La Muerte Blanca

The other day, I was told about a young girl who was found dead at her home by her mother. The girl had graduated high school and was attending junior college. She had been out with friends and, presumably, taking drugs. Somehow she arrived home and went to bed, never to wake up. The girl was otherwise a good kid from a lower class home, but she made a mistake that turned out to be fatal. The exact cause of her death is unknown to me, other than it was a drug overdose, but the story is a familiar one.

The cultural revolution of the 60’s is often celebrated by the Left and Baby Boomers, but it was a disaster for the lower classes in America. The most obvious example is recreational drugs. In the 60’s, smoking weed and experimenting with narcotics was for college kids living off their parents at a university. By the 70’s, the drug culture had settled into the lower classes, along with all the other excesses of the beautiful people. It’s not an accident that crime took off, violence rates increased and we got an underclass.

Ever since, the great fear facing every parent, but especially those in the lower classes, has been the call on a weekend night from the police, telling them their kid was dead or in the emergency room for a drug overdose. Being poor or working class has never been an easy life, but the corrosive effects of recreational drugs have put a trap door under these people. Most are lucky enough to avoid a horrible mistake, but for many, the drug culture proves too much. They make the fatal mistake or throw away their lives for a buzz.

According to Kaiser statistics, whites make up 82% of opioid overdoses. Most of the drug overdoses are among the young, but older whites are killing themselves at record numbers as well. That means the spike in drug deaths is not driven by youthful foolishness or ennui. Instead, it is being driven by more white people using more potent drugs. The consensus is that the over-prescribing of pain killers has driven a rise in heroin use. Once the Feds cracked down on prescription drugs, addicts turned to heroin.

The temptation is to blame the culture or blame the profligate degeneracy of the modern age, but that would not explain the spike in youth overdoses. A middle age man offing himself is understandable to anyone who has hit middle age. Young people, even in terrible situations, naturally have hope. The better answer is that this is a case where supply drives demand. There used to be high barriers to potent opioids. Today, they are cheap and you don’t have to jam a needle in your arm to use them.

All of that means little to that mother who went in to wake her daughter, only to find her dead from a drug overdose. People can come to terms with a kid going bad and throwing their life away on drugs and crime. When a normal kid who seems to be headed in the right direction drops over dead from something they got at a party, people wonder what’s going on in the world. They naturally look to their rulers for answers. If people were suddenly dying from a virus in these numbers, it would be a national emergency.

That’s not to say that the drug war is a good idea. After decades of squandering billions trying to stem the flow of drugs into the country, the result is the opposite of what was expected. Illicit drugs are cheaper, more diverse, more widely distributed and more normalized than when the drug war started. By any measure, the war on drugs was lost and drugs won. That’s why our rulers don’t talk about drugs or the drug war much anymore. It’s just one of those things that has been quietly forgotten.

There’s also the fact that drugs are mostly a downscale problem, something that does not touch the Cloud People so they don’t care about it. The mothers in Cloud Country are not fretting about junior riding the dragon. He’s parked in front of his XBox all day, playing the female character, because he is questioning. The drug issue is mostly a Dirt People problem now. It’s blacks slinging on street corners and crackers getting loaded in an apartment complex far away from the people who run things.

That said, it is important to note the direction of the drug flow. America has never had a problem with drugs pouring in from Canada or Iceland. The flood of cheap narcotics into America starts in Mexico. When heroin had to be imported from Asia, it was not easily attainable and the quality of the product available to the poor was quite low. Now that Mexico has take over the production and distribution, heroin is suddenly cheap, potent and plentiful. This is also true of meth, which is now made in volume in Mexico.

This sort of thing does not happen in Canada because Canada is a responsible country with mostly responsible leaders. They would use the tools of the state to cripple the large scale production of narcotics. That’s not the case in Mexico, where the political class provides cover to the drug cartels and helps them violate US laws with regards to banking and border access. Putting pressure on the Mexican political class, to crack down on their narcotics trafficking and their human smuggling over the border, would have an impact on the heroin problem in the US.

Up until now, our rulers have not seen fit to put any pressure on the Mexican rulers about the drugs and human smuggling. Real countries with patriotic leaders have no tolerance for other countries protecting pirates and drug cartels on their border. They hold the leaders of those border countries accountable. Globalists have no duty to their citizens as citizenship does not exist. America’s ruling class has nothing but empathy for the Mexican ruling class and nothing but contempt for the Americans people, especially the founding stock.

That may be changing as Trump is the first pro-American president we’ve had in close to three decades. Trump seems to get that the way to address the border problems, including the drugs, is to hold the Mexican elite responsible. They need America much more than America needs Mexico. If the cost of tolerating the drug cartels and human smuggling gets high enough, the Mexican government will do something about it. It can never be eradicated entirely, but it would not take much to sharply reduce the flow of drugs and people over the border.

Maybe then the White Death will begin to subside.

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CaptDMO
CaptDMO
3 years ago

I wonder if the “older folks” overdosing with synthetic, and organic, opium are the same folks from the 60s that simply never grew up to outgrow their addiction to immediate gratification,
and synthetic enlightenment.
Red Pill? Blue Pill?

parascribe
parascribe
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

A new wrinkle to the current heroin epidemic is the practice of cutting it with fentanyl, which is contributing greatly to the number of overdoses.

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  CaptDMO
3 years ago

don’t know if zman was saying older whites were OD’g or that they were dying from other causes.

i wouldn’t discount the number of well off kids doing this kind of stuff, either.

in the end, drugs are like a mouse trap; a lot of mice get snapped, but the ones that survive learn to avoid the traps. this is what happened in the negro community with crack. seeing a relative become addicted caused others to shun crack.

Dr. Dre
Dr. Dre
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

In a few months I will be attending my 50th college reunion. It was one of those all-female institutions, sort of the way that black colleges are referred to as “Historically Black Colleges and Universities,” and back in the day, there was an equivalent number of cool men’s colleges, which made for lots of fun weekends which led to actual marriages upon graduation. i.e. under 25, young marriages. Don’t know all the numbers, but there are still a bunch of women-only colleges, some being pulled back from the brink of closing for lack of students who wish to attend, like… Read more »

Drake
Drake
3 years ago

Either I know the family you are talking about or the exact same thing happened in our town in NJ last week.

The temper-tantrums being thrown by Mexican leadership are to be expected. Their relationship has become so skewed and one-way in their favor that it feels like a punishment as Trump puts it back on an even keel. It’s like an adult has entered the room, turned of the Xbox and sent the kids off to brush their teeth.

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

the mexican elite is in for a hard hard time over the next 8 years. and they deserve it. from what I read, Mexicans are already protesting and rioting against the government. add in a big dose of economic pain, and things might just go pop there.

Member
3 years ago

I lost my best friend to a heroin overdose two weeks ago. if Trump sends drones and special forces death squads against the cartels, I will be cheering him on. Kill everybody.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Taco_Town
3 years ago

You mean like how a shadowy group unleashed carnage on Pablo Escobar’s drug cartel? The group that hunted down Che’ also. They targeted every one around them till they had nothing left to protect themselves. They had a special name too, get this, Los Pepe. Now what are the chances of that? Trump was sending everyone connected, on both sides of the border, to the corruption stream in the drug/arms business, when he told the Mexican’s he would send the US Military south of the border if they couldn’t clean up their end of things. That message over a private… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Los Pepes (personas perseguidas por Pablo Escobar) were made up of what was essentially a rival drug cartel, the paramilitaries fighting against the FARC in what amounted to turf wars. They had some support from US intelligence, but were largely autonomous. They had nothing to do with Che in Bolivia. I was in Colombia at the time of Escobar’s demise (a death foretold) and like to believe I had a fairly good grasp of the situation.

ganderson
ganderson
3 years ago

My first teaching job was at a New York City private school- spoiled rich kids, mostly. Not entirely fair- the ratio of good kids to not good kids wasn’t much different than the public school where I am now. What was really clear to me was that the pathologies affecting the upper classes- VERY high divorce rates, drug use, etc, could be papered over with money- however these things were death to the “lower orders”. And- re the drug war- wasn’t it Derb who said that while we call it a War, we don’t really fight it like a war?

Libertymike
Member
Reply to  ganderson
3 years ago

How about the spectacular misallocation of resources occasioned by the WOD? Not just billions, but hundreds of billions, if not trillions, have been wasted in this most PROGRESSIVE of undertakings. I submit that one of the many reasons we are bankrupt is the WOD. Welfare for the prison building and prison administration rackets. Welfare for the array of law enforcement rackets. Welfare for the drug courts, the drug counselors, the special drug courts. Welfare for the prosecutors and judges and public defenders. All of the resources devoted to the above are resources that could have been much more productively allocated… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Libertymike
3 years ago

I think a lot of people don’t understand the real purpose of drug laws: Besides being a hedge of deterrent protection for the stupid but fearful, otherwise inclined to dabble their toes in decadence, their enforcement is an easy and reliable way to maintain public safety by taking young men who are only and reliably trouble off the street. Feral young men pop up in every race or culture (some much more than others) like genetic mutations in every generation and they must be dealt with somehow for the good of all. Some of them see the abyss and pull… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Al from da Nort
3 years ago

Two corrections: Thankfully, in most societies the number of incorrigible feral young men, as described above, are few. Else life in human society would be as Hobbs postulated, nasty, brutal and short. We cannot go on subsidizing this subgroup. But, speaking of and, I was almost one off them. Thanks be to God for pulling me back from the abyss.

Dr. Dre
Dr. Dre
Reply to  ganderson
3 years ago

Have a relative (a jerk) who went to a private school in NYC — Dumb White Idiots Getting High Together.

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  Dr. Dre
3 years ago

That’s where I taught!

Doug
Doug
3 years ago

It is not only Mexico. Here in WV the drug problem is almost entirely supplied by US produced pharmaceutical prescription drugs. There are pharmacies that fill millions of prescriptions a year, almost entirely of synthetic opiate pain killers, literally truck loads delivered a month. That is all they do. There is no way the various government authorities do not know what is going on. If that isn’t a conspiracy of corruption between the political class and big business I don’t know what is. In no uncertain terms it requires both parties to make such a thing possible. The common theme… Read more »

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

what can replace the drugs, in these people’s lives? don’t say christianity as that ship has sailed (and sunk)

Teapartydoc
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Am I detecting a little “religion is the opiate of the masses” here?

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Teapartydoc
3 years ago

Marx wasn’t stupid. But he also couldn’t help reveal what the existential threats to his ideology are.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

It is indeed Christianity, which holds people together in these mountains. A deep and abiding faith in god. If you look past your preconceived notions you would see that is one of the reasons why the clouds despise the dirt people, because people with faith are impossible to subdue to your authority.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

It is not only faith in God either, it is unfettered economic freedom which is a key component of liberty, that creates prosperity and happiness. Something which naturally would inhibit a great deal of societal issues simply because happier prosperous people aren’t self destructive. And liberty being what it is, as long as those who are unhappy, well thats their liberty too, as long as their actions doesn’t infringe on others liberty.
The two paradigms are mutually supportive. God and Liberty.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

If you intended to yank my chain Solomon, I got another thing to tell you. Something people who don’t live in rural Christian communities have lost, much to their disservice. The drug problems are literally all to do with Meth and script drugs, Pot, moonshine, beer, everyone accepts what they are and the problems inherent, they are dealt with grace and tolerance, because of things learned over time. It is just a part of life and to judge others is looked down upon, it is grace that is held in highest value. With the crank heads and pillbillies, it is… Read more »

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Doug, I was pointing out that Christianity is already there, and isn’t helping with this problem. It isn’t helping with any problems because true Christianity doesn’t exist in America. Did it stop the abortion mills? Did it stop the erosion of religious liberty in this country? Did it stop the kiddie diddling? Did it stop anything? no. Sorry, but that’s the way I see it. Would love to see counter examples 🙂

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

Your trying to quantify faith like it was a loaf of bread you buy and economists use the purchasing data to determine the market price of wheat. Your quantifying Christian faith by the absence of you not having any, or believing in it. We call that being barn blind. Just because you don’t doesn’t mean there isn’t any to be found. You have to look in peoples heart for that friend. Put it this way, How can you understand what faith is to other people if you don’t have faith in other people? This Republic was based on Christian values… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Doug;

That is absolutely lovely. It can be much that way in ‘da Nort’ too, depending on which way one looks. Look that-a-way and praise God.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Al from da Nort
3 years ago

Look dat away Al from da Nort? Nice to meetutu. You from Nu Hampsha? Was born and raised up in the White Mountains myself. WV in Monagahela Mtns and NH are a lot alike. It is pretty interesting being a Yank in WV. More clans and larger extended families. Good people in both places as you say. We hear from folks the heroine addiction is pretty bad up around the Lakes Region. My son in law is on the needle and having a tough time cleaning up. He lives over in Merideth NH. We had him down couple times to… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Doug; I’m originally from the Mid-West farm belt and now reside in the upper Great Lakes region. This last fall there was a local radio special about heroine addiction which I thought overdrawn at the time I heard it. Then, a week later I went to a big box building supply store in a nearby larger burg (7k pop.). I noticed a peculiar look to the check-out girl and on my way to the parking lot I remembered where I’d seen that look before. In the ’90’s top NY models cultivated a ‘heroine chic’ look (big eyes, drawn cheeks, pencil… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Doug, this post made my morning. Thank you!

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Doug, I see the world with the eyes of an engineer. It’s wonderful that your faith is so strong, and your community so caring. But what of the people this article is about? they are lost and suffering in spite of all you say. The non-addict christians could easily burn down the pharmacies, and block the delivery trucks. why don’t they? they could easily burn down the abortion mills and beat the hell out of the “doctors”. why don’t they? far from being willing to be put up on a cross, today’s “Christians” are more inclined to cross the street.… Read more »

PRCD
PRCD
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

Solomon is right. Protestant Christian children used to have the catechisms of their particular denomination memorized by age 6. Everyone observed the Sabbath and went to church on Sundays. Churches were real communities. The Bible was read and the gospel was preached. Christians used to take their faith seriously. This can be found some places in America today but it’s far less common, and most don’t know what old time religion even looks like.. The decline of the faith has been quantified by many people. Just look at all of the mainline denominations that used to contain the majority of… Read more »

FaCubeItches
FaCubeItches
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

Islam would be a good bet, unfortunately.

el_baboso
Member
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Substantially the same as the Ozarks a decade and a half ago and the Inland Empire in SoCal 20 years ago.

During the same time in SoCal, during a 30-day period, a meth lab detonated within earshot of my suburban (a rather shabby suburb, to be sure) home, another one was discovered right next to my workplace, and yet a third was busted next to my favorite burger joint.

My friends in the managerial class are clueless about all this. We’re living out A Scanner Darkly and they are insulated in glass cubes and safe neighborhoods.

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  el_baboso
3 years ago

was your neighbor a HS chemistry teacher named Walter?

el_baboso
Member
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

Karl: A retired pharmacist, per the police reports. When Breaking Bad premiered, my mind returned to that incident.

Joan
Joan
Reply to  el_baboso
3 years ago

Inland Empire Expat here. Breaking Bad was originally set to be filmed in Riverside. That would have been apt.

David
Member
Reply to  el_baboso
3 years ago

There is still a terrible problem in SoCal. I live in San Diego and last year there was an article about kids in High School on the I-15 corridor going to Mexico to get their hits. One girl said she usually traveled the 60 mile round trip somewhere between 4 and 6 times a day.

Harvey
Harvey
3 years ago

Z, this is similar to an idea Scott Adams posted here, near the bottom of the entry. http://blog.dilbert.com/post/156532225711/the-persuasion-filter-and-immigration You’re suggesting that Mexico’s politicians have no “skin in the game” to reduce drug trafficking. This is because drugs, people, and money can flow easily through a porous border. Unrest rises as formerly unfettered flows suddenly back up. Trump’s plan, shutting the border, forces the Mexican politicians address the back up. Suddenly, Mexico’s leaders have skin in the game.

Tdurden
Tdurden
3 years ago

Back in the days over a century ago when anyone could walk into just about any pharmacy and walk out with whatever drugs they wanted and could afford, we didn’t have a lot of the problems of the failed drug war. Of course that was a time where the streets were filled with drug crazed zonbies and refer maniacs raping women 24/7, right? Oh wait…that wasn’t how things were. Well, then there was the whole country just laying around stoned all day as the culture collapsed and regressed to the dark ages. Oh…no, actually that was an era with some… Read more »

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Tdurden
3 years ago

I agree although I doubt it will happen in our lifetimes. One of the Progressives’ many sins was to infantilize the population. Guns, drugs, explosives, prostitutes, and all the other things that adults were expected to deal with responsibly in the 19th Century suddenly had to be prohibited (or so heavily regulated as to be banned to common people). Now people expect to be treated as large children by the government.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

The trade-off with the drug war I most despise is the militarized police agencies. It just strikes a very bad vibe in me to see local and federal cops armed and dressed like Infantrymen conducting raids.

Libertymike
Member
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

The fact is that far too many white dirt people have been either to accepting or too scared to do anything about it – perhaps, in part, because there have been millions of white dirt people feeding at the public trough or reliant upon family members who are such parasites.

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

the FBI also got their asses handed to them a few times.

Miami Vice is actually a good source for this kind of thing, as they were weaving actual events into their stories.

DFCtomm
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

I think much of it has to do with our current ME occupations. The military had to adopt war zone policing techniques, and those have slowly spilled over to police as former military personnel and trainers have came home and entered the police force.

LetsPlay
LetsPlay
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

I don’t like the militarization either but I agree with Z on this. After the North Hollywood Shootout, it was apparent to everyone that the bad guys had heavy weapons, automatic weapons and the 9mm pea shooters the police carried were just not going to cut it. And as Pres. Trump just declared, although the problem is more widespread than just MS13 and other gangs, the bad guys have been arming up big time as the Big Score in dope, human smuggling, prostitution, gambling, kidnapping, etc. has blossomed on US soil. The problem as I see it is two-fold: 1.… Read more »

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

i saw that shoot out live on tv. holy mother of god! what an unbelievable spectacle that was. the movie “Heat” kind of replicated that episode, but it was nothing compared to the real thing. the cops were going into sporting goods stores to get rifles.

but none of this is new. during bootlegging days the cops and the goons both used “grease guns” <= i am getting this term from the movie "The Laughing Policeman" don't know how common its usage is 🙂 but it was a reference to Thompson sub-machine guns.

FaCubeItches
FaCubeItches
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

The Fibbies upgunned after the Miami Shootout in ’86. It started creeping into state and local pds, too. In California, the upgunning started after 4 cops got dropped in a shootout in the late 70s.

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

the drug war was ginned up as an excuse to take away our liberty. simple as that. not advocating drugs or anything, but when the cure is worse than the disease…

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

It one of the most lucrative law enforcement boondoggles imaginable. The funds to fight the War On Drugs is a rice bowl from hell itself. Talk about addiction, especially federal drug interdiction operations, law enforcement is like a smack junky, it is hooked on the billions it captures to have a lucrative paycheck and the fun of having so much power it can get away with anything. Because payroll patriots.

DFCtomm
Member
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

It’s a justification for even theft. Remember civil forfeiture was created to fight the drug war.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  DFCtomm
3 years ago

Look at the Clintons. An organized crime syndicate. They did it all. Extortion, political corruption, influence peddling, arms trafficking, money laundering, murder, and sex rackets. And they where a President, a Senator, and a Secretary of State. Lord love a Duck. They where that close to ruling over us. Can you imagine the drug trafficking for profit with those two psychopaths in charge? It would be nothing to them after all the weapons they shipped south of the border aka Operation Fast & Furious. Tell you another thing, there would be a lot more LeVoy Finnicum’s and Vince Foster’s taking… Read more »

Libertymike
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

No, the WOD is the PROGRESSIVE utopia where all men are to be perfected. Like all PROGRESSIVE schemes, there is no appreciation and conception of the costs.

Tdurden
Tdurden
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Let the stupid play with all the legal drugs they can get their hands on and the ratio of garden variety idiots to high IQ sociopaths is likely to improve.

DFCtomm
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

People who argue for drugs to remain illegal always make the mistake you just made. You’re argument makes the assumption that your dug band is effective, but it’s not. You aren’t stopping anybody from using drugs. We’ve still got all the drug use + the organized crime.

jeffersonian
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Then we should end the welfare state. Make the cost of drug abuse too high to pay. The social safety net once depended on the practical limits of social acceptance and the will to personally support those who desired to live off the donations/charity of others.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  jeffersonian
3 years ago

Amen, welfare funding drugs and drug war, a self licking ice cream cone

DFCtomm
Member
Reply to  Tdurden
3 years ago

The question nobody seems to ask is why do the normies not do drugs? Is it because it’s illegal, and they are afraid of getting caught? No, everybody has that black sheep uncle who knows where to get the drugs. They simply don’t desire to do drugs, and that’s the key. I say make them all legal and safe, as possible, and then let people see what drugs do. Hollywood won’t be able to glamorize that. When people see that it’s poison not even “Harold and Kumar go to White Castle” will be able to convince them otherwise.

xennady
xennady
Reply to  DFCtomm
3 years ago

Golly. I remember Robert Heinlein writing about the drug war he recalled, from the 1920s I suppose. It involved warrentless searches and police brutality and the like. The difference this time is that our cloud people rulers actually don’t care about the fate of the dirt people, and aren’t willing to take any real action against drugs. If it’s an actual war, act like it. Hunt down drug dealers and kill them, for example. Secure the open border. Don’t ignore drug-dealing, or pretend the non-war can’t be won, because you can’t even believe drug use is bad, and hence don’t… Read more »

DFCtomm
Member
Reply to  xennady
3 years ago

So if the drug war can be won by a just people why did they give up on Prohibition? That’s all this is all over again, even the massive organized crime in Chicago. I’m surprised there isn’t a drug lord there named El Capone.

xennady
xennady
Reply to  DFCtomm
3 years ago

There’s a difference between beer and heroin- and between a government that put serious effort into preventing the consumption of beer and a government that ignores the consumption of heroin.

I dimly recall reading, many years ago, that the government used ex-navy destroyers to enforce Prohibition, deploying them to the Detroit River to keep Canadian beer out of the country. Today, the government is indifferent to the importation of all sorts of drugs from out of the country, simply giving us the usual nothing-can-be-done angst about the open border.

One of these examples was serious. One isn’t.

DFCtomm
Member
Reply to  xennady
3 years ago

I believe in real world results, so how long do you expect your drug war to go on before you’re willing to entertain the idea that you might be wrong. How much fail is needed for you to wake up like people did during prohibition?

xennady
xennady
Reply to  DFCtomm
3 years ago

I believe in real world results too. I want a government that is capable of serious action, instead of prattling on relentlessly about how nothing can be done. Thus, I refuse to pretend we have been undertaking any action serious enough to be called a drug “war.” We have had a government that has refused- despite savage consequences- to take the problem of drugs seriously. Instead, we get the half-anused shinola that ignores drug use by the well-connected- why does no one ever get hauled away to prison because of the never-ending string of overdose deaths by famous actors?- and… Read more »

DFCtomm
Member
Reply to  xennady
3 years ago

We have more people in jail than any other country, and most is drug related. We have instituted draconian police state policies such as civil forfeiture. We have morphed the police into a quasi military force all to fight the war on drugs, but you don’t think we’ve done enough?

xennady
xennady
Reply to  DFCtomm
3 years ago

You bestow upon me a cavalcade of non sequiturs. Again, the government cannot be serious about the so-called drug war when it will not secure the wide open pathway to drug trafficking known as the US border. It rather infamously abandoned parts of Arizona to the cartels, merely posting signs warning people that it is dangerous to be in those parts of the United States because of the foreign criminals it refuses to do anything about. The conversion of the police into heavily-armed grifters, eager to steal from the public and armed with an eye to stomping out any protest… Read more »

Member
3 years ago

No matter what people say, I believe the wall will go a long way toward stemming the drug flow. It won’t stop everything, but it will create a big enough bottleneck to affect distribution.

Clayton Bigsby
Clayton Bigsby
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Real jobs should help as well. Many if not most decent paying jobs come with drug testing as a condition of employment. For 20 grand a year people are stressed and rationalize a little weed or worse as both an escape and recreation….and maybe a little bit of a sense of rebellion and titilation of doing something verbotten and getting away with it…. Once you get around the 35-50 k range (where in many rural places you begin to feel like you may be able to hold your head up as a bonafide member of “society”) I think most people… Read more »

el_baboso
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Amen. Twenty virtual upvotes.

Clayton Bigsby
Clayton Bigsby
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Amen.
( somewhat off topic but, I’d love to be a fly on the wall if someone in his administration actually accepts a sit down with Chicago’s Murder for Hire….. Kinda like Like the Hells Angels becoming the BBB….)

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

me too.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

10-4 people back to work and paying good money for quality American made. Damn straight.
The Walmart strip mining ideology is a wasteland.

Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Trump’s wall is the physical manifestation of the real wall: prosecuting those responsible for “sanctuary cities” while cutting off Federal funds. That’s the real wall, and it’s why you hear the globalists mock the wall, but they really won’t do anything to fight it. They will fight for sanctuary cities to the death, which is why part of the solution will need to be a bunch of buses which we will use to drop illegals off at the corner of First and Main in the sanctuary cities.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  hokkoda
3 years ago

If Trump really told the Mexican’s he was going to send the US military south of the border if they don’t do something about the cartels, it was a brilliant thing to say. He just put everyone on notice on both sides of the border this racket, because that is exactly what it is, probably the biggest cash cow of political corruption going (outside the MIC and the Fed).
Trump is crazy like a fox. Only he could say something like that. What a set of balls the guy has.
WooHoo!

Rurik
Member
Reply to  TempoNick
3 years ago

Legalizing drugs will not really reduce crime. Sure Pedro, DeJamius, and Vito will find it impossible to make a profit from selling drugs, but that does not mean they will Convert their Crank & Crack shop into a Malt and burger shop. They will keep their organization and special skills to go into some other line of crime, maybe bootlegging tobacco, or whatever else TPTB decide is newly out of fashion.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Rurik
3 years ago

Nope. There is nothing else like drugs.
Meth economy is a special case in point.

And weed ain’t the synthetics.

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  Rurik
3 years ago

in fact, legalization will reduce crime. i saw a 60 Minutes segment (way back when I watched the MSM) and these two black junkies stole a $25k mercedes to buy $500 worth of heroin, that cost maybe $1 to make. that’s the math for crime fueled drug use. just give junkies their fix each day and the costs to society go way way way down.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
3 years ago

Z Man; A very perceptive connecting of the dots. I confess that I was bewildered by the sudden eruption of addiction and OD’s in my remote part of the world. Your analysis is great explanation for the general supply side situation but it is missing a piece, namely Section 8 vouchers. Hereabouts it seems that we have been deliberately salted with them as a means of keeping a lid on complaints by inner city residents of Cloud Land about the downsides of inner city vibrancy they are forced to live with by using said vouchers to displace any of the… Read more »

Member
3 years ago

the war on drugs was lost and drugs won. That’s why our rulers don’t talk about drugs or the drug war much anymore. It’s just one of those things that has been quietly forgotten.

Actually it’s more pernicious than this. The War on Drugs has indeed been lost, but it is not forgotten. It is merely soft-pedaled when Democrats hold formal power, because talking about it would make them look bad. Democrats are out of formal power. Look for it to return.

Horace Pinker
Horace Pinker
3 years ago

Fentanyl-laced heroin from Mexico has been responsible for a recent surge in overdoses in Philadelphia. I live here and work in the ghetto. The other day when I was leaving work, I saw a junkie openly shooting up while sitting on the sidewalk a few feet from my car. The syringes, used condoms, and little baggies that litter the street are usually left there overnight. It was odd to see someone shooting up in the afternoon. At that time of day, I’d guess that 50 – 80 cars drive down the street each hour and you occasionally see kids walking… Read more »

el_baboso
Member
3 years ago

For years, the Mexican elites could threaten us with a Mexican civil war with battles and violence flooding over the border and mass immigration (I’m talking refugee camps here) if we didn’t take their population overflow. The Mexican TFR is 2.25 and falling. They no longer have that leverage over us.

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  el_baboso
3 years ago

plus the wall

Guest
Guest
3 years ago

Just out of curiosity, did you write this post while microdosing on mescalin, as referenced in a previous post?

http://thezman.com/wordpress/?p=6993

alzaebo
alzaebo
3 years ago

Why aren’t the non-addictive opiates being heavily marketed? They attach to the same receptors, without addiction.

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

it’s my understanding that with long term heroin usage, the addict no longer experiences euphoria. they have to take the drug just to feel normal.

CaptDMO
CaptDMO
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

Just like booze.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

To keep from barfing profusely in the morning; no, no euphoria left

Best workers in the world with a coule 5 minute breaks though. Heroin patches would work better than needle parks with syringes everywhere underfoot.

Desert Rat
Desert Rat
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Years ago I saw an interview with Newt Gingrich wherein he was asked about the war on drugs. His response was that what we were doing was not working and that the U.S. should either legalize the stuff or get serious and make distribution for sale a capitol crime while decriminalizing recreational use. I also note that the Chinese shoot drug dealers but apparently this hasn’t solved the problem as they seem to always have more drug dealers to shoot. The money is just too good to resist for some people. Any idea what the drug problem is like in… Read more »

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Desert Rat
3 years ago

There’s a great saying, “There’s no government like no government” I am always amazed, how can a government make something that grows like a tree, or a weed, illegal, how can a government make human behavior illegal, how can a government make people behave a certain way, how can a government decide what you can or can not do to yourself? I’m not advocating government shouldn’t be involved, I’m advocating government should be involved in it’s people figuring out naturally how to deal with people things their own people way. We made it all this way through thousands of years,… Read more »

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

10th Amendment solution- 50 sovereign experiments.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

Time to knock the feds back down to size yes. Most defiantly 50 sovereign states with Congressmen selected by each of the states senates. Every action taken that redresses to Republican Constitutional form of government nullifies the feds and empowers the will of the governed and States rights.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Maybe we could simply re-legalize crosstops- no zombies before 1980.

Meth economy politics rule the lower classes now. Everything from who gets the kid to who’s on disability. Oxy must be the new improved competitor.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

alzaebo you answered your own question.

jdallen
jdallen
3 years ago

My stepson is an ICE agent, for about twenty years. I have discussed this crap with him and his ICE and DEA buddies many times. The agents at the point of the spear are not dummies, they’ll tell you that the Mexican government IS the cartels and the cartels IS the Mexican government. Giving money to the Mexican government is just paying the cartels. Think Danegeld. There’s not gonna be any stopping this. It will continue to get worse. Even if all heroin traffic over the border is stopped, and I would not bet on that, it’s very easy to… Read more »

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  jdallen
3 years ago

it would be trivially easy to stop. just have the government buy up lots of heroin, and mix it with arsenic. then give it to dealers, while at the same time announcing what you have done. if people still want to play with fire then, well, better to weed them out early then. at the end of the day, the lower classes will simply have to take more responsibility for their own well being.

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

so your saying arsenic is harmless? 😛

Clayton Bigsby
Clayton Bigsby
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

How about just Silver nano particles? More politically acceptable …. I don’t know the dosage thresholds to induce argyria, but it could be a modern day ‘scarlet letter’ of sorts ….or exploding dye bag…

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

How about government just leave it to people to figure out how best to manage it instead Karl?
Is that a terrifying thought?
I know I would get a little testy if the government made a law only it could wipe my arse when I take a dump.
Wouldn’t you?
This whole drug war is the same freakin’ thing.

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

that in fact is my actual position. make it legal and then let normal laws apply if you cause a car accident or something. use the taxes to fund treatment centers. the recreational users — of which there are many — will provide the money to help the chronic users. at the end of the ay, it is the mouse’s responsibility to avoid the traps.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

War on your own citizens. Kill the sinners.
Gee, nobody ever thought of that before.

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

hahaha spoken like a true cuck — do nothing and wring your hands!

Chiron
Chiron
Reply to  jdallen
3 years ago

Yup, the Zetas Cartel is basically the Mexican Army Special Forces.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Chiron
3 years ago

Las manyas are the street level footsoldiers fired and replaced with military professionals. They had to resort to widespread kidnapping and robbery; touching Cartel business- drugs- means your head will be delivered in an ice chest.

Or, since Aztecs have a macabre sense of humor, your head might end up as a hood ornament. They then park your truck facing the front door of your house, waiting for the wife and kiddies to come out in the morning.

Ya know, Brave New World is starting to sound mighty fine

kokor hekkus
kokor hekkus
3 years ago

As Steve Sailer has repeatedly pointed out, the rising death rate of middle class and working class whites is highly correlated with the economic destruction of their incomes and net worth in the last 30 years. I personally know two individuals whose businesses have been destroyed by the influx of off-the-books illegal labor. Both have spiraled down rapidly, though they haven’t killed themselves, yet…

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  kokor hekkus
3 years ago

Spot on. A lot of folks lost everything because of those free trade agreements. Including hope and a belief in a better future. It didn’t just devastate the breadwinner but his family as well. The kids knew their job prospects would suck just as bad and their options were few. The military, college if they wanted a mountain of debt and a useless degree. The thing that made it so bad, was that free trade destroyed entire communities and their associated social infrastructure so there was no safety net. Except empty words from tough talking libertarians(who didn’t work for a… Read more »

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Rod1963
3 years ago

Meth and disability are how millions pay for cable. Sometimes even some rent!

Member
3 years ago

I want to constructively comment and discuss this article, but it’s too personal.

Teapartydoc
Member
Reply to  Taco_Town
3 years ago

There are a bunch of stories I could tell about this subject but I might get sued if I ever get doxxed. Not taking that chance.

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  Teapartydoc
3 years ago

Surely you can give us your insight on drugs, human nature, etc?

Teapartydoc
Member
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

Sorry. This is too big of a problem to handle in a post. There are no pat answers, but the one glaring error I see in some thinking is that religion can’t help. In many instances it is the only help available, and it works better than any secular solutions. I do think that more jobs and more self reliance would help. I’ve known some doctors that have had problems, and some that have traded narcotic prescriptions for sex and money who have had their licenses taken or suspended. Some of these cases are inexplicable to me and a couple… Read more »

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Teapartydoc
3 years ago

Wrote more on this above, but worked for in Fire/EMS right outside NYC, so saw this coming a long time ago. In the early 2000’s you’d hear the stories from agencies up county that covered poorer districts, but was not long before it cropped up in the high income districts like mine. The delay seemed to be more a function of having the financial wherewithal to keep finding more black market Vicodin before having to turn to heroin. But by the time I got too old for the job, we’d gone from having to get a medic to administer Narcan,… Read more »

Alex
Alex
3 years ago

Two books examine this problem, the first being the memoir Hillbilly Elegy and the second being Dreamland. I recommend both, but the “best” story is Dreamland. Sam Quinones tells the story of the rise of opioid pills in the US, the crackdown on over-prescription, and the subsequent rise in Mexican black-tar heroin. Riveting story, and the adoption of pure, distributed capitalism by a small segment of the Mexican criminal underclass is engrossing.

Dutch
Dutch
3 years ago

Amen brother! From my outpost near Tijuana way, border control is the key, and lack of it creates so many other problems. Border control will morph the opioids problem, but not solve it. But it will also change the complexion of the economy overall here in Southern California, and make things much more “above board” when it comes to jobs and other aspects of living. The Hollywood types will lose their “paid in cash” servants, and veggie prices will go up, but all in all, a great trade-off. The gist of the Mexican situation is that their 0.1% super-wealthy have… Read more »

Dan Kurt
Dan Kurt
Member
Reply to  Dutch
3 years ago

re: “veggie prices will go up” if illegals were gone from California, etc.

Not so. Picking machines were demonstrated in the 70s but politically stillborn. With today’s advances in robotics there would be no need for human pickers. Robot picked and sorted lettuce, grapes, etc. would be even cheaper in constant dollars. Fresno et al would return to being American cities instead of Mexican.

Dan Kurt

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Dan Kurt
3 years ago

They tested the first mechanical grape picker next to my house- at night.

The workers used to come up for the season, then go home. Can’t anymore, so they stay and abuse bennies.

Mobster Cesar Chavez’s men used to wait in the fields with baseball bats. Sometimes you would see burning labor buses on your way to school. Chavez was born in Indiana.

Teapartydoc
Member
3 years ago

Burke in RotRiF:
“You lay down metaphysic propositions which infer universal consequences, and then you attempt to limit logic with despotism.”
If there is anything we should have learned by now it is the folly of the universal proposition. Even the seemingly mildest of these can be carried to an extremity. Religion, tradition and prescription and prejudice would be the barriers keeping us from doing this but apparently they are no more. Is despotism all that is left to us? If it is, then let it be the despotism of the right and not the left.

Member
3 years ago

People are on drugs because they’ve got nothing else to do, and there’s really no shortage of money raining down from the Cloud People. The way you resolve the problem is to give people a purpose. In human history, we’ve seen what happens when we give people an evil purpose in order to get them focused. But I think we have an opportunity to give people a purpose for the good. And that means jobs. Most people who get themselves in a hole really don’t want to be there. It’s a wretched and miserable existence, no matter how much our… Read more »

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  hokkoda
3 years ago

when people say they get high on life, I tell them they haven’t been high. cannabis is called “poor man’s heaven” so imagine what heroin is like! if your real life is absolute misery, then drugs are a rational choice. so to curtail drug use, you absolutely have to give people a decent life, or at least a chance at one. anything short of that is a waste of time.

LetsPlay
LetsPlay
Member
Reply to  hokkoda
3 years ago

“We” need to give them a purpose? Who is “we?” How about some personal responsibility and motivation? How about picking up a book and learning something? How about volunteering at the local VA Center and start networking? Something, anything!

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  LetsPlay
3 years ago

oh come on now, don’t be a pedantic prick. clearly i used “you” in the sense of “if the problem is to be solved”. no one here — no. one. — is a socialist.

LetsPlay
LetsPlay
Member
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

Touchy aren’t we? I see that my comment was actually in response to Hokkoda and his mention of “we” and not you Solomon. Sorry to disappoint. And as for no one here is a ‘socialist,’ well, I think I have encountered a few comments over time on this site so one can never be sure of the real thing or the “tongue in cheek.” Chill.

Chu
Chu
3 years ago

A large part of the population has been brushed aside, and the pundits often say they need to adapt to the modern world – so move to San Fran and get a job at Google or suffer the consequences. But they’ve been handed the shit end of the stick from Washington, and it was no more clearer than this past election why they will not support the globalist neolibs like the Clintons. And all the left does is whine about how we have a ‘malignant narcissist’ or Hitler ruining the world. Yet, they seem happy to neglect the plight of… Read more »

Solomon Honeypickle IV
Solomon Honeypickle IV
Reply to  Chu
3 years ago

fukk Krugman in the ass with a sword. call it the Quadaffi Treatment.

LetsPlay
LetsPlay
Member
Reply to  Solomon Honeypickle IV
3 years ago

Ha ha ha. That is funny but I would want to put this clown under some duress before ending his pathetic life. What a douche bag!

Teapartydoc
Member
Reply to  LetsPlay
3 years ago

Don’t worry. It would probably take a day or two for him to die if this was to take place.

DiogenesLamp
DiogenesLamp
3 years ago

It is irritating when people declare the “War on Drugs” a failure. First of all, it’s not a war, it’s a holding action. If it were a war, it wouldn’t be a failure. Second of all, one only need look at what happened to China after 1840 to see what a losing a “War on Drugs” does to a nation.

The Death toll from China’s legalization of drugs is at least 100 million dead.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  DiogenesLamp
3 years ago

100 million dead and a deep hate of the West. The British popularized opium in China in the mid-nineteenth century.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Dutch
3 years ago

Opium was legal in China until Mao. After 1949, the Chinese Communists also started the world’s largest opium farms, with heavy colonization in SE Asia, the original Golden Triangle. What was illegal was any product missing the Emperor’s tax stamp. The Emperor is always paid first! Whether pigs, pig iron, or opium poppies. The Han hated their Mongol conquerors’ stranglehold on the economy. The tongs asked the British to bring in untaxed opium from the Raj’s India, to fund their 300 year old secret civil war against the throne. In return, the British were given port access and warehouses. The… Read more »

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

Damm! Of course an overlong post forgot Pappy Bush’s BCCI bank- and the resultant cash flows through Drexel Burnham’s junk bond division, which allowed Mike Millikan to rebuild thousands of American communities with millions of square feet of tax shelters.

See? The economy depends on drug money. Not as bad as pensions (CALPERS) depending on slave labor in Communist China.

Member
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

Golden Triangle was run by Khun Sa, a Burmese and former KMT-trained soldier, not by the ChiComs, who had little to no influence in that area.

It was the Manchus, not the Mongols during the time of the opium trade.

The East India Company was British.

The FARC is Colombian, not Venezuelan.

Where in Perú is naval intelligence running “drug farms out in the open”?

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Montefrio
3 years ago

Thanks. Burma/Myamar is a vassal of China, and the KMT is still officially Communist. (Found out that little surprise during the Hong Kong handoff.) Manchus were Mongol stock. British East India hired an American captain; our faster clipper ships had run right through the British blockade of Russia’s hemp in 1812, the first global drug war. No hemp sails or rope, no deep ocean shipping, as cotton rots quickly in salt air. Marijuana was as important to transport as oil is today. FARC is backed by Venezuela. Anti-imperialists somehow always engage in imperialism and colonization, funny, no? The Peru allegation… Read more »

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

PS- the top crops of the rich American colonies were tobacco, marijuana and hemp, potash (burnt oak), and lumber for the King’s Navy. Then Eli Whitney invented his cotton gin, making cotton worth fighting for. It was better than wool, but had been hard to process by hand. Spengler at Asia times did a fine survey on how governments have always warred over control of the drug and spices trade, including tea, coffee, cocoa, amaranth (Aztec maize), etc. “Drugs in America”, A 400 Hundred Year History, was authorized by and presented to President Nixon. They recommended a return to the… Read more »

Member
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

And thank you! What’s the Martin book you mentioned? I’ve never heard of him. I ask because I spend time in Perú.

The FARC has been around a long time, long before Chávez in Venezuela.

The KMT was Chiang’s army and to the best of my knowledge was never communist. Plus which, opium was illegal in China long before 1949. Some of your sources appear to be inaccurate with respect to details.

YIH
YIH
Reply to  DiogenesLamp
3 years ago

Singapore won ”the war on drugs”, the Philippines is fighting it using the Singapore method.

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  DiogenesLamp
3 years ago

are you saying 100m chinese OD’d? if so, please provide supporting evidence.

Teapartydoc
Member
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

Do you see any Chinese people from the 1840’s walking around? What more evidence do you need? Sheesh.

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  Teapartydoc
3 years ago

hahaha good one

DiogenesLamp
DiogenesLamp
Reply to  Karl Hungus
3 years ago

I’m saying drugs collapsed China economically and socially, and as a result made a dictator inevitable. There may have been 100 million Chinese killed by drugs, not just by overdose but by collapsing their ability to make a living, but there were definitely 100 million killed by Mao, and he too was a primary consequence of the Drug disease in China.

Member
3 years ago

Mexico is a failed state. Fish or cut bait time is nearing. Just as a little over a hundred years ago the US Army did what the Mexican Army would not do, we may have to do again. Sad that Mexico is so corrupt and dysfunctional.

james wilson
james wilson
Reply to  Uncle_Max
3 years ago

There has never been a time when Mexico was not a corrupt and dysfunctional state. Now it is a corrupt and dysfunctional state fueled by oil wells and narcotics. Strangely enough, there is now and again the occasional reason to be optimistic about Mexico. Trump may help that along amidst the screaming.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  james wilson
3 years ago

Mexico could start by getting rid of the big May Day parades with all those Red Labor flags. No wonder Trotsky fled there.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Uncle_Max
3 years ago

It’s been cut bait or fish time for everyone, for a long time. There is nothing for it but to do the deed. That wall is going to change many things. They know it down there. Mexico isn’t going to be the 51st state much longer. Or is that 52… no wait a minute, 53! Seriously, the cartels and the Mexican ruling elites, gee did I repeat myself?, are going to end up in a bloody civil war for the spoils remaining when that wall goes up. The guys building it are gonna need body armor, armored earth moving equipment,… Read more »

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Heck, a few years ago, Mexican Army helicopters were strafing Border Patrol on the US side.
President Supergenius didn’t say anything about it, either.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

Somewhere there is a piece of paper with a signature of a certain Secretary of State granting cross border authority for the movement of every weapon that went south of the border during Operation Fast & Furious. Not even a screw from a weapon can cross the US border without that authority. What is worse, is the moment the Mexican’s knew that cross border authority was granted on those Fast & Furious guns it was open season, they had perfect blackmail leverage to do whatever they liked. “Elites”, nothing elite about the ruling class, what saves them from their stupidity… Read more »

Clayton Bigsby
Clayton Bigsby
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

I’ve had this Conversation at the bar and shooting pool with the boys…. fact is, I probably know 30 people seriously into long-range shooting ( seems to be all the rage of late) and they probably know hundreds more….we would have no trouble assembling a bunch of people to head south and practice long-range marksmanship …..Kind of a Snipers for Trump thingy……Not to mention the horde of ‘Volunteers of America’ if they needed people to swing hammers on the wall….. probably make a an Amish barn building crew undermanned….

Clayton Bigsby
Clayton Bigsby
Reply to  Clayton Bigsby
3 years ago

Ooops… make them LOOK …undermanned

Member
3 years ago

I’m very worried about the brownification of America. Is that going to be something we can solve? It will certainly have to involve getting rid of the filibuster. That is the only way to get rid of Immigration Act of 1965 because I don’t ever see being able to scrounge up 60 votes to do that.

DFCtomm
Member
Reply to  TempoNick
3 years ago

America as well as the rest of the West is toast, as we know it. The great sorting is coming, and borders will change, drastically. Territory will be lost.

DFCtomm
Member
3 years ago

Chicago is a central hub of drug distribution, and that’s what’s fueling the violence. I can’t quiet recall, but seems like at some point in the past Chicago was the hub of organized crime distributing an illegal drug, anybody else remember that? What did they do to stop it then?

Doug
Doug
Reply to  DFCtomm
3 years ago

Notice how in one way or another Chicago is the root of almost every political and social problem in America? It’s red diaper brat commie cultural marxist fucking central.

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

It’s also the industrial powerhouse of America, as well as the global clearinghouse for commodities and currencies.

Ours is truly an odd world.

Why do communists always flock to where the treasure is? Almost seems like they’re lying criminals.

PS- the Democrat Socialist Alliance had members heading 76 of the 80 Congressional committees in the Pelosi-Reid Congress… then member Obama got elected on the Mortgage Meltdown.
DSA is headquartered in Chicago.
As was Alinsky.

A radical faction first takes control of the Congress/Parliament, then the Presidency, then the economy. History rhymes, don’t it?

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

Double-damm! Hillary is also a DSA member.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

Here’s a partial list: William Ayers, Saul Alynski, Frank Marshal Davis, (I’m thinking Malcolm X, Angela Davis), Bernadine Dorne, Cass Sustein, Rahm Emanuel, Valerie Jarret. The Weather Underground and the SDS, FALN, NCHA. Barry whats his name?

Doug
Doug
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

Oh ya, HRC was a deciple of Alynski.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

Because socialism/communism and statism is a shakedown system of power. Natural gas is the perfect allegory. Chicago is the trading hub for natural gas, it has to come through pipelines. Bottle neck in distribution, own the pipelines, get rid of coal thru regulatory power and the creation of the farce of globull warming, artificially inflate the price of petroleum, presto, you have a monopoly. Energy is so critical to this world now it ranks up there with air water and food. Control all or any of those you have power and wealth unimaginable. Take a guess who are heavily invested… Read more »

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  Doug
3 years ago

Bill Ayer’s dad- Commonwealth/Edison Energy of Chicago.
Pierre Trudeau and Maurice Strong of Petro Canada. Chretien of FITNA. Rachel Red Notley of Canada Hydropower.
Future Presidents Bush and Salinas (Mexico) running the Texas Railroad Commission then, and drug rackets later.

Oil, drugs, weapons, FX- almost seems like a pattern. Shades of Smedley Butler!

Karl Hungus
Karl Hungus
Reply to  alzaebo
3 years ago

“was”

alzaebo
alzaebo
Reply to  DFCtomm
3 years ago

They ended Prohibition?

jeffersonian
Member
3 years ago

Well. The first thing to consider is that the Federal war on drugs now encompasses at least 16,000 Federal employees who have a vested interest (wages, benefits, and perks, including near absolute power) that they are loath to relinquish and you have the most rational explanation for why the alleged “war on drugs” will never be won. My sincere sorrow and condolences go out to the family of this unfortunate young woman.

J Cass
J Cass
3 years ago

Shooting the dealers in the back of the head works too.

J Clivas
3 years ago

The term “white death” is already taken; it refers to tuberculosis.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
3 years ago

I’ll weigh in with some perspective from twenty years of Fire/EMS experience in an affluent district near NYC. Strictly volunteer, my real job is in finance. This is no longer a lower class problem. Cropped up first in the lower income areas in communities to the north, but soon spread. In the early 2000s only medics carried Narcan, then the EMTs, then we put it in all the medical bags on the rigs, now the cops carry it, since they usually reach the 911 calls first. But in my last few years, our guys were running calls to plenty of… Read more »

Fuel Filter
Fuel Filter
3 years ago

Here is a completely different take on opiods, a senseless tragedy, one all here should read before they go off on their rants:

Steveaz
Steveaz
3 years ago

Two things:
The most commonly abused class of drugs in America is Prescription Drugs. Let that sink in for a moment…

And the wealthy abuse more drugs than the lower classes but they are more adept at masking the physical symtoms of their narcotics use and at finding “legitimate” sources to support their habits. This means the wealthy users escape detection and so do not show up in drug crime stats.
-s

FaCubeItches
FaCubeItches
3 years ago

“When heroin had to be imported from Asia, it was not easily attainable and the quality of the product available to the poor was quite low. ”

Frank Lucas respectfully disagrees on both counts. At least in its area of control, his organization flooded the market with cheap, high-quality heroin.

PRCD
PRCD
3 years ago

“When a normal kid who seems to be headed in the right direction drops over dead from something they got at a party, people wonder what’s going on in the world. They naturally look to their rulers for answers.”

The parents need to look no further than the mirror.