A Rotten Elite

Long before Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon, the Roman Republic stopped being a serious political entity.  The system was still a well thought out and conceived system of governance, but the people operating could no longer be trusted to operate it. The Roman political class could no longer trust itself, because the political class was no longer dominated by serious men. The proof of that was not just its collapse, but the fact that men like Marius and Sulla existed and needed to exist in order for the system to stagger on.

The old line about people getting a government they deserve always comes up whenever someone points out the defects of democracy. It’s circular reasoning but an effective way of not addressing the real issue. That is, a people with a capable ruling elite can get along and be happy with just about any form of political system. A people who need the restraint of democracy or a strong constitution to tame their ruling classes is a people with a ruling class incapable of operation a constitutional government and abiding by its limits.

What this means is the people don’t get the government they deserve, so much as they get the government their ruling class deserves. Even that does not explain why it is that the ruling elites of a society can go rotten within a generation or two. The human capital of America in the 18th century was certainly different than that of today. The ruling elite it produced was very different from today. But, the population of America a century ago was not that much different than today. We’re a little browner, but materially much better off.

As the circus of the Kavanaugh confirmation unfolds, it is important to note that the people creating the circus are not the brown ones. Sure, they were the opening acts, but the main stage is populated with geezers produced by the ruling class of a half century ago. Diane Feinstein is the representative of a the generations that produced the cultural revolution of the 1960’s, not someone from the current age. In other words, the American ruling class started going sour a long time ago. We’re just getting to smell the rotting corpse of it.

You have to wonder if if events like this are what gives the remaining serious men the idea of toppling over the system. In the Roman Republic, the one place where merit counted was in the military. There were plenty of politics, of course, but ultimately a man was what he showed on the field of battle. Read accounts of Caesar in Gaul and the man was not just a great general. He was a lion on the field. While there were plenty of old men in the Roman senate who served their time in the legions, none were the equal of Cesar.

No matter how sophisticated a society, men judge other men by the simple calculation of whether they can take them in a fight. You have to think that the men running the military look over at their civilian leadership and wonder why they are taking orders from clowns like they see in the Senate. This must be especially true of the junior officers, most of whom by this point have done tours in Afghanistan and the Middle East. As patriots, they have to be looking at the civilian leadership with nothing but contempt.

That’s not to say we are about to have a military coup. It’s always possible, but the one place where civic nationalism is strongest is within the military. The one place where multicultural lunacy is strongest is within the senior leadership ranks of the services. The civilian leadership remains cautious enough to make sure the top brass of the military are just as feckless and craven as the civilian side. Even there though, the ingredients are in place for a young and ambitious officer to start thinking about a short cut to the top.

Putting the military coup aside, watching the Kavanaugh circus should be a reminder that America is one serious crisis away from collapse. The financial crisis of 2008 was so terrifying to the elites, because they sense the fragility of their position. The central bankers were able to contain it and limit the damage to the public, by pushing the costs off into the future. The US debt now stands at $21.4 trillion for a reason, but you can only charge off the costs of a crisis so many times. At some point, the elites must act.

It’s clear that the political elite of America is incapable of handling a genuine crisis. They struggle to do the basics of government now. They still have not written and passed a budget for next fiscal year. This is ground floor stuff. If they cannot handle the simplest of tasks, how will the “world’s greatest deliberative body” manage to debate a response to a genuine crisis? The answer, of course, is they won’t because they can’t. Instead, they will look around for the strong man to arrive and take over the task from them.

That’s what we are seeing with the Kavanaugh hearings. Serious men would never have allowed a handful of deranged matrons, suffering from the typical middle aged female hysteria, to disrupt this process. Generation after generation since Gettysburg, the political elite has grown weaker as the quality of the ruling elite has declined. Maybe the system is to blame. Maybe the breeding patterns of the elites are to blame. Maybe it is just an example of reversion to the mean. Either way, our elites are no longer elite.

124 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Whitney
Member
1 year ago

Long essay from Joe Sobran from 1985 and the National Review. Well worth it

https://joeportolano.wordpress.com/2011/12/30/pensees-notes-for-the-reactionary-of-tomorrow/

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Whitney
1 year ago

Fantastic read. Thanks!

TBoone
TBoone
Reply to  Vizzini
1 year ago

I am 60% thru the Sobran article. I concur. It is brilliant! Worth the effort. Amazing how far down we have slid since it’s been written. I was an adult then and naive…. Much less so now…

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  TBoone
1 year ago

You re not the only one getting one helluva education these days

AHfOH
AHfOH
1 year ago

At the risk of hyperbole, if Scalise had been a Democrat and the shooter from anywhere to the right of Paul Ryan, the crisis would have already been upon us.

At least the Romans had “censors” who in theory could clean the dead wood out of the Senate. The Romans also had patronage so that, like Donnie Brasco, you bring the wrong guy in, it’s on you.

Mcleod
Mcleod
1 year ago

We are beyond the “elite” using the levers of government for personal enrichment, and are to the point of the “elite” using their powers to beat their betters down out of insecurity and jealously.

This, as has been said, will not end well.

wjkathman
wjkathman
1 year ago

“Elites” now appears to be synonymous with grifters.

oughtsix
oughtsix
1 year ago

Human. Nature. Never. Changes. Frail and Fallen, prone to error, such that all human systems succumb to spiritual entropy. The temptations of Power and the Lusting after it are the most seductive of all and so well known as not to need this restatement, except that this is never the First Premise of most discussions of the ways and means of our destruction. Few want to admit this or the answer. We can’t relinquish the idea that we can solve the problem(s) through our own intellect and will. Full circle back to Human Nature, the root of all sorrow. We… Read more »

Tax Slave
Reply to  oughtsix
1 year ago

Choose to buy more ammo.

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  Tax Slave
1 year ago

In the natural, certainly. Do all that you can to prepare.

I was alluding to accepting the Principles higher than one’s own predilections and common understanding.

Observer
Observer
1 year ago

If a society is not led by its best fighters, then it will be led by its best liars.

Glen Filthie
Glen Filthie
Member
1 year ago

I know the post is about our elites… but holy hell, it speaks volumes about the massive problem we have with our women too.

Whitney
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

And now that many of the desires of the Frankfurt School have reached fruition instead of turning into ‘the natural state of the matriarchy’ the denial of nature is predominant Blank Slate thinking and gender as a social construct as examples of that reveal the falseness of the Frankfurt School ideology and its lack of internal consistency

Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

How do ideas created by creatures such as the Frankfort School come to dominate and become our ruling outline?

Like other ruinous ideas that come into being, they have a receptive audience, at least the ones that even think about ideology.

Tempters and willing sinners like the spiritual realm.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

How? It’s an expression of the inheritable traits of the MAOA gene complex, paranoia married to aggression.

The almond thinkers not only believe their own made-up sh*t, they ACT on it.

paul scott
paul scott
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

I looked up the MAOA gene complex, and read a paper on the warrior effect > which opened with, “We need to….interfere with noxious genetic susceptibilities in ways that are fair and decent for everybody. “
Wonderful, More science from the fringes of totalitarianism
Genetic Literacy Project < Tabitha Powledge

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

How? It’s an expression of the inheritable traits of the MAOA gene complex, paranoia married to aggression. The almond thinkers not only believe their own made-up sh*t, they ACT on it. A Jewish poster at Unz explained the high school trips to the Auschwitz disneyland: the kids, traumatized by Narrative, learn that they can trust no one outside the cult. Normie Jews have been trying to escape their radical brethern for millenia; witness the betrayal of the Ten Tribes in 712 B.C. They, like German Jews, were comfotably patriotic, and thus traitors to the rule of the bolsheviks of Judah… Read more »

Issac
Issac
Reply to  David_Wright
1 year ago

Persuasion is the forte of high verbal IQ.

ExPraliteMonk
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
1 year ago

“Jews are awfully good at creating pseudosciences—elaborate, plausible, and intellectually very challenging systems that do not, in fact, have any truth content—and that this peculiar talent must be connected somehow with the custom, persisted in through long pre-Enlightenment centuries, of immersing young men in the study of a vast body of argumentative writing, with status in the community—and marriage options, and breeding opportunities—awarded to those who have best mastered this mass of meaningless esoterica.”
— John Derbyshire

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  ExPraliteMonk
1 year ago

“Jews are awfully good at creating pseudosciences—elaborate, plausible, and intellectually very challenging systems that do not, in fact, have any truth content…”

Just like modern marxist “academia.”

And jesuits, et alia.

Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

also recommended is the little known Marx-Engels co-production “The Origin of the Family” (compiled by Engels after Marx’s death). https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/download/pdf/origin_family.pdf

part 4, in the middle of the piece, is the most on point as it is where their conclusions are

The thing is absurd pseudoscience but definitely would have influenced later Marxists.

Severian
Reply to  fondatorey
1 year ago

Feminism has been a wholly owned subsidiary of Marxism from jump street. Engels’ work — I believe he was the sole author — is the foundation of modern feminism. The early ones — the Mary Daly, Shulamith Firestone type weirdos — explicitly said so. They embraced feminism (and lesbianism) in order to “smash patriarchy,” which to them was the same thing as smashing capitalism.

dad29
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

I think that there’s a larger thing here, known as “Right Order.” THAT is the target of the ‘smashing’ going on.

Nietzsche called it ‘the transvaluation of all values’. How else to describe the eagerness for “abortion rights” in any sane society?

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  Glen Filthie
1 year ago

Industrial society, absent intervention by the state, typically requires both parents to work in order to maintain living standards. Mass immigration only intensifies this. While everyone worked in agrarian society, it was rarely outside of the household. The Internet society could have seen a decentralization of work to home-based consultancies, but the TechBro control freaks preferred to outsource what they could, and import foreigners for what they couldn’t. When both parents are working, it creates the illusion that somehow women are “equal”, but they are discriminated against in the labor market and the deadbeat husband won’t do his share of… Read more »

dad29
Reply to  DeBeers Diamonds
1 year ago

Industrial society, absent intervention by the state, typically requires both parents to work in order to maintain living standards. That was not true in the USA until the LBJ signed EO 11273 (IIRC) requiring workplace equality for women. He was also running “guns and butter” at the same time. Then women with degrees joined the workforce and men’s compensation numbers leveled off. But due to “guns and butter” consumer prices rose–particularly housing–and two incomes became a requirement. It’s also fair to state that what used to be “wants” have become “needs”–which also increased the cost of living. Cellphones are a… Read more »

Frip
Member
Reply to  Glen Filthie
1 year ago

If women believe that abortion rights are truly at risk with Trump’s nominees, it helps to explain their willingness to block Kavanaugh at any cost.

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

Well, Duh.

Ya think?

PostTenebrasLux
PostTenebrasLux
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

Well if abortion is made illegal, planned parenthood would be out of business and there would be no more baby parts to make money off and provide the elite with the hope the said baby parts will enable them to live forever by stem cell technology

dad29
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

Abortion is primary. But in line with Z’s think on this, don’t forget queer “marriage” and transgender “rights.”

Orwell could never dream this stuff up. Those drugs weren’t legal then, nor even invented….

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Glen Filthie
1 year ago

Holy sh*t this subtread just gave me an epiphany; this may be the feminine instinct, or what you would call it, for masochism. Women need and possess a certain level of masochism; to drawn to strong, violent males, to engage in sex knowing that 9 months later that will result in a very painful and, in the old days, dangerous process lasting hours if not a day or more and such. Assuming masochistic tendencies makes it possible to explain large parts of the leftist mindset, from immigration to softness on criminals to many other things. Since it is dictated by… Read more »

Drake
Drake
1 year ago

From day 1 in the military there was contempt for civilian leadership, and an acceptance that civilian leadership in how the universe works. The rule was (and I assume still is) that male officers make it up to Colonel based on merit. The jump from Colonel to General (or Admiral) is the jump from combat leader to politician.

ChrisZ
ChrisZ
1 year ago

Of course I see the truth in this essay—it’s the reason I find myself awake at night. At the same time, what might we identify as a period with a wholesome, dedicated ruling class? The elites who gave their countrymen the Civil War, World War I, the Great Depression, or the ‘60s cultural revolution? I have no problem asserting that our current batch is especially rotten; but compared to what? OTOH, is the current ruling class really determinative of the future? England in the Regency period was led by rotten, decadent elites; but they were succeeded by the Victorians, whom… Read more »

Severian
Reply to  ChrisZ
1 year ago

The pendulum always swings hard the other way. Like I always say, today’s SJW is tomorrow’s obergruppenfuhrer. The decadents will push too hard, and assuming — big IF — we survive it, the next generation of elites will act hard enough to put Attila the Hun to shame.

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

From your keyboard to… the Future.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
1 year ago

It has been apparent for some time that giving women, and especially single women, the vote injected a lethal, long acting poison into the American body politic…Women are genetically neurotic, inclined to favor invaders, and love the welfare state. That’s a trio of pathologies that invariably prove fatal.

Thorsted
Thorsted
1 year ago

The hedge fund manager, Ray Dalio recently addressed the debt problems of the US as a threat to the stability of society. He predicted serious cuts in various social programs to reduce spending. The alternative might be the end of the dollar as a world currency that would have more dramatic consequences for the US. He then spoke about that in his state Connecticut (80% white) 20% of the young didn’t have any qualifications to be in the labour force an money had to be spent to make them a productive asset. We know that that will never happen with… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Thorsted
1 year ago

Thor; I don’t know why people act like this situation is mysterious. What has happened with sovereign debt that becomes un-payable in recent history is: – Simple default (various Revolutionary regimes & Hapsburg Spain); – – Currency debasement up to and including hyper-Inflation (Venezuela now and Weimar Germany then) – Expropriation of the rich but unprotected local institutions inside your borders (Henry VIII). – Conquest and pillage of your rich neighbors. This was the go-to method in more ancient history and also Napoleonic France. The Romans used all four methods. Why would this time be different_? It may be that… Read more »

james wilson
james wilson
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

Except that there are no rich neighbors to steal from without debt of their own .

Chaotic Neutral
Chaotic Neutral
1 year ago

I am curious about when and why the “tyranny of the judiciary” became a thing. This refers to the (supposedly)modern tendency of the court to interpret law so broadly as to function as a legislature as well as interpreter, hence making the appointment of a new justice a matter of such import as to motivate the vilest levels of character assassination. My first instinct would be to think that the cultural divides have grown so deep that there is not the minimum civic virtue to maintain the roles of government as intended by the constitution, but can the divided in… Read more »

Guest
Guest
Reply to  Chaotic Neutral
1 year ago

The short answer is that it began to creep into jurisprudence in the 50s but really gained a foothold in the late 60s and 70s as the generation of attorneys steeped in Frankfurt School doctrine matured into command of the legal system.

The next wave of judicial lunacy is beginning now as the generation of attorneys steeped in Critical Legal Theory are coming of age and will soon take command of the legal system.

Chaotic Neutral
Chaotic Neutral
Reply to  Guest
1 year ago

Yeah, but it must have always been possible, as defined by the system, but people didn’t actually try to subvert the system, ie political interest was seen as more important than the integrity of government, until the 60s and 70s. Similar to this Kavanaugh thing. No one ever tried to invalidate a confirmation with fake rape accusations. Of course classical civilization never allowed for such situations to occur….

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  Chaotic Neutral
1 year ago

Only if both teams agree on the rules. When one team plays by it’s own set of rules and refuses to accept the outcome of a legal election is when we have trouble.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Chaotic Neutral
1 year ago

The Constitution pretty well limits the scope of the Federal Government – even with the mental gymnastics that have been performed around the Commerce Clause. This makes Progressives sad because they would like an all-powerful government. So… they want political Judges like RBG who are willing to disregard the Constitution and rule on feelings, the South African Constitution, whatever… Not guys like Kavanuagh who would actually take the job seriously.

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
1 year ago

With all due respect for your military, it is not the military of days past. To be fair, the US hasn’t won and held anything since occupying Japan and Germany. Additionally, there have been plenty of top level military scandals including corruption, dereliction of duty, sexual harassment, abuse of power, etc. They may be wearing a uniform, but the only way you get to the top in any organization, especially a peace-time military, is through politics. The closest thing you had to Caesar was Eisenhower and there hasn’t been anyone like him in American military or politics since. The aged… Read more »

Mcleod
Mcleod
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
1 year ago

To be fair the United States hasn’t been in a war since WWII. There have been many political actions that the US has engaged since then, but no wars.

I will say this about the neocons, you can’t have an effective military unless you practice practice practice. It’s the only way to effectively build up the noncom ranks and test equipment.

Russian equipment has always been significantly inferior and have the Chinese ever won a war that wasn’t against other Chinese in their entire history?

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

Most Russian equipment has been monkey models used by Third World armies.

Mcleod
Mcleod
Reply to  DeBeers Diamonds
1 year ago

A significant portion of what Saddam had in the first gulf war was the best the Russians had to offer. From the tanks to the air defense. Hot knife through butter is how I’d describe it. The rest of the world parades and brags about the best equipment in their respective militaries. I have zero idea what the best the U.S. military has to offer and, with all respect, neither do you or 99.999% of the people. I can’t think of a single platform in which the U.S. is currently, or likely in the near future, outmatched. There has been… Read more »

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

The US is outmatched with ICBMs, we are using a vintage 70s model, while the Russians have continued developing them. I agree that isn’t a point in Russia’s favor, as they can’t afford a stealth bomber.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

In ’91 the Iraqis had longer range artillery they bought from South Africa. I spent an unpleasant night with that stuff falling around me while we fired back with Rocket-Assisted Projectiles (RAP) rounds that didn’t seem to do much.

Then the sun came up and Marine Harriers went hunting and annihilated their arty.

Ryan
Ryan
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

What is the US equivalent of the Iskander?

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

Some of the American MLRS have long-range capability with smaller rockets. American Army never bought into the big tactical surface-to-surface ballistic rockets like the Russians.

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

The US also never put much into SAM systems, since the Nike program was cancelled. The Fighter Mafia ensured of it. Cash strapped Russia was therefore forced to invest its limited resources into the S-300, S-400 and S-500.

Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

A serious country wouldn’t have been meddling in that hornets nest for all these years.

lew
lew
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

A serious country would have seriously investigated 9/11 instead of blaming it on Kabul.

The Israelis, ably assisted by US Neoconservatives, did 9/11, not Osama Bin Laden.

Karl Horst
Karl Horst
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

The bigger question is whether or not conflicting organizations (e.g. Army, vs. Guard vs. FBI vs. Local SWAT) would end up turning on each other.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Karl Horst
1 year ago

Karl; Given that the National Guard answers to each states’ governor, you could count on it happening in some states. How many, who knows. Locally-situated FBI (and other such locally situated armed Fed police forces – and there are many of them) plus any hostile locally-controlled SWAT teams, (who are each not even a full platoon, BTW) would have to be awfully lucky to escape being rounded up by the guard in a full-on scenario. But the sorting would be ugly indeed and no sane man should wish for it. If I had to guess, I’d say that something like… Read more »

Karl Horst
Karl Horst
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

Al – If your State Guard is comprised of local residents of each state, and they report to the State Governor, then it would be very interesting to see if they stand with the local population against Federal enforcement. I read that some states are taking a reverse stand against gun control laws just as sanctuary states for illegal immigration, so there may be something to it.

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  Karl Horst
1 year ago

Historically the NG has had zero qualms shooting dead men, women and children when ordered to as in the case of striking mine and foundry workers. They don’t teach this anymore, but the NG was a favored blunt instrument of the elite along with Pinkerton Men(forerunner to Blackwater) to crush worker uprisings. Because they were seen as the personal goon squad of the governor whom the elites owned. People have no idea what rotten, ruthless SOB’s those elites were like at the turn of the last century. The regular Army is no better. Though if the order is given it… Read more »

dad29
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

Yup. The NG’s also shot up a bunch of strikers at a Milwaukee foundry in the late 1800’s. A (R) governor–Rusk–ordered the shooting.

That’s one of the two big reasons that Wisconsin Catholics have voted (D) for near 100 years. The other was the early 1900’s (R) support for wacko-bird psych-experiments of a certain Dr. Rogers of UW-Madison. (Rogers Memorial hospital in Oconomowoc is named for this troglodyte.)

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Karl Horst
1 year ago

Karl; A National Guard unit dual-reports to the State Adjutant General who is a two-star general officer appointed by the State’s Governor and to the Guard Bureau in DC which is part of the Dept. of Defense (DoD). In theory the Guard Bureau is simply there to ensure training and equipment (paid for largely by the Feds) standards are maintained. But in practice the Guard Bureau controls all senior guard officer promotions and so it and the DoD have considerable influence. A National Guard unit can be activated by either the Governor (for flood relief, etc.) or by the President… Read more »

tullamore92
tullamore92
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
1 year ago

“…it is not the military of days past.” On a slightly related note, I’m always running across the firmly-held belief of those on the Right that “the military would never fire on its own citizens” and similar sentiments. Basically, the Left could never successfully use the military against the Right because all order takers (if not all order givers) lean Right. But my experience – admittedly, it’s a small data set, ~20 – runs about 50/50 for ex military guys leaning Right (usually Moderate) vs Left (always Far Left). Maybe that’s specifically a result of no longer being active duty… Read more »

Member
Reply to  tullamore92
1 year ago

They wouldn’t even risk seeing how much they could trust regular army units. The point of drone warfare is that it can be tightly controlled by a small central group.

Besides, any war against civilians would consist entirely of atrocities and false flag attacks.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that these people are constrained by any form of Christian morality.

John_Henry_Eden
Member
Reply to  fondatorey
1 year ago

Especially since they’re Jews.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
1 year ago

Karl:

Here in the USA (and as in Germany I suppose), the best of us are not currently in the military. That dynamic only changes during wartime or a draft when the general population gets raided for manpower. Which is not to say that our current military is impotent, but rather that numbers matter. There are less than a 100,000 able-bodied fighting men (front line combatant types) in our Armed Forces. You can find more than that in rural Texas alone right now.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
1 year ago

The military is built to win battles. I guess Mogadishu was a loss (Les Aspin denied the Rangers armor support and left them badly outgunned). Before that there were a few early losses in Korea, but when deployed in strength, the American military has rarely lost since the early days of WWII. But it is politicians who decide when wars start and end. Afghanistan should have been a raid and over in a year. If it had been presented that way it would be viewed as a win and a warning similar to the British expedition to Abyssinia. Instead, the… Read more »

Tykebomb
Tykebomb
Reply to  Drake
1 year ago

The US military has consistently failed at its modern strategic goal: build legitimate local governments.

Once the country cracks, the US military does not have the acumen to put it back together. You gonna lie down when some grunt calls an air strike on your house?

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
1 year ago

Eisenhower …. Not hardly. MacArthur perhaps. Eisenhower was a politician from the start. Not a fawning MacArthur groupie; on the other hand, Eisenhower just doesn’t have the martial creds — great administrator though. As to not winning …. spent 34 yrs in uniform — E-1 to O-6; no politician. I can tell you there are tremendous performers in the upper field grades — combat leaders and thinkers. Bear in mind most military coups are lead worldwide by Lt Cols / LTCs & COLs …. the generals and admirals are seen by those actors as part of the problem.

Georgiaboy61
Georgiaboy61
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
1 year ago

@ Karl Horst Re: “With all due respect for your military, it is not the military of days past. To be fair, the US hasn’t won and held anything since occupying Japan and Germany.” True, but this is partly due to the revolution in military affairs brought forth by the development of nuclear weapons by the U.S. and her Allies, culminating in the two atomic weapons dropped upon Hiroshima and Nagasaki in summer, 1945. The invention – and just as importantly, spread – of nuclear weapons technology to the Soviet Union and then the People’s Republic of China, et al.,… Read more »

Karl Horst
Karl Horst
Reply to  Georgiaboy61
1 year ago

@ Georgiaboy61 – Good question on Frau Merkel. Her position and coalition has been in serious jeopardy for a while now. The AFD was as you say “a wake up call” to Germany and her party that people are not happy and really quite fed up with her. Nationalism is rapidly spreading across Europe as we’ve seen in Italy and Greece with the EU doing everything it can to stop it. As it stands, Germany and France remain the dominant EU members so they will continue to drive the course of Europe without without the “blessing” of the US. Countries… Read more »

TomA
TomA
1 year ago

If you have been a dependent parasite for most of your life, the coming crisis (or perhaps collapse) is indeed a trauma of existential anxiety because you understand that you’re likely to die off due to a lack of productive contribution or even survival skill. Conversely, the able-bodied citizen views this event as a necessary catharsis and remedy for what ails us. The former will respond with handwringing, pouting, wailing, and gnashing of teeth. The latter will get to work and fight off all threats before rebuilding the next civilization. The crisis, when it comes, will be a cure, not… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  TomA
1 year ago

Vomiting up last night’s party is never fun, but it is necessary.

Member
1 year ago

Leftists radicals became deeply entrenched in the principal institutions of society. That had much to do with what happened when my generation came of age in the 1960s. Perhaps the nation became ungovernable at that point and it’s more a matter of the elites pandering to the masses in order to keep the whole thing from going off the rails rather than a decline in the competence of the elites.

Member
Reply to  MBlanc46
1 year ago

“became deeply entrenched….in the 1930s.”

james wilson
james wilson
Reply to  MBlanc46
1 year ago

It amazes me that people on the right in the here and now do not recognize the inevitably failure of the experiment of 1789 was finally achieved in 1933, and this is irreversible.

Christopher Chantrill
Christopher Chantrill
1 year ago

“Short cut to the top.”

Can you spell T-R-U-M-P?

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  Christopher Chantrill
1 year ago

Yes, and I can spell “strawman.”

Can you spell, troll?

Dan
Dan
1 year ago

There is a reason the moral stock of our leaders was much higher 150 years ago and that reason is our society was mostly Christian. The values of Christianity have withstood the test of time: Male leadership of the home and workplace. High value and commitment to marriage and children. High value of sexual purity and rejection of sexual deviancy. Rejection of excessive use of alcohol and drugs. Honesty in our judicial system. And on and on… It is no coincidence that the moral slide in our country goes hand and hand with it’s rejection of biblical Christianity. The point… Read more »

Desert Rat
Desert Rat
Reply to  Dan
1 year ago

Yes. We see quotes from some of the Founders about how the Constitution is meant for a religious, moral people and will not work for any others. We steadfastly ignore this because so many of us “know better”. There is no end of solutions proposed to bring sanity back but they all have no chance of being implemented for the simple reason that only a religious, moral people will go along with them and we no long have that. We have a mass of people who no longer even try to understand morality let alone the religious doctrines that give… Read more »

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  Dan
1 year ago

“There is a reason the moral stock of our leaders was much higher 150 years ago and that reason is our society was mostly Christian.”

Absolutely correct and to the point to which I was alluding way up yonder.

dad29
Reply to  oughtsix
1 year ago

Umnnnhh….yah….except this society remains ‘mostly Christian,’ at least nominally.

Perhaps the better term would be ‘mostly straight-laced Christians’–which is a far smaller cohort, perhaps as little as five percent.

Tax Slave
1 year ago

I want and expect the US to break up and I hope to end up—in my lifetime—in a new Christian nation governed by laws, free of Satan, at least mostly free. My hunch is that it will include the present states of Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana and the “oustate” areas of neighboring states. I hope economic collapse brings this on but I have a feeling it will come about through bloodshed.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Tax Slave
1 year ago

T. S.; Geopolitically, you need a seaport and defendable natural barriers. Sufficient good growing land is also important but not 100% essential (e.g. Japan & England). The grouping you propose has none of these features, except maybe barriers. So unless it’s back to pre-industrial technology, your grouping would have to either expand to achieve these attributes of survival against hostile neighbors or eventually be crushed. The center of the continent bounded by the Appalachians on the E and the 2nd range of the Rockies (or the Sierras) on the W *could* work (New Orleans is the seaport). Of course Canada… Read more »

Georgiaboy61
Georgiaboy61
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

@ Al Re: ” Of course Canada would have to be dealt with some way or other (nothing personal) on the N.” If the kind of Balkanization or fracturing of which you speak comes to pass in the United States, it may well ignite something similar in Canada, where the more-traditional and conservative central-western provinces have been chaffing under the bicoastal leftists for years. My point being, is that a rancher or farmer in Alberta has more in common with his counterpart in Wyoming or Nebraska than he does with the liberal-left elites in Ontario. We’d best not write off… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Georgiaboy61
1 year ago

G. B.; Your are entirely correct about N-S regional similarities between the US and Canada. But such a realignment of those similar territories necessarily entails breaking up one or both countries, indirectly making my point. My main intended point re Canada was more a geo-strategic one. Fond as we all are of the Great White North, objectively, Canada exits at the sufferance of the US.* Canada is 1/10 the US in population and economy. Those folks are almost entirely all strung out within 100km of the US northern border. This means that *opposed* US forces could cut Canada into pieces… Read more »

anonymous
anonymous
Reply to  Tax Slave
1 year ago

I’ll be there with you. House on market.

Member
1 year ago

My understanding is that no potential independent and ambitious man, as the military is currently run, is be able to get above lieutenant colonel. And it really would have to be ambition and glory, not patriotism, that drives such a man.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  fondatorey
1 year ago

fond;
That was my experience, starting with the Clinton I regime. Apparently once the Cold War ended the Cloud concluded that having capable men on top was a danger to their rule.

Ryan
Ryan
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

Well, they probably always felt that way, it’s just the capable Soviet men were seen as a greater danger, so ours had to be tolerated.

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  fondatorey
1 year ago

My father was career Army from WWII said the same thing. The elites made sure the fire breathers and straight shooters didn’t get above short colonel or colonel in rare cases. They would never be allowed to make general. This is why Congress approves all promotions to general. This is why we never had a general who resigned over our insane and useless wars, even though they would write in their memoirs that the wars were unwinnable. These men have no guts just obedience to the system. Powell and Patreus are great examples of this. And why very bright officers… Read more »

Severian
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

Rod, did you ever read HR McMaster’s Dereliction of Duty? It’s fascinating. It’s one giant catalog of our stupidity in Vietnam. While LBJ and McNamara were “dialing in” “graduated pressure” to “communicate” with Hanoi, the Army was running the SIGMA war games. McNamara said Ho Chi Minh was getting the message because all the metrics were pointing that way… meanwhile, by the end of SIGMA II the army had half a million troops in SE Asia and was gearing up for a full scale invasion of North Vietnam — and all this in 1964!! The kicker — McMaster went on… Read more »

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

Severian No I didn’t, I did dig into McMasters bio and found he was stalled at Lt. Col until he hooked up with Patreus’s staff and started making promotions real fast. He said all the right things, embraced the Neo-Con/Globalist POV and the rest is history Yes he’s a sell-out. he knows damn well the strategies he promoted to Trump were batshit crazy. But that’s whet the military establishment wants. Is he the sort of man who makes rank? Yes. Many are worse. Here’s a link below to a Army briefer’s view of our higher ups in Afghanistan. It’s funny,… Read more »

Drake
Drake
Reply to  fondatorey
1 year ago

Saw a couple of good ones make it to full-bird, but that was it.

Liberty Mike
Member
Reply to  Drake
1 year ago

Some of you are missing the pack of pachyderm in the parlor:

Independent, free-thinkers tend not to be military men in the first place. After all, military men:

(1) feed at the public trough;

(2) they do not make or invent or provide any service upon a voluntary exchange basis;

(3) they pledge fealty to Caesar;

(4) they have been conditioned to obey orders; and

(5) they want and rely upon their government pensions.

james wilson
james wilson
Reply to  Liberty Mike
1 year ago

I once owned those same ignorant opinions. Then I got to know a number of executive officers who blew my mind. Pure talent, creativity, and independence of thought. That any existed meant that more existed. Where we find the people you are talking about is in academia.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  james wilson
1 year ago

Yes !!!! Certainly the military is populated with all the bad characters making up humanity at large. But the above is an over simplification. There are many standouts among the dirtbags and rat-bastards who unfortunately do survive far up into the senior ranks due to persistance, naked political skill and an appalling absence of shame. But please don’t fall for such over-simplifications. There are tremendously selfless and dedicated performers functioning up through senior field grade ranks …. men not driven by your ascribed motives of “pension” and “trough”. Often, their sacrifices range far beyond those of their civilian counterparts. Now,… Read more »

Liberty Mike
Member
Reply to  james wilson
1 year ago

Did you overlook the word “tend” in my assertion?

In service to your position, you appear prepared to jettison language precision.

It would also appear that you think that I have had little, if any, experience with military men.

To be sure, I have known military men who do have creativity and independence of thought.

They, however, are the exception.

TBoone
TBoone
Reply to  Drake
1 year ago

To add to the military capabilities conversation above: Keep in mind the US has the most combat tested military over the last 15+ years. Highly trained and effective at winning battles. That’s a full generation of warfighters. Pretty good kit & technology. Aging technologies. But still leading the world, albeit for the time being. Not large enough Force to invade Russia or China. Why would we? NeoCONjob fantasies? On the converse, Russia nor China are coming here anytime soon. The lack of massive Quantity of US armed Forces also mean they aren’t big enough as construed to control the entire… Read more »

Guest
Guest
1 year ago

I am watching the hearings. The Democrats are throwing Ford under the bus, using the hearings to score political points and argue for an FBI investigation in order to delay the nomination process. Ford is too stupid to get it.

Member
1 year ago

If Kavanaugh isn’t confirmed, then… then… then… conservatives will piss and moan about it for a few weeks, write long screeds about how the Republic and Rule of Law are dead, threaten dire consequences when the NEXT bad thing happens, then quietly go back to work and pay taxes to the guilty parties.

That’s the problem: no consequences. The deranged lunatics on the left are a pretty horrible way to maintain party discipline, but they are effective.

Lance E
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Nah, Trump knows he can’t win on the spending bills. It’s been mentioned before, but the second there’s actually a shutdown, the boomer base suddenly remembers how important the government is. We all like to think that a shutdown ought to be good for Republicans (yay limited government!) but every single time they try, it’s a disaster. Unless you mean that Trump is threatening to burn his own house down and veto the spending bill in order to torpedo Republican re-elections. I think they’d call his bluff, though – they know that he knows they can’t afford to lose the… Read more »

dad29
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Nope. Trump acceded to McYertle’s begging for FBI b/c Trump knows that the shit here is spattering all over the Democrats and the stinking ‘women’ of “me too.”

Trump reads the public so well that it’s almost preternatural. It’s proven (see the election) that he reads the public FAR better than any pollster.

Frip
Member
Reply to  Lance_E
1 year ago

I’ve only seen Kavanaugh talking a bit. I could be wrong, but he seems too conciliatory or “understanding” with his voice and demeanor. If he acted like more of a man, and had more attitude, he might not be so easy to push around. Again, I could be wrong. Maybe he’s speaking the way he has too nowadays.

Ryan
Ryan
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

Dilbert man made the argument that in the face of sexual assault allegations coming off as a timid nerd was probably better than angry alpha.

Flash
Flash
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

I could not disagree more. He is really pissed about what this has done to him and his family. He’s actually mocking some of these Democrat shit heads.

Frip
Member
Reply to  Flash
1 year ago

That’s good to hear. I have only heard him talk when Kamala Harris was trying to grill him a few weeks ago. I believe he was too defensive during all that. I can’t watch this whole fiasco as it would make me crazy. But I know what’s going on. I hate my country.

Fabian Forge
Member
1 year ago

That the most important job of the state is the nurture of the next generation of the elite has been known since forever. Historically that work focused on the existing elite and their kids. But even at the most intellectually advanced level that job has been, in the terms of the Current Year, “problematic”. Plato made kind of a mess with Dion of Syracuse, and Aristotle’s much more spectacular experiment with Alexander the Great was similarly unstable. Our founder’s experiment was to treat everyone (well, every free European propertied male, anyway) as a potential elite and let the best man… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
1 year ago

Speaking of serious men, I’m waiting for our precocious CIA psych professor, little Chrissy Ford, to show up in pigtails and a flouncy gingham dress, with a lollipop.

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

Winner!!!!

The devolution from Shirley Temple’s America to that of the Soulless Sold Out Bought and Paid For Bitch Whose Name(s) I Cannot Type is nauseating.

trackback
1 year ago

[…] As the circus of the Kavanaugh confirmation unfolds, it is important to note that the people creating the circus are not the brown ones. Sure, they were the opening acts, but the main stage is populated with geezers produced by the ruling class of a half century ago. Diane Feinstein is the representative of a the generations that produced the cultural revolution of the 1960’s, not someone from the current age. In other words, the American ruling class started going sour a long time ago. We’re just getting to smell the rotting corpse of it. […]

John Badger
John Badger
1 year ago

Semi-off-topic: the Kavanaugh hearing is fascinating in that it’s providing enormous rage-justifying confirmation bias for both sides.

I mean, I know that we’re right, and that this is just a rerun of the Duke rape case, Roy Moore, etc. They’ve gone emotionally all-in to defend a character-assassinating lie.

But the reaction of both sides is, “this proves just how evil the other side is.” It’s a very interesting event in political psychology.

Frip
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Damn. Good to hear. I’m gonna have to watch this crap now.

Frip
Member
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

Watching it now. Good to see him acting like a man finally.

Felix_Krull
Member
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

Acting like a man? He’s crying like a girl, for heaven’s sake! I had to turn it off, it was so cringey.

Frip
Member
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

“Man” was an unfair word to begin with. How about feisty? Pissed? Human? I’d like to see you perform under the world spotlights, guy named Felix.

Felix_Krull
Member
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

I’m not running for SCOTUS.

John_Henry_Eden
Member
1 year ago

My daughter the recently retired Lt. Col. told me that many junior officers, captain and below, were not retained after the withdrawal from Iraq so no hope there.

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  John_Henry_Eden
1 year ago

Except that they are out here now, among us, and free to let their frustration and anger flow, to awaken fully to the “rules of engagement.”

And to apply their training and experience truly in the cause of their own people.

Member
1 year ago

While I might not go as far as attributing to black magic the problem here is that we aren’t seeing the man behind the curtain. Their is a world order that is entirely covert and only seen through a glass darkly, a breakaway civilization that is running the world for its own interests. Various people have alluded to this in unguarded moments – most famously in the UK the Queen is reported by a member of the royal household to have said, “There are powers at work in this country about which we have no knowledge.” See also the missing… Read more »

Member
1 year ago

I’ve long had a theory about the elite class. They have an expiration date. The very nature of living an elite lifestyle causes that family to become withdrawn and out of touch with normal society. It also gives the elite family the ability to protect and nurture their idiots. We all have morons in our family but we love them and if we could we would protect them, from themselves. However, the elite class has that power, and they do protect their morons and secure them away in high paying but ultimately “safe” positions where they can do no harm,… Read more »