The Compound Eye

Compound eyes, common with insects and crustaceans, are made up of thousands of individual visual receptors, called ommatidia. Each ommatidium is a fully functioning eye in itself. The insect’s “eye” is thousands of ommatidium that together create a broad field of vision. Every ommatidium has its own nerve fiber connecting to the optic nerve, which relays information to the brain. The brain then processes these inputs to create a three-dimensional understanding the surrounding space.

The compound eye is a good way to imagine how the surveillance state will keep tabs on the subjects in the near future. Unlike the dystopian future imagined by science fiction, it will not be one eye focusing on one heretic, following him around as he goes about his business. Instead it will be tens of millions of eyes obtaining various bits of information, sending it back to the data-centers run by Big Tech. That information will be assembled into the broad mosaic that is daily life.

For example, rather than use informants and undercover operatives to flesh out conspiracies against the state, the surveillance state will use community detection to model the network of heretics. Since everyone is hooked into the grid in some fashion and everyone addresses nodes of the grid on a regular basis, keeping track of someone is now something that can be done from a cubicle. There is no need to actually follow someone around as they go about their life.

For example, everyone has a mobile phone. At every point, the phone is tracking its location, which means it is tracking your location. It also knows the time and day when you go into various businesses. Most people use cards to pay miscellaneous items, so just that information would tell the curious a lot about you. Combine that information with the same information from other phones that come into close proximity with your phone and figuring out the community structure is simple.

Of course, the mobile phone is not the only input device. Over Christmas, millions of Americans were encouraged to install surveillance devices in their homes by friends and family. Maybe it was an Alexa listening device from Amazon or a Nest Doorbell surveillance device from Google. All of these gadgets are collecting data on your life inside and around your home. It is then fed to the same data-centers that have all of your movements and associations collected from your phone.

That’s an enormous amount information about the lives of the subjects, but that’s just the start of what they are collecting. Everything about property and property ownership is now kept in those same systems. Tax and earnings information are now shared with the new technological overlords. We know this because Raj Chetty told us so. He gained access to everyone’s tax information from the IRS. Since Big Tech provides the infrastructure to all government operations, they have their data too.

It turns out that the future will not be one big eye searching about for a heretic on which to focus or even thousands of such eyes. Instead, it will be tens of millions of eyes, collecting data, filtering it through a specific lens, and passing it onto massive data-centers controlled by Big Tech. It is there where the focus will narrow, looking for patterns, modeling communities and searching for any anomalies that could indicate unacceptable behavior. Big Brother will be an Indian in a cubicle.

The human eye is attached to muscles that allow it to move, expanding the field of vision and narrow in on specific items of interest. The compound eye is fixed and therefore cannot focus on a single item. It also results in nearsightedness. It is, however, exceptional at detecting motion. The mosaic of infinitesimally small images lets the insect notice the smallest movement around it. This is why flies, for example, are so good at anticipating your effort to swat them.

Big Tech’s compound eye will be similar. It will be adept at tracking movement and capturing data about the environment, but it will not be very good at focusing in on one individual or even a group of individuals. That’s where the brain takes over to interpret the data, looking for the sorts of movement that could present danger. As with insects, the compound eye has evolved for defensive purpose. Hunters need focus, prey need a broad field of vision and pattern matching.

We are seeing the precursors of what will be special teams of agents charged with focusing in on potential trouble. Those “Trust & Safety” squads on social media are the early attempts at this. Algos were created to look for patterns and movement that would then warrant further review. The “focus teams” then look more carefully at individuals inside an identified community. This is how a heretic gets banned from Twitter despite not using the system very much. He was part of an identified community.

In the future, these “Trust & Safety” teams will be dispatched into the real world to infiltrate suspected communities, disrupt social bonding within dissident communities that are forming up and, of course, neutralize genuine threats. That last part is always what the dystopians focus on, but that will be an exceedingly rare occurrence as we move into the custodial state. Technological advance will also bring with it new ways to influence behavior in a myriad of small ways.

Alongside those millions of eyes collecting data will be other nodes that nudge people in the right direction through the power of suggestion, social proof and social bonding. The Chinese social credit system is a crude example of what is to come. A much more subtle version will rely on social influencers, who will be rewarded for encouraging positive behaviors. Social proof and fear of ostracism will confirm the tendency to accept what comes from prominent influencers.

This is already happening in a crude way on social media platforms. They promote those with the right opinions and demote those with the wrong opinions. Since active users seek an audience, inevitably they act in such a way that gets them promoted by the algos running these sites. It is why review sites have abandoned real user reviews in favor of robots. It is a lot easier to push a movie on a movie review site if the “viewer reviews” are actually robots run by the site.

That’s the future that awaits us in the custodial state. It is living under the watchful compound eye that is feeding all of our data into massive data-centers controlled by private companies. Since information is the ultimate currency and controlling the currency makes you sovereign, the official state will simply become another node on the network run by the Big Tech. There will be no recourse. Any effort to revolt will be detected by the compound eye before it gets started.

Note: Some have asked why comments end up in moderation. This is the doings of the spam filter I’m using. It is often triggered by epithets, certain links and mysterious word combinations. These messages get flagged as possible spam. Now, in half a dozen years it has blocked over 3.5 million spam messages, so it is trade-off I accept. It means I check the moderation queue once an hour or so. I approve the real comments and trash the spam. Otherwise, there is no moderation.


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Franciscan
Guest
Franciscan

Thank you once again for distilling into a concise essay what I and many sense is happening all around.

ExNativeSon
Guest
ExNativeSon

In other words you’re saying we are safe accessing and posting on your site???😳

Member

The few sane among us recognised (and ignored) the warning that the opposite is the case,

Penitent Man
Guest
Penitent Man

Pretty stark analysis of the near future. I’d like to say you are being too gloomy but I can’t.

I can only think of a few things that might offer hope.

The techno compound eye requires infrastructure to operate and that means vulnerability.

Information Overseers are human and can be gotten to.

Finally, our betters, that seek to manage us, seem to have no qualms or restraint when it comes to destroying and unpersoning dissenters. Men unmoored and ruined in great numbers have nothing left to lose.

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

If the whites who keep the power grid working ever go on strike, the Custodial State dies right then and there and their brown skinned pets will riot and eat the Cloud People alive in their urban gate communities.

That’s how delicate our system is. People only see it’s facade and never pull back the curtain and look behind to see how it all works or doesn’t.

Except whites are born slaves and will never revolt against their masters.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

RWC there just might be a few reasons why I keep pushing for people to form Communities that are self sustaining…

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

So they can get infiltrated and the members arrested?

Exile
Member
Exile

Meme, having people to help support you and cover your ass can be an asset not just a liability.

Is it somehow easier to raise based kids as an atomized nuclear family with doxxable jobs inside an urban Hive full of Wokies and mystery meats?

Any collective action carries some risk of infiltration or doxxing. That said, without some kind of collective action I don’t see how we can survive, much less gain ground.

Otto vonB
Guest
Otto vonB

Meme, they will have a hard time infiltrating communities composed of families. Biker gangs and all sorts of other clubs can be infiltrated by feds, sure, but infiltrators are not going to to come with their families. It’s the single males or even females you need to watch out for, not the deplorable White families in the self sustaining community.

Member
MossHammer

OvB. You nailed it. Family men, with families, grouping up. We see observable signs of likemindedness. While anecdotle, it’s a start.
>Homeschool
>Christian
>Wife (visually put together) in submissive postures / tone
>Smiling and happy
>Older vehicles

While imperfect I know, that’s where we start…and why we are likely relocating to greater potential density of our people.

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

“whites are born slaves and will never revolt against their masters.”

When you cut your wrists, be sure to cut ALONG the vein and not perpendicular.
——-
But you’re correct about how delicate the system is. And how unaware the majority of Cloud People are.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

It’s quite something isn’t it Brother when you take people’s comments as a whole even just on a single post and you can get a good idea of what they are all about…

Exile
Member
Exile

Speak for yourself, blackpill.

Xman
Guest
Xman

The whites who keep the power grid running need paychecks… and they’re being monitored just like everyone else.

People need to wake the fuck up and realize that they’re living in the Soviet Union, but with football, porn, blacks, and enough food to eat themselves into obesity.

This guy
Guest
This guy

This is an oldie but a goodie addressing this issue. https://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/02/technology/kafkaesque-big-brother-finding-the-right-literary-metaphor-for.html

See also, Brazil.

An almost constantly fallible omniscience is in many ways worse.

Drake
Guest
Drake

The difference is that the government is too incompetent and inefficient to track us very well. Google, Facebook, and the rest will be the ones doing the tracking – with devices we bought from them. The future is strange.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

The future keeps proving that the masses rise to the level of stupidity that their masters expect of them.

The solution is simple: stop doing that.

Lorenzo
Guest
Lorenzo

Not sure about that. The government is better at the things it should not be doing (e.g. illegal surveillance, maladministration of justice and coup fomenting) than the things it should (i.e. border control and anti-trust enforcement).

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

It’s nothing new under the sun. Just using technology to build.

Build what? Community, society, if you’re accepted. A prison if rejected.

Thing is, can it be done if you remove the human element? Maybe if you’re not dealing with humans.

A community of bots talking, snitching, doing business—LARPing, in other words. Sounds familiar. Sounds insane, too. So are insane people competent enough to pull it off? I doubt it. This thing seems destined to founder on the shoals of reality IMO.

Maxwell Demon
Guest
Maxwell Demon

Asssuming you’re correct, and I think you are, the dissident strategy should include the generation of as many false positives as possible, among individuals and communities who have a random distribution of connection or lack of connection to dissidence. The chans, as I understand them, already grasp this in attempts to anathematize things like the rainbow flag and the OK sign. In a world where all things are omens, no oracle can function.

ConservativeFred
Guest
ConservativeFred

Max,

You nailed it. Going completely dark, save for a few transactions associated with every day life, will be a giant red flag. It is best to plant thousands of random data points.

Sandmich
Guest
Sandmich

Yes, and keep in mind this surveillance back-end will be engineered by the finest, cheapest tech engineers the subcontinent can supply.

ExNativeSon
Guest
ExNativeSon

Max: Absolutely.

My VPN, for example; shows me being in Germany at this very moment. While in my previous post I was in Brazil. I travel very fast apparently.

Lorenzo
Guest
Lorenzo

But the compound eye knows you use a VPN and therefore merit more watching by other means.

Drake
Guest
Drake

DON’T bring your phone everywhere – particularly if you are meeting like-minded friends. Park a few blocks away and walk to them, or ride a bike. Pay cash if you meet them for food or drinks…

Exile
Member
Exile

Or bring 3 phones with different IP’s everywhere.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Cashless society is the next big thing. One must avoid it at all levels. Unfortunately, the general awareness is not there. Perhaps never will be there. Whenever I leave the house, it almost always involves a cash transaction. Use credit or debit and the computer records date, time, amount, location and product. Not much more is needed to know everything there is about an individual.

Exile
Member
Exile

Comp, from what I’ve seen of Russia, the cashless society is not going to fly here. Maybe it’s a hangover from the bad old days but at least in St. Petersburg, cash is still preferred to cards. In Scandinavia I barely thought about have kroner on me, used my cards for everything. Here, in Russia’s NYC, a lot of places may take cards but there’s a definite wink-nudge to it, and some are unapologetically cash-only. The hood who drove my cab from Pulkovo to downtown was definitely cash-only, in the “or you ride in the trunk” sense. The only times… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

I would hope we are underneath like the Germans—cash lovers. But then, there are their neighbors to the North, Sweden—95% cashless. Sigh. Anyway, l see the younger set using cards for $2 transactions. EBT’s used in Dollar Stores. CC in grocery stores. Are they the future? Because if they are, then grey folk with no such transactions become more noticeable by default. There once was a 500 euro note, now thanks to extreme US pressure, the top denomination is 100 euro’s—ostensibly to fight money laundering by drug cartels. India took it’s largest bills out of circulation a year or two… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

A big hassle here in Russia is big-ass banknotes from the ATM’s. Try breaking a 5000 ruble note (basically a hundy) – anywhere. The look you get – like the Cossacks in the Pale, oy vey.

Just get smaller notes, you say? $10 ATM fees. At bank machines (not all, FWIW).

Member

The most beautiful woman I ever dated I met on Nevsky in front of Dom Knigi (the House of Books).

She was six feet, a buck 25, with blue eyes, albeit with a few forehead pimples.

Exile
Member
Exile

That place is on my list, Mike. I’ve got some time left before Londonistan, I’ll get there.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Yes. I’m a cash guy. Plus it has the added benefit of making it easier to keep a budget and save.

the Russians
Member

I’ve not been thinking on this long but if a group were to each find someone to “buy” cash cards for them, we could then meet and share the cards in a way that ensures I leave the meeting with the same number of cards that are none of the ones I walked in with.
I’m certainly guilty of some bad habits with tech and credit cards but as others have mentioned, it’s time to start with my own false flags, leaving the phone at home, etc…

Hun
Guest
Hun

Don’t forget Bitcoin etc. While BTC may eventually die, the blockchain technology is a totalitarian’s dream.

Member

Good suggestion, but why not leave the phone at your house, or in the barn?

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

OK sign is the GOAT. Can’t believe it still works. They scrambled some deep programming with that one!

Member

Yeah they can keep track of us but they still can’t build roads or buildings or install plumbing. The practical and the spectacular are going to collide at some point. We’re running out of intellectual capital to keep the water on and the robots are not up to snuff

TheLastStand
Guest

Boeing discovered the downside of hiring foreign talent recently.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

There’s an old saying that you get what you pay for. Another reality is that temporary contract labor may not care about the long-term quality of their work. They’re only interested in the paycheck and employment information posted on their resume. At one time, companies liked long-time employees. That’s one reason why they provided pensions. A man who intends to work for a particular company long-term has a vested interest in both the quality of his work and the success of company. He makes friends and helps them. There’s loyalty to the manager. A long-time, permanent employee cares. These temporary… Read more »

Yves Vannes
Member

Since Silicone Alley (if you’ve ever been to the Stanford Shopping Center you’ll know what I mean) started loading up on contract workers through employment firms the quality of the things coming out of there has deteriorated. Their solution to this in recent years has been to replace expensive local contract workers with less expensive replacements (Indians) in larger numbers. After all we’re all the same and thus all replaceable. More engineers and programmers at the same cost will get them across the finish line, or so they assumed. But this has only accelerated the deterioration. Now they don’t know… Read more »

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

The two founders of Google are Jewish men (one born in the USSR), the CEO is an Indian man and the CFO is an English Jewish woman. Rootless cosmopolitans, indeed.

As silly as sounds, ever try to speak to one of these Indians? Some of them are unintelligible. End up needing to communicate via e-mail.

Not an original observation that modern-day American corporations typically have short-term thinking. I don’t think that they have thought the situation through.

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

“Indians have become so numerous in some companies that they now control who gets hired and promoted: them.”

Ain’t just Tech. Medicine is heading that way too.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

They’ll only hire those they consider members of their own tribe, competent or not.

Normies don’t realize how tribal non-Whites are.

Isn’t diversity grand?

c matt
Guest
c matt

In the not too distant future, a white employee will sue an Indian run company for employment discrimination, represented by a Pakistani lawyer, before a Jewish judge in front of an Hispanic jury. Good luck with that.

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

I hate to say it, but I’m increasingly having trouble sympathizing with those Whites who still don’t get this.

Member

I used to walk around in the tunnel system of a large city. There are miles and miles of it. All the ethnic groups have different lunch hours, different “tea times”, and mid-afternoon breaks. They are all segregated into their own ethnic enclaves at their several favored restaurants. The only people I meet who pay lip-service to “diversity” are whites who watch too much TV, and university students.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Produce hauling, too- 80% of the fruits and veggies on your plate.

Friday night at the California border looks like a Diwali festival.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

It’s that way with every race except White people of course…Good whites are ensuring the destruction of all whites…

Member

This is why I think Z’s analysis here is a bit flawed. The many eyes of an insect all feed their data, ultimately, into a unified brain. Well, yes, it’s more complicated than that with many “sub-brains” often doing pre-processing along the way but all, ultimately, working toward the survival of the organism. The elite’s greed and fetish for outsourcing, insourcing, and every-which-way-sourcing of absolutely everything means that the sub-brains which intercept and process the data streaming in from the billions of eyes are a patchwork of nationalities and ethnic groups united mainly by the desire for a quick buck.… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Top notch, Ris. “At one time, companies liked long-time employees. That’s one reason why they provided pensions.”

Now the interlocking boards, such as McDonnell acquiring Boeing, are only interested in next quarter’s share buyback.

Bells and whistles, like the 737’s unnecessary CWAS system, have replaced secure R&D by Bob and Tom.

The surveillance state will end up selling apps to each other, designed by Pajeet for use by Gundeep.

Member

In my industry, I get lots of calls from recruiters, 90% of them mullet who are used to passing out six-month contracts in Halifax or Albuquerque. Sometimes I innocently say, “That’s 800 miles from my house. I don’t know if I could handle that kind of commute every day.” They say, “Oh, no, you see, you will just move!” Then I tell them that I have family, friends, commitments, familiarity with my city and state, and I can’t just pull up stakes and live in a Motel 6 in Umbonga until the next contract starts. I actually think they are… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

I hear you, but Boeing is a better example of automation allowing for mediocrity. The plane in question is highly automated. The pilot literally starts the engine and after moving onto the runway presses an icon labeled “take off”. The automation system does the rest. 99.9999% percent of the time all goes well. When it doesn’t, a knowledgeable, experienced pilot is needed with immediate hands on correction. American pilots have reported correcting for such failure—obviously, or we’d be cleaning up debris all over the States. Sand people can not master the technology of flying manually to the same level. Hence… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

From what I can tell, Boeing has been trying to introduce a reverse “dead man’s switch”, that will only allow the pilot to override the automated flight by repeated, consistent, specific actions. I think what they are trying to do is foil the “snack bar” pilot induced plane crashes, but they don’t want to talk about that. Because if you look at the plane crashes of the last decade or so, they are almost all either “snack bar” pilot suicides or ground-to-air missiles. The fly in the ointment is that, for foreign carriers that did not buy the optional extras,… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

But does that completely account for the two crashes we have had, if I read you correctly? Perhaps I don’t know what a snack bar pilot is—a poorly trained pilot? One crash, I read, recorded the pilots frantically looking through an instruction manual for procedure to correct failure. There was an interview I saw with an American pilot who claimed to have encountered the same failure and corrected manually (hands on control of airplane) and he said such a failure was not unknown for this plane and had been encountered by other pilots he knew. In short, he stated one… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

In the two crashes, there appear to be two significant contributing factors. One was that the sole or minimal exterior flight sensors were iced up or otherwise damaged. Little or no redundancy there meant that the flight was screwed up to begin with by the automated system. Domestic 737 Max planes get many more redundant sensors, so this kind of equipment failure is minimized. The second element is pilot training. The automated flight characteristics can be overridden, but only by repeated, specific actions, as the overrides only last for a few seconds unless they are precisely repeated. The pilots need… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

I hesitate to mention it, but oddly enough, two Israeli tech companies had sold such systems to the DoD before 9/11. Those remote control systems could lock out both pilots, and cut off all communications “to prevent false messages.” They enabled auto-piloting of near inhuman maneuvers, such as precision targeting or a U-turn in the sky. That’s like saying somebody could remotely control Micheal Hasting’s car at 104 mph thru red lights and into a tree. We know they can’t until they admitted, well, yes they could. Crazy talk, amirite? I can hardly wait for the Internet of Things- but… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

Dutch wrote:
“One was that the sole or minimal exterior flight sensors were iced up or otherwise damaged. ”

Every pilot knows to turn on the de-icers when there are weather conditions conducive to exterior sensors such as pitot tubes (air-speed measurement devices) getting iced up, or to turn on carbeurator heaters if you’re in a
piston engine (accumulated ice can choke off the carb’s breathing, and kill the engine).

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Compsci, from the cry, “Allah snack bar!”.

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

You do realize the 737 frame was not designed to handle those giant engines and Boeing figured their code monkeys could do their magic to make the plane viable.

But there they sit in Mojave gathering dust because the airlines figured out they were sold a sack of lies by the techies and Boeing management. Otherwise the plane would be hauling passengers by now.

BTW it’s funny, you do realize Boeign outsourced the software upgrades to some Indian company in Bombay. That really should give Americans a idea how much Boeing hates their guts.

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

The problem is the design, Boeing stuffed a giant set of engines on a air frame that wasn’t meant to handle it and it screwed with a host of flight parameters. Something only idiots with no real world experience would do. Boeing was cheep, instead of designing a new airframe to handle it, they cut corners and did a force fit which blew up in their faces. Now if it was just a simple code patch – which it isn’t the MAX would be flying but no airline believes boeing or it’s Hindu code monekys who they hired to fix… Read more »

Member

You reminded me of the practice I had of writing a detailed change procedure for each and every change window handled by Pune. The intent was to hand off operations to them completely. However, if there was the smallest detail that was omitted or if something didn’t happen exactly as expected, they would ditch the change. That pissed off the customer, who paid us a million a month. The India crew were very inflexible and would do nothing outside the project plan. My PM therefore asked me to act as a second set of eyes because she didn’t trust them,… Read more »

the Russians
Member

boeing stock price over the last decade is…staggering

Exile
Member
Exile

Exactly, Whit – that’s the margin I’m talking about occupying. We’re playing for time in an arms race that’s both demographic and intellectual and our enemies are hearing the footsteps of catabolic collapse louder than we hear the march of Big Brown. And yes, those things are related.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Maybe if whites weren’t so in love with tech they’d have more kids. Like the Amish. And then the demographics would fix themselves. We’ve become too intellectual, in other words.

As far as the intellectual side, continuing to live in temperate climates will keep us in shape, as long as we get outside once in a while. All that strategic thinking about a changing environment, etc. Plant a garden, save seeds, commit to growing a lot of food well. It’s amazing how rigorous it is.

Exile
Member
Exile

Painter, I’m a “blood and soil” guy to a great extent myself – tech has its limits, but going Trad-Luddite on tech is taking it too far. We shouldn’t throw away areas of advantage and expertise if we can help it. There are a lot of factors that go into demographic lassitude, not just tech, and the Amish have been experiencing a lot of youth flight just like the Euros have, especially in more trad Visegrad countries. We can keep our screens if we master them instead of letting them master us. What’s on them matters as much as whether… Read more »

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Sure. I just use the Amish as an example because that’s what I know. Not for everybody, myself included, but they definitely have big families because of their lifestyle. The young are changing but I think they’re equipped to realize when they’re going off the edge. Plus the Amish are one of the most successful dissident groups out there. Probably a lot to learn from them. I think tech is an opiate. Has one specific use it’s really good at (labor saving) but if you become dependent it can kill you. So it’s best to only use it when you… Read more »

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

And now that I’m thinking about it, I think the success of the Amish comes down to a couple of things: 1. Tightly-knit, even insular communities. Which they take a little too far (inbreeding), but not by much. Maybe allow for a few trusted outsiders to join. 2. A commitment to productivity and saving that produces remarkably self-reliant and resilient communities. 3. They are in the world but not of it. They aren’t trying to take anyone’s wealth or power, so nobody sees them as a threat. This makes for good will, and people generally leave them alone. And when… Read more »

Penitent Man
Guest
Penitent Man

Following Lind’s proposed route of becoming a neo-luddite is a recipe for having to live under the auspices of a technologically superior state for protection and eventually the mark in a protection racket. Perhaps the trick is to follow a mennonite rather than amish approach. Use of technology solely limited to enhancing or doing actual work. Eschew technology in your daily personal life to live a more wholesome and holistic life. Put your hands in garden soil or to use on physical projects. Limit your electronic entertainment to only the choicest of selections if wanted at all. In your professional… Read more »

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

That’s pretty much my approach, too. I will say about the Mennonites, some of them aren’t rigorous about who they let join, which has led to considerable convergence (as Vox would say) in the more liberal sects.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Exile, I agree that its not a rejection of tech but a mastery. I just think that mastery requires a level of rejection as well. Or at least heavy and constant skepticism. “I am using a tool of my enemies” is more or less how I see it. The gravity of tech in the hindbrain is a real issue. Cocaine is actually a pretty good stimulant. But how does one master the use of coke? Rationalization is a strong force too. Look at all t he people who say they dislike social media. Who ‘never’ or ‘rarely’ use it. But… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Exile, exactly. We need to heed and promote some corrections to this phenomena. For example, I read awhile back that one strong mother restricts cell phones in the home during gatherings, such as Thanksgiving. Everyone must place their phone into a basket upon entering her home. She then puts the basket into a closet. I assume she permits access at an appropriate time of her choosing. Seems extreme, but nothing is sadder than sitting at the Thanksgiving table with almost all the family staring down at their phones, rather than talking and catching up with family members. I’ve been there,… Read more »

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Is it your home Compsci?

Member

From a Christmas card:

“Before everybody tucked in to the wonderful feast of food before them, they each lowered their eyes for a few moments.
After all, they hadn’t checked their phones for nearly five minutes”…

Lawdog
Member

“We can keep our screens if we master them instead of letting them master us.”

A good deal of money and research is going into preventing such self-mastery. You might not be a slave today, but…

And then there are those who fancy themselves masters but are actually complete slaves. Sometimes, addiction erodes your capacity for honest self-reflection. And then you can say sayonara to any possibility of rescuing yourself.

Exile
Member
Exile

Lawdog, it’s like anything else – a man has to learn his own limitations. One-size-fits-all solutions aren’t usually good for human problems. “Avoid all tech” comes with its own ambiguities as to what’s toxic tech vs. “safe” tech. There’s a reasonable medium between Youporn-permissive libertarianism and “no cell phones allowed.” I’m aware of the dopamine sink of Twitter, been there. But that doesn’t mean I have to stay off the internet entirely. Let’s not purity spiral and abandon all modernity b/c some guys can’t handle it.

Lawdog
Member

Never suggested that we abandon all modernity, Exile. I’m pointing to the “I can handle it” mentality people have toward masturbatory pixelpleasure. Yes, there are those technology judiciously. Maybe a game or two after work. This is harmless. However, the influence and scope of pixelpleasure is metastasizing, and there’s no reason to believe it’ll stop. Those who can handle the temptation of today might not be able to rebuff the temptation of tomorrow. Again, I’m not arguing for abstinence. Just caution. Especially in people who inflate their psychological resilience, or who overestimate the role of “free will” on their actions.… Read more »

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Absolutely right Whitney. This abiding faith in technology is nuts.

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

” they can keep track of us but they still can’t build roads or buildings or install plumbing”

Most of our would-be overlords are from a culture that does not work with its hands. Law, finance/banking, academia, government, and Hollywood/Newsmedia are manipulation of SYMBOLS, not creation and maintenance of physical things.

For such people there is a tendency to assume that these things just happen, and therefore to underestimate the importance, difficulty, and complexity of the real, material, world. That goes double for the subset of paranoid, spiteful overlords who have existed for most of history in other people’s civilizations and infrastructure.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

There is a scorn for blue-collar labor among the elite, ignoring the fact that blue-collar trades often pay quite well. I know two men who dropped out of high school, began fixing cars and became wealthy running their own businesses. My Greatest Generation mother once said that if a woman can type and a man fix cars, they’ll always find a job.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Labor keeps you honest, too. Less likely to believe utopian nonsense when you’re getting your hands dirty. In other words idle hands are the devil’s tools. The moral utility of labor gets overlooked.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Short-order cook. I could’ve gone anywhere.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

Hey, you might have eventually risen to owning your own restaurant. Learn the ropes from the bottom.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Yes Ris. We’re given youth to bust our asses so we can be comfortable later on. If you have kids you can put them to work, and they won’t grow up spoiled, won’t despise the workers, won’t get delusional about themselves.

The cloud people lost that. The people emulating the cloud people are losing it, hence the decline. They can’t outcompete the people coming up, so they try the iron fist, and that never works for long.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

A self-made wealthy retired hedgefund manager friend said that wealth ruins children. She didn’t want her kids to endure what she did growing up poor. Nowadays, kids are kept busy with afterschool activities. Mom’s not home or is disinclined to actually be a mom and keep an eye on the kids. They also want to burnish their resume with politically correct activities and jobs before they go to college and then get a job. No working at a fast food joint or shop, mowing lawns, housecleaning or babysitting. The latter two I did back in the Dark Ages of the… Read more »

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Which is why I advocate for our dissident young men to be joining the trades mine in particular because it gives them many options because the pay is so great…

Educated.redneck
Guest
Educated.redneck

Ris, the problem in society is that money and income are no longer a key status indicator. When women have an equal or even primary income earning role in the economy, earning income is no longer outcome-determinative for socio-sexual status heirarchies. A rich blue collar young man might be sitting alone in his own house’s living room instead of his parents’ basement, but he will still be alone. A steady, high-earning job is of importance only after he’s gotten into a stable marriage.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

You’re right about that. A male friend made good money as a mechanic, as well as being a great guy. He made the mistake of attending church in a tony area and the girls scorned him. He would be a good catch to me.

A Jewish friend liked to work with his hands, but family pressure pushed him to go to college and eventually work with computers. He didn’t enjoy it.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

I disagree ED…So many problems come about when the male doesn’t have his career secured before marriage and family…What kind of wife will he get when he still lives at home because he can’t afford to get his own place…The marriage won’t be stable if he isn’t the breadwinner…Who’s going to provide the income for the two of them when the husband either goes to college or trade school…Etc Etc…

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

Traditionally, a man needed the promise of being able to provide for a family before he wed. Not just a wife, but many a baby was born a year after the wedding. During the 1940s-1970s, there were plenty of good, well-paying jobs for a man with a high school diploma, so he could graduate high school, marry his sweetheart, work and within a year be a dad. Great time economically and better socially. Being the man of the house encourages a young man to be responsible and sober. Attending college might be a part of an extended adolescence. A man… Read more »

Member

The virtual is no replacement for the real. Don’t forget that the DMV is running this show. The real trick is to never come under suspicion in the first place. Big Brother is much more effective after the fact. Murderers get caught because they accidentally leave something at the scene which has a lot number on it and you are seen on camera the day that lot was sitting the local walmart buying that very item. The dystopian future will have to survive the bursting of the money bubble. Things that are profitable today might not be profitable with historic… Read more »

Member

Vdare published an article this morning about the need to get rid of affirmative action. It’s getting critical.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

Originally, the idea behind affirmative action was to ban discrimination based on race, creed, color or national origin, and later sex, and encourage members of “disadvantaged” groups to apply for a job. It very quickly led to quotas and lowering standards, whether for the targeted groups only or every applicant. That’s what inevitably happens.

LineInTheSand
Guest
LineInTheSand

I still can’t believe they manipulated us into referring to anti-white discrimination as “affirmative action.” Our enemies are highly skilled in their use of language and narrative.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

And women can vote 🙂

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

AA was the original migrant labor program.

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

This is a big issue. California can’t keep power affordable or sometimes even on and its not the only place. Roads don’t work as roads, food variety and quality is starting to decline and water is being rationed. Oh yeah and it took huge amounts more capital to get a gas leak in an affluent neighborhood fixed also California. The State had to intervene basically They’ll spend all the declining money to keep themselves safe but social friction and costs render it moot. Another example here, the citizens of California made weed legal and in theory will collect revenue and… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

100% of the firefighters in Australia are white. None of the Moroccans or Chinese volunteer, they’re too busy enriching their beloved new home or protecting their investments or something.

Here in Cali, prison convicts are work-released to firefighting duty.

They love it, but I think that’s the new plan, for all of us.

Our phones will be our new ankle bracelets.

With social credit scores and minor infractions, the lucky many will be on work-release from our homes.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

The majority of communities in the US use volunteer firefighters. I wonder how likely non-Whites are to volunteer. I checked the website of the Iselin. NJ, fire department. There are more Asian Indians than Whites in town, but the photos indicate a White volunteer force. Neighboring Edison is loaded with Chinese. Neither group is known for its civic mindedness. Civic mindedness is in decline among Whites, as well. I belong to a gun club and am an active volunteer. 5% of the members do 95% of the volunteer work. We’ve been forced to outsource some tasks, such as cleaning the… Read more »

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

I guess that means people will either have to pay the higher costs for civilization or do with less. I suspect the later for the simple reason that the US is far too corrupt to keep costs in control. This should surprise no one though . This country is made by and populated with people who wanted to avoid paying the costs of society , taxes, tariffs , the myriad of offices that make civilization. It is at its heart part of the 3rd World , the Americas We got by with a manufacturing powerhouse cheap social capital and because… Read more »

John Smith
Member

That’s a double edged sword. Surveillance proves innocence too. Harken back to the last election: an intrepid lady reporter was trying to ask questions of Trump during a rally. It was awful!!! Trump’s goons interceded and brutally beat her! She was assaulted! She was raped!!! She was murdered!!!! The media locked shields and carried the narrative – and it went from the ridiculous to the sublime. “Yes, the woman was assaulted.” And nobody on Trump’s team did anything to help the lady? “No! We all saw it!!” And none of YOU did anything about it? “No! Trump’s goons wouldn’t let… Read more »

DLS
Guest
DLS

It’s true that some surveillance may work for us too, but what our state and tech lords can do is terrifying. It won’t be long before they decide to plant criminal activity on your computer/phone and then prosecute you. We can’t do that to them. We saw the initial salvo when that FBI lawyer in the coup cabal edited an email to change the meaning 180 degrees.

Member

Another unplanned (I guess) consequence of the ubiquitous screen is the effect on the jury trial. How will jurors with castrated attention spans be able to fairly decide guilt or innocence in a lengthy or difficult trial?

Lawdog
Member

This is an excellent point. Just punctuate the trial with advertisements for Bubbleworld and I think we’ll be good.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

DLS. Also, I believe there were “edits” of the 911 phone call from the Zimmerman incident to make him look like a racist. This was done by the news media, but one can imagine what would have happened if the government edited the one original digital copy. Deep fakes are now real and growing such that firms are working to keep up with detecting such fraud.

Member

The degree to which the Zimmerman affair was a media creation is astounding:
https://spectator.org/did-the-media-force-a-false-narrative-on-the-trayvon-martin-case/

Ifrank
Guest

Richard Jewell, the guy who did not plant a bomb at the Olympics in Atlanta.

Member

The technology is already available and in use.
https://www.jordanbpeterson.com/blog-posts/i-didnt-say-that/

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

There is the idea out there that people will believe what they are told, despite what is shown on the video. Why someone would fall for that is unfathomable to me. But there are sheep, and then there are those who question everything. Blue pill versus red pill, I suppose.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

I’m beginning to question everything—and I admit it freely. This is the “distrust” issue coming from our current multi-cultural experiment—as discussed by Z-man and others such as Ed Dutton—and helped along by advances in technology such as deep fakes.

I hate it. It is no way for honest men to live. Devolution. However, whole societies, e.g., China, seem to thrive on such in their business dealings. But it’s alien to me and my upbringing.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

China is diversity-free, so there’s that.

Ifrank
Guest

The truth used to be about the battle with nature, who only revealed her secrets begrudgingly. Now it’s a battle between men, the truth seekers and the pretenders. We see this battle being waged in every arena. Science, as in global warming, in food, as in what to eat, in politics, as in news reporting. Truth seekers today don’t need to be scientists so much as truth detectives. The truth is out there, and there are those who are trying to tell us, but we can’t always identify them.

Member

Dutch, see Zimmerman being described as a “white Hispanic.”

If he is white, nobody is white.

Member

And just to cement how white he was, he was half jewish

KGB
Guest
KGB

One should always record any encounter with law enforcement and should probably do that same anytime they interact with the State. A couple years ago, for some reason TSA wanted to look into my carry-on after it had gone through the scanner. I whipped out my phone and recorded the search (Recording the TSA process is always a good idea, particularly since they’re staffed mostly by diversity hires. Don’t let them tell you that you can’t, you absolutely can). I doubt it was anything other than routine, but it never hurts to let them know that they’re being watched too.

Member

We should never forget that white people love them some TSA.

Doubt my asseveration? Just count the multitudes of servile whites who voluntarily submit to the groping and the grabbing and the poking and the prodding.

Exile
Member
Exile

KGB – check out

https://national-justice.com/surveillance-state-tactics-airport-and-border

then talk with a knowledgeable criminal/privacy attorney. TSA operates in a grey area in many respects.

Tom
Guest
Tom

I think rural areas will be the opposite. Not enough economic activity to justify the maintaining of roads and electricity. Already rural hospitals have been shut down. Rural areas might end up the “forbidden zone” like some dystopian b movie.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

The cartelization of medicine has stripped the rural areas of any sort of healthcare. The independent doctor hanging up his shingle somewhere is not allowed to exist any more. This was probably not by design, but it is a side benefit to the powers-that-be that want to crush the red areas. The rural communities constantly see older people moving out and back to the suburbs, to get their dose of healthcare.

Member

Health care that in many cases they may not even need. Older Americans place way too much confidence in doctors’ deciding they need a prescription.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

All too true. But damn, if I hit the floor with a heart attack, an hour and half trip to the nearest ER is a decidedly sobering thought when considering moving out to the more rural and pleasant areas.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Rural areas are being pitched helicopter medical evacuation insurance. The idea is that the insurance will pay for an emergency helicopter evacuation to a distant hospital, and will also make sure the service is available to you, the policyholder (and not necessarily anyone else). This is a new version of the old fire department services provided only to the policyholders of fire insurance. Some say it is a shady deal, and I am not sure of the economics of it to the providers, if what they are offering is real. I will be a late adopter, if at all.

Exile
Member
Exile

Dutch, I have a hard time believing they could provide reasonably dependable air service for an affordable rate unless the pool of contributors was enormous, something small dispersed communities can’t offer. With the population density vs. coverage area of LA you might just make it work. Sounds fishy.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Exile, that’s the problem. Unless everyone signs up, the pool of premiums in no way covers the cost structure, from what I can tell. And nowhere near everyone is going to sign up.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Exile and Dutch I have first hand experience with it so will discuss later…

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

We hope that our helicopter pilot or EMT’s will not be an incompetent vibrant… in the ‘cheapest is best’ vein. Hospitals try to hire the cheapest but most talented care they can find among people of color while they turn away whites who are innately more organized, caring and competent because they don’t want to pay a fair wage that is deserved for the service provided. Are they thinking, “Oh well, let the smartest, most talented white men do drugs and die on the streets, so long as we can provide services *most efficiently*; i.e., cheapest labor possible; i.e., low-IQ… Read more »

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

Look at the Minnesota STEMI Network as an example of how emergency cardiac care for rural areas might be made to work. http://read.nxtbook.com/medreviews/reviewscardiovascularmedicine/volume17no1_2/treatmentupdate_adecade.html The link is a report on the MN (and the Los Angeles cognate) network that is fairly accessible to the nonspecialist. However, it does not address the economic aspects. Briefly, a STEMI is the “serious” heart attack where you have to get treatment ASAP because large portions of heart muscle are dying or at high risk of dying quickly. (A non-STEMI is a “lesser” heart attack where treatment is slightly less time-urgent. STEMI=ST-elevation myocardial infarction, where “ST”… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Entirely by design.
It’s that weird mix of corporate-government at work again.

KGB
Guest
KGB

I hope that some aspiring doctors see this as an opportunity to exploit a new market and figure out a way to navigate the encumbrances.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Hint: Veterinary medicine.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Now yer talkin’, KGB.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Before FDR most rural areas didn’t have electricity, and most Americans lived in rural areas. It couldn’t have been that bad, and a trip through the local cemeteries confirms it. People didn’t linger in infirmity into their 80s in some retirement home. That doesn’t sound bad unless you think there’s nothing after this life. Also, the smiling faces in old family photos. Terribly poor people by today’s standards, but no mortgage, no income tax, no debt. So I wonder how poor they actually were.

G Lordon Giddy
Guest
G Lordon Giddy

Double edged sword. The public finds out the police don’t actually genocide innocent blacks but on the other hand we get a check mark against us for visiting a gun range.
I don’t see an easy way to subvert this barring giving up all technology and driving a 74 El Camino. Enemy of the State I believe is the movie?
What is best path forward?
I am still searching for that?
I think the Z is correct.
The Trumpsters are watching their own demise by cheering on the Military Industrial complex and it’s boy toys being used against a more basic civilization.

Apex Predator
Guest
Apex Predator

“What is best path forward? I am still searching for that?” What is your tolerance for inconvenience & discomfort? Once you know that metric you can easily find your own ‘path’ which will be different for every human being. Related, what is your tolerance for risk? You can use burner phones, pay cash for everything, setup fake emails, VPNs, hardened browsers, and use pre-paid debit cards when an electronic transaction is required and do ‘ok’ about being the gray man. If you want to -really- disappear your inconvenience & risk are going to start going up rapidly from this baseline.… Read more »

ExNativeSon
Guest
ExNativeSon

AP: “ You can use burner phones, pay cash for everything, setup fake emails, VPNs, hardened browsers, and use pre-paid debit cards when an electronic transaction is required.” Yep, can do all that and more. In addition only use highly encrypted email and texting tools, use cheap burner laptops, post under various names, etc., and stay off all social media. The phone is the toughest for sure. The inconvenience and wasted time is a big negative but only do the extreme stuff for the most dangerous things. I don’t care if the Eye of Sauron knows what kind of trash… Read more »

Member

Son, I’ve got the email thing taken care of. But how do I text encryptedly?

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Yep Apex. Dopamine is their greatest weapon. 40% obesity is the physical manifestation. But thats the tip of the iceberg. The spiritual/psychological changes have been massive in an incredibly short period of time. We are, for all intents and purposes, a population of addicts. Already we have two generations that effectively cannot even fathom the abstract proposition of not having 24/7 live, personalized, mobile tech. So yeah, what is the level of discomfort that you can endure until the feedback loop can be migrated away from the brave new world? Based on what I see vis a vis the diet-exercise… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

Apex, it’s one reason why my old ass went to live in the woods for weeks over the summer. Find the limits of what you need vs. what you just want or merely like to have. Clean the consumer-culture poison out of your system and unplug. I still managed to be online and on-grid when I wanted to be with minimal inconvenience, and worked a full schedule. Burner-phones and SIM cards vs. “plans” are the way to go. Use Google Voice or something similar for your normie-tier plugged-in-life calls where you need a stable consistent phone number. Use the SIM’s… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

The smart people who figured this out long ago would have established a completely separate identity, SS number, residence, and all. One individual, two identities. Probably too hard to do now, with the matrix of information already on file.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

You have read Unintended Consequences haven’t you Dutch?

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

What about showing up at the DMV somewhere in SoCal, claiming to have walked in from “down south”? That should get you some new ID minimal questions asked.

Anyone know what biometrics (if any) are involved?

Facetiously said. Mostly.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Must admit when I saw an emerald late ‘60’s Camaro up on flatbed next to me at a stoplight It made me smile. But it also made me kinda sad for the relic; like so many things that reflect a dead culture. It also makes me think more seriously about the strategic aspects of rolling back modernity in my personal life. Which already lags behind most people I think. All this while sitting in my boring Toyota hybrid sedan that is so computerized I can’t even rev the 4-cyl engine if I wanted to. Anyhow, half the militarys budget (the… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Scanners, buy scanners. No license necessary, hard to track, learn your local frequencies and you can listen in to what is going on in your neck of the woods. Buy multiples, stash them around here and there, like you would other survival or prep gear. They may not be available much longer, for obvious reasons.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Dutch, TPTB are already onto the scanners. For the ‘safety of first responders’ municipalities are switching over to encrypted communications.

Maybe in rural areas and maybe on the off chance there is other comms that would be useful to scan, but for police/fire/EMS/mililitart/NatGuard etc will soon be encrypted. Happened here just recently.

At least the coast guard still keeps a channel open.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

I’m sure there are always undisclosed alternative frequency ranges for LEO as well. But scanners give you a “listen only” version of a lot of what is going on out there, without the licensing and visibility to you-know-who that ham radio operation does. Not ideal, but something.

KGB
Guest
KGB

The police in my town have stopped communicating via radio. You will hear calls from dispatch, directing them to a location and maybe a description of the problem, but after that you get no details. First responders still use accessible channels to discuss the condition of patients.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Highly doubtful KGB they probably just have encrypted it so you aren’t hearing it…

Exile
Member
Exile

Screw, it’s an area where we’re just starting to explore what the answers are. Using the whole range of low tech and high tech gives us the most options. If some of us want to live low-tech, that’s their option, but those who want to infiltrate & compete with the bugmen are welcome too. We’re a bunch of opinionated iconoclasts mostly learning how to be a community on the job and under pressure. Thinking too bigly has been a curse of the right, as Z’s recent posts have touched on. You’re thinking practically, which is where we’ve been lacking. One… Read more »

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Exile, true. I have never been too worked up over tech either way. Just tools. So my instinct is to shy away from those tools that ask too much of me or otherwise encumber me onerously. Part utilitarian, part skeptic, part the tech elite have always struck me as creeps. This and my contrarian nature made it relatively easy for me to avoid all of social media and then limit my tech once I left the corporate chain gangs. I just lump it in with the rest of the holistic approach. How we engage with our environment and each other… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

I’m not going to surrender b/c Magic Custodial Jews just yet. The challenges Z mentions are all good reasons why maintaining a foot in the Hive is part of our strategy for successful separatist communities. Big Other needs Whitey to manage Yuti, Juglas, Shaniqua & Lupe and to do the Work Non-Americans Can’t Do. There’s no Voight-Kampf test to separate the sheep bugmen from the goat sh*tlords. We can get Our Guys inside. It takes relatively few of these guys to feed us useful intel and toss a few wrenches in when they can. And if Big Nanny ever goes… Read more »

Yves Vannes
Member

Excellent summation of our position and how we should deal with it. First this: ” We have to first plan to survive, then to reproduce and recruit, then to be self-sustaining and separate. Once we have that down, we can worry about “fighting.” We have already begun, it needs to grow. Second this: “And if Big Nanny ever goes full and explicit No Whites Allowed, we can thank her for vastly expanding our recruiting base.” They are already doing us this favor and accelerating things. Third this: ” If militias in Iraq and Afghanistan can withstand the full fury of… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

YY – Exactly. The demographic clock is ticking on the elites. Ashkepath outmarriage is taking a brutal toll and their fertile feral faction can’t swing the same lumber on IQ and time-preference. The goyisch Belmonters of Charles’ Murray’s “Coming Apart” are also “Losing Ground” as more of their Beckys buy into or fall prey to Wokeness, race-mixing and heinous social habits that their parents only wanted for “those other White kids” to live with. The Palis have managed to stick in the throats of the Chosen for a lot of years and may yet live to see Israel fall. The… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

“the all-seeing prey”

When The Saxon Awakes

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

I fear the Saxon expired without issue in the trenches at Verdun.

I hope I’m mistaken.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

To me, we’re in a very long guerrilla war. Be everywhere, but nowhere. Hit them in their vulnerable spots, let them massively over react and disappear. Get them to lose the support of the larger population as they crack down trying to find and subdue us.

Bleed them dry. Make it too costly to stay. Most of all, let them know that the war will never end. This is our home. We’ll fight today, tomorrow, next week, next year, next decade, next century. Give them no hope of permanent victory, just never-ending, expensive war.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Sign. Me. Up.

Member

I would like to submit my application for employment to the Trust and Safety squad. Do they have any openings in the doxing department?

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

There is recourse. It’s just not the recourse that we want to employ. Muslims in Europe proves the vulnerability of Big Tech/Custodial State (BTCS). BTCS relies on a population that 1) accepts its authority; 2) rejects violence, particularly disorganized, on-the-street violence; and 3) refuses to protect its own. If any community rejects these principles, BTCS loses most of its punch. Muslims make the cost of enforcing BTCS’s rule too high. Ironically, they achieve this via low-tech, low-IQ means. Muslims are willing to beat people up and go to jail to stop BTCS rule. Cut a Muslim off from using the… Read more »

DLS
Guest
DLS

True for the most part, but the selective prosecution is a huge state advantage. Witness those two Proud Boys who recently got four year sentences for what amounted to a simple street fight with antifa. Had they been brown, they wouldn’t have been charged at all.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

True. But, again, one of the reasons – though certainly not the only reason – that browns and, particularly, Muslims aren’t charged or are changed with very low-level crimes is because TPTB are concerned with push back from those communities.

However, frankly, we’re not even close to having a community as intact as Muslims in Europe. I was just trying to show that BTCS is vulnerable to push back (and not necessarily violent push back) from unified communities.

Lawdog
Member

Even intelligent and educated Muslims do not subscribe to the milquetoast trends of academia. Ever wonder why that is?

Seriously, I wonder sometimes. Maybe it’s because their religion is reiterated throughout their daily lives — especially the Quran. When I was in the middle east I was awoken every morning to the call of a dozen muezzins. Annoying, but not nearly as bad as my neighbor’s blasting CNN.

Chad Hayden
Guest
Chad Hayden

End of paragraph 9: “Hunters need focus, predators need a broad field of vision and pattern matching.” It makes more sense if ‘predators’ is ‘prey’. The high school I went to was about 10% south Asian spanning the gambit from bengalis to Pashtuns and some Persians. There are some cool ones but as a group they are absolutely insufferable. Someone described them as lower IQ joos which made me chuckle. The white guys I work with love their little tech toys. When I mentioned the creepy surveillance aspect they shrugged their shoulders, with one obfuscating that it’s about the level… Read more »

G Lordon Giddy
Guest
G Lordon Giddy

The Boston Red Sox already used a form of compound eye to steal pitcher catcher signs.

Member

Looking for a scientific article on Bill Belichick’s compound eye . . .

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

interesting movie from long ago: The Conversation, starring Gene Hackman. They are trying to record a conversation between 2 people as they walk through public areas: multiple microphones are placed along the route that the targets walk down, the resulting snippets of audio are spliced together in chronological sequence to create one coherent audio track. The FBI used similar tech methods to catch some Mafioso in Little Italy (Vinny the Chin maybe, on Mulberry St? I don’t remember.). The FBI had video cameras hidden in cars parked along the street; the mobsters thought they couldn’t be recorded, as they were… Read more »

Member

Your forecast assumes that the technological infrastructure is sustainable. As companies increasingly hire and promote based on race, sex, and mental illness rather than ability, it’s a real possibility that the infrastructure will collapse. You can already see the beginnings of it in a lot of tech companies.

Marko
Guest
Marko

I agree. While there are very smart people in the tech world, asking the hoi-polloi to operate security tech is another matter. There will be incompetence, bunglings, and turf battles/data hording which will thwart the security state. I have faith that there enough dumbasses and enough ethical people to offset the grand designs of tech surveillance.

Lawdog
Member

I think that mistakes will decrease in tandem with the development of more sophisticated AI. It will take a bit of time — and that’s good, cause we need it — but this is a slow consolidation of power.

ProZnoV
Guest
ProZnoV

No prob: the West will just buy ready made systems from the Chinese. They’re going to clean our clock this century; the amount of raw talent and untapped potential is staggering. I’ve no doubt that plenty of western governments would be more than happy to buy anything from anyone to keep their elites in control.

No one hates the people of the West more than their elites.

DaveA
Guest
DaveA

When Western companies are taken over, first by feminists then by Indians, they gradually stop inventing new technology for Chinese spies to steal.

China does not have affirmative action but it does have feminism, crippling its production of Chinese babies.

The big debate of the 20th century was who shall own the means of production. In this century, it’s who shall own the means of reproduction.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

“The big debate of the 20th century was who shall own the means of production.
In this century, it’s who shall own the means of reproduction.”

That’s the money quote!

DaveA
Guest
DaveA

Consider the Soviet Union. It owned 1/6 of Earth’s dry land and everything on it, controlled all sources of information, banned guns, and was free to spy on, arrest, imprison, and execute anyone it suspected of plotting a revolt.

It would have fallen to pieces much sooner if it had affirmative action.

Guest
Guest
Guest

See Targeted Individuals (start with Targeted Justice and read their links). See Fusion Centers, and organized gang stalking (stasi tactics). Precrime is happening. Watch this guy’s presentation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJ6d_Q0sT8c He’s a black guy who admits he was trouble and what’s happening now. Before you applaud remember everyone is the enemy. Remember they ARE admittedly using dew weapons in parks and airports (sound). Google it. It’s very scary, but be brave and check it out. This article is a start but perhaps zman can do it more justice. Other ‘issues’ will pale in importance. Also, you will be prepared if weird things… Read more »

Vegetius
Guest
Vegetius

A cubicle is a dangerous place from which to view the world.

R7 Rocket
Guest
R7 Rocket

The agents of the West’s ruling class cannot pass RedPill on Women tests.

CAPT S
Guest
CAPT S

I’m old-school secessionist on this point. Going gray doesn’t mean going dark, but it does mean being exceptionally careful on what you order with a card, say on your cellphone, and have delivered to your home address. E.g. You definitely want to read “Resistance to Tyranny” but you may not want to order it on Amazon. You may want to buy a 6.8 upper for your AR but you may not want it shipped to your home address. You need a cellphone but there are times when you pull the SIM card. And of course Alexa and the plethora of… Read more »

Member

If you have been banned from a website’s comments section, you’ve already experienced our brave new world. Do not ever go back to one of those websites to read their articles again. They can’t be trusted.

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

LOL, I still lurk at ace of spades now and then, but that’s pretty much it. start asking questions about our greatest ally, that’s a big no no…

Dave
Guest
Dave

On “A Voice for Men” I argued that women and poor men shouldn’t be allowed to vote. The blog-master’s girlfriend banned me.

Saw on Reddit, “Haha, Jim Donald tried to post here, we done banned him good!” If they could also ban the homeless junkies who defecate and drop used needles on the sidewalks outside their $3000/month studio apartments, they might have a point.

Come the Day of the Machete, millions of white liberals will be hacked to death by their beloved diversity, caught unawares because none of their liberal news sources dared to say anything that might be construed as racist.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Come the Day of the Machete, millions of white liberals will be hacked to death by their beloved diversity, caught unawares because none of their liberal news sources dared to say anything that might be construed as racist.
Can’t come about soon enough…

Lynyrd Skinnerbox
Guest
Lynyrd Skinnerbox

36 years ago a high-school dropout wrote books about all this. William Gibson invented the metaphor of cyberspace in “Burning Chrome” (1982) and emerged from obscurity in 1984 with the publication of his debut novel Neuromancer. Neuromancer, which won three major science-fiction awards (Nebula, Hugo, and Philip K. Dick), established Gibson’s reputation. Its protagonist is a 22nd-century data thief who fights against the domination of a corporate-controlled society by breaking through the global computer network’s cyberspace matrix. Set in the future, the novel follows Henry Case, a washed-up computer hacker who is hired for one last job, which brings him… Read more »

Homer Hinkley
Member

I was just about to mention Person of Interest. Then I saw your comment, so I’ll leave my remarks here. For everyone who thinks they are going to go grey with burner phones, burner laptops, VPNs, fake emails, and multiple identies, watch the TV series Person of Interest (on Netflix.) Spoiler alert: the good guys lose. The 24/7 panopticon of surveillance cameras and AI is impossible to escape. Do you really want to try? How about this : become Bigfoot !!!

Apex Predator
Guest
Apex Predator

You are, like many, missing the point which is part of why we fail spectacularly. Plausible deniability, do you know this term? It would have been REALLY f-cking useful to me during my ‘midnight rendezvous’ with the people you are saying are all powerful and omnipotent. It is about damage mitigation not damage elimination. I have lived experience regarding this, you have Netflix. If there is already a bullseye on you, it is trivially easy for anyone to find and track you, you are correct. So here is the point you miss. create enough misdirection that the Eye of Sauron… Read more »

TomA
Guest
TomA

Yes, the technological revolution centered around internet and cell phone addictions is a Brave New World paradigm unlike anything our species has ever experienced in the past. And these new artificial environments are changing the species fundamentally, and this change is neither trivial nor slow. The end-state is insect-like drone behaviors in which only passivity and compliance is rewarded. The antidote is also a new paradigm that leverages off of modern technology. Be smart, be strong.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Tom thats what keeps the black pill lodged in my throat as it relates to “our children, out future.” A lot of talk of debt. Leaving the next gens with a massive bill. But thats nothing compared to what is coming in terms of the biological and sociological impact of unmitigated environmental changes thrust upon the children, technology and otherwise. We are already seeing remarkable changes at very fundamental levels. Will epidemiology reveal a tight correlation between when smart phone usage in moms began and spiking behavioral/emotional issues in children? What about the social, emotional, and cognitive changes already showing… Read more »

TomA
Guest
TomA

Agreed. Children, particularly during their early developmental years, are most vulnerable to the deleterious and insidious effects of near-continuous artificial mind stimulation. Instead interacting with the real world (and it’s reality based feedback), they witness and absorb a a contrived pseudo-reality devoid of tangible feedback. The next generation will likely lack natural evolutionary robustness and only be suited to live in an imaginary environment fueled by ephemeral affluence.

Maus
Guest
Maus

All of this speculation about the “how” of the surveillance state is simply too tedious. So they’ve got all the data: Maus has written racist badthink; Maus buys a lot of bourbon; Maus has guns. The end users can’t fix the potholes and manage the homeless. Their incompetence and policy fetishes mean trannies can use any bathroom they want; but shit and rats in the street are leading to outbreaks of typhus. This won’t lead to a culture of fear, but a culture of loathing. Big Brother will demand the Two Minutes of Hate for cis hetero white men; and… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

I’m with you on that, Maus. American identity for all its downside comes with a sizeable fraction of people who instinctively rebel against this kind of thing. Not everyone is content with amusing themselves to death or going along to get along. The West seems to attract a lot of those folks.

The tricky part is going to be getting those people to work together but if we turn that corner we’re going to have a hardcore group of Whites with the Covington Smirk that says “is that all you’ve got?”

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

The compound eye picks up everything in its wide field of vision, but only to a certain distance (the predator eye can see a long way in a particular vector, but with a narrow field of vision). Try to figure out what that distance is, and then array your life and your interactions with the borg to go in and out of the limits of that compound eye’s distance of vision.

Operating wholly within the limits of their vision is foolish, but so is creating an informational black hole where you are supposed to be.

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

The Chinese have a famous saying: “The Emperor is far away.” Meaning that locals could pretty much do what they wanted most of their life, according to their own customs and traditions. The electronic panopticon nightmare we are currently installing is the scariest thing I’ve ever even thought about. The Stasi couldn’t dream of such tools. These days, the Emperor is literally monitoring your very heart beat (Apple watch). We had a presentation at work about reduced ins. rates and swag if we allowed such “monitoring.” Perhaps going Amish is really the only sane thing left to do. They are… Read more »

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

One other thing, the title “The Compound Eye” is a bit off I think. I’d call it instead “The Unlimited File Drawer”. They simply cannot process the amount of data they are collecting on us. The real danger is when you get on their radar screen and they instead backtrack and see what you’ve been up to. Ever wonder how they know exactly what websites the synagogue stabber was looking at?? Perhaps it was simple browser history from a confiscated laptop. But one could get same info if IP address was not masked. Even with VPNs, are they ever really… Read more »

Lawdog
Member

“The Unlimited File Drawer.” Hmm. Sounds like my girlfriend.

Member

They don’t need to process all the data.
They only need to process the data on the few thousand people of interest at the time.
The hard piece isn’t the data processing, its the data acquisition and they’ve done a superb job of nailing that.
Storage is basically free now.

Member

C’MON SOLAR FLARE!!!

Lawdog
Member

What’s that, a gay astronaut or something?

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Yea ready to give us all the shaft.. 😂

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

Yet such a system will be controlled by foreigners, the Pajeets and Chens who run the day to day operations at Big Tech and who have no loyalty to our White Masters in D.C. or in the corporate boardrooms. How many of them are actual moles and Snowdens who have wormed their way into critical positions.The tech itself is all from China and as we find out those fellas have put in back doors. Yet this supposed all powerful state is helpless in the face of terrorists, the cartels and every piece of mystery meat that wanders across the border.… Read more »

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

Reminds me of this quote by a Scots M.P. Ian Welsh When the revolution comes, if it comes, the first job is going to have to be to destroy all of this stuff, and to inculcate a visceral understanding that this and all types of constant surveillance are, simply, the hallmarks of evil regimes. Of course, in time, the descendants of the revolution will forget. The hallmark of evil regimes for our forefathers was torture, after all. That said my main quibble with our host in general is his habit of passivizing people. If people get off their ass with… Read more »

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

If people get off their ass with a plan…The key is just getting people off their ass…The plan is there it just needs people to actually implement it…

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

I’m not so sure there is a plan, one that is agreed upon widely anyway. Not a new problem mind, the US almost didn’t happen for the same reasons and we ended up with a crap compromise. Take the militia right for example, they have guns and expertise and can sometimes even manage to get people out there in meat space . How many of them would fight for what we we want, essentially authoritarian right wing nationalism with nationalist socialist economics Until the Libertarian bug fades enough the motivation just isn’t there. Nor is the US despite church going… Read more »

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Well Brother Pain and/or Fear seem to be the only thing that motivates people these days…You can offer them something better but if one of those two things aren’t a factor then they won’t take it…So the real question is will it get bad fast enough so that people still have enough time to do something about it after it motivates them to get off their butt…

Doofenshmertz Evil, Inc.
Guest

Today’s entries for the Doofenshmertz Internal Gym for the Soul (net time required approx 45 mins): — Marianne Moore’s poem “The Steeple-Jack”. A marvelous little accretion of details, all building up to the wonderful final passage that begins “It could not be dangerous to be living…” Good for a smile every time, it gives, so to speak, the pleasures of sentimentality without the dreck of being sentimental. Also, an excellent portrait of what we’ve been robbed of. — Yes, “The Revealing Science of God,” easy to find on YouTube. One of the finer entries in the so-called “progressive rock” genre,… Read more »

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

One other thing, as this is a topic I am fascinated about. There is some unbelievable study, using nothing but cross-referencing matrices, which showed common membership in certain organizations at the time of the American Revolution. If the English had had this data and merely taken a look at it, they would have been able to imprison PRETTY MUCH EVERY FOUNDING FATHER we had. Well before the fighting started. No fancy math, just building tables!! Of the simplest data. I think RooshV had linked it as one of his 30 interesting articles of the year. And this is just math… Read more »

Rogeru
Guest
Rogeru

On the subject of Alexa and similar devices always listening:

I have this conversation over and over, its like a bad dream. You know they listen to and comprehend everything you say, how else would they know when you were talking to them?

Nobody cares.

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

So true. So many people have it in their house and I just want to look at them and say, wtf is wrong with you!!???? Start shaking them or something.

But then again, perhaps they figure their life is so meaningless and their thoughts so bland that who gives an F. Sadly, that is not likely to be off the mark.

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

So true. So many people have it in their house and I just want to look at them and say, wtf is wrong with you!!???? Start shaking them or something.
Yea I feel the same way about people who don’t see the need to build Communities which will have a far greater impact on them than any device ever could…

Durendal
Guest
Durendal

So you don’t think we have any chance of becoming sovereign? We have ability but to become serfs? Z?

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Yea there is still a chance but that window of opportunity is closing fast..

Durendal
Guest
Durendal

I just can’t force myself to believe that we can’t change this trajectory. Not everyone in our thing is a sheep.

Durendal
Guest
Durendal

So we are doomed to technological slavery?

Lawdog
Member

Probably. Teams of bright Indians and Asians have been tasked with addicting us to their frivolous technology for more than two decades. Men of sterner stock might be able to resist the circus lights, but that’s no matter; our enemies only need to hypnotize the dulls and the normies to win. I am a 28-year-old male with a pregnant wife. It’s our first kid. In no way am I allowing our son/daughter to get a phone before high school, period. And even then, it’ll be the shittiest phone that rupees could possibly buy. I think that young parents need to… Read more »

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

You can get the phone, just disable the internet/app function. Works perfectly. But absolutely no phone is needed before 7th grade. Beyond that, activities etc. make it a convenience necessity, so to speak.

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

This is the most interesting and important question of the next 100 years. I always thought we lived in a duolopoly of 1984 vs. Brave New World. But I always thought the latter approach, which globohomo is now employing, was the most dangerous and likely to succeed. Soma, free sex, denigration of motherhood, literal gene mixing in lower classes for obedient servant workers, etc., etc. Even Huxley’s predictions exceeded his wildest dreams if he could see today.

Lawdog
Member

“If you have nothing to hide, why do you care?”
Oh, just wait a while. You’ll have something to hide soon enough.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

“Show me the man and I will show you the crime”, Lavrentiy Beria.

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

Exactly. Here’s another hint. The whole PROMIS, which has become exponentially crazier PRISM system, allegedly has black files on every politician. But guess who doesn’t use technology of any sort?? TRUMP!!! Except for posting shit on twitter. No texts. No emails. No web. He has people print his shit out for him to read hard copy.

But clearly, the man is an utter moron. Not as smart as any of us. LOL

Ifrank
Guest

Yup. Words can be word shopped just as well as photos can. It’s not so much what you said, but what they say you said.

Hoagie
Guest
Hoagie

The TV series “Person of Interest” uses a similar premise to follow everyone and pick out a few to help/kill depending on what “the Machine” needs.

Gauss
Guest
Gauss

Every friggin’ one of these columns is a home run. Flabbergasted.

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

Well well well Zman and fellow dissidents: BREAKING NEWS!!! Right on point. Cook County Judge has ordered Google to turn over to prosecutors all of race hoaxter Jussie Smollet’s data. This includes, “a trove of documentation from Smollett and his manager’s Google accounts — not just emails but also drafted and deleted messages; any files in their Google Drive cloud storage services; any Google Voice texts, calls and contacts; search and web browsing history; and location data.” Chicago Tribune is reporting. Just look at that and tell me that’s not a person’s LIFE down to the microsecond and detail.

Exile
Member
Exile

Don’t keep anything on Google you can’t own in court later. Scrub it regularly just to get in the habit, but there’s scuttlebutt out there that suggests this isn’t a 100% solution https://www.siliconvalleywatcher.com/google-keeps-your-data-forever—unlocking-the-future-transparency-of-your-past/ https://askleo.com/how-long-does-google-keep-my-account-information/ I’m going to put this idea into my “stuff to look into” folder and try to get some better info to share about the details. Smollett’s case might end up being instructive on just how deep they can dive, but given the politics involved, it likely will prove how little Google can find if it doesn’t try its hardest. If some White Supremiss data was being… Read more »

Johnny555
Guest
Johnny555

In civil discovery you can’t get this deep of a dive. In criminal/intel discovery, THEY CAN GET IT ALL. Google never, ever deletes a thing. Remember that.

9-Fingered Bucket Man
Guest
9-Fingered Bucket Man

Fibredietbelgianwaffle 大学 I’m bicycling along three [by pilled-up car from Sudan TODAY!FREE CREDIT!) coast e4ting my Belgian ヤクザwaffles.

I just wanted to play with the moderator bot.

(Edit) wish you had a delete comment function. I’m just messing around!

Whiskey
Guest
Whiskey

Agreed the great crackdown is coming … but … What are they going to do with White men? We are needed for war. China has ambitions to turn the Pacific into a Chinese lake, the way Tojo figured he’d turn it into a Japanese one. That’s not going away, particularly since China is a fragile system built upon a fragile emperor whose people want desperately the poz of the West. Think young Hong Kong girls are going out fighting with Xi’s police for freedom and democracy? Nope its their desire to screw around not live the regimented life of Chinese… Read more »

Member

And only today James Corbetty has a great piece on the pushback against facial recognition with Michael Maharrey of the Tenth Amendment Center ( A wonderful source of ideas and initiatives)

https://www.corbettreport.com/interview-1507-michael-maharrey-on-facial-recognition-pushback/

wxcon
Guest
wxcon

n