After Conservatism

National Review was founded in 1955 by Bill Buckley and, until the last few years, it has been the prestige publication of American conservatism. The late 50’s is a good starting point for the movement that has been the alternative to Progressivism. Buckley was greatly influenced by Russel Kirk, so the magazine took on Progressivism, but also the libertarianism of Ayn Rand and the failures of previous efforts to create a legitimate conservatism in the United States. The goal was to create a new Right.

Reading the take down of Ayn Rand by Whittaker Chambers all these years later, it is easy to see how things have changed. In the early days of Buckley conservatism, it was understood by people claiming to be on the Right that libertarianism suffered from the same materialism as Marxism. Rand loved ideology so much there was no room in her cold heart for humanity. Today, the so-called Right is indistinguishable from the libertarianism of today. The editor of National Review actually celebrates it.

It has become a cliche of sorts that what passes for conservatism today is just yesterday’s liberal fads. The social media gag “the conservative case for [fill in name of liberal degeneracy]” stopped being funny because it became common on the page of National Review itself. Here they make the conservative case for homosexual marriage and here they make the case for transgenderism. Of course, one of the leaders of what passes for conservatism these days is a man who walks around dressed as a woman.

When confronted by the ridiculous spectacle that is Conservative Inc., it is tempting to fall into the same trap as Muslims, Marxists and libertarians, when they confront the lunacy of their cults. Whenever a Muslim explodes in public, the response is, “well, that’s not the real Islam.” In the Cold War, Marxists professors would always say that Bolshevism was a mongrel and defective form of Marxism. Of course, libertarianism spend all their time wheeling around those goal posts on roller skates that define libertarianism.

The fact is, the conservatism of Bill Buckley was always defective. It was a continuation of what Robert Louis Dabney observed a century ago about Northern Conservatism. Russell Kirk saw conservatism as a disposition, the lack of ideology. What Buckley conservatism was, in fact, was a pose. The range of allowable opinion on the Left, however, allowed for the existence of a reformist element that drew on the old Right, as well as western traditionalism. The managerial state had not yet snuffed out liberalism.

A couple decades ago, the great paleocon academic Paul Gottfried noted that the managerial state had killed liberalism. By liberalism, he meant the philosophical view that distributed powers and bourgeois moral standards worked to restrain the state and protect civil society. The system of governance refined in the 19th century was being wiped away and something new would replace it. Today, what passes for the Left and the Right both agree to call it neoliberalism and both sides strongly embrace it.

In that Fred Bauer post, you see that Buckley conservatives are on the last leg of the journey into the sun. They no longer see a reason to oppose the Left, because the Left disappeared into the sun of neoliberalism a long time ago. As has been its habit since birth, the conservatism of Bill Buckley follows Progressivism around like a puppy. Its last act on the stage will be fusing itself permanently to what was once called the Left to form the bipartisan fusion ideology of the American managerial state.

Paul Gottfried coined the phrase “alternative Right” in his speech at the Mencken conference, when discussing what happened to the paleocons. Richard Spencer appropriated the idea and started the alt-right, but it was never a coherent movement nor did it have anything resembling an intellectual foundation. It was, at best, a grab bag of ideas plucked from various subcultures in the larger umma of the Dissident Right. As a result it became a cult of personality and then fizzled out entirely.

It is easy to lay the blame for the alt-right at the feet of Richard Spencer, but the real problem is something you can pick up in Gottfried’s speech at Mencken. Paleos never fully grasped the reality of Buckley-style conservatism. Paul remains puzzled by how easy it was for the neoconservatives to overrun the conservative institutions. The reason, of course, was that those institutions were built on the same manor as the Progressive institutions. Conservative institutions were just outbuildings for the main house.

If there is to be a genuine alternative to the prevailing orthodoxy, the first task is to accept a central truth of the managerial state. That is, it must approach an intellectual and moral singularity in order to exist. While it will never reach the point where all opinion is assimilated, the allowable differences are now so small they cannot be seen by the naked eye. A system that evolved out the principle of universal truth, must evolve a morality that is intolerant of anything that challenges it. There can be no room for an alternative.

That means that whatever comes after conservatism must first sink roots outside the neoliberal order and maybe even outside the Enlightenment. It cannot be a reaction to neoliberalism, as that implies a dependency. The obvious implication is that what comes after conservatism, in the framework of the American Right, is nothing. That line of discovery and inquiry has reached a dead end. It is an intellectual tradition with no future and no shadow. What comes next must be a clean break from northern conservatism.

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Wildman
Wildman
1 year ago

Any system political, mechanical, electronic that is based on positive feedback eventually spirals out of control

Neal Madison
Neal Madison
1 year ago

So many people are black pilled these days but the greatest white pill is that this current tumult in America is the death rattle in the throat of conservatism. We have never been more ripe for revolution. The pieces on the board are perfect for a massive paradigm change and for a new order to take the reigns. All we need is some leadership. Any takers?

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  Neal Madison
1 year ago

So far it doesn’t look like it and the factionalization even among the dissident right makes things harder. Finding that sweet spot, the compromise that works is THE challenge our Founding Fathers faced and the same one we face The “Leave me alone/Constituionalists” can’t lead and millions of people myself included will not follow nor permit the Deus Volt crowd who are at least willing to lead to turn the US into Iran with more Jesus. And note I know how much that sounds like what the Left says. The reason I think its true is if there is a… Read more »

Member
Reply to  A.B. Prosper
1 year ago

People looking for, or needing the approval of, or pleading for a green-light from, “leaders” are losers.

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  Libertymike
1 year ago

Without leaders you have no society. Human’s require a hierarchy to function in groups larger than a tribe and allowing nought more than an atomized nuclear family hands victory to the Left

Felix_Krull
Member
Reply to  A.B. Prosper
1 year ago

factionalization even among the dissident right makes things harder.

To culturally appropriate Cathedral language, diversity is our strength. The more fractions we have, the more moles they need to whack. By not having leaders or ideologies, we give them no big targets. That’s what makes the Yellow Jackets so dangerous to the French government: there’s nobody to bribe, nobody to threaten or kill.

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  Felix_Krull
1 year ago

Fair point, The presence of police and security people who support the yellow jackets disallow the usual strategy of just shooting or imprisoning enough people to force compliance Also generally the cathedral avoid the whip hand as it causes reprisals. What happened to Charlie Hebedo , who while satirical was an approved satire sent a strong message. You are vulnerable However let me ask, if there are hundreds of factions and they manage to take the Cathedral down nibbling it to death by the proverbial ducks how is anyone supposed to actually govern Distributive 18th century systems won’t work in… Read more »

Whitney
Member
1 year ago

My father loved Ayn Rand. I woke up one morning when I was 12 and Anthem was on my nightstand. Huge reader so I just picked it up and read it cover to cover. I read Atlas Shrugged 3 times by the time I was 20. But that still meant I had plenty of years to look into her and her ideology. It was completely removed from reality. She was a hero worshipper that applied her ideology to her personal life and just created Mayhem all around her. Life is messy and like many people I like order but it’s… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Whitney
1 year ago

You say “[Rand] was completely removed from reality.”

I think she explained reality as well as anyone ever has. She provided the tools for understanding how the world works, both politically and economically.

David_Wright
Member
1 year ago

In a pluralistic society I don’t see your proposal coming about. Unless you can figure out how a small elite of new rightists can govern over the various new nations formed from the old America.

My new country “Heartland” is a good start, formed from the former American midwest states. (Apologies to the 1980s Amerika tv series).

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  David_Wright
1 year ago

Demography is destiny..That’s why the Globalists have been dumping non-whites in the US for the last 53 years, and at an accelerating pace..No conservative Western nation can survive with 30-40% minorities…They have to go back, but Americans won’t face that truth until catastrophe far worse than the Great Depression is upon us,

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  pyrrhus
1 year ago

The acknowledgment of racial differences has to be the foundation of what comes next.

Neal Madison
Neal Madison
Reply to  Wolf Barney
1 year ago

This.

But I’m also skeptical of any solution that doesn’t involve metaphysics. They took our religion before they took our lands.

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  Neal Madison
1 year ago

The US is among the most Christian nations in the developed world with up to half the people claiming the attend church

We also have I don’t know how many other religions out there

Lack of metaphysics is not the problem nor will anything be solved by a return to that Old Tyme Religion unless it ends up Wicca which seems to be the fastest growing one right now

DrDog
DrDog
Reply to  pyrrhus
1 year ago

“I have a dream ….. of millions of F150 pickups with lawn equipment heading South.”

When the Free Shit stops most will leave. Won’t get rid of all of them, but most. Best example is the current caravaners down Mexico way. When the situation got dicey and the tear gas flowed a good many of them called it quits. All but a 100 or so die hards will remain in a couple of months.

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  DrDog
1 year ago

California will stay a mixed culture I suspect but most of the people here speak English and work and have been here for a long while.

You can force them out if you like but its not going to be easy.

JohnLocke
JohnLocke
Reply to  pyrrhus
1 year ago

I don’t know the whole answer, but this must be part of it: The actual, verifiable truth is cognitive abilities are genetic, whites about 100 IQ average and blacks at 85 average (American Blacks). Mexico averages 90 and Central America 70-80. Whites Will always dominate a free society. Any new country simply cannot allow the one-man-one-vote principal or you get tyranny of the low IQ.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  David_Wright
1 year ago

Forming a land-locked country surrounded by blue-hive enemies doesn’t really sound like a formula for a bright and long lasting future.

I see an awful lot of people on the right going with the “new nation in the heartland” premise – and at the same time spouting the “demographics are destiny” tagline……… but I think they’re forgetting one MAJOR thing:

Geography is destiny too. Probably more-so than demographics in many cases.

People who have their hearts set on a white nation in the heartland – had better start thinking that shit out a little more thoroughly IMHO.

Toddy Cat
Toddy Cat
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Coastline will be Texas Gulf coast. Won’t be landlocked.

Hoyos
Hoyos
Reply to  Toddy Cat
1 year ago

Sure about that? Texas is on the razor edge of becoming blue. We are tomorrow’s California, I think, a once red state flipping all the way over. I’m kind of with Carlsdad on this one. The parasite of leftism needs to feed on a host, that host is what Nixon called the Silent Majority. Even if it isn’t the majority in actuality. What will happen, if that happened is we will be surrounded on all sides by rotting failing nation states. Because they need someone to loot, the other side will not let us peacefully leave and we’re also forgetting… Read more »

Primi Pilus
Primi Pilus
Reply to  Hoyos
1 year ago

Assuming that in any future reorganization the state boundries will remain intact. In Texas, the county red-blue schism is stark. It’s likely to remain that way, with red areas remaining red except any near the border and around urban areas. Continuing that example, Texas hasn’t always looked like the current “Lone Star” configuration, geographically.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Hoyos
1 year ago

The whole premise of a white nation in the heartland just seems like another iteration of the run run run away behavior displayed by so many on right for so long. Instead of putting their heads down and digging into the real problems and trying to figure out ways to defeat their enemies – it’s just one long train of constant “run and avoid the issues” type behavior. Show me a landlocked nation that hasn’t had major issues with their enemies dictating the terms of their very existence. Go look at the history of WW1 and WW2 for crying out… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Kansas? That may not be much of a sanctuary for the whitey who wants muh Medicare and muh Medicaid and muh social security and muh collective bargaining.

That Kris Kobach garnered only 43% of the vote speaks volumes.

A pro-Trump immigration hard-ass got his ass handed to him.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Libertymike
1 year ago

Kansas is bible belt territory. They always get their fundamentalist panties in a wad if they think you are not “nice”.

John
John
Reply to  Libertymike
1 year ago

Kansas is full of Mexicans, many illegal. That’s how the Democrats took the Governorship. About 25% demographically. They spread like a plague upon the land. Running is all one can do if you have assets. You can’t kill them and your fucking government lets it all happen. For 53 years. Thanks Emanuel Celler.

Minimalmed
Minimalmed
Reply to  John
1 year ago

To clarify, Kansas is 25% mestizo. The largely Castiian Mexican ruling elite are quietly snickering as we become them, serving as the containment pond for their excess underclass. Cartel violence cannot kill enough, so to maintain control, avoid uprising without building a social welfare state nightmare (like us) they vent their undesirables into our society. They have been doing it increasingly for seven or eight decades. We are both their social safety net and a large liquidity pool (remittances) for their economy. Why add on to your house when your (dunce) neighbor keeps letting your distant relatives sleep over and… Read more »

johnmark7
johnmark7
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

I wrote a small chapbook of an essay in 2012 entitled, The Next American Revolution . . . will be stillborn. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008XEZGEU/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i5 One description of the future is of a USA break up into regional confederations. But the bad news is that the same sort of politicians and businessmen who are in charge now, will be in charge again because the kind of sea change Z Man is talking about needing to occur is unlikely to do so. Whatever govt that has Detroit or Baltimore or Atlanta in its jurisdiction or Phoenix and El Paso is still going to have… Read more »

John
John
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

The only solution is to stop all immigration, legal and illegal with a few exceptions for highly skilled candidates. It is too late for that solution. The country will collapse as more and more subhumans pour into the country because the government is in the hands of the global banking cartel and they have targeted this country for destruction. The future is brown and dumb. As far as running to a whiter area; that’s just intelligent behavior. The government is infiltrating skinnies and pepperbellies into all white areas as well, however, there is not enough time left before collapse to… Read more »

Tadpole
Tadpole
Reply to  Hoyos
1 year ago

S

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  Hoyos
1 year ago

“we will be surrounded on all sides by rotting failing nation states.”

Good. Let them rot and demonstrate the difference between them and us.

“Because they need someone to loot, the other side will not let us peacefully leave…”

Good again. Refuse to be looted and what ever that entails. They can’t beat us and, even the worst of them must realize that yo can’t loot a corpse.

No matter, it will come to guns sooner or later. It would be much better to control an area (Haven) than for there to be “distributed” violence and it’s 4gw everywhere.

oughtsix
oughtsix
Reply to  oughtsix
1 year ago

Excuse me, I missed this:

“Heartland America is not some utopia.”

Ho one is proposing ‘utopia,’ that is the fatuous nonsense we’re trying to defeat/prevent.

“We’re basically weak.”

We know ye not. Speak for your self…

WE are everywhere.

Felix_Krull
Member
Reply to  Toddy Cat
1 year ago

What Hoyos said. Texas is going the way of California. What you want, are the states south of the Canadian border, a belt with both Pacific and Atlantic access.

Yes, they’re Commies now, but that’s less important. Communism can be rolled back, demography, not so easily.

DrDog
DrDog
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Won’t last anywhere without a change of reference. Lets assume that the old South split off like before, but no civil war this time. How long will that last? Maybe a decade. What will happen is that the Socialist North with its economy now teetering on the brink of ruin will look for an external threat to distract the masses. The socialist mindset always goes this route. Rather than outright war the North will institute guerrilla insurgency along the border. You will never have peace from that point forward as this is the ‘politics by other means’. The liberty side… Read more »

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Folks aren’t going to get the whole enchilada baring some nightmare scenarios and frankly while we deplorable types are much alike, we aren’t the only ones here. I suspect many of the Blue hives will be in ruins but we’ll still need to rule a mostly urban society for many years Outside of the Constitutional issues, people in Kansas have no more business giving order to Yankees than Yankees do to people in Kansas anyway Also land locked nations are common and can work especially if the new state invests in self defense. There are plenty of weapons available to… Read more »

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Where do you think all those mega blue hives get their food from?

Those Hives would become mass graveyards inside of a week if food from the heartland ever ceased. Hell within 48 hours the brownskins and white yuppies would be killing each other over what was available.

Member
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

What about all of the sons and daughters and trannies of the heartland who are active duty and serve Uncle Sam?

What about all of the sons and daughters and trannies of the heartland who are Uncle Sam’s reservists?

What about all of the sons and daughters and trannies of the heartland who are part of the constabulary?

What if they are mobilized for the purpose of ensuring the blue hives get the food?

What if they are ordered to shoot anybody who obstructs?

Infidel1776
Infidel1776
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

Agreed. Urbanites have no appreciation for the complexity of the supply chain. Most grocery stores maintain an inventory of three days or less. A trucker’s strike or a blockade would bring the cities to their knees toot sweet. At that point, things would start getting really vibrant.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  David_Wright
1 year ago

Sorry to rain on your parade, but the Midwest won’t be that white in a generation or two. Whites only account for ~70% of births in many Midwest states, including Minnesota, Kansas, Indiana, Michigan and Ohio. Some, like Illinois are even lower.

Besides, what makes you think that the most cuck whites in the country will be in favor of blowing apart the United States?

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

If Trump pulls off another surprise victory in 2020, and he still might, it would not surprise me to see the secession of several blue states. The left only opposes separatism when we do it, they have never called separatists in Catalonia and Scotland “racist”. Decoupled from bicoastal donors, the Redstan GOP would have Fidesz-level powers and a newly aggressive base. Most victory scenarios for our side depend on leftists jumping the gun.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  DeBeers Diamonds
1 year ago

The trouble is that vote harvesting in a few states like Florida, Georgia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, (California, Colorado, NY, and Illinois are already gone), and it doesn’t matter how the rest of the vote goes. The Senate will be all that will be left to us, and then they will whittle that one down to eliminate the “unfairness”.

Not to be “defeatist”, but trying to face the reality of the situation. Trump snuck up on ‘em last time.

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  Dutch
1 year ago

We’re not yet in a situation where electoral politics can be abandoned. And that time may be a long while, as South African whites are still showing up every 5 years to cast a hitherto meaningless vote for the DA Party that turns around and blasts them for their privilege. Are we ready to be Cortez burning the ships?

Whitney
Member
1 year ago

Oh yeah one other thing. Atlas Shrugged is softcore p***. That was definitely one of the reasons I read it three times before I was 20

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Whitney
1 year ago

As a teenager, I heard lots of good things about Rand. When I started reading the Fountainhead, I expected to be swept away by its undeniable truth. Then I hit the rape scene. “Wait, this guy is the hero?” How can a rapist be the hero?

(Much later I would see that Ayn revealed a side of female nature to which I was blind.)

Whitney
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 year ago

Yes she did 🙂

Felix_Krull
Member
Reply to  Whitney
1 year ago

And what’s more, it’s pretty progressive stuff, aggressive masochism.

bob sykes
bob sykes
1 year ago

It needs repeating that The Enlightenment was an Eighteenth Century phenomenon, and that it was replaced, especially on the Continent, by the Romantic Movement of the Nineteenth Century. The Romantic Movement explicitly rejected the Enlightenment ideals of individualism, reason and science and embraced feeling, intuition and oceanic submergence in a greater whole. All leftist movements are Romantic, and the prevailing political ideology of the West is today Romantic. Realization of that fact, and of the fact that the Enlightenment is a dead letter, is necessary to effectively oppose the leftist horror that is coming. The Antifas thugs in Portland and… Read more »

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  bob sykes
1 year ago

Modern art and architecture are the decadent remnants of the spent force we called “leftistm”. They are the last gasp of Romanticism.

Dupont Circle
Dupont Circle
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 year ago

Modern art and architecture were rejected by the communists. They pushed Social Realism. Operas about tractors and peasants like Khachaturian’s Gayne.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  bob sykes
1 year ago

Portlandia is of course just Berkeley with trees..Antifa is a white/Jewish movement, basically just Bolsheviks, that has not gained any traction in minority areas, and would be very foolish to confront blacks or hispanics…

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  pyrrhus
1 year ago

In their own words, An-coms say they tell Blacks/Hispanics not to join because they fear their pets would get criminal records. The claim is that white/Jewish rioters are privileged to afford lawyers (National Lawyers Guild) that help them beat the charges.

As a propaganda point, “I’m a good white person and thereby oppose white identity politics” is a better sell than “I’m black and want to tear down white supremeists”

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  bob sykes
1 year ago

Bob S;
I’d say Romanticism hooked up with the Enlightenment at a wine bar in Germany and spawned Marxism. Don’t forget that Marx was the proud producer of *Scientific Socialism* as a corrective for earlier failed (because unscientific) experiments in Communism aka communal living by various sects. Or so he thought.

Also, it’s not hard to make the case that Rousseau, who considered himself part of the enlightenment, is one of the fathers of both Romanticism and Marxism.

Point being, *both* should be rejected for their respective roles in leading to the current lunacy.

jaqship
jaqship
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

Indeed, Rousseau, considered himself part of the Enlightenment, but Allan Bloom (in his famous book “The Closing….”) stressed that Rousseau was a *”heretic”* (from the Enlightenment), and was thus a decisive mover in the West’s history, largely for his spurring of Marxism etc.

Insofar as the Enlightenment birthed *capitalism*, the act of also pinning the birth of (its mega-foe) Marxism on it is, to me, rather unfair.

Fabian_Forge
Member
Reply to  jaqship
1 year ago

Yes. Rousseau was a transitional figure from the Enlightenment to Romanticism. But his heresies did intrigue the French Enlightenment figures (Voltaire, Diderot) and some few British (as I recall, Hume) and of course reached full flower in Germany. Luckily the US founders stuck mostly with Locke, Montesquieu, Smith etc. The tug of Rousseau’s heresies was felt mostly by Jefferson who was thank goodness mostly ignored when it came time to design the post revolution government. Thus the US didn’t go Full Continental until He Who Must Not Be Named drove the most energetic of the 20th Century post Enlightenment thinkers… Read more »

Dupont Circle
Dupont Circle
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

“I’d say Romanticism hooked up with the Enlightenment at a wine bar in Germany” Pretty close. Lenin hung out in Zurich near the first Dada venue called Cabaret Voltaire. Were dadaists socialists? Lenin, who hung out at a place next to Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, never gave them any commissions after the revolution. I get the feeling he didn’t like Naum Gabo very much. Certain German expressionists such as Emil Nolde were originally accepted by Goebbels and Alois Schardt, director of the Nationalgalerie in Berlin. But Hitler, in 1934, made it clear that “medievalist expressionism” was out. This, even after Nolde,… Read more »

Dupont Circle
Dupont Circle
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

“Also, it’s not hard to make the case that Rousseau, who considered himself part of the enlightenment, is one of the fathers of both Romanticism and Marxism.”

Expressionism is considered to be a reaction to Dada, and therefore Romantic, i.e., both individualist and anti-tradition but one super intellectual snob and the other angst-ridden and prole.

jaqship
jaqship
Reply to  bob sykes
1 year ago

bob, a really good start!
When you say that “the Enlightenment is a dead letter”, do you mean this in a philosophical sense, or only in a Realpolitik sense?
I’d consider a dropping of the philosophical achievements of the Enlightenment (of, say, Machiavelli, Newton, or Montesquieu) to be quite a mistake, until their insights can be incorporated into the utterly necessary challenge to Romanticism.

Dupont Circle
Dupont Circle
Reply to  bob sykes
1 year ago

“All leftist movements are Romantic”

So are anti-romantic like Dada. Dadaism is basically emptiness and irony. It is the dominant modernist movement today with Marcel Duchamp as the patron saint.

Were the Nazarenes leftist?

Dupont Circle
Dupont Circle
Reply to  bob sykes
1 year ago

“The Romantic Movement explicitly rejected the Enlightenment ideals of individualism, reason and science and embraced feeling, intuition and oceanic submergence in a greater whole.”

The Enlightenment created Frankenstein! Mary Shelley’s mother is considered to be the first feminist.

Teapartydoc
Member
Reply to  Dupont Circle
1 year ago

Shelley and his wife were romanticists.

Dupont Circle
Dupont Circle
Reply to  Teapartydoc
1 year ago

True, but Mary Shelley’s mother Mary Wollstonecraft wrote the first feminist manifesto, The Vindication of the Rights of Woman, in 1793.

https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/wollstonecraft/

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
1 year ago

I think you may be misinterpreting the phenomenon we are seeing at the NRO Mr. Z. It’s the same thing going on at all the mainstream media outlets. In order to boost diving readership and ratings, ALL the mass media platforms, left and right – have been reduced to trolling their own readership to manufacture controversy. It works too: You read some inflammatory idiocy on the NRO, post a link on one of the most popular blog sites on the net, and all your loyal fans (including Yours Truly) – dutifully hie thee hence over to the NRO to see… Read more »

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

At it’s root, “common sense” is really just ancient wisdom that is passed from generation to generation. That tradition added to the robustness of the species and therefore was a net benefit to all. But now, our macro social forces are proactively killing off common sense as if it was a disease, and we are all worse off because of it.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

The naive white guy assumption is that different people will work together for their common benefit, given a chance. We have all been naive white guys at some point. I got over it.

roo_ster
Member
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

Too clever by half.

Kodos
Kodos
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

Agreed on the whole clickbait thing. Sometimes I have to step back and remind myself of this, as it is easy to get caught up in the adrenaline rush of the daily doses of outrage. This takedown of Rod Dreher comes to mind. https://www.takimag.com/article/the_roof_korean_option_a_response_to_rod_dreher_jesse_russell/ A choice quote from this: “Dreher spends his columns (often filled with more copy-and-pasted writings of other people than his own thoughts) taking his readers on an interminable emotional roller coaster back and forth between white guilt and pride in “the Western tradition” (depending on the week). Like a therapist who profits from his patients never… Read more »

ExPraliteMonk
ExPraliteMonk
Reply to  Kodos
1 year ago

Rod Dreher is National Public Radio’s idea of what a christian looks like.

Pinochet
Pinochet
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

You decry what you call “cucks” and then literally in the next sentence promote cuckservatism: “I have no problem with what queers do in their bedrooms” (I’m OK with degeneracy and moral relativism). “I have no problem with competent intelligent women in the workplace” (I’m OK with feminism, just don’t let it go too far.) “Ditto for blacks and minoritiies.” (I’m OK with losing the country my ancestors fought for.) This is an excellent piece by Z because it makes clear that the new thing that is needed to replace conservatism must have at its core, an uncompromising stance towards… Read more »

Epaminondas
Member
1 year ago

The Curse of Lincoln continues to dog the footsteps of Northern Conservatism. They just can’t shake his baleful influence.

Chaotic Neutral
Chaotic Neutral
1 year ago

I think the Alternative Right has a satisfactory intellectual foundation—more satisfactory than any of the others that you mention—Marxism, conservatism, libertarianism, this ism that ism, ism ism ip! The foundation is simply that race is real and that the USA is a country founded by and for persons of white euaropean descent, and moreover that we are the only ones capable of sustaining and advancing western civilization. What is the difference between alternative right and white nationalism, that is a good question for analysis, but I would say that alternative right is less extreme in that it allows for the… Read more »

Chaotic Neutral
Chaotic Neutral
Reply to  Chaotic Neutral
1 year ago

I mean, the foundations are simple, common sense, so they don’t require large volumes and arcane language to expound. Political ideologies such as you discuss are complex smoke screens and misdirections, possible compromises of opportunity, which veil simple, primal interests. For example, with neoconservatism: if you agree to attack the Middle East, maintain virtual open borders, we will support your bid for low taxes on the wealthy, less affirmative action, and rhetoric against gay marriage and abortion. This could be seen as a compromise of opportunity between the old Anglo elite, your bushes and Cheneys, with the new Jewish elite.… Read more »

Bruno the Arrogant
Bruno the Arrogant
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

The alt-right was the movement it needed to be, when it needed to be it. It may have been clumsy and excessive, but it finally put white identity politics in the Overton window and on the map. While the alt-right as a movement appears moribund, the zeitgeist that spawned it seems to be growing in leaps and bounds. I hear things spoken routinely that no one would have had the balls to say five years ago, including from the President of the United States himself. The alt-right may be over, but I’m not sure I’d call it a failure. It… Read more »

Carrie
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I’m not so sure the term ‘alt right’ is totally entwined with Spencer, at least from where I stand. When I explain the concept of alt / dissident right to friends overseas or other non-red-pilled who are willing to shut up long enough to listen, I refer to myself alternately as either alt or dissident right (depending on how I am feeling that day). For me, it’s a definition that refers to “Right” but outside of the mainstream box of the R – D framework. Maybe I’m using it “wrong,” but it seems the best definition still, today, for what… Read more »

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I recently heard Richard Spencer supporting a universal basic income on JF Gariepy’s “the Public Space” show. He also regularly brings up the economic issues that Ocasio-Cortez talks about, thinking that the “alt-right” needs to make these issues part of the platform in order to appeal to young people. These are interesting topics to debate, but I’m at the point where I don’t know if Spencer is serious or if he’s just being provocative.

Lance_E
Member
Reply to  Wolf Barney
1 year ago

A stated goal to appeal to the youth in a democratic system is one of the surest signs of a political amateur. It’s all the proof we need that Spencer isn’t serious. He might believe that he’s serious, but he’s just putting a racial spin on Conservatism Inc.’s failed strategy of appeasement.

Severian
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Might the lesson simply be that Spencer is a bad politician? Coherent sets of ideas are the first to go when politicians have their first taste of success. Lenin and Mao got movements named after them, but for all the formidable technobabble they both boil down to “do what you have to to sell your movement to the rubes; retcon it with The Scriptures afterwards.” This is why I think Trump is doomed to fail — there’s Trump, but there’s no “Trumpism.” He doesn’t need to go write a manifesto (though it couldn’t hurt), but he absolutely has to get… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

To me, that’s the crux. There’s no home base for Whites who wish to stand up for their people, even if that simply means demanding that Whites not be persecuted. If you speak out, you can lose your job, career, friends and, possibly, family. What Whites need is a network of other Whites to back you up if you get fired for opposing immigration or supporting freedom of association. We need businessmen who will hire the fired executive. We need think tanks that will hire academics banished from universities for speaking the truth. We need media outlets to hire writers.… Read more »

Primi Pilus
Primi Pilus
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

Paragraph 5 ….. YES!!!!!

Gravity Denier
Gravity Denier
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

Citizen … ,

Yes. We need to be talking up and performing the kinds of specific, practical actions that you describe. Never mind the sterile ideological manifestos and theorizing.

If the dissident right can “move from the Internet to the real world” it won’t matter what the movement is called and the quest for genuine leaders (as opposed to media “personalities”) will get a jolt of energy.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Gravity Denier
1 year ago

Whites continue to believe that the overall society is “their” society. We’re all Americans, right? Wrong. We are now just one group among many. We need to create a White community within the larger society. No need to wait for a revolution or financial collapse. This is something that we can do now. (Btw, if civil unrest or a financial collapse ever happened, having an already formed White community would be hugely helpful. If they don’t happen, we’d still be on our way to carving out our own spot in whatever the United States is heading toward.) But it’s going… Read more »

Lance_E
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

There’s no “home base for Whites who wish to stand up for their people” because “Whites” aren’t a monolith and conflating race with ideology always fails. WN 1.0 is retarded. Racial imperialism is retarded.

Whites aren’t unified. A solid 45% of white people and more than half of single white women reliably vote for the left. It’s an interesting piece of statistical trivia that white Americans are the only group with a right-leaning majority, but that information is utterly useless in America right now.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Lance_E
1 year ago

I agree with what you say. Indeed, “Whites” may be too broad a category. But you have to start somewhere. Start pushing for groups that will look out for Whites and see where that leads. Regardless, if Whites somehow survive that period of history, the herd will have been severely culled. I wouldn’t be surprised if half of Whites disappear through not having kids or breeding with other groups. Fine. As HBD Chick points out, odds are pretty good that NW Europeans had a lot of their clannishness bred out of them. That worked for a while, but it’s a… Read more »

Lance E
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

Neither “whites” nor hyphenated-whites is a useful foundation on which to build a movement or nation. Most of the people who advocate for this do so knowing full well that they aren’t part of the posterity that the early English and Dutch settlers were talking about. They want to invent a tribe that still includes them but not the coloreds and Jews they hate. That’s why white nationalism can’t succeed; it’s not identitarian, merely exclusionary. It defines itself not by what it is, but by what it isn’t. That’s the same reason Progressivism is fracturing. An identity based *only* on… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Lance E
1 year ago

Your observations are spot on. Nevertheless, I am a white nationalist and here’s why:

First, a racial identity can be imposed by an enemy. For example, blacks in the USA, no matter which parts of Africa they descended from or how mixed they are, identify as a group because of slavery. Similarly, the disparate white groups will be forged into a group by the accusation of “white privilege.”

Second, a white ethnostate is not bound to accept the whites who reject white identity.

Outis
Outis
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

We could simply choose to relocate. Eastern Europe is looking mighty promising.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Outis
1 year ago

That’s another option. Like most people, I’ve narrowed it down to Eastern Europe or the Derb-inspired Uruguay.

Severian
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Social media does that, doesn’t it? People mistake upvotes and retweets for goods in themselves (the same way the Left mistook “kids reading our webpage” for “kids voting for us” back in the early Aughts). An effective leader has to be more or less an attention whore — he just needs to *do something* with that attention, other than “buy my products.”

Neal Madison
Neal Madison
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

If Trump had a party of Trumpism with loyalists in the military then a coup could be feasible. His Levers of Power speech on the campaign run in Palm Beach, Florida nearly made me a true believer myself. It really seemed like he knew that he was a strong man prepared to take down the corrupt powers that be. If he would have pivoted from those anti-globalist speeches and had a party to take power I’d be the first one to run for my rifle and drive to DC to hang traitors. I’d even have a few extra rifles for… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

Trumpism is the traditional Republican platform, but with border enforcement and fighting back hard against the media. Trump has moved the Overton window by showing Republicans they don’t have to fear a brown backlash or the NY Times. If Romney had used this approach, and meant it, he probably would have won. My depression is that the Republican party will not learn this lesson, and will revert to the same open borders, chamber of commerce, fear of the media pussies they have been since Reagan. Thinking back to the history of Bush, Dole, Bush 2.0, McCain, Romney and imagining more… Read more »

Severian
Reply to  DLS
1 year ago

There it is. Hillary Clinton ran an absolutely terrible campaign in all ways but one: “I’m With Her.” You need an actual personality to build a Cult of Personality, but had it been anyone other than Hillary, that slogan was a killer. Why doesn’t the GOP do any of this? Why doesn’t Trump? “Make America Great Again” was good for the campaign, but to establish “Trumpism” (or just old school Republicanism), you need something personal. What would “I’m With Him” even mean? That’s a serious messaging problem.. “Because he drives the Left nuts” is a great reason for me to… Read more »

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Anybody who advocates for universal basic income is #1) a moron, and #2) a leftist. I haven’t really followed Richard Spencer much – but if he is for UBI, that tells me all I need to know about him. As far as I am concerned the Western world got where it is (was?) – because people WORKED. All those fancy buildings, cathedrals, infrastructure – etc – didn’t build itself. And despite the blatherings of BLM and it’s ilk – it wasn’t built by slaves either. It was built by white MEN , who worked their asses off. So much so… Read more »

Felix_Krull
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

The problem with the alt-right is it is not really a philosophy or even a coherent set of ideas.

That is not a bug, that’s a feature. It is why Charlottesville didn’t destroy our movement, we could drop the AR label like a pair of worn-out shoes.

Issac
Issac
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I thought Spencer was fairly easy to read. He is promoting fabianism which is fashionably white elite politics of fifty years ago. His problem is that he is promoting it to the lower classes and he is grossly over-estimating the power of white elites to buck the diaspora status quo. With respect to the alt right, or dissident right even, more generally: idealism is what victors write about to justify their conquest and holdings. If the right in general is still poweless, which they are, it would behoove them not to have a positon on UBI or anything else until… Read more »

Mcleod
Mcleod
1 year ago

Our system of government is broken. It is a mathematical certainty that it will fail. The debt accrued due to universal suffrage will come due and either the world will face hyperinflation or default. Either one of the options requires a hard reset. Can we have our revolution before the collapse? It’s possible I suppose, but I’d call it extremely unlikely. The “right”, “alt right” or whatever you want to call them needs to position themselves for what comes next and not get too caught up in the vain hope of fixing what is. What do the Brits call it?… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

We are a nation of “dindus” and “gimmes” now. Obama blew that cover. Our best option is to let the rest of it take itself down, and then pick up the pieces in the right way.

TomA
TomA
1 year ago

Every living thing evolves over time, including the macro manifestations of social behavior (culture, politics, economic systems, etc.). Eventually, what persists is what works best in a particular environment, and changing environments motivate changing evolutionary patterns. Today, our dominant environment of affluence and excessive abundance is motivating an evolution toward parasitism and its handmaiden, the extinction of fitness selection. Instead of purging the outliers of the species, we are festering in the cancer of their unbridled growth. That is the underlying phenomenon that is killing us, not a failure of political doctrine.

Red Forman
Red Forman
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

It’s a spiritual problem, at the very core. I know that there is sometimes some friction between the Christian and non-Christian in “our thing.” This is one of those issues that materialism comes up short on, but we have an answer. Failure to reproduce is both rebellion and judgement.

Chaotic Neutral
Chaotic Neutral
Reply to  Red Forman
1 year ago

Right, it has to do with purpose of existence, as in the Huxley dystopia yesterday. Religion provides a purpose to life, once you have found the leisure time to contemplate it. When you stare into the meaningless maelstrom, you jump in! Figuratively.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Red Forman
1 year ago

I have been a lifelong practicing Christian and would like nothing better than to pray our way out of this mess, but that’s about as likely as voting our way back to sanity.

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  Red Forman
1 year ago

I agree with Red

Materialism andit’s off-shoot Consumerism are not replacements for a inner life, meaning and sense of community. In fact the former two are societal poisons. And eventually any society that adopts them loses the will to live.

roo_ster
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Red Foreman is right, it is a spiritual, not material problem. No belief in something transcendent and you get maximum hedonism in the here and now and no offspring. Because offspring cost big time money, time, and effort to raise.

If you look at the white sub-populations with high birth rates, almost all are religiously orthodox/fundy/fanatical. They have hope for tomorrow, in the afterlife, and for their children’s children.

Whiskey
Whiskey
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Give women a choice in reproduction and they go Alpha male. Or nothing at all.

Bob
Bob
Reply to  Whiskey
1 year ago

I agree. It’s rather simple: The more “freedom” you give women (or with divorce laws, power) the less they choose to get married or then have kids.
Lower fertility doesn’t correlate so much with wealth as with female independence, which may go with wealth (Japan) or not (Peru).

TomA
TomA
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Well, I spawned three sons, raised them, and put them all through college (at great expense I might add). It’s not too late for you to get started. Trump was making babies well into his 50s.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  TomA
1 year ago

Trump is rich. VERY rich. Tony Randall married a 25 year old woman when he was 75 and had two kids with her when he was 77 and 78 years old. Tony Randall is also quite a bit wealthier than the average person. I am 54 – I just had my first son a week ago. It required medical intervention (on the woman’s side of things – my stuff was tested and worked just fine). Doing it the way I did it was EXPENSIVE. Using people like Trump, Randall – or even me as examples – is ludicrous because they… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Congratulations on the child!

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

There also weren’t billions of people on planet Earth and most of the population wasn’t urban , its 80% in the US and growing The US in say 1920 the last time population was really growing other than the baby boom bubble was 100 million, less than 1/3 the population and it was almost entirely in small towns or rural areas Humans like every other animal has a physical and a social carrying capacity and the higher IQ specimens have for the most part exceeded theirs Its healthy and natural for the population to decline and when the numbers are… Read more »

John Pate
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Demographics don’t lie, this is the issue, all else is just sound and fury signifying nothing. My hypothesis is that it’s a failure of white males on so many levels in that they failed to maintain control of women. Women have to be excluded from the workforce and put back into the home having babies and raising children. Until you figure out how to make that happen you’re putting the cart before the horse. Some countries that are majority white have started to make attempts to address that issue and, if they succeed, the rest will follow for them. These… Read more »

A.B. Prosper
A.B. Prosper
Reply to  John Pate
1 year ago

I must politely disagree that its a spiritual malaise in that with a population of a a quarter billion Whites in the US alone we in no way shape or form need more. We need less of them and a change of leadership but allowing population to decline at a natural pace is a good thing The human population will come down one way or another, there is not going to be an escape velocity not a colonial effort. We have overshot our physical carrying capacity In the end if we allow population to decline while keep a homogeneous population… Read more »

Toddy Cat
Toddy Cat
1 year ago

It should also never be forgotten that Buckley Conservatism was, overwhelmingly, fixated on the idea of opposing the USSR and its frightening expansionism. Domestic issues were never more than a distraction – for example, both Barry Goldwater and WFB opposed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, but pretty much abandonded this opposition when the Commies started to score propaganda points with it. Buckley Conservatism had a good reason for being, but it lost it after 1991, and NR should have just declared victory and gone home, leaving the field free for a new kind of conservatism to arise, more in… Read more »

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Toddy Cat
1 year ago

“It should also never be forgotten that Buckley Conservatism was, overwhelmingly, fixated on the idea of opposing the USSR and its frightening expansionism.”

Thanks for the laugh. Buckley was a CIA tool, a believer in big government and the expansion of the American Empire.

Which came first, the Warsaw Pact or NATO?

If you were frightened by “frightening expansionism” your fears were directed at the wrong target. By means of CIA operations like Mockingbird.

Toddy Cat
Toddy Cat
Reply to  bilejones
1 year ago

You’re wrong. Buckley was a tool, CIA or otherwise, but Communism was and is a muderous expansionist philosophy. Some things are true, even though Buckley said them. The attempt to whitewash communism by some on the Alt-Right, just because the US was expansionsit as well, never ceases to amaze me.

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  Toddy Cat
1 year ago

The US foreign policy establishment spent the first half of the Cold War more concerned with dismantling European colonialism than containing the USSR. A futile propaganda effort for the “hearts and minds” of Third World intellectuals. We’d have been better off telling Nehru and Gandhi to take their chances with Communism, since they hated European Christians so much.

bilejones
Member
1 year ago

I’m surprised that you didn’t pick up the obvious parallel- Conservatives bear the same relationship to Liberals as Blacks do to Whites: They just follow them around.

tz1
Member
1 year ago

There was the other side of the problem, there was no “The Conservative case for a large, nuclear family”. Or “for not disrupting stable small towns”. I see complaints that small town newspapers are either disappearing or are just being run by very remote hedge funds so aren’t responsive to anything but profit. But somehow unlike factory workers or coal miners, no one is telling them they need U-Haul. (I’m waiting for NR to either become the captive toady of someone like the Koch brothers, like Cato is, or disappears). NR and Conservatism Inc benefited for a while from the… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
1 year ago

I read through the comments on the 2017 Pinochet post referenced at the end of yesterday’s thread. I had such optimism! The midterms solved that. The Trump/Maga thing is not a sea change, for us it is the Tiananmen Square, stretched out. Trump is going for some tariffs, tax cuts, and a border wall, all of which will be quickly reversed in a few years. Net result, zero. Vote harvesting will see to that. Like Obama’s followers, who read much more into him than was actually there, some of us, including me, have done the same with Trump. Mea culpa.… Read more »

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Dutch
1 year ago

Angelo Codevilla talks about the exact nature of what we face in this great short interview by (gasp! Horror!) Lew Rockwell.

https://www.lewrockwell.com/podcast/come-the-revolution/

Codevilla is the author of, among other things,

“The Ruling Class: How They Corrupted America and What We Can Do About It”

https://www.amazon.com/Ruling-Class-Corrupted-America-About/dp/0825305586

Nathan
Nathan
1 year ago

RL Dabney on Northern conservatism, for those who missed it:
https://www.counter-currents.com/2012/11/robert-lewis-dabney-on-conservatism/

Member
Reply to  Nathan
1 year ago

One of the most prophetic political quotes ever uttered by man.

Member
1 year ago

There is an enormous gulf between what my neighbors here in a deep, deep red corner of already deep red Indiana think conservatism is versus what our “leaders” think conservatism is. If you ask them what it means to be conservative, you will get a long list of talking points (pro-life, traditional marriage, smaller government, etc.). How many of the pundits and politicians that we call “conservative” hold any of the same positions that they do? For many years we assumed peopled like Bill Kristol, Glenn Beck and Jonah Goldberg were supposed to be on our side but in reality… Read more »

Member
1 year ago

Now we can see what ”Conservatism” has been trying to conserve all these years. They are conserving GloboHomo.

DeBeers Diamonds
DeBeers Diamonds
Reply to  Isaac_Bickerstaff
1 year ago

Most conservative voters are rather insular by nature, rarely taking interest in the problems of the outside world. While condemned as boorish by our cosmopolitan overclass, I don’t see what is wrong with “staying in your lane”. So the Middle American voter has to be suckered into NATO and the endless wars, told they are unpatriotic if they think otherwise. This is what Buckley post-war conservatism sees as its role. Stopping the Right from returning to its natural isolationism.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  DeBeers Diamonds
1 year ago

I absolutely hate it when people use the word “isolationism”. It’s been used over and over again by the lefties and the people on the right who just can’t seem to get it thru their thick constant sticking their noses into everybody else’s business heads – that minding your own goddamn business is not “isolationism”. To a person that feels it’s their purpose in life to rule over and tell everybody else what to do – apparently NOT being that kind of person is “isolationism”. If the right is going to make any progress – it’s time to start calling… Read more »

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  Isaac_Bickerstaff
1 year ago

In a nutshel yes. The fact is “Conservatism” never conserved anything. It was at best a front for rapacious corporations to ass rape the country and people while convincing people it was for the common good and progress,

House of Pancakes
House of Pancakes
1 year ago

We’re living in a period of extreme crisis, where ideology is irrelevant, because the only important question is a biological one. The White race is on the brink of extinction, at the point of being snuffed out and exterminated by the mudslide and its (((gleeful enablers))). If this extinction is not prevented and reversed, nothing else matters. The only thing conservatives need to conserve, and I do mean the ONLY thing, is the White nations. How this comes about doesn’t really matter, so long as the effort is successful.

Nick
Nick
1 year ago

This hilarious takedown of Ayn Rand at the New Yorker still makes me laugh. https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.newyorker.com/humor/daily-shouts/ayn-rand-reviews-childrens-movies/amp
Her review of Willy Wonka and the chocolate factory is the best. And yes the people at national review can now be charicatured just as easily.

Guest
Guest
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

Amerika has become a freak show. I wouldn’t know which side to root for in the remake of Red Dawn.

Otto
Otto
1 year ago

The first step toward a break is identity politics. It’s already dogma for the neoliberals, depending on whose identity. We can see the effectiveness by the hysteria when identity is claimed by the “wrong” group.

Start with identity and everything follows: culture, politics, and economics.

The beginning of the argument is simple. I refuse to apologize for being white.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Otto
1 year ago

The problem is convincing the Trump-supporting people that we (whites) have to embrace identity politics. I really don’t think the vast majority of them have been presented with our solid argument that “all other ethnic groups play it, and will crush the whites due to demographic force if whites don’t play it.” Instead they’re listening to guys like Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, Charlie Kirk, Dinesh D’Souza, Tomi Lahren, etc. all denounce identity politics, and push feel-good color-blind MLK crap. Because our argument is so good, I don’t think it’s that difficult to convert these good-intentioned patriotic MAGA folks. The difficulty… Read more »

Tim
Tim
Member
Reply to  Otto
1 year ago

Identity Europa looks pretty interesting, and soundly based i.e. not crazy. I’m thinking of sending them some money.

Nathan
Nathan
1 year ago

I like the term “neoliberalism” to describe our current bipartisan ruling regime, but I’ve struggled to describe it. I think I have a good conceptualization after reading this post. Make a Venn diagram, one circle for Mittens Rmoney and one for Hillary Rotherham Klinton. Wherever they overlap, there is your neoliberalism: open borders; free trade; bankster capitalism; blind support for Israel; subversion, prison, or wars for any who resist Globo-gayplex. From a distance, it appears as one solid circle. On closer inspection you find trifling issues which really aren’t that important. That’s where you find our Tweedle-Dee/Tweedle Dum political debates.… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

How about Ethno-conservatism

Lance_E
Member
1 year ago

Pre-enlightenment is the new post-enlightenment.

Chambers was quite the visionary – he saw all of this coming long before his contemporaries. But the farther back you go, the more people you’ll find who knew the score. Filmer and Carlyle are good places to start for literate people who want to break from the intellectual prison of Locke and Mill.

Whitney
Member
1 year ago

The Whittaker Chambers review of Atlas Shrugged with fantastic. Good link

Paul Bonneau
1 year ago

“While it will never reach the point where all opinion is assimilated, the allowable differences are now so small they cannot be seen by the naked eye.” Scratching my head on this one. Normally, if allowable differences become very small, then non-allowable differences become numerous, large, and, well, diverse. Exactly the kind of place where a new paradigm can appear. But maybe that is what you are saying (in the following paragraph). I don’t know about equating libertarianism with Rand’s objectivism. Didn’t she herself deny that? I suppose objectivism might be considered the cartoon version of libertarianism… Anyway, what is… Read more »

Issac
Issac
1 year ago

In all likelihood the only major challenge to neoliberalism, in a decade’s time, will be some new mutation of Leninism. Corbyn is the obvious example from the UK. Whites that survive will have to mimic the diaspora, and the first behavior of the mimic will have to be turning a savage new population against the existing managerial class.

Drake
Drake
1 year ago

Nothing to disagree with here but I think it a waste of time to talk about what “conservatives” believe. Since Hoover there haven’t enough of them who weren’t complete liars to matter. Maybe the slobbering over HW has me in this mood. The full quote from HW Bush’s famous campaign speech: “The truth is, this election is about the beliefs we share, the values we honor, the principles we hold dear…. I’m the one who won’t raise taxes. My opponent now says he’ll raise them as a last resort, or a third resort. When a politician talks like that, you… Read more »

Sparky
Sparky
1 year ago

YANKEE conservatism – – check out a great read
Amazon.com: The Yankee Problem: An American Dilemma (The …

Cerulean
Cerulean
1 year ago

Almost all let’s-imagine-a-perfect-society projects start with a list of axioms or postulates. “We hold these truths to be self-evident…” The usual thinking is that any person of good will would accept the axioms, because they are self evident. That’s probably more a definition of what one means by good will than it is of anything else. The usual assumption is that all the good outcomes one could hope for would necessarily tumble out of these axioms when they are mixed together, just as everything we do in geometry comes from a handful of statements we don’t bother to try to… Read more »

Frip
Member
1 year ago

Commenter: “Make a Venn diagram, one circle for Mittens Rmoney and one for Hillary Rotherham Klinton.”

Why do people here like to skew names? It’s so pervasive that it’s starting to freak me out a little. It really requires an explanation. Is it something to do with older, left-brained men? You guys find it endlessly humorous.

Nathan
Nathan
Reply to  Frip
1 year ago

It’s called mocking your enemies, drip.

billrla
Member
Reply to  Nathan
1 year ago

Nathan: Now, that was a good one.

The Old Guide
The Old Guide
1 year ago

The words, liberty, freedom and constitution do not appear in this drivel.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  The Old Guide
1 year ago

Because those ideas have proven to be entirely inadequate for the challenges we face. Liberty, freedom, and constitutional government are desirable, but they are the outgrowth of white civilization, not the cause of civilizational success. They are impotent in the multiracial present.

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KAB
KAB
1 year ago

White man’s burden?
Maybe we are destined to be John Wayne (Searchers, Yellow Ribbon, Green Berets).
The embattled hero.

Haxo Angmark
1 year ago

“…and maybe even outside the Enlightenment.”

no “maybe”.

Jews, both Red Tikkun Olas and Zio-neoconz, better hope Israhell is still on the map when push comes to shove. Otherwise,

I fear for their future.

Frip
Member
Reply to  Haxo Angmark
1 year ago

Israhell? This is getting ridiculous.

Abelard Lindsey
Abelard Lindsey
1 year ago

What exactly is meant by the term “neoliberalism”? The people I’ve asked about this to say its not a rigorously defined term.

Felix_Krull
Member
Reply to  Abelard Lindsey
1 year ago

It’s basically neocons without the wars, the cronyism and the messianic tone. Anti-commie globalists.

Slab Bulkhead
Slab Bulkhead
1 year ago

The failure of the Alt-Right has to be kept in perspective The Alt-Right was mostly a meta-political movement, that aimed to change the culture. Nobody believed that Richard Spencer was going to become an elected official. The culture… of certain segments of the population has changed quite a bit, to where we are seeing White Nationalist topics being discussed on many conservative sites that did not previously discuss them. That’s not entirely due to the “Alt-Right” and it’s certainly not something that E-celebs directly accomplished themselves. But the Alt-Right as a broad unorganized current probably helped. The reason things are… Read more »

Member
1 year ago

With the possible exception of VDH, all of the male writers for National Review are not just cucks. They are gimps ala Pulp Fiction.

KAB
KAB
1 year ago

White Man’s Burden II

I forgot to mention John Wayne in The Alamo.
Hey! At least the Mexican women are Christians, can cook, have big tits.

Jonah Kyle
Jonah Kyle
1 year ago

No conservative philosophy will ever see a pragmatic chance in hell at being implemented in the Democratic globalists institutionalize their oppression by taking over the presidency, senate, and house in the next couple election cycles. Once that happens, the game is over, and conservatives will be prohibited from even discussing it online without being hit with the coming social credit scores aka China.

David Davenport
David Davenport
1 year ago

Z man, I’m sure you have heard the long standing rumor that the CIA funded the start-up of *National Review* in 1956. The CIA wanted to create a “respectable” conservative alternative to the John Birch Society. The J. B. Society was roughly and sort of the Alt Right of the1950’s and ’60’s. Furthermore, the go-between between the CIA and young Bill Buckley is said to have been James Burnham. Burnham’s book, *The Managerial Revolution* is almost a Bible of the Imperial American Big Government-Big Business complex. James Burnham was an American philosopher and political theorist. Burnham was a prominent Trotskyist… Read more »

David Davenport
David Davenport
Reply to  David Davenport
1 year ago

And this, from tonight’s Steve Sailer blog: “Franz says: December 3, 2018 at 11:43 am GMT • 100 Words @Hail GV was a total bastard from the Podhoretz’a point of view. As editor of Commentary, Norman P crafted a Vidal hit-piece called “The Hate that Dare Not Speak it’s Name”; smearing GV as an antisemite but Vidal only mentioned the Israel Fifth Column, not Jews as such. Funnier was Vidal’s comments, strewn through his works, about Jewish Power in Hollywood when he was out there. Paddy Chayefsky, of Network fame, treated Gore so rotten that Vidal asked William Wyler what… Read more »