loved wiretapping opponents. Hoover, of course, was basically the official blackmailer of Washington. The brazen disregard for law and order by the Obama people and the Clinton people suggests a culture of corruption that started long before Strzok and Page decided to become the Bonnie and Clyde of the FBI.

After the election, one of my suggestions was that Trump set up a truth and reconciliation commission. This was a bit tongue and cheek, but not completely. The point of this commission would be to clear the air. Everyone in the government class would have a chance to come forward and admit to their crimes, in order to receive a pardon. It would allow the public to finally see the full scope of the corruption and begin the public debate over how to reform a very corrupt political class. That’s looking like a good idea now.

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Tamaqua
Tamaqua
2 years ago

I’ve said it before. The FBI needs to be disbanded. The criminals will be charged, but the agency itself cannot be allowed to continue existing as an independent entity if Trump is serious about reforming the imperial bureaucracy. The creatures inhabiting the rest of the bloated alphabet soup of agencies need to see that not only individuals, but the institutions, can be held accountable for coup plotting. Make the FBI cease to exist and you send that message loud and clear.

Glen Filthie
Glen Filthie
Member
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

Exactly. If you clean out that nest of vipers, there’ll be new ones in place tomorrow. This is how the human animal rolls – wherever you find power and money – you will find the corrupt hard ballers that don’t care who they have to kill to get a piece of it. There is no doubt in my mind at all that the Clintons had inconvenient people killed. The others probably did too. There is no “answer” to this; all gov’ts are corrupt to some degree. Trump, being a money man, knows this and he knows how to protect himself… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Glen Filthie
2 years ago

That is why it is so important to prosecute people for public corruption. In fact, an imporant outcome of these investigations likely needs to be a reform of the civil service laws to eliminate “retirement with pension” for a host of activities that ought to be prosecuted instead.

Look at all these people “retiring” at the FBI, DOJ and IRS, and you have a very quick solution to a bigger problem if we give the President the authority to pull those big fat pensions and de-bar people from public service for life.

BestGuest
BestGuest
Reply to  hokkoda
2 years ago

I think that if just a few of them lost their pensions and health care it would make the rest of them think twice.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  BestGuest
2 years ago

No. Wholesale prosecutions and pension forfeitures might do it, but tokenism never works.

calsdad
calsdad
Reply to  hokkoda
2 years ago

There was recently a school shooting in Florida. Now all the leftists are going ballistic claiming we ought to completely eliminate the right to own firearms. Under their logic – if there are no firearms – there will be no more shootings.

This is the same type of logic that got applied to the Federal government when this country was founded – yet lefties can’t seem to see it , or won’t acknowledge it. Minimal government = less opportunity for corruption in the first place. Big government = inevitable corruption.

calsdad
calsdad
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

LOL. You think? The government of this country was setup the way it was on the principle that it was INEVITABLE that government becomes corrupt. I hate going back to the Constitution as an excuse – but the Federal government was supposed to have some pretty severely restricted powers. Other pieces of the puzzle – like Senators appointed by state governments – and a militia and armament protected by that Constitution – as well as another amendment protecting your right to call out the goverment when it screws up – all revolve around the fact that corrupt people are attracted… Read more »

Pimpkin's Nephew
Pimpkin's Nephew
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

It’s not just government – it’s academia, the media, the police, the military… when once-honorable ‘callings’ become offensive to the normal, decent human being, those callings will still be out there, waiting to be filled, with the perqs and salaries that go with them. The system requires that all these positions be filled; when decent people turn away in disgust, it just means that more ‘flexible’ people will step in.

Corruption is part of the life-cycle of all organizations. We see it in large-scale business too; it isn’t specifically a government thing.

Matt
Matt
Reply to  Tamaqua
2 years ago

We need to take some easy steps to rein in the worst shenanigans built around lying to a federal officer. This is always pulled out when they have nothing else.

Require all interviews to be videotaped. With copies immediately given to the interviewee and their lawyer.

I’m sure there are a handful of other simple fixes to rein in other abuses we are seeing.

Require all FBI agents to wear body cameras just like we’re asking of street cops.

What else?

Member
Reply to  Tamaqua
2 years ago

I think the issue is this silly idea that the FBI is an independent entity. Most of the crazy stuff we’re seeing coming out of there and out of the DOJ is because the bureaucrats in the permanent government think they work “for the American people”. That’s pretty convenient sanctimony, because “the American people” cannot fire them. But the President can, and he should. Sure, he might collect a few innocent scalps, but the greater good is served by re-establishing the chain of command in the Executive Branch. Those clowns have gotten away with murder for decades, but nobody reigns… Read more »

Mark Matis
Mark Matis
Reply to  Tamaqua
2 years ago

The FBI not only needs to be disbanded, but every building with any of their offices needs to be razed to the ground, and the earth salted so nothing will ever grow there again.

Then publicly execute every one of their employees, from the very top of the agency all the way to the secretaries and janitors. And think seriously about doing the same to their families as well.

revjen45
revjen45
Reply to  Mark Matis
2 years ago

Can’t we spare the janitors? Other than them, let’s proceed with televised public hangings.

Tax Slave
Tax Slave
2 years ago

“How to reform a very corrupt political class “? Start with lots of rope. Scaffolding helps too,

CraigAustin
CraigAustin
Member
Reply to  Tax Slave
2 years ago

We have plenty of lamp posts, build scaffolding for spectators.

MBlanc46
MBlanc46
Reply to  Tax Slave
2 years ago

Lamp posts will do in a pinch.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  MBlanc46
2 years ago

My trucks bumpersticker
“politician, lamppost, rope
Some assembly required”

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Tax Slave
2 years ago

But the child traffickers need to get medieval punishments.

Saml Adams
Saml Adams
Reply to  Tax Slave
2 years ago

No scaffold needed. The spectacle of short drop will provide more, shall we say, deterrence.

CraigAustin
CraigAustin
Member
2 years ago

Ever since this began, I have wondered how much difference a relatively few people in the right places can do, can they remove a President? I have been watching old films about the JFK murder, and I believe that with the media on your side you can indeed remove a President right in front of the public eye, but you also need the FBI. They are involved with every political disaster before the bombs or rifles go off .

Cooperman
Cooperman
2 years ago

I have always known – and said repeatedly to anyone who would listen – that Romney’s “day of the election state of the art” GOTV system was hacked.
Glad you made it to the party.

Rev.Hoagie
Rev.Hoagie
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

In other words, Democrat business as usual.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

Z Man; Yeah. I agree about Romney. His nomination was what convinced me that the National Fusion Party was all too real. I mean, you *know* that he’s a perfect ‘Riche Rich’ target of opportunity for the many red-diaper, soft-marxist Progs. that you know are everywhere in the NGO’s, MSM and Permanent Government. Not only that but you know how he *got* to be vastly more rich than he already was starting out: He ran the Wall St. ‘bust out’ racket on overly complacent, middle-American companies, mostly manufacturing. The class-based, populist attack adds practically write themselves. IOW, he ran as… Read more »

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Al from da Nort
2 years ago

Plus he’s a giant pussy.

Corn
Corn
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

I know it’s easy to say it-and easy to be called a sore loser-but 2012 just reeked of vote fraud to me. I remember all the articles on Drudge and other news sources at the time…. “Voting Precinct has 150% more votes than registered voters” etc. I remember a newscast on CNN… Early Voting in Colorado, Early and Red. Obama ended up winning CO quite comfortably IIRC. Plus there were a few “Colorado county X had more votes than voters” stories in right wing media.
I think an honest appraisal would find vote fraud rife in 2012…..more so than usual.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Corn
2 years ago

From what we know now, Obama lost.But Romney and the cuck GOP would never challenge anything, so wholesale theft was safe…

Member
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

Low GOP turnout and the fact that Romney is a total snake.

Did you hear his announcement to run for Senate? It’s the battle cry of the Open Borders Brigade, “”Utah welcomes legal immigrants from around the world,” Romney says. “Washington sends immigrants a message of exclusion. And on Utah’s Capitol Hill, people treat one another with respect.”

Same guy who during the 2012 election was talking about border enforcement and illegals “self deporting”.

Total. Snake.

It’s a shame Trump feels like he has to endorse him in order to avoid another Roy Moore debacle.

BestGuest
BestGuest
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

ZMan, I love your blog, but to think MA would vote out Fat Boy Kennedy is simply delusional. I’m guessing your NS restaurant was on the “far” North Shore where the vanishing WASP remnant resides, hence the anti-Kennedy animus. Mitt lost his chance with “Romneycare” (which eats over 40% of the Commonwealth’s budget).

BestGuest
BestGuest
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

I know that Romneycare played no role in the election, just as an example of Mitt having no “fight” in him. He always viewed the gov’ship as a way to boost his national visibility. To be fair to him and to Charlie, there are just too few republicans to put up a meaningful resistance to the dems. I do wonder if JoeJoeJoe was hurt by that speech he gave after the SOTU? Time will tell.

Member
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

look at the pictures of the guy the day after the 2012 election. He was the happiest guy in America.

The rich guys only running for office because daddy would have wanted them to will never fight.

UXCGGjames+wilson
UXCGGjames+wilson
Reply to  fondatorey
2 years ago

Why would he fight? First he would have to have something to fight for.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

I think there was, is and always will be massive voter fraud in Democratic districts.

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

I suspect Romney lost simply because he is a Mormon and upwards of 1/3 of the Republican base consider him a heretic or a Satanist . This means that the “above margin of fraud” is not going to happen

It only requires a few people to stay home to guarantee a loss and while the Evangelicals would not vote for Obama, they wouldn’t vote for Romney either

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

And people who consider Rommney a loathsome rodent.

bad guest
bad guest
Reply to  Cooperman
2 years ago

How hard would it have been to hack it? It sounds like simple DDoS would – and may – have taken it down. Script kiddies would have been capable of hacking it.

How could any organization of the scale and importance of the Romney campaign not have foreseen that possibility?

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  bad guest
2 years ago

Politicians are idiots in the realm of IT.

dad29
2 years ago

Roberts did a 180….for that matter, one should take a look at Sen. Ron Johnson, who got elected on ONE promise: to un-do ObamaCare. After only 12 months, Ron suddenly went silent.

Hmmmmm……

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  dad29
2 years ago

As an accidental witness to the behind-the-scenes shenanigans used to entrap one of the Republican Congressmen who has suddenly decided to “retire” this time around, I can tell you that IMO they are all compromised. The wheeling and dealing that is a part of becoming a congressman is quietly used against them to leverage them into cooperation with the powers-that-be. I think too many of them, especially the Republicans, have realized that all of this stuff will be coming out in the next few months or years, so they are all getting out while the getting is good. Of course,… Read more »

James LePore
Member
2 years ago

Strzok was the head of counterintelligence for the FBI. It is almost unbelievable that a person in this position would use a government-issued cell phone to say the things he did in his 50K texts with Page. Between stupid and arrogant, I say arrogance. This applies to the whole gang. With Obama, Holder, the msm, Hollywood and academia on their side for eight years, they came to believe that we were a nation of men, not laws, that they were apparatchiks or nomenklatura who could do and say anything they wanted to advance party power and destroy political enemies. It… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  James LePore
2 years ago

Never underestimate the attraction of texting your lover the things that get her all hot and bothered about you. As was pointed out in an earlier thread, a counterintelligence person should never, ever let his snake out of his pants except for his wifee at home.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Dutch
2 years ago

Even if your lover has buckteeth…

Member
Reply to  James LePore
2 years ago

There’s also the little problem of the chief of counterintelligence breaking the #1 rule of espionage: sex and blackmail make excellent weapons. His extramarital affair with Page – while investigating Clinton’s ILLEGAL “private” email server – is just one of the most stupidly baffling abuses of power in recent history. How could he lead an investigation into Hillary’s ILLEGAL security practices when he, himself, was engaged in activities that even the most green recruit is taught never to do. It was a total violation of his oath. Strzok possessed the two most important elements of a criminal act: motive and… Read more »

David+Wright
Member
2 years ago

I just saw an interview with Roger Stone and the story he told about J. Edgar Hoover’s meeting with newly elected President Nixon. He showed him photos of Nixon’s liaison with his Chinese mistress in China. Don’t worry Mr. President, these photos are safe with me.

I know, lot of similar stories with Hoover but just a reminder this corruption goes back a ways.

bad guest
bad guest
Reply to  David+Wright
2 years ago

First rule of politics which everyone except maybe Pence ignores: Keep it in your pants.

Brigadon
Brigadon
Member
Reply to  bad guest
2 years ago

Ron Paul followed that rule, look where it got him.

If you don’t give the ruling elite a handle on you, and you aren’t Trump, you get nowhere.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  David+Wright
2 years ago

David; Considering that the source here is the GOPe’s version of Sid Vicious and Cody Shearer, a bit of skepticism is in order. Not that the story couldn’t be true, mind you. Reasons for skepticism: – Stone (who was originally a Nixon loyalist) specifically says that it happened in China. After the 1949 commie takeover, nobody but vouched commies could get into China before Nixon became president. This leaves only a thin slice of time before Nixon stopped being a Naval Officer in 1946(?) and before he became a Congressmen in 1948. – China was in the midst of a… Read more »

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Al from da Nort
2 years ago

Good points especially on Stone. The man is seriously creepy , more so when you look into his lifestyle. Refers to himself as a trisexual.

Bill Cox
Member
Reply to  David Wright
2 years ago

What’s the third leg of the Tri triangle….sheep, dead bodies………?

Member
2 years ago

Like I wrote here a few weeks ago when that Nunes memo came out, guys like Flynn and Pappadapolous have a very good case to rescind their plea agreements based on what we now know about the FBI investigation. I don’t think a truth and reconciliation commission would work. What needs to happen is a prosecution of several high government officials (I would start with Comey, McCabe, and Strzok along with Ohr and Milner) on charges of Public Corruption or maybe even Racketeering since the “solution” (criminal investigations of Trump by Trump opponents) would not exist if Trump’s opponents had… Read more »

Monty James
2 years ago

The big stumbling block for a truth and reconciliation commission is that the idea presupposes good faith, and Democrats are sewer rats. They fight like sewer rats, and that’s how they’ll go down. They would only try to game a truth and reconciliation commission for their advantage. The Left owns the Federal bureaucracy:

Federal Government Workers Donating Overwhelmingly to Democrats

Member
Reply to  Monty James
2 years ago

This. Go read that Milner op-ed in the WaPost. In it, he comes clean that he was the conduit from Sydney Blumenthal at the Clinton Campaign into the State Department. And, although he doesn’t say it this way, his primary role was not just to feed that information into the bureaucracy, but to SANITIZE it. He writes in the Op-Ed that he basically rewrote the reports he read from memory. Why would he do that? Because, like money laundering, Blumenthal needed an air-gap between the Clinton Campaign and the DOS/DOJ/FBI. When Milner rewrote the reports in his own words, it… Read more »

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Monty James
2 years ago

How about a law banning campaign contributions by Fed workers?

Pimpkin's Nephew
Pimpkin's Nephew
Reply to  pyrrhus
2 years ago

I like the idea except I think it wouldn’t be constitutional; federal workers are citizens – sad to say – and are as free as anyone else to give money to anyone they please.

But, give me a Franco or a Pinochet to suspend the constitution, ruling by military force, clearing out the rubbish and promising to step down after free elections, I am all ears on that proposal.

TBoone
TBoone
2 years ago

Truth & Reconciliation is only going to be a beginning. The sheer volume of malfeasance/corruption & moral bankruptcy will be staggering.

Then we’re going to need a ‘sorting hat’ process to decide who can be a useful cube-holder and a massive recruit & sort for people of competence & minimal ‘ethics’.

Statutes of Limitations are going to be expired for way too many perps. Pensions will still be obligated. Too bad the magic pensions can’t be ‘liened’ on/devalued … That would get serious attention of the #MeLiedToo!! crew….

Oh well…. Bitching & Whining never got the job done….

Member
Reply to  TBoone
2 years ago

I think it’s going to take some high profile public executions (by which I mean prosecutions and jail time) to shake this loose. We might get a few of the good guys in the process, but if we kill off 100 bad guys for every 3-4 good guys, we’re making progress.

Pimpkin's Nephew
Pimpkin's Nephew
Reply to  hokkoda
2 years ago

I agree. The everlasting ‘revelations’ aren’t enough; they only reach (at most) half the public, and of that half, at best a tenth has the time and the attention span and the gift for nuance to follow all of this foulness down to the sewers.

Roll out the guillotine in Dupont Circle, and start chopping off heads. Then the vast and amorphous ‘American people’ will wake up and notice that something is going on, that all is not well in the imperial city.

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  TBoone
2 years ago

I don’t see any reason to reconcile with people that have been proven so untrustworthy. South Africa could pull this off because for all its flaws the Apartheid state was fundamentally principled, not necessarily in ways you or I share but they had a core ideology they believed in Our current leaders are rootless, amoral globalists and while I’d be happy to see them slink into the night never to bother us again in order to avoid something worse, I’m not sure it will happen I suspect the American people will have to do the unthinkable at some point quite… Read more »

Chazz
Chazz
2 years ago

Commissions are like committees. They generate a lot of words and a lot of paper but rarely any good results. They often become immortal. I would instead recommend killing a chicken to scare the monkeys. Discover who murdered Seth Rich and prosecute them to the fullest extent of the law.

Dr. Dre
Dr. Dre
Reply to  Chazz
2 years ago

Here’s my nomination: Cody Shearer, Hillary’s dirty trickster par excellence. He’s been lurking in the shadows since forever, but I have NEVER seen a photo of him, even during “Clinton Time” in the ’90s. That would make him the perfect one to get to li’l Seth without raising any suspicion, esp at 3 AM. My question also is, if the bar that Seth was at shut at 1:30, or at least that’s when SR left the premises, what was going on for several hours before he was shot on the sidewalk, then taken to the hospital — still alive. He… Read more »

Rien
2 years ago

“Their recklessness is astonishing for people in their world.”

But the risk/reward ratio was very high. It looked very likely that Hillary would win, hence risk was low. But at the same time if you were the one to bring Trump down…. the rewards could have been enormous.

TomA
TomA
2 years ago

The complicity and dereliction of the major media in enabling and assisting in this crime spree is not to minimized. The DC corruption is so pervasive that the remaining good guys were effectively compromised or intimidated into surrendering. And this was more than just malfeasance and criminality, it was an actual real-life attempted coup d e´tat right here in the good ol’ USA. The checks and balances did NOT work, it was the election that changed course.

Cloudbuster
Member
2 years ago

How long? I’m going to have to say at least since July 1, 1870. That’s when the Department of Justice was founded.

To think, the nation made it nearly 100 years without a DoJ, FBI, IRS, Federal Reserve, Department of Education, or the EPA.

The good old days.

wholy1
wholy1
2 years ago

Possibly your best to date, Zman. With regard to your closing paragraph, the first thing that came to my mind was . . . REPENTANCE – the reciprocation of giving/receiving “forgiveness”. For those of the Christian faith, REDEMPTION is “elemental” – the keystone. Who would be willing to “forgive” career criminals the likes of the Hildabeast, Soros, SICK Chaney, GHW Bush, Eric[the race-baiter]Holder and now Robert[the Clinton mule]Mueller/Adam[piece of]Schiff – just to mention a few of the more “notables”? Such is a real struggle for me but, when considering that RESTITUTION – according to One’s ability – is the second… Read more »

Member
2 years ago

Said the Liar in Chief to Bill O’Reilly: “……not even a smidgen of corruption”.

So other than collecting and enjoying her taxpayer funded pension, what’s Lois Lerner up to these days? I’m thinking about her as we approach income tax season……..

El Polacko
El Polacko
2 years ago

There’s some interesting reading over at the American Digital News site about a government organization called “Senior Executive Services”.

https://americandigitalnews.com/2018/02/19/deep-state-shadow-government-senior-executive-services/#.Woy2EGbMxYg

I had no idea this organization existed, and a lot of the Obama Admin holdover FBI skinks and members of the Mueller Team are charter members.

What I do think is interesting in light of the high level FBI and DOJ resignations and reassignments coming fast and hard is the speculation that Mueller somehow got flipped and purposely corralled these bad actors to keep them from doing any more damage.

Not bloody likely, but we can dream, can’t we?

Bill Cox
Member
2 years ago

can we hang a few of them for general principle

walt reed
walt reed
Member
2 years ago

Gen Flynn pleaded guilty to a process crime. The Flynn family has suffered greatly. The Feds can ruin innocent men, see Ted Stevens. Judge Sullivan, a Democratic appointment and an old time straight shooter, has ordered all documents concerning Flynns’ agreement turned over to him. Unusual move by a judge. A very clear signal the judge thinks the prosecution is dirty. Mueller postponed Flynns’ sentencing for a reason. Flynns’ conviction will be thrown out. BTW Judge Sullivan tossed Ted Stevens’ conviction and lambasted the prosecution, in writing, in a very pointed way.

Brother Antony
Brother Antony
2 years ago

Truth and reconciliation commissions rarely, if ever, work as intended. Just look at what happened in South Africa after theirs, and also the end result – white ethnocide.

David Wheeler
David Wheeler
2 years ago

Doesn’t really matter at this point — time to get to the killing — cheers

dave
dave
2 years ago

I am sick and tired of seeing Muller and Comey out of uniform without their cover. Could someone who knows how please put their stupid pink pussy hats on them?