The Future Is Now

People love talking about the future, as it allows them to project their own narrative onto the present, without actually having to argue from facts and reason. The robot future is the best example. Those inclined to doom and gloom assume the robots take over and the result will be awful. Libertarians imagine the robots take over and immediately realize a society based on private property is the only viable option. In other words, when we start imagining the glorious future, we do so in order to make points about the present.

The fact is, the future is never what is promised. Those inclined to dark thoughts in the middle of the last century were sure Orwell’s vision was mostly correct. We live nothing like that today. Yet, people insist he will be proven correct any day now. Of course, the glorious future promised in the middle of the last century never happened either. Instead of flying cars, hot women in tight fitting jumpsuits and colonies on Mars, we have traffic jams, fat single mothers scurrying over the southern border and an emerging police state.

Just because the futurists always seem to be wrong, it does not mean no one warned about what was coming. Every society has its prophets. That’s because the future does not spring from nothing. There are always signs early on, suggesting what comes next and the ramifications of it. In retrospect, those signs seem obvious, of course, but the fact that some people saw them suggests people chose not to see them or to simply ignored them for short term reasons. Immigration policy is the obvious example.

What commonplace items today will be things the robot historians look at and wonder how we missed them? This story at the Huffington Post on DNA testing is an example. The story itself is unimportant. It is the sort of thing that would have appeared in a woman’s magazine fifty years ago, except the topic would have been French cooking. That’s a clue, for sure, but not one being has missed today. Popular culture is now awash in females playing roles, other than the one for which they evolved.

The interesting bit is the writer. Her name is Julia Ries, a young graduate of Boston College, working as a freelance writer. Here is her resume. Boston College is one of the more prestigious schools in America these days. It is in a new class of colleges called the “New Ivies” because their admissions standards are similar to the Ivies and their name carries a lot of weight in the managerial class. That means young Mx Ries is fairly emblematic of the type of woman who will be taking up a position in the ruling class.

Look at the job titles. It is a dog’s breakfast of managerial speak. For example, she was a media planner for health and wellness clients. The word “wellness” is a neologism that means the state of not being sick. In other words, instead of being sick, people have degrees of wellness. No one can ever be completely well, so there is a whole industry to promote wellness. If you read that entry carefully, what you see is she spent her days recommending keywords that would work in a Google search.

The next entry is “Digital Content Strategist” which she describes as “we’d listen to clients talk about the growing pains their brands were experiencing and we’d whip up some powerful campaigns to create some buzz and punch things up.” If you want to know why corporate communications is a tangle of neologism and nonsense phrases, there’s your answer. It’s bright young people spending their days coming up with new ways to say what their parents said. It’s a thousand monkeys pounding away at search engines.

The point here is this women is pushing thirty and her career thus far as been a series of nonsense jobs with clever titles. She no doubt thinks they are important steps on the career ladder and they very well may be essential steps. The managerial system is really just an apprenticeship process bolted onto an exam system. If you want to know why mass media is populated with middle aged airheads, incapable to dealing with observable reality, the answer lies in the resumes of young people like Mx. Ries.

The managerial system is not just selecting for the weak and frivolous within its ranks. It is breeding a generation of hot house flowers with its exam system. This story Sailer linked to is a great example. The Hindu comic gets the hook, because his jokes made the Columbia students uncomfortable. The thing about it is the students did not rush the stage or stomp off in a huff. They sat there in various states of emotional distress, until their handlers rushed the stage and shut down the the comedian mid-set.

The point of all this is there seems to be a strange old flaw in the managerial system, that will probably seem obvious in another generation. That is, the system selects for and cultivates increasing weak-minded people. As the system becomes more complex and interdependent, the people become more helpless, depending on the inertia of the system to supply the courage and resolve. In a system built by people with the soul of a human resource department, the greatest skill is doing nothing while sounding essential.

Perhaps the system will become self-aware before this becomes a crisis, but that’s not the way to bet. Instead, we’ll reach a point at which the people in charge are emotionally, morally and intellectually incapable of addressing the inevitable crisis. We may be getting a glimpse of this in France, where the ridiculous fop Emmanuel Macron is quickly being undone by men in safety vests. Macron is an example suggesting the managerial system is not going to be producing a Napoleon or even a de Gaulle to save the day.

The Mongols figured out that invaders from the hills had a habit of taking on the habits of the people they conquered in the valley. The conquers got soft and were in turn conquered by a new tribe from the hills. The Mongols tried to remedy that by being raiders and never settling the lands they conquered. In the West, allowing talent to bubble up from the bottom, often in military service and later business, was a way to keep the ruling class vigorous and on edge. This used to be way things were done in America.

Today, the ruling classes of the West are a closed system. The children of the elite head off to prep schools nestled away in secluded areas. They head off to nice colleges and then start their apprenticeship in the system. Outsiders can only gain entry by first proving they are no threat to question the system. The managerial class is becoming a hot house of make believe work and fatuous airheads. Like the people in the valley enjoying the good life, they are wholly unequipped to handle the next conqueror.

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Tom
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Tom

Works on the local level too. Local elites go to a big state college, attend a middle class church, rotary club, etc…

Member

I think this is an entirely different brand of elite.

Ryan
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Ryan

That doesn’t seem so bad honestly. The families at the middle class church are the people the local government exists to serve. That kind of relationship might actually facilitate good government.

Bruno the Arrogant
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Bruno the Arrogant

The problem with trying to extrapolate from current trends is that current trends are so malleable. It would have been impossible to forecast the 2000s from the 1990s without knowing about 9/11 in advance. One terrorist attack, a presidential assassination or a market crash, and your assumptions go out of the window. If North Korea drops a nuke on us today, we will be concerned with a whole different set of problems tomorrow morning. Through the years, I’ve noticed problems don’t get solved so much as they become obsolete as the action moves elsewhere. The cold war went away not… Read more »

Member

1. Reagan had the Cold War figured out. He quit subsidizing the USSR and forced it to compete. When it couldn’t, it fell apart. Sure, the leaders of the USSR helped out, but the trends were there. No argument with the rest of it. When it comes down to taking out a business or a country or nation-state in a preconceived way, the key is in recognizing a place where the marked organization has an exposed area it is unaware of or unprepared to defend. When Rome was sacked in 410 AD the barbarians entered the city via the aqueduct… Read more »

Bruno the Arrogant
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Bruno the Arrogant

Color me skeptical about Reagan’s contribution to the cold war. It never made sense to me that the Soviet Union collapsed after Reagan left office, when the Soviets could well have anticipated a better deal under Bush. It’s possible Reagan’s strategy sped up the collapse by a few years, but conservatives had been pointing out since the 1950’s, quite correctly, that the Soviet system was unsustainable and would eventually collapse under its own weight. Then it did exactly that, and now they’re taking credit for it. I like Reagan as much as the next guy, but that’s laying it on… Read more »

Member

Quote one conservative who in the 1950’s predicted that the USSR would collapse under it’s own weight.

Asking for a friend.

Saml Adams
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Saml Adams

Look up Herbert Meyer. Most of the CIA had the conventional view that the Russians were still growing economically in the 70s and 80s and that trajectory would continue. Meyer was one of the first guys to start noticing that non-traditional sources of intelligence indicated something different and was green lighted by Casey to create something of an intel skunk works to develop alternate viewpoints on the Soviet economy. Meyers group drew the conclusion that the underpinnings were rotten…they were right and the conventional thinkers were wrong.

Member

Looked him up. No wikipedia bio. Still working at the Hoover Institution at Stanford. Was in Reagan admin. Doubt he was running around in the 1950’s telling everyone we could win the cold war. He’d be over a hundred years old.

Chaotic Neutral
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Chaotic Neutral

Black identity politics will end as Hispanics take power, since Hispanics are unencumbered by any form of white guilt and have wants of their own. Sounds about right!

Member

Let’s all agree to stop reading the Zman for about a month. Until Christmas. We take a break now. Walk. Expose our minds to the wintry air. We come back refreshed. Maybe less cynical. We open all the unread Z posts and podcasts on Christmas morning like they were presents. It will be fun and, I believe, healthy. Let’s do this you guys. As an act of good faith, I’ll be the first one not to comment again until then. Who’s with me?!

DeBeers Diamonds
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DeBeers Diamonds

Liberals love saying that Fox News/talk radio brainwashes clueless Boomers into being conservative, “voting against their own interests”. So if they left the “epistemic closure”, they’d see the light of progtopia. Perhaps, but a sizeable number of them would become realtalkers without Ben Shapiro-types to be gatekeepers.

Julian
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Julian

It’s easy for the older generation to complain about these upstarts and their new words. People want friends and a salary. If you see things as they are, you don’t get too far with young educated whites. What can a girl like Julia Ries do with herself? Remember, she is female and girls really want to fit in. She did what people of her (intellectual, social) level do, which is to say she tried to get into a good university and succeeded. At university, she will have been surrounded by a load of garbage that was a lot easier to… Read more »

Guest
Guest
Guest

She did precisely the opposite of what she should have done and what biology led her to do. She’s a fairly attractive young woman who, judging by her resume, is approaching age 30. There’s no indication in her work that she’s in a serious relationship, married, or has children. She wasted the most important asset a young woman possesses: the beauty of youth. She should have spent her twenties prospecting for a mate, getting married, and then starting a family. Instead she’s wasted her prime formative years churning out meaningless drivel that nobody reads. The Wall comes at women fast.… Read more »

Screwtape
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Screwtape

And its not just that she has wasted her best pro-civilization assets pursuing the clickbait and google algo nirvana, but it is that in the practice of such waste she has likely become an unsalvageable cog in the wheel of misfortune. Hitting the wall indeed brings the boxed wine and accumulation of flings and fur babies. But what i’ve also noticed with these women is that their ego-investment in their flimflam “careers” and the corresponding facade of status is a powerful toxin when it comes to relatjonship formation and thus healthy family formation. They not only spend all their precious… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
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Citizen of a Silly Country

Agreed that she has wasted and continues to waste her narrow window to get married and have a family – something that 90%+ of women want. That said, women have another biological need: Stay in the good graces of the tribe. Her tribe – the dominant tribe of our times – has told her since birth that she should get good grades, not be a racist, get a job, don’t rely on a man, etc. She has been told this by her parents, her teachers, if she went to church her pastor, the media, government officials, her professors, her employers,… Read more »

Alzaebo
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Alzaebo

Superb observation, Citizen!

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
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Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

” […] In a few years she’ll be writing pieces about the melancholy of single life at the Holidays, a few years later come the articles complaining that men no longer pursue her, and then the articles about the peaceful joy of evenings alone with box wine and cats.”

True, true. But when she writes that drivel, she’ll “whip up some powerful [articles] to create some buzz and [she’ll] punch things up.”

You may rely upon it. It’s who she is. It’s ALL she is.

Member

I also think free-lance writing is pretty economically unstable.

Citizen of a Silly Country
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Citizen of a Silly Country

Yep. In another era, Julia would have been a (happy) Church-going, stay-at-home mother of three because that’s what would have pleased her group at the time. If she had been born to an upper middle-class White family in the South in early 20th century, she would have favored Jim Crow and felt it natural and right for blacks and Whites to be separated. (Btw, it’s interesting to note that Southern women back then didn’t worry about what the NYT said.) Girls like Julia Ries are just doing what nature pushes them to do. White men men should no more complain… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
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Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

BTW, why don’t you guys send a link to this comment thread to Ms. Julia Ries?
I’m sure it will become a learning moment for her.

;>)

Calsdad
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Calsdad

Send her a link to Chateau Heartiste .

That will give her a reason to retreat to her apartment with a few gallons of box wine.

Member

Instead of looking to Orwell or Huxley, maybe H.G. Wells would be better. I know they are imperfect but Well’s Time Machine gets some things right. The Eloi representing the ruling and indolent class and Morlocks the lower and working classes. One fears the other and separates from them. The other, seething hatred. ( ok, they eat them too).

Kind of a science fictionalized Coming Apart of America.

Member

The Eloi representing the ruling and indolent class

I can only assume people who say things like that have never actually read The Time Machine.

The Eloi were literally human cattle for the Morlocks. They had the minds of children. They didn’t “rule” anything. They grazed indolently on bounty provided by the Morlocks — the technological and actual ruling class — and were periodically harvested for their meat.

Member

H.G. Wells stated as much, the movie does a different take and the book less so. The impetus for the story is pretty much as I stated.
As for ruling, most of the cloud people now are not rulers and are as powerless as we are. Just better situated inside the walls.
But correct, less so than I stated.

Member

“For a moment I was staggered, though the import of his gesture was plain enough. The question had come into my mind abruptly: were these creatures fools? You may hardly understand how it took me. You see I had always anticipated that the people of the year Eight Hundred and Two Thousand odd would be incredibly in front of us in knowledge, art, everything. Then one of them suddenly asked me a question that showed him to be on the intellectual level of one of our five-year-old children — asked me, in fact, if I had come from the sun… Read more »

Member

The cloud people do indeed rule. The fact that they don’t do it well does not diminish that.

Member

Once the slave undertakes all the duties on which the master relies for survival then doesn’t the slave become the master? It is obvious to me that the Morlocks were the slaves supplying all the requirements of life to the Eloi but then one day they realized they had all the power, and that shift in perception was all that was needed.

Member

Sure, once upon a time. But to refer to the Eloi as they are encountered as rulers is incorrect. “Distant descendants of rulers,” sure.

Member

Yes, there is a systemic error in how we produce elites, no doubt. I agree that that it has a lot to do with the idea that absurd jobs are part of the apprenticeship program these days. Turns out, neither “clever,” nor “smart,” are virtues; they are really bad attributes to select for if you’re interested in making a healthy state. I feel like someone has thought about this somewhere before. Consider a society like medieval Spain. Whatever its own faults, the system insured that leaders certainly had the virtues of courage, wisdom, and justice: the business of reconquest made… Read more »

Wilson McWilliams
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Wilson McWilliams

>>>the central task of a society is creating a process that selects for virtue in its elites.

Excellent observation. I believe many here would agree that a society that does not (consciously or unconsciously) set up such a selective process will fail within a small number of generations, to be replaced by a society that does so select.

I think of the gamesmanship and box-ticking involved in Ivy League college admissions… and laugh. We’d be far better led by Army noncoms.

Juri
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Juri

Predicting future of communism or as people in the West say, liberalism is very easy. Communism always runs out of other people money. Next major economy crisis is on the front door and this will be end.

Drake
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Drake

I am a middle-manager with a project management title. I think most organizations have people like me. I get crap done by avoiding Marketing, Legal, and Human Resources as much as possible. I have a network of other people like myself in Commercial, Billing, Operations, IT, and the Regions. We are the ones who actually take the better ideas in the corporate strategy and make them happen – and nudge next year’s planning in the right direction while gently talking our leaders out of dumb ideas. We can talk the corporate jargon and debate return on investment with Finance without… Read more »

Mcleod
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Mcleod

That’s the 20% rule. 20% of the people do 80% of the work and 80% of the people do 20% of the work. The 20% all know each other.

Riveaux
Member
Riveaux

Thank you for your service..you and your colleagues, who actually get the work done, despite the efforts of HR, Legal and Health and Safety, will be the ones left after “the revolution” or wharever we want to call it, to put the pieces back together, and get things going again!

Glenfilthie
Guest
Glenfilthie

We see this every day even down here at dirt level. I have had grown adults as managers – come up and insist that I do what they themselves cannot, and will not do. Oh – and do it for free, or else! I learned early in the game (the hard way) that the ‘or else’ option is usually the best. Then these morons were shocked and horrified when I walked away. Most of them end up getting fired and replaced with more of the same because our ‘leaders’ tend to hire people like themselves. It all starts at the… Read more »

Member

It’s good for us that the managerial class is becoming so isolated. They’ll be easier to bring down. Look at that little shit Macron. Can you imagine the conversations in those bureaucratic salons in Paris right about now?

Tim
Guest
Tim

FWIW, just for the hell of it, I ordered myself a yellow safety vest.

JJB
Guest
JJB

Our country won’t go on forever, if we stay soft as we are now. There won’t be any America—because some foreign soldiery will invade us and take our women and breed a hardier race.–Chesty Puller

Matrix
Guest
Matrix

Try teaching in an affluent high school. If you even suggest that a state college or trade school would maybe be a better fit, you are looked at as an alien. That’s the elitism at its best. Also, these kids don’t work very hard at really learning anything of substance, just getting a score on the SAT or ACT is the goal. I hearken back to the philosophers Dire Straits, “Now look at them yo-yo’s that’s the way you do it You play the guitar on the MTV That ain’t workin’ that’s the way you do it Money for nothin’… Read more »

dad29
Guest

Har!! BC sent me an acceptance letter. THAT should take care of that ‘elite’ reputation they have. I think it’s not as bleak as you think it is. Based on your writings, I suspect you’ve had extensive interface with Fortune 50 or 500 enterprises, here and abroad. Thus you are slightly handicapped in assessing the Small Business (25-1,000 employees) picture. Those entities are usually headed by someone who does NOT ‘fit’ the Big Corporate mold; they are strong-minded hard chargers. Eventually, as Big Biz entropies (see GE), the small ones will become large (see Danaher–which 35 years ago was a… Read more »

bob sykes
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bob sykes

A quibble on typography: Ms is not an abbreviation and it should not be written Ms., with a period. Ms was coined by some catalog company back in the 50’s or 60’s so they wouldn’t have to worry about Mrs. vs. Miss in the address.

By extension, the neologism Mx should not have a period either.

Member

La wik seems to disagree with your history. Be that as it may, every normal English word has vowels. Words without vowels are always abbreviations, initialisms, or other types of modern semi-words. If they are abbreviations, they are marked with a period. (Yes I know that this usage is being effaced. Call me reactionary.) “Ms.” is an abbreviation, abbreviating both “miss” and “mistress”. “Mx” is just ridiculous, the fever rambling of idiots who are resolved to fight human nature to the bitter end. I find it funnier written without a period. But if I wanted to use it as a… Read more »

Member

Not in British usage; no period (which they call a ‘full stop’). And being Brits, they must be classier. Although Dorothy Sayers was right, single commas for quotes are stupid.

Hoagie
Guest
Hoagie

Shouldn’t it be Mxy to cover both sexes?

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

I vote “Myx”. Like a mutt. No offense meant to the dogs out there.

Wilson McWilliams
Guest
Wilson McWilliams

BOTH sexes? How quaint.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

That’s true, many of the Mx’s don’t have periods.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Touché

Babe Ruthless
Guest
Babe Ruthless

A lot of parallels with the rottenest periods of imperial Chinese history. Just three for now: (1) A sclerotic bureaucracy, knowing little of the “real world,” bolted right on top of a stultifying “education” system based on formulaic essays on official texts. Co-opted the best and brightest, and strangled innovation and reform. (2) An explosion of official job titles, from the boringly bureaucratic, to the Orwellian avant la lettre, to the hilariously-florid-in-translation. Feel free to help yourself to Professor Charles Hucker’s 676 page A dictionary of official titles in Imperial China. (3) Eunuchs. The eunuchs, originally brought in to avoid… Read more »

Member

The eunuchs sound like a Eastern version of the praetorian Guard

Al from da Nort
Guest
Al from da Nort

Whitney; Very limited parallel. Roman emperors didn’t have formal harems but their female relatives filled in for the eunuchs in being the source of the usual intrigue common to centralized power. The Praetorian Guard, OTOH, were picked Roman soldiers and most definitely not eunuchs. Originally they were the Caesars’ bodyguard and insurance against the Senators getting ideas. Later on they were able to auction off the Imperial power on a few occasions. Ultimately they were disbanded and their leaders killed as an insurance policy by some bad-a**ed general from the provinces who had just overthrown his predecessor as Caesar. Regional… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Guest
Al from da Nort

Babe R;
Interesting parallels. Imperial China had a wall against the barbarians on the other side, though.

Apparently our Mandarins are not that smart.

Barbarians from the Steppe were the usual source of regime change for China AFIK. Hard to see that happening to us, but maybe a unified set of Mexican Drug Cartels taking us over is the future.

Member

“The greatest skill is doing nothing while sounding essential.” The biggest handicap one can have in business today is ability. When combined with the propensity to avoid the herd mentality it can make for a quick ending to ones career. At the very least you will be required to attend some kind of behavioral modification seminar or anger management program. It is all marketing. The idea we as individuals are a brand is, I don’t know what. Maybe we are. It all seems so nebulous. Today’s reality, ridiculous.

Drake
Guest
Drake

Even worse, people with actual ability become too valuable to promote into worthless management jobs. They get shoehorned into dead-end jobs because they are irreplaceable.

Member
James LePore

You are going to have to go a long way to find someone as vapid as Mx. Ries. The titles of her “articles” say it all: WORSE THAN MORNING SICKNESS: THE CONDITION THAT LEFT AMY SCHUMER HOSPITALIZED RBG’S QUICK RECOVERY: WHAT OTHERS CAN LEARN FROM HER WORKOUTS 5 TIPS FOR DEALING WITH DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME NEW NUTRITION LABELS REVEAL HOW MUCH ADDED SUGAR YOU’RE EATING LENA DUNHAM’S MULTIPLE SURGERIES HIGHLIGHT DIFFICULTY IN TREATING ENDOMETRIOSIS MEGHAN MARKLE’S ‘GERIATRIC PREGNANCY’ PUTS SPOTLIGHT ON OLDER FIRST-TIME MOMS DOES PAIN AFTER CHILDBIRTH INCREASE POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION RISK? SALMONELLA AND LISTERIA OUTBREAKS SPARK MASSIVE MEAT RECALL… Read more »

Gravity Denier
Guest
Gravity Denier

I offer Person Julia Ries a few titles, gratis. She can fill in blanks in her online template to produce career-enhancing “think” pieces: “Don’t Look Now: Speed Reading Tips for Skimming Books.” “Are Vegetables the New Carbs?” “Don’t Let Cats Encourage You To Over-Nap!” “Why Bathing Isn’t the Answer to Dirty Fingernails” “Once in Your Lifetime, Travel Through the Sahara by Boat” “Thrill Pills: Is Science Closing in on the Orgasm Capsule?” “Be Someone Else: Rotate Your Identity In Tune With Your Menstrual Cycle” “Can Learning Esperanto Recharge Your Brain Power?” “Hello Darkness My Old Friend: Paint It Black!” “Looking… Read more »

Member
James LePore

G.D., Great titles, satire of course, but, except for the last one, I don’t doubt we’ll see them in print by some “intellectual” some day soon. God save us.

Gravity Denier
Guest
Gravity Denier

James, Thanks. My inspiration was the clickbait pieces in the British tabloids. Here’s (a real) one from today’s Daily Mail:

Head:
‘Keep your clothes on and make sure you eat’: HR expert shares five tips to make sure you leave the work Christmas party with your career (and reputation) intact

Subhead:
With work Christmas parties in full swing, HR expert Karen Gately and founder of Corporate Dojo, tells FEMAIL the five ways you can unwind and keep your career and reputation intact.

(Keep your clothes on and eat. Never would have worked that out myself! So glad we have experts to turn to.)

Member

Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind. Then you will be able to test and approve what God’s will is—his good, pleasing and perfect will

Pursuvant
Guest
Pursuvant

I’ll throw a pitch in the prediction of future, based entirely on discoveries of quantum mechanics. Neils Bohr in 1930 said everything we think is real is fundamentally unreal. Fast forward, with the big collider: Matter is unreal, a wave function prediction. Time & space are a kind of delusion. Double slit, quantum eraser, and entanglement experiments strongly indicate true underlying reality of time & space is not what our brains perceive. Our evolution hides underlying reality. What we think we know: Time is always now, our brains tease out the past and future. What time was it, when you… Read more »

Member

This is kind of the robot problem or rather the robot problem has already happened. Most jobs are a kind of make work: to provide the basic needs of the vast body of useless eaters only takes a small proportion of the population. Look how nobody is working in agriculture nowadays to produce corn or wheat, they’re commodities produced by soon to be fully automated processes. The problem is the ignorant and largely stupid managerial class arrived at using wealth destruction as the method used to cycle money through the system: America is top dog because it has the biggest… Read more »

Member

I think the antisemites you regularly tweak may have a point in that our ruling class has been judaized. Our ruling class has slowly, over a century or so, morphed from being a group that relied on action and deeds to make one’s reputation and move up, to being a group for whom words and poses are everything and deeds unnecessary at best.

Endless words, words, words; arguing over minutia and vigorously arguing reality away into a box that can be resolutely ignored. I don;t think it will end well for them.

Ris Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris Eruwaedhiel

That’s the situation in a nutshell.

At one time in this country, virtue meant living a life of personal integrity and doing the right thing. Not anymore. What counts in today’s society, especially among liberals and cucks, is not doing the right thing but saying the right thing and holding the right attitude. You could live your life in diametric opposition to your purported ideals, but that’s okay because everyone else is, too. So you feel free to utter the most lofty ideals because all it is is extravagant virtue signaling.

Member

“The point of all this is there seems to be a strange old flaw in the managerial system, that will probably seem obvious in another generation. That is, the system selects for and cultivates increasing weak-minded people. As the system becomes more complex and interdependent, the people become more helpless, depending on the inertia of the system to supply the courage and resolve. In a system built by people with the soul of a human resource department, the greatest skill is doing nothing while sounding essential.” Riesman called it “other-direction” as opposed to “inner-directed” pioneer and self-reliant types. This maroon… Read more »

Mcleod
Guest
Mcleod

What I’ve told my nieces and nephews, my own children being too young to worry about it yet, is to go to College to join a guild. There is no education in the classical sense to be obtained so don’t bother and college has become the gatekeeper to the best guilds and cartels. Get your state stamped certification in nursing, medicine, law, engineering, accounting, or whatever the hell you want as cheaply and as quickly as possible. It’s all in the game. The game might change and realize that it is just a game, but for now play the game.… Read more »

Chaotic Neutral
Guest
Chaotic Neutral

This is very true. If you have enough AP credit from high school, as I did, you can pursue a dual degree—one in your “guild” and another for liberal education. But you have to have a strategy for future employment because our education system will be more than willing to sell you useless African Pygmy film studies degrees for years.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

What has surprised me so far is that Macron has been quite light handed, almost indifferent to the protests. The French government could easily just lock up the leaders under “hate speech” laws, and produce trumped-up evidence they were Russian-backed. Macron would ride a wave of popularity for standing up for “law and order”. At this point, early elections would still be a surprise, which the FN would have a low chance of winning.

Juri
Guest
Juri

So called 4th generation warfare or 4GW point is that there are no leaders and chain of command. There may be some think tank, inventing new methods and recommending action but generally, people on the place decide what and where to do.
You can invent trick how to take Macron down, write this idea for example right here and hyperactive trolls take care that next weekend every last Frenchman have heard it.
Good blog about 4GW in English.
https://www.traditionalright.com/

Member

In our day and time a police record is all that is needed to make one an outlaw. The only thing keeping these groups of people in check right now is that they are tenuously holding on to their meager position in society. If you started to make huge chunks of them outlaws, then you are just creating a structured opposition that has nothing to lose. It would be better to kill them, but that is a whole other can of worms.

Unwashed Mass
Guest
Unwashed Mass

Could it be that Macron is under the impression that these are “his” protesters, just a liitle off message for the duration? He doesn’t seem very bright.

De Beers Diamonds
Guest
De Beers Diamonds

The President in the French system of government is not as powerful as the American President. The day to day business of government is handled by the Prime Minister. Think CEO/COO. Macron prefers to be detached and focus on the “big picture”, that’s why he looks clueless in public. The prime minister can be thrown to the wolves. The current situation is odd because the prime minister is actually polling higher than Macron.

Unwashed Mass
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Unwashed Mass

Hey, I got a down vote. Who’s the cuck?

Wolf Barney
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Wolf Barney

One of my cousins works for a corporation we’ve all heard of and would be described as “socially-aware.” Her position is Digital PR, lives in Hipster City, USA, she’s in her mid-thirties and is married but has no children and isn’t planning on having any. But she has a dog, who’s treated like a child. She sprinkles words in her conversations like “unpack” and “non-binary” and is into “world” charities. I also have cousins who live in the rural upper Midwest, who seem like they’re from central casting for 1950’s America. They’re into things like hunting and fishing with their… Read more »

CaptainMike
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CaptainMike

https://vimeo.com/159436632
An Onion newscast from the year 2137 which someone linked to over on Sailer (made in 2013). I had never seen it. Probably the best/funniest thing they ever did. Only unrealistic thing about it is that there are too many white people. Or maybe not, perhaps we regain our preeminence after the great die off.

Member

This is a column about the future, you say? Humbug – it’s clearly about the past, because what you describe is exactly what has happened to every single rusty, sclerotic empire whose time was just about up throughout all of history. You might as well have written it about the last of the Bourbon kings, or the Qing Dynasty in the 19th century, or Rome under Julius Nepos. We know the drill – the civil service gets filled with increasingly unimaginative, out-of-touch yes men who know how to climb within their closed system but never talk to the peasants outside… Read more »

DeBeers Diamonds
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DeBeers Diamonds
Dutch
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Dutch

The Missus and I were installing a new kitchen sink a few weeks ago, one of those big enameled cast iron farmhouse style deals, about 250 lb. worth. We set up the cherry picker from the garage and suspended the thing over the hole in the counter to do the deed, like a crane in a construction site. The 20 something kiddos were passing through, along with a few of their friends. One of them, of the predominantly female appearance, started talking about the whole thing triggering her and making it hard for her to breathe. I told her xe… Read more »

DeBeers Diamonds
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DeBeers Diamonds

https://quillette.com/2018/11/30/the-new-evolution-deniers/

“Back when evolution was under attack from proponents of Biblical Creation and Intelligent Design, academic scientists were under no pressure to hold back criticism. This is because these anti-evolution movements were almost exclusively a product of right-wing evangelicals who held no power in academia”

Now you see, our gatekeepers will not actually do anything like giving the right-wing power in academia. But the Right is supposed to support the FACTS and LOGIC and SCIENCE of neoliberals. #NotYourFreikorps

Severian
Guest

I forget the Russian word, but the Soviets had a name for the kind of guy who will actually run things in our Human Resources-ruled future. He might have actually been a lowly shift supervisor or something, but he was the “fixer” — he knew everyone, could get with his fellow fixers, and actually get the materials a factory needed to meet its targets outside the cumbersome requisition system. (When the USSR collapsed, these guys found themselves owning the newly “priviatized” utilities). Maybe some lessons here for us.

Drake
Guest
Drake

When I was in the Marines, we would just go steal the shit we needed from the Army.

Yves Vannes
Member

“Eloi” posting…

Babe Ruthless
Guest
Babe Ruthless

Instead of what this sad lady is doing, a lot of smart women could live a more meaningful life by “doing a Jane Austen.” Instead of puking up globohomo officialese, they could have a family life and write online (or in print, if they’re good and/or lucky) using honest, real language, about what life is really like. Then they would make a real contribution. Life for them and us would be much richer.

Range Front Fault
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Range Front Fault

This lady is doing just as you suggest. She is a western woman who raised a family, lives in the panhandle of Idaho, keeps a homestead going with her husband, and writes for World Net Daily her weekend column. Meet Patrice Lewis. http://www.rural-revolution.com Please take a few minutes to relax with her remarkable website. Most of you are city folks either midwest or coastal. You barely touch on issues of the west. My people are the people of the Nevada Great Basin and Range country (see http://rangemagazine.com Please take a few minutes to read Range Magazine to gain a better… Read more »

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
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Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

” […] In a system built by people with the soul of a human resource department, the greatest skill is doing nothing while sounding essential. […]”

When describing a shemale of the Mx Whatever ilk, I am never wrong when I say, “She has the soul of an eel and the disposition of a tarantula.”

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
Guest
Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

One thing, however, we do know for absolute certain: the current Grand Solar Minimum. We are now able to predict pretty accurately what that is going to look like. Several governments are already making the necessary preparations (not ours, of course, but we never expected them to do it anyway). A great deal of the present-day foolishness will simply vanish, thank God.

fredcdobbs
Guest
fredcdobbs

I live near Los Angeles, where they have their very own ridiculous fop – Eric Garcetti – as mayor. From the same mold as Macron.

Garcetti is mulling a White House run.

Member

fredcdobbs: I live in LA. Garcetti would be better off mulling wine this time of year. LA produces incredibly vapid mayors.

Steve
Guest
Steve

“Those inclined to dark thoughts in the middle of the last century were sure Orwell’s vision was mostly correct. We live nothing like that today.” Of course, the the real world is necessarily more complicated and messy than any dystopia described in a science fiction cum polemic novel, but Orwell predicted several key features of our world, for example: 1) Crimethink/Crimestop — To have.avoid such thoughts as diversity + proximity = conflict; there are measurable racial differences in behavior, intelligence and personality 2) Unperson — The consequences of Crimethink — Crimethinkers aren’t killed, at least not yet, but the are… Read more »

ChrisZ
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ChrisZ

As far as visions of the future go, I count the dystopias of Burgess in “A Clock Orange” and Houellebecq in “Submission” to be especially perceptive.

And there’s that one by John of Patmos…

Member

I am not generally an optimistic person, but these days I have a strange sense of optimism. It’s as if God has blessed us by making our enemies fools.

Member

“Like the people in the valley enjoying the good life, they are wholly unequipped to handle the next conqueror.”

What are we waiting for? Let’s get together and go take their shit.

TomA
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TomA

Great post. Here’s another useful insight. The incestuousness and lack of formative hardship in the ruling class is producing more than just weakness, it is making the whole ruling network extremely fragile. They have no resilience and rely exclusively on government force to keep then safe and in power, rather than traditional leadership skill. Macron is pissing his pants, not because he is flummoxed by a crisis, but because he wouldn’t last two minutes outside his security cordon.

Dan
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Dan

The current carousel of incompetence will end…..it must. And history tells us it will probably end violently. A culture that has NOT surrendered to feelings and wishful thinking will come along to kill, conquer and enslave……the current candidate for this chore is Islam.

Saml Adams
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Saml Adams

In the good old days Boston College was a safety school…

Walt
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Walt

Pre and Post-WW2, the left used to be the cream of the working-class. Their hearts and minds were guided by blue-collar sensibilities and an ability to understand white culture. Today however, the managerial class is the dregs of the middle-class. It isn’t sure who exactly it is building a future for. It has no skin in the game and no motivation to preserve its heritage. In fact it has been taught to hate where it came from and to spend every dollar possible to avoid looking and acting like the people who raised them. They have no identity, no loyalty… Read more »

pyrrhus
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pyrrhus

And then there’s the fact that Americans are becoming dumber every year, as evidenced by declining test scores since the 1960s, and every other measure of intellect…Most kids are baffled by the Harvard entrance exam that was used around 1900…Mouse Utopia.