Poor Rich People

One of the great challenges of the demographic age will be re-conditioning people to think culturally, rather than materially. This is particularly true of conservative white people, who have been trained their whole lives to define their existence by the amount of stuff their heirs will throw away when they die. Theirs is an entirely materialist existence, so the transition to cultural thinking is going to be difficult. An example of this is in this post by Steve Sailer regarding public venues.

He starts with the observation that the ancients built a lot of very sturdy stone theaters and arenas, while those who came immediately after the fall of Rome did not built anything of significance. It was not until the Middle Ages that we see the building of large public structures, but those were cathedrals and churches. He notes that it took until modernity to build large public arenas. Sailer then jumps to the conclusion that the Greeks and Romans must have a lot of money relative to the Middle Ages.

Now, it certainly required a great deal of money to hire men to build amphitheaters and arenas in the ancient world. Reallocating thousands of people from farming and military service can only be done by a wealthy society. The early medieval period in Europe was not a time of great prosperity. Wealth is not enough, however. Those theaters and arenas were not just the toys of rich people. They were not built by rich people, at least not in the way in which our sports arenas are built today.

In fact, the more apt comparison is between the arenas and theaters of the ancient world and the cathedrals and churches of the Middle Ages. The theaters built by the Greeks were an important part of their cultural life. The plays and festivals reinforced the cultural values that made Greek life possible. The arenas built by the Romans were not just for sport. They also had strong cultural importance. The reenactment of great battles tied the Roman to his past and to his ancestors.

For most modern white people, Sailer’s instincts on this seem natural. After all, we live in an age without any sense of culture, other than the endless war on what is left of white culture by the brown tide sweeping the land. For most Americans, the point of life has been to stuff their pockets with as much stuff as they can. The measure of life is your pile of stuff. The super-successful at getting stuff build really large buldings where you can buy stuff, like sports jerseys to remember buying stuff.

It is a good example of how the white people who came along after the Second World War became entirely materialistic in their thinking. This is not a Baby Boomer issue, but more about the legacy of their parents. That cohort went through the Great Depression and then the privations of the war. In the ensuing boom times of the early days of the empire, they justifiably enjoyed the fruits of their labor. It was a golden age, relative what came before, so they quickly learned to value material prosperity.

The so-called greatest generation gets credit for weathering the grinding depression, without embracing communism. They get credit for fighting two industrial wars on two continents, winning both and ushering in the Pax Americana. They also should get credit, and blame, for ushering in the material age, where all things are measured in material terms. The generation that built the American empire, also built a society in which everyone knows the price of everything, but the value of nothing.

It has become a meme to mock the Baby Boomers for their obsession with stuff, but it is a society-wide phenomenon. Modern America functions like a ghetto riot, in which the culture is a liquor store. Everyone is just smashing and grabbing what they can, not because they need it or want it, but because that’s what they do. This is particularly true with conservatives. All of their arguments, particularly those that fall into the cultural and spiritual, have been reduced to economic appeals.

In the long scope of things, the American empire will be seen as an entirely artificial construct, built on the wreckage of Western civilization. The two great industrial wars that opened the 20th century exhausted the people spiritually. This includes the people who claimed to have saved the West. The cultural achievements of the American empire, such as they are, reflect that lack of spirit. The American empire and the culture around it is a lifeless zombie shuffling through time and space.

A simple way of seeing this is the fact that Los Angeles, the home of Hollywood and the center of American popular culture, has a homeless camp in the center. Estimates say it contains 70,000 of our fellow citizens. Yet, the super-rich who run the city are not concerned in the least. After all, they have their stuff. Even the most callous of Roman emperor had compassion for the poor of Rome. The modern American oligarch has nothing but contempt for those who cannot consume product.

The current ructions are not a response to the changing demographics as the suicidal wreckers like to claim. It’s not about the transition to a post-national order. The reason for the growing unhappiness is that modern American society offers no purpose, no beauty and no reason to celebrate life. It’s an ugly age with a sterile ascetic that reflects the transactional nature of the age. This is an unnatural state for people, so the people are increasingly unhappy with life in the material age.


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Alex
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Alex

It is worth noting that the current generations in control and ascendance, the Millenials and Gen Zers, both seem to eschew the drive to buy more stuff. Of course their urge to “have experiences” and Instagram them concurrently is just as damaging, as anyone who has discovered a that a favorite outdoor secret spot is covered up by morons taking pictures of themselves.

Its all so tiresome.

Carl B.
Guest
Carl B.

Prosperity = Weakness, decadence, and ultimately collapse. Same as it ever was. What will the “Soi-Boy Generations” be given “credit” for?

LineInTheSand
Guest
LineInTheSand

Can a civilization be prosperous and not degenerate? I hope so, but I do have an affinity for the Spartan existence.

Must we renounce prosperity?

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

Some voluntary renunciation of nonessential do-dads is always a a good thing.

Member

That probably depends on your definition of prosperity. People with a place to live along with food and shelter can probably be called prosperous at least in most respects.

DLS
Guest
DLS

Studies show that after basic food, clothing and shelter have been obtained, anything above that does not make people happier. One study put the amount at about $70K per year for a standard US household. No one believes that though. It seems to be hardwired into our bones that more stuff will make us happier.

Member

I believe them. Having a bunch of Walmart junk is not going to improve your life. Not to mention we have to throw so much of it in the trash because of how poorly it is made. Nothing lasts anymore.

Thisisme
Guest
Thisisme

Agreed. Stuff is so poorly made it cannot be repaired anymore. Unreal. Iv’e stopped buying China one trash can at a time. Buy American. Remember how we pushed that meme? If I can’t afford something that is made right, built anywhere but China, I probably don’t really need it. Working hard for your food, clothes, shelter, and, (used to be able to say), private property, is all you need to be happy. More than that and it becomes strife ridden. We have been so busy in the Cash Cuisinart of keeping up with the Jones’, we forgot to take time… Read more »

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

The problem, at least for many of us, is that we don’t want stuff. My family doesn’t. We want land, and privacy, and the ability to learn and acquire new skills and become more self sufficient and anti-fragile. That all takes money – a good deal more than 70k a year.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

I’d love to have more land – and privacy. Not sure if this dynamic applies across the entire country – but here in New England property taxes make it very expensive to have large areas of land unless you can designate the land as a farm (means you have to work it) or in some of the northern states you can designate land for timber growing. Just having a large plot of land however – quickly makes your property tax bill unbearable without having a pretty significant paycheck coming in. And the better portion of most town budgets – goes… Read more »

Lineman
Guest
Lineman

Property tax is the most insidious because you can never avoid it…

Ifrank
Guest
Ifrank

The more spartan Spartans did, after all, defeat the more prosperous Athenians. Mandatory military service? Was it helpful to force the Boy Scouts to admit girls? Is it cruel to walk a mile to school instead of taking the school bus?

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

Renounce excess not prosperity. Our corporate run society celebrates excess – materialistic gluttony if you will along with greed and jealousy are considered virtues.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

LOL. Go ahead and try that – and see how far it gets you. Why not start with having a conversation with the average American about how we should get rid of the Fed – and go back to “honest” money , so we’re not financing all of the wars and the “prosperity” with debt and Judenbucks. Then follow that up with a conversation about how we shouldn’t be financing all of the levels of government welfare – with deficit spending. I don’t think we’d be anywhere near as prosperous – if we simply went back to having to pay… Read more »

A.B Prosper
Guest
A.B Prosper

No. But to have both you must have a moral leadership that is opposed to degeneracy and has the power to fight it. China does so they might manage to become rich and powerful and manage the degeneracy. Even ignoring the inverse morality of our Baizuo, the US has a strong Libertarian and grifter spirit and it may literally be no longer possible to have prosperity and morality since no one trusts one another or is capable of the moral control self or otherwise required. Take for example architecture. If I told most Americans that the government should ban foreign… Read more »

Penitent Man
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Penitent Man

Carl B., Perhaps the depredations and impediments increasingly heaped upon young white males will be the catalyst breaking the prosperity/weakness/decadence/collapse slide. Those Millenials and Gen Z youths that don’t become incels or sociopaths that is. I also wonder if the blame heaped upon the Boomers will also be visited upon Gen X parents like myself by our progeny? “Dad, why weren’t you in constant combat against the anti-male feminists, the anti-white progressives, the perverts in entertainment, the poisonous academics, the foreign hordes jumping the border, and the treacly God-forsaken clerics?” Where is my birthright country, Dad?” I guess I’ll use… Read more »

Brahma
Member

Non-binary, gender queer, pan sexuel etc and probably the first trans Potus

the Russians
Member

my niece sort of has this travel bug and she proceeds to get and stay hammered for the duration of the trip. the selfie is a foregone result

UFO
Guest
UFO

Travelling is fun… but compulsive “travelling” (doing drugs and having unprotected sex in hostels) is just stupid…

They say travelling makes people less racist. Well, after visiting Europe I became far more racist, in fact a deeply avowed racist after seeing the destruction the Negroes and Arabs were causing. It’s a testament to the massive willful blindness of whites – how can any sane person NOT be racist after seeing that???

Go visit Europe now while you can….

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

>>> Go visit Europe now while you can….<<<

Go visit the Hudson Valley before it completely turns into Puerto Rico. Go visit Northern New Mexico while it still has some of the founding criollos living there. Visit Arizona before it becomes a cartel war zone. Visit Utah before they all marry negroids to show what good little globalists they are.

I’m sure there’s plenty of other suggestions also.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

Stay away from Tarrytown.
Otherwise the Hudson Valley is very nice.

HomerB
Guest
HomerB

“Otherwise the Hudson Valley is very nice.” I didn’t downvote you, but from a local, a few thoughts. The town of Hudson is and has long been a shithole. If you have to pass through, suggest you remain in your car. Kingston is a great place to observe outdoor wandering meth addicts, if that’s your thing. I think they are less evident in the colder months, perhaps they migrate to warmer climes or Seattle. Chester is trying to keep the “Kiryas Joel Experience” from expanding its West Bank, er, Gaza, ah, settlements within its confines. The Red Army had its… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

I’m in brooklyn, the furthest north I can get lately is Bear Mountain.
When I was young I would bicycle-camp all the way up to Sacandaga lake. Used to go to Mt Tremper and points west too.

Judge Smails
Guest
Judge Smails

HomerB
I lived in the Beacon\ Fishkill area for five years in 90s right after IBM laid off thousands. Got a one bedroom co-op apartment for $10k. How are things looking in Dutchess County?

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

Huh. I was unaware of this Kiryas Joel of which you speak. Let’s see what Wikipedia (yes, yes) has to say. The [Satmar Hasidic] village abides by strict Jewish customs [… As of the 2000 census] the racial makeup of the village was 99.02% White, 0.21% African American, 0.02% Asian, 0.12% from other races, and 0.63% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.93% of the population. Gosh, but it sounds to me like monocultural Kiryas Joel desperately needs some diversity and vibrancy. Perhaps it needs some taxpayer funded “public housing” to facilitate that. And… Read more »

Member

Insofar as it makes sense to “work within the system” at all anymore, this kind of lawfare is where it’s at. What should the “agenda” of the DR be? Well, we probably can’t have our ethno-state before the country goes Road Warrior but how about a simple agenda for right now – hurt the elite, hurt the people who did this to us. Using their own weapons against them adds to the hilarity. I can even think of a good dog-whistle slogan along the line of MAGA – “make the bastards pay!” – MBP!

HomerB
Guest
HomerB

“During the 2000 Senate campaign, first lady Hillary Clinton visited Rabbi Twersky and his wife in New Square while running for the U.S. Senate and received nearly 100 percent of the local vote. Twersky was invited to the White House in December 2000 and secured commutations for the criminal sentences of four Skver hasidim, who had been convicted of defrauding the government of more than 30 million dollars to benefit the educational institutions of New Square.” Well, that there citation is from that amazing information source, ‘we need your coffee money’ Wiki-propaganda-media. But they do put it right out there,… Read more »

Major Hoople
Member
Major Hoople

Can confirm….that’s where I was born and where I’ll pass on.

Ultra-Pasteurized
Guest
Ultra-Pasteurized

Stay the hell out of Oklahoma.

Just sayin’.

Marko
Guest
Marko

The 2 big cities have been enriched, and the small cities are full of marijuana dispensaries. Despite this, the Plains States are where it’s at, IMHO

Exile
Member
Exile

Dindus, Hindus & Abus stand out in Norway like bloodstains on a white linen tablecloth.

It’s visually jarring to scan a tram-crowd full of vikings & tall, willowy blonde 6+’s*, then spot a hijab’d koala-lump-urian or a beak-nosed Turk, much less a coal-black bulbhead.

* fugs are very uncommon here, and I live in SoCal for comparison

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

“SoCal for comparison”

Heh. I flew in and out of LAX a few weeks ago, and texted the following to my sweetheart as they were buttoning up the plane:

Oh, getting through “security” was a freak show. The stereotype of LA being full of gorgeous but stupid people is false. It was ugly stupid people.

Exile
Member
Exile

LAX is basically Ingle-hood + all of our transiting vibrants. Not even fair to a sh*thole like LA to be judged by that crowd.

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

“Not even fair to a sh*thole like LA to be judged by that crowd.” Well, fair enough. Last summer, having an hour to kill before an evening flight (and no constructive ideas left after two long days of meetings), I drove up to Venice Beach, and sure enough, the most incredibly beautiful “California Girl” straight out of central casting — a vision of slender, long-limbed athleticism, tanned gold, with sun-bleached blonde curls tumbling to mid back — rode by on her beach cruiser bicycle. So that memory partially balances out the Squatemalans, meth heads, and huge black women with 50+… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

I’m a Norwegian Air fan now – the only diversity I had on the whole flight here were a couple of well-mannered well-groomed Asian fams. Quite a few Asians here, FWIW, chatted up a Korean waitress last week w/family in HelLA, helped me with some of my still infantile Norsk vocabularly. Fellow Ice People don’t trigger me like Sun People up here.

HomerB
Guest
HomerB

Try Danbury, CT Wal Mart.

Jim Smith
Guest
Jim Smith

Been there, done that. The Walmart in Danbury, CT.

SidVic
Member
SidVic

Bloodstains? They brown, shouldn’t that be shit stains?

Exile
Member
Exile

Trust me, that was my first thought. Just trying to maintain our customary high-toned conservatism around these parts. Tea pinkies up, y’all.

SidVic
Member
SidVic

Well yeah, leave it to me to bring the conversation straight down into the gutter. On the other hand accuracy and precision of language is important as well.

William Williams
Guest
William Williams

>>>Go visit Europe now while you can….

Is it too late to visit Cape Town?

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

No, not too late to visit Cape Town, just that you have to bring your own water supply. Pretend you are camping. 😉

Gauss
Guest
Gauss

Europe is becoming a museum; the legacy culture remains for now but the caretakers are replacements. Tourists pass through, visiting the buildings erected centuries ago. It’s like going to a Disney park: representations of a bygone era or fantasy but not the current reality.

Exile
Member
Exile

Steyn called the shot & pocket on that 10 years ago. A future where a few token English concierges and corporate spokesmen are all that’s left of British Empire.

I’ve discussed with Our Guys here the idea that America might need to be the “Ark” for Whitey someday. Thankfully they’re not ready to give up on Europe, because we have a long way to go to build that Ark over here yet.

Exile
Member
Exile

Ladies, the first things we look at when you apply for a job are your Faceberg & your Insty. The Internet is forever – ask Ashley St. Sexlaptop.

https://www.counter-currents.com/2019/06/coal-burning-point-usa/

Drake
Guest
Drake

I’ve seen extremes both ways with the youngsters. Some willing to live in shoe-box apartments to get the “urban experience”. I’ve also had interns who drive nicer cars than me – leased or financed with 5+ years loans versus mine I bought with cash.

John Smith
Member

No chit! And I don’t know what to make of it! I am following a young man on OyTube who fascinates me. He looks and sounds like a soyboy. His schtick is that he bikes across the continent in the summer on a fat bike – a mountain bike with ludicrously fat tires. He literally will ride from Alaska down to the lower 48 and tool around there – living outdoors the entire time, carrying only what he can on the bike. In winter he literally lives in a minivan, kitted out with solar and diesel heating. He works in… Read more »

Lorenzo
Guest
Lorenzo

He might not be any good at raising a family. Extreme types seldom are.

Member

Historically, 50% of men have no offspring: they’re genetic throwaways,

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

>>> Historically, 50% of men have no offspring: they’re genetic throwaways<<<

Or a huge source of potential converts

Exile
Member
Exile

Exactly. A lot of those “throwaways” and “extremes” are just taking what they see as the best option. If I knew in my 20’s what I know of where my dating life would lead, I would have made some serious changes much earlier. It’s been fun but there was no future in it.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

John these tubers are not anti-consumerism. They simply consume a different source of things to fuel their wants. Would he quietly and anonymously embrace a hand-to-mouth spartan life if nobody was watching? These live in the now types tickle the fancy of escapism but they will not escape an unplanned future. The idea of living with less stuff is not a bad one, but I know several of these people, some 20 years later when they have no savings, no career, questionable social skills, sparse real life connections, but all kinds of wants and needs, and it is not so… Read more »

John Smith
Member

What a great post, ST. I dunno about my guy on OyTube. He is definitely a marginal character, or at least, his Tube personality is. And yes, I can see his future being one of poverty quite easily. My daughter is pissing away her youth the same way and it drives me nuts. In my life I have tried to split the difference between boomer consumerism and the live-for-the-moment X’ers and Millennials. I still ended up with a house full of crap that I should sell and de-clutter… but like your Mom, I can’t seem to bring myself to do… Read more »

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

It makes me cringe to see it. And it is everywhere. A simple dinner out reveals an acceleration toward something that is getting more difficult to imagine. The more time and space I spend away from that culture, the more of an affront it is when I have to step into it for a moment. There is a gauche ugliness to it; the clumsy theatrics of their public personas like so many B actors in an overproduced novella. They can’t hide the panic, their anxiety, the constant spiritual grasping at straws and signaling of the hip-cool-woke. No wonder they are… Read more »

Penitent Man
Guest
Penitent Man

Screwtape,

Nothing to add except a note of appreciation. Particularly good posts today, Sir. Good observations.

Jay Dee
Guest
Jay Dee

You should compile your commentary, ST. I’m serious. Throw it into a random blog of yours at the very least. I’d be a reg’lar reader.

Exile
Member
Exile

Good points. Everything is switching to a rental rather than ownership model. Like most consumer traps, it looks like progress – you can enjoy great stuff & services for very cheap, but the hook is that you own nothing. As Z has pointed out before, you feel the hook only when your refrigerator or your car flashes “access denied” because you’ve been caught sh*tposting on GAB or you “punched down” at work.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Although there is more “stuff”, much of the stuff is not of substantive functional difference from previous “stuff”. Case in point, currently I’m replacing my light switches in the home with “smart” switches. Basically, the old, “dumb”, switches would continue to work for another 20 years—but I’m bored and needed a project. The interesting part is finding a solution that allows the old tried and true manual operation to remain, but allows some benefit of communication among the switches. Having to access your cell phone to type on/off commands or yelling “Electra, turn of my lights” is ridiculous. Perhaps our… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Can anyone explain to me why on God’s green earth I would need or want an internet-connected refrigerator?

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Because—technology! 😉

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

BTW, first thing I saw after setting up my new mesh wireless network was my damn LG refrigerator wanting to “join”. WTF? I had this fridge for damn near 10 years and never knew it was “smart”.

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

>>>Can anyone explain to me why on God’s green earth I would need or want an internet-connected refrigerator?<<<

Shut up and eat your maggots, goy

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

The real reason is so BigTech can track your eating habits and sell that info to other companies like the one you get your health insurance from and who then will have a reason to jack your rates up or cancel your policy. The same applies to NEST and similar hi-tech gizmos. Amazon is positioned with it’s line of big brother products to not only know what your likes and dislikes are, who your friends and what you guys talk about, to what you eat and where you drive to and visit with. This is a governments wet dream –… Read more »

Member

Plus, you get people you don’t know monitoring your house through your smart devices and using them as nodes in botnets. Exciting!

Maus
Guest
Maus

I am gobsmacked by this willful blindness to the surrender of privacy. I have a genX friend who is race realist and probably politically aligned with Our Thing; but he insists on bragging about acquiring his illegal (in Mexifornia) .50 cal rifle within earshot of Alexa. I made the conscious decision to keep him in the dark about the depth of my commitment to DR until I can convince him that Amazon tech is not as cool as he believes.

KGB
Guest
KGB

I’m still at a loss to explain how these devices actually improve one’s quality of life. The tasks they accomplish are so simple that avoiding them seems to plumb the very depths of sloth.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

You can show off your tech BS knowledge to your other techie friends. Status signaling. I remembered about twenty years ago on vacation with the brother-in-law (big techie type). He had one of the first GPS car navigation systems, which at that time needed to connect to his laptop in the car. Damn thing never worked right. First gas station, I bought a standard road map. From then on the trip went a lot faster, since we never pulled over for him to make the software work. I’d just pass him, and he’d have to follow me.

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Actually, that’s something we do need to stock up on – lots and lots of paper maps of everywhere. We’ve never relied upon GPS and I don’t plan to in the future, either.

Penitent Man
Guest
Penitent Man

3g4me,

Yes, do. They are becoming harder to find. Wife and I were often out of cell range while traveling through the Ozarks, parts of desolate Texas and New Mexico high desert. At one point I had enough of Google maps having mental meltdowns and popped into a gas station for a map. Two gas stations, three convenient stores and an auto parts store later I found some at a truckers gas station. If I had one more pimply millennial clerk ask me why I didn’t just use my cell phone maps.. I, well, nevermimd.

Exile
Member
Exile

The harder-core preppers point out that paper books could be vital in a major collapse scenario, maps too. A lot of us into camping have hard-copy maps but if I lose power for long, all my books are going to be gone. Good thing I have a decent memory, but much will still be lost. The ultimate anti-fragility is an oral tradition like the Balkan bards who science says reflect Homeric tradition even today – also the ancient Celts & Germans. “Book of Eli” for all its cheessiness & negrolatry showed how to beat both fractured power grids and loss… Read more »

HomerB
Guest
HomerB

Said Millenials will be ‘buying less stuff’ because the older generations, in their wisdom, caring and unconditional love SOLD THE FUTURES OF THEIR OFFSPRING – so they could enjoy those lofty pensions, academia jobs …. while the ELDERS compare notes about the values of their homes, portfolios.

The luxury auto business? Once the youngins come of age, consider it dead. And similar enterprises. Old folks now getting their asses wiped by glorious PoCs? Consider them lucky – the youngins gonna euthanize grandma.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Homer, nonsense. Plenty of poor Boomers out there. As for the ones now ending their “reigns”, as I’ve pointed out before, the largest inter-generational transfer of wealth is now occurring. Bloomberg estimates it to be about $62T when all is done. You make the same mistake as many do when you compare the wealth of Millennials with Boomers—age within cohort. Millennials are in their poorest phase—as were Boomers—in their 20’s and 30’s, while Boomers are in their absolute wealthiest phase in their 60’s. However, it’s no great shakes being in your “wealthy 60’s” since actuarial tables give me a lot… Read more »

HomerB
Guest
HomerB

Well, not being a Boomer, but interacting with people of different ages and situations, via business travel – I have attended services in towns where there are lots of low income elderly. Can’t say I know all that many middle class older folks ‘transferring wealth’, no matter what Nanny Bloomberg publishes – to kids once the nursing homes get done thrashing their life savings. If you trade places with me, are you going to do the brake job on my wife’s truck? I have the rotors and pads already, you know how to back out the calipers, and I think… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

I still have some leftover clutch pack from when I rebuilt my Econoline’s automatic tranny ( i hate it when you’ve got leftover pieces and you don’t know where they go);
Do you think they’ll fit in her truck?
I’ll toss my 40 foot ladder on the van’s roof, if you need any help with that damn roof.

Pleased to meet you.

Brahma
Member

Boomer bashing is rubbish, Boomers suffered from immigration, downsizing, outsourcing, AA, union busting etc. They manned up and did the best they could. It’s called survival and none of us modern people know what real hardship is”the black plague”?

DrDog
Guest
DrDog

Walk into any Millennial hip eatery and you might as well add an hour to your wait. They spend more time taking pics of their meal than eating it.

Brahma
Member

In many ways they’re extremely childish, don’t get it

Brahma
Member

Saw a millenial idiot yesterday standing outside a crap bakery holding up a crap cake in the light to photograph it. A crap pastry, zombies!

Drake
Guest
Drake

To members of the “greatest generation” who were adults in the 30’s, I give very little credit. The 20’s were prosperous times, when the inevitable recession hit, they threw it and their freedom away for leftist class envy and FDR’s nonsense promises. The Great Depression was entirely self-inflicted BECAUSE they embraced socialism (if not full-blown communism). The rot had started back then.

Ultra-Pasteurized
Guest
Ultra-Pasteurized

I’m curious.

Do you make a distinction between leftist socialism and rightist socialism?

I ask because over the past few years I’ve learned of, and begun studying, Germany’s remarkable rise out of the Depression after uncle lampshade’s gang of merry misfits were voted into office in 1933. Their economic policies shouldn’t have worked according to the “experts” but they worked really well.

I now make a distinction between types of socialism. What do you think?

Member

There is a lot of debate, most in the negative, as to whether or not uncle lampshade’s economic policies really worked. Recall they were only in power 6 years before the war. They immediately imposed very harsh rationing right at the beginning of the war. You might want to check out a book called Into the Darkness by Lothrop Stoddard, who as a fan. It’s called into the darkness because at night, no light could be visible. No street lights, dark curtains, no stop lights, nothing. Given the very short period uncle lampshades was in power before the war, I… Read more »

Ultra-Pasteurized
Guest
Ultra-Pasteurized

A nationalist and truly conservative version of socialism seems like a valid alternative to capitalism given what globalism has brought, to me at least. Maybe I watched too much season 2 MITHC though.

Nation over markets. America first and foremost. That kind of thing.

Needs a better name than NSism though.

Member

The abuse of social programs in the US makes so many whites think these things are bad in and of themselves. It really is annoying to be in the supermarket spending your hard earned money while Tanisha with her 5 illegitimate kids in tow whipping out the foodstamps to pay for a bunch of junk-food. They are seen as wealth transfer vehicles from whites to diversity. Now the Indians are getting in on the gibs with their usual fraud and dishonesty. People in Europe had no problem with this type of thing because they never had to put up with… Read more »

Member
Felix_Krull

Their economic policies shouldn’t have worked according to the “experts” but they worked really well.

They ran a massive deficit. They’d have experienced a sovereign bankruptcy if they hadn’t happened to stumble across some under-utilized gold reserves lying around their neighbors’ basements.

Brahma
Member

German’s prosper in any system, smart, industrious and organised. East Germany was the best country in the Eastern block

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

As I’ve gotten over Libertardianism, I’ve come to view certain things FDR did as very positive and worthwhile.

Specifically, the CCC and WPA built structures that still benefit us 80+ years later, while giving young men a sense of purpose and cohesion.

This is one example of seeing people as people and not interchangeable economic units.

Drake
Guest
Drake

Having actual jobs would have also given them a sense of purpose without binding them to the state. But FDR spent the 30s systematically destroying the economy while erecting the welfare state we have now instead of families.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

It’s called “alignment of interests”. Good things can be accomplished by arguably less-than-good methods and it all works out fine in the long run. The wealthy and the government used to have a much greater fealty to the alignment of interests with the middle class than they do today. Big government/small government is a separate argument from the practical results.

The alignment of interests between Mussolini and the Italians made the trains run on time.

Brahma
Member

Il duce is still much admired in Italy today

Michaeloh
Guest
Michaeloh

“This is one example of seeing people as people and not interchangeable economic units.”

Can you explain?

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Problem is the courts have pretty much killed this type of workfare. 30’s for all its faults was a different country. People only wanted a job. If they were talking about rights, it was only the right to make a living and have a job.

Today? Well not so much. You have right to the sweat and toil of your neighbor, i.e., welfare in its many forms. Your only responsibility…well nothing I guess. 🙁

A.B Prosper
Guest
A.B Prosper

Part of the problem is that the modern economy is far more efficient and that efficiency destroys jobs. The arch example, Craigslist nuking newspapers but there are plenty more. The Internet means it almost impossible even for popular bands to make money off selling music which is something that many people could do into the 90’s In the broader picture by FDR’s era less than half of people lived in rural areas. The UDSA notes this In 1900, just under 40 percent of the total US population lived on farms, and 60 percent lived in rural areas. Today (2016 edit)… Read more »

Michaeloh
Guest
Michaeloh

Back in the olden days when i was a reliable consevative and believed all the fables of Buckley and Friedman I shared your hostilty to FDR and his programs. But now I understand that outside the extremes like Maoist communism and unfettered, sell your daughter into prostitution Capitalism, the system isnt as important as the demographics. For instance, what FDR style program have the Nordics, pre- diversity, not been able to make work reasonably well (and been pretty darn happy with the more egalitarian societies they built)?

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

Blame the rape victim mentality is alive and well I see. You know back then, the average American lived in small towns or did subsistence farming, IOW they worked their asses off, No safety net, no nothing for many. When the GD hit it was of no fault of their own. They just got by one day at a time. The urban factory worker didn’t have it much better. Neither group had political clout just like it is today. And BTW both Communism and Nazism were seen as valid alternatives to capitalism during the GD. Though Communism was never popular… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

I don’t blame FDR. But today is today, not 1930. There are no victims, only volunteers.

Penitent Man
Guest
Penitent Man

“The 20’s were prosperous times, when the inevitable recession hit, they threw it and their freedom away..” I dunno Drake. I think most folks didn’t live the Great Gatsby or Hearst lifestyle. Most folks that relocated to the urban areas got a mean but slightly livable wage existence during the “roaring 20s”. For my kin the 20s meant they could buy one whole bolt of fabric to make dresses for all the girls in the family and the roof was tar papered. The Depression meant flour sack dresses and caulking an abandoned rail car for shelter. Dirt poor to third-world… Read more »

Brahma
Member

They were infinitely better than their children and grandchildren. Decent and tough as nails,modern people are rubbish. Watch an old movie

Member

I once had a Gen X guy tell me: “the guy with the most toys at the end wins.” He also billed himself as a sort of Buddhist, believe it or not, and lectured people on the advantages of a brown rice diet etc.– when not helping run a particularly rapacious ad agency. To me, he epitomizes what this article is talking about — someone dedicated to the meaningless pursuit of “things” — who is also desperate at some subconscious level to find some spiritual value in his life. It is increasingly obvious that we must choose between short-term material… Read more »

Member

America is like the middle-aged fat wife who sits up in bed all morning in her dressing gown eating chocolate bonbons and reading her Harlequin romance. Sooner or later she’ll sicken and die a miserable death.

Carl B.
Guest
Carl B.

Sooner or later she’ll sicken and die a miserable death.

Sooner or later we all do. And that includes nations, culture and all.

Outdoorspro
Guest
Outdoorspro

Speak for yourself, CB. I plan to live fast, die young and leave an unidentifiable corpse.

Ok, so I’m not young anymore. Not that fast anymore (‘cept when I ski). Still think I can manage the third part.

The Right Doctor
Guest
The Right Doctor

Damn – I just realized that I no longer need to worry about dying young!

Member

I don’t know. Maybe her long-suffering husband will just come in and off her one day.

Mark
Guest
Mark

Heh, I remember a riff from some comedian comparing the US to Elvis; came out of nowhere, took the world by storm, had a resurgence, died fat on the toilet…

Member

And drugs. You forgot the drugs.

Member

If we care to understand the idea of individualism in that too many put it above culture and community it tells us all we need to know about our current state. Pretty easy trap to fall into when culture and community are almost nonexistent or discouraged by the Marxist progressives.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

That’s the thing, we have no larger community now. The homeless live in the center of town both because people who don’t live next door don’t give a rip, and also the family and close-in community (relatives, neighbors, close friends) used to take it upon themselves to either get these people help, a cloistered existence somewhere off the street, or shame some of them into straightening up and flying right. Theatres and arenas used to be built by communities to add to the public weal and ennoble the patrons. Corporations and individuals doing such things took it upon themselves to… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Perhaps we don’t give a rip about the homeless because it is all so old and continuing. The answers proposed have been tried over and over again and the problem remains. One gets tired and moves on. I know this is harsh. But, here where I live, most of the “problem” is with males who are drug addicted or mentally unstable. The courts repeatedly have struck down any societal ability to arrest and incarcerate such individuals. It seems to be their right to live and die on the street and our responsibility to put up with it. In the desert… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

In a real community, the relatives of those homeless people would have been shamed by the community into doing something about that son or nephew that can’t or won’t take care of himself. In a real community, the remaining homeless would not be allowed to set up shop anywhere near people’s homes, by threat of severe physical violence, ignored or aided by the local constabulary. In a real community, breaking and entering, under these circumstances, would be met with a quick and justifiable homicide. We don’t have many real communities anymore.

Exile
Member
Exile

For as much as I laud Whites for empathy and trash the Asians for lack thereof, functionally the Asian shame-culture results in fewer elderly & disabled Asians being warehoused, more living with family who care for them than in White culture which relies on feelz alone.

By forgetting the face of shame we have forgetten the faces of our fathers & mothers.

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

how will these homeless locusts’ “family” shame the community being devoured (by the locusts) when they are all from out of state?

I say relocate all the homeless to Puerto Rico and let them eat FEMA left-overs.

Oh, love the person bow-hunting them in SF.

Maus
Guest
Maus

Dutch, I completely agree with your take on the erosion of community; but the problem of homelessness in CA is not a homegrown one. Statistically, we have 25%+ of the entire nation’s welfare caseload. If you are going to be poor, lazy and ignorant, why not do it in sunny California? Anecdotally, my northern CA city is a destination for homeless drifters who’ve learned that they can get cheap tar heroin here and free food practically 24/7 from a local mega-church that blithely believes it’s doing God’s will. Our reputation for charity is so widespread that more than one state… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

A real (unpozzed) community would block the bus loads from coming in, and buy lots of one-way bus tickets out for the undesirables. A real community would keep cheap tar heroin and free food away from the menu choices of the transients. Of course, a pozzed community gives you all the rot along with a community consensus on doing all this stuff. Which is why I usually preface “community” with “real”. The pozzed community is a simulacrum of a real community, but missing many essential elements of a real community. Which is why a lot of people fail to understand… Read more »

Tykebomb
Guest
Tykebomb

Why should our rich, upper class care about poor people in America? Capitalism has raised millions of Africans out of poverty. And why should men in America get college scholarships when Afghan girls can’t go to school? The morality of America is the morality of the left: fuck your neighbor, you’re helping the Human Race(tm).

When the sewage systems have rotted and the mob rips them out of their homes, they will scream “but I built a well in Africa!”

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

Our current metapolitics, both Left and “Right”, views people as merely economic units.

We need a better way.

Wolf Barney
Guest
Wolf Barney

Their vision is humans as interchangeable economic units, living in little pods, stacked up on top of each other in urban areas among other “units” of all races from all over the world, obediently working and shopping and watching netflix and of course, all having the same “woke” opinions. That’s the goal.

Maus
Guest
Maus

The nihilism of the bugmen wants to destroy the ties of kith and kin and subject everyone to the hive. I’m no particular fan of Roosh V, but one take-away from the collection of his “national tour” videos is how much every big city in America is marked by a bland, gray similarity while the small towns of middle America still preserve noticable cultural distinctions that are nevertheless grounded on shared bedrock values. As his tour concludes (21 of 23 venues), he is visibly exhausted physically, mentally and spiritually from what he has experienced. For a great take on the… Read more »

Marko
Guest
Marko

I like Hunter Wallace’s terms of “progressive liberals” and “conservative liberals”. It’s all neoliberal. I would favor a kind of – what to call it? – civic nationalist socialism. Something without the LARPers in red armbands and Nordic supermen.

Wkathman
Guest
Wkathman

Zman has been crushing it lately! Ours is an age of nihilistic materialism. Nothing short of a spiritual reawakening can save us now.

Carl B.
Guest
Carl B.

Gonna take Armageddon for that to happen i’m afraid.

Hilltop
Guest
Hilltop

A lot of people think it’s coming. Just read this today, from Severian, sometime commenter here and very fine Outside The Gate blogger in his own right.

http://www.rottenchestnuts.com/its-inevitable/

Severian
Guest

Thanks for the love, y’all.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

True and that’s how I ingest today’s blog post. However, I can’t help thinking whether we have a chicken-egg situation here when we discuss cause and effect. We talk of acquisition of stuff, but the 20th century was the century of invention of “stuff”. Easy to be a person of ascetic bearing in a world of limited alternatives. But after WWII, with the mastery of mass production, electronics and communications breakthroughs, credit, we were off to the races. I still remember living in my first home, late 40’s, early 50’s design. Closets were no bigger than the towel closet in… Read more »

John Smith
Member

Correct. Actually, depending on the times, you guys were doing very well. In my neck of the woods, back in the fifties, if you had a 700 sq. ft. home, that was upper-middle class. The high rollers might have had one car in a tiny one-vehicle, dirt floor garage in the back yard. It was like that for my Grandmother – I can still smell the grass and gasoline for the lawn mower. She herself was always perfectly presentable and smelled like leather and perfume. Poverty is largely as state of mind, perhaps. Today’s average negro welfare slob has it… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Worse, today’s welfare slob lives in poverty and outright filth, worse than animals in a barn. When I was growing up, even folks in trailers were clean and tidy. Poverty was never an excuse for uncleanliness. If that’s a Western value, then I’m all for keeping such in whatever society we develop from here out.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

“The theaters built by the Greeks were an important part of their cultural life. The plays and festivals reinforced the cultural values that made Greek life possible.” Television has played that part for us, for the past 50 years. But the TV shows, which were produced and edited by a small cohort of leftists, were not reflecting our culture, but changing it; we willingly lapped up cultural garbage created by misfits, weirdos, and psychos. I recently caught a couple of episodes of Lassie, and the contrast with any current TV show is amazing (and frightening to see). My point is… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Norman Lear and “All in the Family”. 1971. A big turning point, right there.

Wolf Barney
Guest
Wolf Barney

1971 is significant. That’s when the Rural Purge occurred. TV shows Petticoat Junction, Green Acres, Beverly Hillbillies,Mayberry RFD, Lassie, Hogan’s Heroes, all cancelled. Later on Gunsmoke, Bonanza were gone. All wholesome shows.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

That’s correct, the Left was in ascendency in the media and we on the Right sat back and watched, unknowingly, as to what was happening. Hindsight they say is 20/20. We should have paid more attention when this phenomenon on media was called out. It was termed at that time, a “vast wasteland”—but it was worse, much worse. I remember coming home from University on break and hearing my Grandfather (he lived with us in his declining years) say that he had to be home no later than 7 p.m. to watch “All in the Family”. I asked, what is… Read more »

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

I remember watching AITF with my parents when I was a kid. After ingesting few episodes my mother said about Archie, “He’s not wrong, you know.” After having seen the depredations of the Chicoms firsthand, then narrowly escaping them on literally the last boat out of Shanghai to Taiwan, working nine years for an American government agency in Taipei (to perfect her English and save money to take care of her own mother — the rest of the family had been lost along the way), then coming to the US to complete her final two years of college, Mom had… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Yes, there is something wrong as you say. But it’s oh so common. Seems you have to come from nothing to appreciate abundance—material and political. Heritage Americans are all too often fat, dumb, and lazy.

Maus
Guest
Maus

You just know that if they remade Bonanza today, the Cartwrights would be working for Hop Sing to make the Ponderosa a green, sustainable enterprise dedicated to veganism and either Hoss or that purty Little Joe would be struggling to express xer’s transexual awakening. Of course it goes without saying that one of the episodically repeating guest characters would be a powerful black lesbian whose wisdom would be unimpeachable. And that’s how the West was won, kids…

Triff
Guest
Triff

“That’s when the Rural Purge occurred”

I live in MeTV land ..
ALL those shows are still on 24/7 here ..

Exile
Member
Exile

When I’ve lived on boats in SoCal the only broadcast TV has tended to be very old-school fogey networks like MeTV and the like. I’m more of a Rockford Files guy if that’s my Overton Tube selection but I have noticed how 1950’s-early 1960’s TV was still trying to put some high culture out there. Reversion to the mean + reversion to the green took care of that by the 1970’s. Dutch is right on the Normal Lear era, too. TV used to be kind of a ghetto, low-class thing to Hollywood types so it wasn’t as pozzed at first,… Read more »

Barnard
Guest
Barnard

You need to include movies and the pop music industry as well. Look at the way idiot progs rush to play Imagine by John Lennon after terror attacks in Europe. That is our culture to them, most people today of any age would not recognize most classic works of music or art of historical significance. Appreciation for traditional high culture was steadily eroded by the pop culture industry during the 20th Century.

Member

The basic difference between today and 100 years ago is that today’s American personality is essentially a construct of media controlled by people who have a very specific and destructive agenda. The person of 1919, by contrast, was a product of a culture that was still mostly local and traditional. The lesson to be learned if anything survives the media age is “tell your own stories and sing your own songs or someone with bad intent will do it for you.”

Exile
Member
Exile

A lovely Lilith in one of my more Faustian relationships once observed that “poor people care about people, middle-class & nouveau riche people care about things and old-money rich people care about status.” Being a natural born gold-digger, she was a shrewd observer of the modern condition and what made people tick, especially the rich. Steve’s a middle-class guy at heart. He sees social conflicts as a struggle for stuff, not for solidarity or status, the latter of which he particularly derides (e.g. Jewish country-club obsessions and Dindette hair-hate). If a mosaic-image of Petronius’ Trimalchio (“Satyricon”) came to life at… Read more »

LineInTheSand
Guest
LineInTheSand

Referencing Satyricon is pretty damned learned and on point.

Exile
Member
Exile

IIRC, we had to read that in high school. I had a Latin teacher who was a Classics fanatic and several Lit teachers who were very old-school. Hated it back then but read that kind of stuff for fun now. Those broads were right after all.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

That’s exactly the thing about community. In a real community, people will not allow the ugly and the perverse in their midst, as it reflects on everyone.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

There is a longing out there among many whites. They know something is wrong, despite what the TV, movies and the MSM tells them. They want community, a tribe, a place to belong.

To discover whites proud of who they are is horrifying to many whites but a drink in the dessert for many others. These whites don’t know what they are looking for but they know it when they find it. We need to give them that purpose beyond material goods. What greater purpose can you have than to save your people (your family) and your culture.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Speaking of all of this. I think that it’s time to start a Z Club in the Northern Virginia area. There has to be a bunch of us around here. The question is how to do it. How do you create a private club with a public announcement?

(Btw, any infiltrator would be sadly disappointed by our club. It won’t be political, though I would like to talk about ways to help the local communities – all races, of course. Want to help young men find a purpose and to know their history.)

Patrick Henry
Guest
Patrick Henry

+1 on the Z Club. Would agree with the comment above that some Millennials and Gen Z appear to be eschewing the modern consumerist (bugman) lifestyle. Have not really seem much data on the topic, however. Although if you are not forming a family and focusing on cultural values worth preserving does it matter?

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Pride in yourself and your history will make you want to continue that people and culture. The family and kids will come, but these young men will need to let their prospective wives know their feelings about their people and history, i.e. she understands that counter-education will be part of their lives.

Ultra-Pasteurized
Guest
Ultra-Pasteurized

Nice try fed.

You probably are a fed being in nova but that’s a good question I’ve been thinking about. I think it just takes IRL action and interaction at places likely to be infested by people in our thing.

And to be honest I bet there are plenty of feds in the same boat asking the same question….

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Exactly my issue, especially in NoVa which is fed central. (My guess is that feds prefer NoVa over the Maryland suburbs but who knows. God knows I have enough neighbors with security clearance.) A fed or just some liberal DB working for one of the countless DC-area NGOs wouldn’t exactly have to travel far to join our meeting. Maybe it can’t be done here, which is too bad but understandable. I’m probably not going to join a political campaign. Community groups are good, but it’d be nice to start with a core group already intact. Was hoping someone might have… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Btw, a fed would never try and have us meet. I’d assume too many legal issues. But I wouldn’t put it past some Lefty group trying to do some expose on “suburban Nazis.”

Member

“Btw, a fed would never try and have us meet. I’d assume too many legal issues.”

Thanks for the laugh,

When have the murderous thugs ever been constrained by “legal issues”?

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

True, but it would have bad optics for them. I’d still argue that the bigger threat would come from non-government types.

But like I said, I assume that every group has someone who will stab you in the back and dox you. I wouldn’t trust someone with my real opinions until I know where they work, see how they talk to their kids, what they do on the weekends, what they watch, etc.

It’s tough to keep up the act for years. They’d slip.

Patrick Henry
Guest
Patrick Henry

IRL, likely very difficult to square the circle. Yes NOVA is literally fed central. Almost easier to show up at a large conference where you know there will be feds but you will have the benefit of a large crowd.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Good point.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Btw, I was kidding about calling a club a Z Club or having any name for it. Just trying to figure out how to get people together in the real world. Looks like it not possible. Will stick with being a part of community groups and keeping my eye open.

WR outside the IC
Guest
WR outside the IC

No, getting together with people is always a good idea. Man, the social animal and all that. All of your other caveats and qualifiers apply – in spades. One problem is that NoVa inhabitants are already atomized; ain’t no community here. So you’re talking about creating something that mostly doesn’t exist. Now others will say that plenty of organizations and clubs, groups, and teams exist already. But I’d like to join/form a group that I was reasonably certain didn’t exist just for the sake of destroying everything I hold decent and sacred. So it’s a real problem, sure. Cooking club?… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

It just seems a waste. There’s a lot of talent around here, but we have to slowly search through other venues hoping to find one person similar to the commenters.

It’s like we’re search for a needle in a haystack while there’s a pile of needles is just sitting there on the other side of a fence.

But I get it. We all have a lot to lose and announcing our intentions over a loud speaker isn’t exactly staying in the shadows.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

“ What greater purpose can you have than to save your people (your family) and your culture.” Citizen…from those hated creators of Western Heritage, a passage from “Horatius at the Bridge” may be in order here. Well worth reading in full. Genius like Thomas Babington (Lord Macaulay) sadly no longer exist. … Then out spake brave Horatius, The Captain of the gate: “To every man upon this earth Death cometh soon or late. And how can man die better Than facing fearful odds For the ashes of his fathers And the temples of his gods, … Required reading in school… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

This is what needs to get to young people. I see it with my kids. The schools, the media, everyone is taking away their past. Without your past, you’re defenseless.

Major Hoople
Member
Major Hoople

Reminds me of George Carlin’s routine on “stuff”……

Apex Predator
Guest
Apex Predator

“A simple way of seeing this is the fact that Los Angeles, the home of Hollywood and the center of American popular culture, has a homeless camp in the center. Estimates say it contains 70,000 of our fellow citizens. Yet, the super-rich who run the city are not concerned in the least.” Not only are they not concerned, we are right on schedule! The ‘blueprint’ for a while now has been Brazil and we went from inching closer for decades to the downhill rapidly growing & accelerating snowball you see today. The ultra HAVES and the ultra HAVE NOTs and… Read more »

George Orwell
Guest
George Orwell

Can’t see your image, however the point is well taken. There is a part of Los Angeles called Silverlake. If you drive Silver Lake Blvd. north and proceed under Sunset Blvd., the entire length of the bridge below Sunset, about fifty feet, is permanently occupied by bums living in tents. Go about a hundred feet further north and you see modern recent home construction on the west side. These homes go for close to 1.5 or 2 million dollars. Imagine paying that to live literally a stone’s throw from a dozen insane and utterly unsanitary street people. And so you… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Silver Lake is where the Manson women murdered the LaBiancas, in one of those pricey houses.

Exile
Member
Exile

See also downtown San Diego – $2500/mo for a posh 1BR but the minute you step out the door you’re basically in a bad mash-up of South Beach & Skid Row. Nice ballpark, though – if you don’t mind wading through puke & schizos for about 15 blocks. Brag about your address to your friends as you barricade yourself inside after work every night for the Bugman Special of Uber Eats & Netflix delivered lukewarm & made to someone else’s order by the third son of a Persian cab-driver for a day’s white-collar wage. No wonder Mama Cass choked herself… Read more »

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Maybe some reading of Pat Buchanan is in order. Pat – among others – has pointed out that the Western world attempted to commit suicide during WW1. After the war – with all of it’s pointless carnage – there was a distinct falling away from the belief in God. This happened in other countries as well – but there are a couple of books out there detailing how the loss of an entire generation of males made for a British society where women went into positions and assumed power they never had before. If you believe what was detailed on… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

As with most things sh*tty in America, I’d mark the calendar around the Civil War for when consumerist cancer ran amok. Reconstruction & the Gilded Age kicked it off, gas-canned by New Thought & the prosperity gospel hucksters who multiplied fruitfully around then. WWI was a definitely a money war according to Pat in “Republic” – newer guys to Our Thing, read “Great Betrayal” and “Republic” (which he wrote as one super-long book originally) if you want the best intro to DR domestic and foreign policy. They’re definitely part of the foundation for all that Pat’s a paleo more than… Read more »

Member

1851? Compulsory Government schools in MA?

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

“1851? Compulsory Government schools in MA?”

Forcing the hated Papists to build their own schools, as they were forced out by the relentless Prot curriculum.
Many of those Papists had already been starved out of their own country, Ireland.

JFC
Guest
JFC

WW1 losses are exaggerated: Britain didn’t lose an entire generation of males.

The Eisenhower order was a terrible decision but did not represent Allied policy or even US policy.

The Morgenthau plan was not implemented, on the contrary German industry was protected by the Allies to the extent Britain and America diverted economic resources to keep German workers and factories operating.

Member

Eisenhower and his enablers should have been court martialed. His attempt at genocide was taking place while we were preparing charges at Nuremberg.

Da Booby
Guest

Not to oversimplify things, but if Britain wasn’t hell bent on maintaining unrivaled global hegemony, despite the obvious reality that it was not possible, there probably would not have been a WWI or WWII. Saddest part is, for all its hare-brained attempts to keep Germany (and France let’s not forget) down, Britain lost the empire anyway, but only after inadvertently destroying Western Civilization in two horrendous world wars. All for nothing. For less than nothing, really. The ultimate kicker is that Germany and France were the least of Britain’s concerns. As far back as the early 1800s Hegel said the… Read more »

Larry
Guest
Larry

The soaring popularity of Yoga is in proportion to the decline of a spiritual vision for Yoga is an attempted escape from the collapse of culture. This is nothing new – as The Old Testament tries to teach us in the history of Israel Every man did what was right in his own eyes Secular history has repeated the pattern discernible in the history of Israel – Suffering Repentance Blessedness Luxury Pride Disaster Suffering Secular America is now on that same cycle but it remains stuck in Pride, awaiting the disaster that will lead ineluctably to suffereing. Sadly, protestant America… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

It’s a manual, not a warning.

Outdoorspro
Guest
Outdoorspro

“The die has been case.”

That is some profound and thoughtful shit right there.

Da Booby
Guest

“The generation that built the American empire, also built a society in which everyone knows the price of everything, but the value of nothing.” Yes. Now today, everywhere Boomers and Xers are complaining about those pampered, entitled, pussified Millennials… maybe they should be asking who created the Millennials….? Sure, most Millennials are just as described, but they didn’t ask to be helicopter parented, they didn’t ask to be protected from all unpleasantries, nor did they ask to be spoiled rotten. The Boomers and we Xer’s did that. You can’t create a generation of spoiled brats and then point at the… Read more »

Member

The so-called greatest generation gets credit for weathering the grinding depression, without embracing communism. They did step over the Communist line a time or too. That’s when the socialist Ponzi scheme known as Social Security was created. Wait, you might say, isn’t that an expression of compassion or concern for one’s fellow man? Nope, it never was. It has always been about getting free stuff. The increasing instinct to give out free stuff from the government and pretend it represents charity or compassion is actually the opposite. It pushes the hard, unpleasant parts of charity onto bureaucrats, and it gives… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

The idea that “I gave at the tax office” is a huge psychological crutch that helps globoshlomo short-circuit the high empathy levels of Whites. All but the most spergy lolbertarian Whites would have a much harder time ignoring systemic squalor but for this (((One Weird Trick))).

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Government takeover of things best done locally and privately is poison. Here in California, PG&E is a disaster of a monopolistic big-business skimming operation for the highest corporate executives, but the state and local governments are salivating over, and getting their elbows out, to compete with each other to take over parts of the PG&E infrastructure. The opportunity for huge levels of government graft and skimming is simply palpable. Opportunities like this one don’t come along every day, if you are a high government official. The level of service, and collateral damage along the way, is sure to accelerate in… Read more »

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Charity should, of course, be on a personal or religious or community basis . . . however, in the current year, I most definitely do claim “I gave at the tax office” when asked to donate for school supplies (for all the pajeet/han/mestizo students) or “the hungry” (the fat Negress who just got her nails did enjoying a free Thanksgiving dinner) or whatever the cause du jour is. I saw some stupid nice White housewife holding up traffic yesterday and giving money to two Negros holding signs and I wanted to slaughter her. I have had it with grifters and… Read more »

Member

I most definitely do claim “I gave at the tax office” when asked to donate for school supplies (for all the pajeet/han/mestizo students) or “the hungry” (the fat Negress who just got her nails did enjoying a free Thanksgiving dinner) or whatever the cause du jour is.

Well, of course you do. That’s the behavior the system incentivizes.

Exile
Member
Exile

Take from the Empire everything you can. Give them only what you must.

We’re dissidents now, not patriots.

ProUSA
Guest
ProUSA

I upvote this comment. I believe in charity and low taxes. Some will keep their money and screw the charity. I think even Jesus was perplexed; I know that I am. We are coming to the point that we will be forced to help each other out, which is fine as long as we can give the tax collector a big middle finger. The best movement this country could ever have would be for millions of people to coordinate in a show of unity and not pay taxes to the beast. If a few do it, they suffer. If many… Read more »

Bunny
Guest
Bunny

Well, if taxes weren’t automatically deducted from your paycheck…for most people.

ProUSA
Guest
ProUSA

Yeah, but you/we can ratchet up the exemptions.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Soc Sec means the kids no longer had to stay on the farm. The were free to go work for the factory and bureau owners of the big city.

Cloward-Piven: break it so you can remake it.
(Overwhelm with demand.)

The key is, get your forces in place before you break it, that they will promise to bring back order amidst the panic.

Member

Mechanization had been changing the nature and manpower requirements of farm labor for decades before SS. What SS did do for both rural and urban families is help break down the web of family obligation. It was just one of many 20th century bodyblows to the family.

A.B Prosper
Guest
A.B Prosper

Feh. How Ya Gonna Keep ’em Down on the Farm (After They’ve Seen Paree) dates from World War 1 well before social security. Given a chance nearly anyone will move to the city, have since the Middle Ages maybe earlier and probably always will. Farm work and I’ve done it is drudgery and while cities are shite, they also offer opportunity and often easier work. Now I’d like to be a country squire myself but most people like what cities offer and we don’t need that may farmers anway. Economic policies from the dawn time simply make no sense in… Read more »

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

Having the reserve currency, and therefore having decades to consume using artificially low interest rates exacerbated this problem. The dollar as the reserve currency of the world created a supercharged economy in the first 30+ years, then created the deep pools of liquidity to finance and leverage that prosperity for another 40 years. The homeless in LA, just like everywhere else, are crazy and drug addicted. Not all of them of course, but they’re the human refuse of the end stage drug culture in an end stage democracy in an end stage economy. And this is nothing. When the economy… Read more »

ChrisZ
Guest
ChrisZ

A great column, Z-man, which I believe advances arguments you’ve been leading towards for some time now. A question I ask Rightist friends who lament the loss of the “good old days” is: Even if you were able to turn back the clock, what is the kind of society you would want to live in? Is the culture of barbecue dads and soccer moms really so admirable? Or the grind of the grey-flannel-suit era? Or the social life centered around bars and drinking? Each of these has something to recommend it, I suppose; and material prosperity is a blessing never… Read more »

Ayatollah Rockandrollah
Member

Politics does not fulfill us. This was once the teaching of general philosophy courses, if the professor was partial to spending a few weeks on Plato/Aristotle. The senescence of Christianity has left the West with nothing to offer its hundreds of millions except sex and material goods. It hasn’t been enough and now they are turning to political activity. The reaction to this is just amping up, and I expect there will be a confrontation sooner rather than later. If left unchecked, people with nothing else to do with their lives than engage in gossip and slander for emotional validation… Read more »

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

The WW2 generation were generally decent people, who understood what degeneracy looked like. But they didn’t really know how to live. All instant cakes and baloney sandwiches. There’s a reason so many of the women became barbiturate poppers and started reading Betty Friedan. The bored housewife was the first casualty of the modern era. There’s a reason the Stones wrote “Mother’s Little Helper.”

Evil Sandmich
Guest
Evil Sandmich

Hmm, but how much of that is “future shock”? I mean, within a generation we went from absolutely needing women to work all day, every day keep the living space from degenerating into a dirty dog house to having a bunch of machines that allowed the work to be cut to a sliver.

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

True. Once you had the machines doing that, the leisure time exploded. Leisure created the situation.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

You don’t even need to walk the cat any more, she can hitch a ride on the roomba for cat entertainment purposes.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Freed the ladies up to work in the owners’ factories and bureaus, so they could spend their new independence on daycare and those now necessary machines.

Our girls won nothing.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

When time travel allows us to assassinate a historical figure, I vote Betty.

Crazy yenta had it all, including kids and a tall, wealthy husband with a big c**k, that she threatened to cut off.

Never enough, why was she touted as an alpha female leading the femme parade.
“Salon activists, follow me!”, cried Friedan and Steinem, the Mad Avenue asset and the CIA asset.

Feminism was a psyop along the lines of the Laurel Canyon hippy freak ‘revolution’.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

(In short, the hippy revolution came from one place, Laurel Canyon, the lights leading it in music, movies, and Californy culture were all kids of military intelligence agents.

Oddly, the Colombine shooter kids were also sons of mil intel, as were most bowlers following that event. Culture. War.)

Exile
Member
Exile

The level of your culture is also important to your religiosity and overall happiness – they’re mutually-reinforcing. Just like fertility, high aesthetics seem to correlate with religiosity. Russia has one of the great cultural and artistic traditions of Europe, but it has largely stagnated from 1917 forward, at least compared to its Golden Ages. Both atheistic Bolshevism and “post-Christian” Yeltsin-era neo-liberalism produced an imitative mass-culture and crashing birth-rates and life expectancies. God(s) & Beauty are vital cultural roots which have been largely strangled and overgrown by the roots of Science and Prosperity. As a result, the modern Tree of Life… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

In a typical-length blog-post, Z conveys what it took author Peter Brown 792 pages to get across in “Through the Eye of a Needle: Wealth, the Fall of Rome, and the Making of Christianity in the West, 350-550 AD” In a nutshell, pagan displays of wealth like arenas, aqueducts and temples were acts of civic virtue and status, truly a tribute and monument to great things and by association the great man who provided them. They were status symbols, not wealth symbols. Brown argues that famous renunciations of wealth in Christian history were a syncretic variation of this – the… Read more »

Maus
Guest
Maus

We don’t always see eye-to-eye and I recall a brief spate of heated exchange that was not badinage; but I have to admit you are one seriously well-read dude (sincere kudos) and your heart seems righteous. I am curious about some of your recent comments about Norway. Have you decamped from SoCal; or were you merely extending a Scanza-related visit?

Exile
Member
Exile

No hard feelz – I don’t grudge long. Extended Scandza – staying in Scandinavia until Christmas or so then a few weeks in St. Petersburg then back to HelLA.

Yves Vannes
Member

Imagine all my possessions, I wonder if you can. No need for greed or hunger, Yet I pursue them all I can. Imagine all the people living on the Right side of the Tracks…. You may say I’m a dreamer, But I’m not the only one. I hope some day you join us, and The world will live as one. Imagine conversations with my brokers, I wonder if you can. Beef or Dairy cattle to diversity my portfolio, In case of a down turn or a muddling of plans. Imagine all the people living just like me. You may say… Read more »

HamburgerToday
Guest
HamburgerToday

I respectfully disagree. The current ‘ructions’ (nice) are about demographic displacement, and *reaction* it has precipitated. The vacuity of materialism has been noted for some time and the ennui resulting from it as well, so the extent to which a new less-materialistic culture is emerging, it’s doing so in the context of a recognition that non-material things — such as culture, custom, tradition, social trust — are *more important* than ‘stuff’. ‘Stuff’ and behaviors are the *anchors* for these immaterial things that are now taking prominence. On another note, ‘wealth’ is far too nebulous a term to make sense of… Read more »

TomA
Guest
TomA

If you’ve never seen what an actual parasite looks like, look it up on the internet. That is what the elites have planned for the untermenschen. The homeless camp in LA is a success story (in their view), not a moral or ethical debacle. Those formerly human people have been fully morphed into their parasite end-state, where they now serve as dependent minions and slavishly vote for Progressive politicians in order to assure their place at the host. A parasite has only one survival option, bloodsucking.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

I took a car up to a weekend car show at the Petersen Museum a year or so ago. I had to hope my rig, used to trailer the car, was still there and in good shape, parked a block away for the day, a stone’s throw from a homeless tarp/tent camp. The museum is impressive, but I won’t go back. I have no intention of rubbing shoulders with such a crowd living a only a block away.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

All the world as a Congo refugee camp in North Korea, only much worse, with Aztec temples.

That’s why I keep losing my sh*t here with the religiosity, apologies to those I offend.

As Britain was used and cast aside, so shall we be. China was cultivated for a reason.

Soon.

Locusts don’t build, they only move from one field to the next. Their only spiritual motivation is Hunger.

The Babe
Guest
The Babe

Tragically, I think there’s a disjunction between the invention side of materal life and the consumption side. I’ve read a lot of accounts of inventors, innovators, and entrepreneurs. For them–and even just reading about them–it’s an epic adventure of discovery, determination, and vision. The joys of their efforts constitute a substitute for religion. (For today’s topic, religion is the elephant not in the room, if you see what I mean.) Unfortunately, once production of these amazing innovations is routinized, then for their consumers they become part of the passive, vacuous, loneliness-causing, obesity-causing vulgar modern culture. Daniel Boorstin’s fascinating book The… Read more »

Karl Horst (Germany)
Guest
Karl Horst (Germany)

The Romans had three things going for them; (1) access to prime building materials; stone and marble, plus the technology to quarry it (2) a good tax system to pay for and maintain everything they built and (3) cheap slave labor to do all the grunt work. The Romans simply copied everyone else who came before them, added their own engineering technology (including lead pipes and concrete) to build exponentially beyond what any civilization had done before. The middle ages lost all of that technology, including concrete and public running water systems. No one in Europe or Britain could duplicate… Read more »

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

Karl, Americans don’t do craftsmanship well. It’s all about cheapness and quantity. You’ve driven our cars right? If plastic could vomit it would look like the inside of a Chevy. It’s about stuffing our fat American faces at the Chinese buffet and then taking a “back pill.” We do have better plumbing though. Those old European houses have toilets wedged in strange places. They don’t flow well either, as they’re not designed for modern living. It’s hard to get your three wheeled scooter into one of those old houses.

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Excellent point. Our houses are poorly made crap, but our plumbing is immeasurably better. And it may be just me, but I insist on a proper American-sized refrigerator. I’ll happily take other German appliances, but not the fridge!

Karl Horst (Germany)
Guest
Karl Horst (Germany)

The size of the fridge has more to do with how we shop. Unlike American grocery stores, we have very few canned or frozen goods. Germans, and most Europeans, go shopping at the grocery store two or three times a week, buying only what we need for a few days at a time. We don’t haul four shopping carts out of Costo and pack our refrigerator-freezers with frozen pizza 🙂

Karl Horst (Germany)
Guest
Karl Horst (Germany)

Keep in mind anything build prior to the 1900’s was never designed for indoor plumbing. Which is why my cousin has house that’s 362-years old with a WC that about 5 meters long and 1.5 meters wide. . It’s like a bowling lane with a throne at the end. 🙂

ProUSA
Guest
ProUSA

Upvoted the comment.

Eli Broad, big Democrat here in LA, built many of these homes and made a fortune. I lived in one. Almost every homeowner had to file insurance claims for water damage due to broken copper pipes. I could write about the door and window construction as well.

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

KB Homes have always been the worst. And built by illegal subcontractors of subcontractors of subcontractors…I walked into a model years ago and the handrail came off the stairs. Is Eli Broad a jew? I had to get that ball rolling.

ProUSA
Guest
ProUSA

Broadberg? Broadstein? Broadblum? I dunno.

But now he supports charter schools, even though he is lauded for “charitable” contributions. He still built crappy homes.

Member
Felix_Krull

However one only need look at Europe’s to find that even today, hundreds of thousands of us still live in homes that are over 500-years old. Paradoxically, part of it is actually a lack of engineering skill: they were wildly over-engineered, since they didn’t know how to calculate load-bearing stress and such, so they erred on the side of safety. Some Medieval cathedrals have columns that can carry more than a hundred times the weight of their actual roofs, which is why it’s often the last building standing after an artillery barrage or an air raid. Today, buildings are built… Read more »

SidVic
Member
SidVic

Contractors wisdom: Vinyl is final.

Hoagie
Guest
Hoagie

You can have your house built out of any material you want, even gold. If you can pay for it. You won’t get a stone house for the price of a frame.

Member
Felix_Krull

Alright, let me amend that: today, you don’t use more materials than necessary; you don’t design a beam to hold twenty tons if it’s only going to carry two.

Exile
Member
Exile

Every home I’ve seen in Scandinavia (AirB for most of this trip) has been built old-school, rock-solid. Hardwood & stone, not CA-style drywall & pressboard, like someplace people want their kids to raise a family after they’re gone. Putting jeets in places like I’m staying is a travesty.

Member
Felix_Krull

We spend a lot of time indoors, so a quality house is very high on the priorities list. And another thing: concrete homes are considered low-rent; most people would rather live in an 1900-era apartment in a brick building, with dodgy plumbing, creaking floorboards and a broom closet bathroom than a spanking new, concrete one with all modern amenities. What all proper Danes aspire to when they establish a family, is a “murermestervilla”, a “master mason-villa”, ca.1880-1950, so-called since it’s what a wealthy mason would build for himself. Functional, discreetly upper middle class, showcasing the mason’s skill but avoiding ostentation… Read more »

Juri
Guest
Juri

Very interesting videos. So this is how Germany builds quality homes for the immigrants. Good job…:D

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

The muslims will turn your “wonderful” homes into shacks soon enough.

You expose your ignorance when you talk of the US. In the colder climes, they build with brick and stone. In the warmer parts they use wood. Homes built before suburbanization were of much higher standards, than afterwards.

Europe is an old man on a bench, in piss stained trousers. So please don’t lecture us on *anything*.

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

Why don’t you tell us how spacious European homes are? Some of them are as large as 900 square feet! The average German has the material quality of life of a person in Mississippi; i.e. Europe is a big step backwards from here.

Member
Felix_Krull

Europe is an old man on a bench, in piss stained trousers. So please don’t lecture us on *anything*.

Pass me the popcorn, please!

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Jeez, next you’ll start chanting “USA!USA!” Can it, Karl.

ReturnOfBestGuest
Guest
ReturnOfBestGuest

Some truth to what you say, but there are “first period” (17c.) homes, built by settlers that had to clear the land first, using available tools, local materials, and labor that still stand. We also have hurricanes, tornadoes, and earthquakes. What counts as construction “code” in New England is meaningless in SoCal, and so on . . .

One of Many Georges
Guest
One of Many Georges

The Zman has correctly noted that “conservatives” often focus only on economic things, going back to Reagan.

That’s why I found this first-person account by one of the Groypers who went to Don Jr.’s UCLA thing so fascinating:

https://www.counter-currents.com/2019/11/groyper-war-ucla/

It’s clear that the rush this young guy got was from the community of like-minded people. That made the speakers’ talking points about economics seem extra irrelevant.

And this was in Los Angeles, too–one of the main loci, as the post points out, of our rottenness. White guys bonding amid the Globohomo detritus! It’s one of the most whitepilling articles I’ve read in a while.

ReturnOfBestGuest
Guest
ReturnOfBestGuest

I’m encouraged the young people have recognized the fraud that is “Conservative, Inc.” and are fighting against it. Bless ’em!

ProUSA
Guest
ProUSA

While reading this column today, two thoughts occurred: one ugly, the other peaceful.

*Black Friday and all of its mad people, stoked by mad men who have devalued Thanksgiving and Christmas.

**Watching YouTube videos of life in remote areas where you build your own cabin and learn how to survive on very little. I need books and classical music, and tools. With tools you can create, build, live, and be satisfied.

Sperg Adjacent
Guest
Sperg Adjacent

They define their existence by the amount of stuff their heirs will throw away when they die.

Yes, thank you, I do like to start my day with a dagger to the heart along with my coffee.

Evil Sandmich
Guest
Evil Sandmich

That line should go on billboards. I’ve yet to be involved in a relative’s death that didn’t involve a dumpster in front of the place.

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

Funny enough, hollywood (and lefty writers in general) pushed back against this materialism back when it first emerged post WWII. Any thoughts on reconciling that behavior, with how that same group of people now think and act?

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Virtue signalling to blend in and infiltrate the herd of that time.

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

So really, the current societal decadence will cause the system to fail, thereby creating the economic conditions for a revival of non-materialistic behavior. The wheel of history is always turning…

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Boomers were a bubble in history.
It’s a mistake to use them as a floor for economic metrics- growth, growth, growth, growth!

Ifrank
Guest
Ifrank

I think it is both, changing demographics and excessive materialism. A critical human need, as social animals, is for close human relationships. Zman’s diagnosis that we experience feelings of purposelessness is due in part to the fact that changing demographics and diversity inhibits the development of meaningful relationships with people. When the people around you are aliens with different values, religions, music, sports, language, churches, traditions, history et al, it becomes difficult to develop close relationships. Am I being unPC? Am I being culturally insensitive? So, since we don’t find sufficient satisfaction in human relationships we look for it in… Read more »

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

Excellent post, it’s why we are referred to as “consumers” as opposed to “citizens”. One thing that really drove materialism was the advent of TV which allowed Madison Avenue into the home of every American family from the working class to the upper class. The house frau was bombarded with adverts for all sorts of gadgets that would revolutionize her life. They targeted men as well, where a man was defined by the car that he drove. Lower classes drove Chevy’s, aspiring middle-class drove Pontiacs and Buicks and those in management drove Caddies. Children were exempt from the evils of… Read more »

Bunny
Guest
Bunny

They made money off Bugs.
https://www.ebay.com/b/Bugs-Bunny-Vintage-Antique-Character-Toys/723/bn_7113970427
And Mickey.
https://www.ebay.com/b/Mickey-Mouse-Disney-Plush-Toys-Pre-1968/1395/bn_94648889
And most popular cartoon characters. I can vouch for Yogi the Bear and Cecil the Seasick Sea Serpent (from Beany and Cecil) stuffed toys. As long as there has been children’s television programming, and before that children’s movies, there have been ads and merchandise targeted at kids. Television in the 50’s and 60’s was chock full of commercials for toys, breakfast cereals, drinks, etc. for children.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Watching the Ken Burns thing on country music, the program admits early on that much of what was going on was making a quick and easy buck or two for everyone involved. Which means all of the crapola about social commentary and trying to change the world with your “art” (surely true of movies, TV, and also the museum exhibition and auction “art”) is BS. Ask a rocker why he does it—booze, broads, bucks, and blow.

Bob Lee
Guest
Bob Lee

Davey Crockett built Disneyland. One coon skin hat at a time…

UFO
Guest
UFO

One thing that our side can do is to appreciate the “little things”. For instance, food. Put even 30 minutes into making a decent supper. Eat it slowly, and savor it. Be thankful for the company eating with you. If you have no company, savor every bite and be thankful that you have this amazing food in front of you. Be thankful for the house or apartment you have, even if it’s not much. I’m thankful for my heated apartment – coming in from the cold into a cozy, warm room. It’s not a very nice room but at least… Read more »

SidVic
Member
SidVic

Z makes a good case against the materialism but i will push back a little. Prosperity is good. I’ve lived in the third/developing world and i can tell you indoor plumbing and nice reliable auto counts of a hell of lot. Antibiotics and modern medicine are also game changers, big time. As far as the super-rich; a guy like Musk probably does consume vastly more resources than a typical middle class guy. Same amount of food, maybe 2x-5x more oil, wood etc.. In his case he is spending his concentrated wealth on a space program and thank god because nasa… Read more »

Member

When someone can build a successful, self-sustaining city in the inland region of Antarctica, I might start taking talk of Mars or Moon colonies seriously.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Yep. Also note, we’ve never, ever, even built a self sustaining environment for astronauts. The Biosphere project here in AZ, was a failure and has never been attempted again. How could we attempt to send a bunch of astronauts to colonize or establish a base station on Mars without such a successful experiment here on earth. Of course, that’s not the issue is it. Whole thing is a stunt to distract the rubes.

SidVic
Member
SidVic

It’s expensive, but the technology to do it is available. A nuclear reactor and a source of water and you’re good to go.

Member

Inland Antarctica is technically a desert, but there are so many years of permafrost that there’s adequate water available for a very long time to come. One of the many ways in which Antarctica is vastly more hospitable than any off-Earth location known.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Idea! We are Ice People, after all.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Guest

We need to do space, America needs to go up. Or we shall go over the world and continue to muck about and fuck about in the mud, with the muds. We are becoming mud.

What you describe are engineering problems – and you’re ignoring we already build and sustain for decades in orbit.

Member

We build tiny little habitats in orbit that are entirely supplied in food, water, air and other needs by shipments from Earth. That is completely unworkable for Moon and Mars colonies. There’s a huge difference between maintaining a little orbiting bubble of pressurized air and creating a colony where humans can live permanently and independently.

As I said, I will take them seriously when they can actually solve those “engineering problems” in even an environment many orders of magnitude more hospitable than the Moon or Mars

Member

The great blues singer Bessie Smith was right.
“I bin rich an I bin poor. Rich is better”

james wilson
Member

Tocqueville, 1831–I know of no other county where love of money has such a grip on men’s hearts

miforest
Guest
miforest

the last few weeks of your posting have been profound and erudite . excellent job of seeing the forest through the trees.

Greg
Guest
Greg

I’ve read your posts over the past few months, some read very well, some not so much but one thing’s for sure……you are one depressing son of a bitch. Damn, just put the candle out and go to bed.

Member

I say future historians will fold the entire American history into the “Decline of the British Empire” chapter. The British Empire was a huge and vibrant thing… then one of their colonies broke off, and Britain declined. A couple of world wars later, and the colony was still around, but lacking any kind of direction or spirit, it basically bungled things for about a century while everything fell to shit everywhere.

Berglander
Guest
Berglander

Tonight in NC-Groypers for the win!

Member

I stopped by Fuentes’ Livestream and he wasn’t on yet, but the commenters were declaring NC a loss for Groypers. That’s all I know. BTW, Fuentes seems to have a habit of scheduling his livestreams to start at a particular time, but then not showing up until long after, so if you tune in early or watch the stream later, there may be a half hour of elevator music and moronic text chat (it is YouTube after all) before he actually appears. To me that is sloppy and disrespectful, but of course his fanbois will defend it to the death… Read more »

DrDog
Guest
DrDog

This is only a sidebar to this piece but warrants saying: The ‘costs’ of building a Greek theater were comparatively low — * They are built on the side of hills to minimize excavation. * Slave labor was utilized. * The orchestra and dais were minimal construction demands, single story structures. The Romans up’ed the ante in later years but their early constructs were similar to the approach the Greeks took. ex:&q=0&b=1&p=0&a=1 Structures like the Coliseum are on par with the Christian churches. But I would offer the level of skill required to construct the cathedrals was at a whole… Read more »

Member

The cathedrals demonstrate a remarkable defiance of gravity, Amphitheater’s a reliance on it,

Johnny55
Guest
Johnny55

Zman, as an avid reader and fan, can I just make a simple observation. I would say in at least 95% of your posts, all are framed in the negative. In other words, you are very perceptive in the ills that we face, not just as a people, but as a nation and current political issues. But have you ever thought about a PROPOSAL a CREDO a BELIEF that can unify, clarify, and electrify? You seemed obsessive with the negative but unable to elucidate the positive. The dissident right will never mature unless this is provided. You have pointed this… Read more »

Tisisme
Guest
Tisisme

The $64,000 question. I’ll wait.

Thisisme
Guest
Thisisme

I say that flippantly. My apologies. Much respect for Z and posters here. This is an amazing think tank of talented people. I’m humbled and inspired. And that is from the heart. I fantasize there’s a “silver bullet”, there isn’t.

Exile
Member
Exile

Z talks about the need for positive identity more than most in the DR, especially on pods. I don’t see where you’re getting “95% negative” from.

How did “get the biology right, get the culture right, and the rest works itself out” get past you? Pretty positive basis for letting a society build itself organically rather than purely by some master blueprint. Every one of us has a dozen of those, myself included.

Ifrank
Guest
Ifrank

O, is that all? All’s we have to do is get the biology right and the culture right. Come on guys, what are we waiting for?

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Guest

He hints at it; our own, white (?) places somewhere, change one mind at a time.
I think he’s avoiding purge, Feds, and doesn’t want to attract unseemly types who might do bad optics.

He doesn’t like Conservative INC.
This is above all clear.
Or angry people.

There is no program beyond organizing small groups, hopefully local, people you know. This is definitely steps in right direction. The end state is deliberately undefined, as are methods beyond talking.

BroteinShake762
Guest
BroteinShake762

Spot on analysis, Z.

david
Guest
david

The greatest generation continued to live minimalist lives. The woman prepared food at home. The men took the bus so she could drive the kids to school or to run errands. The elderly and disabled family members lived right there with them. They didnt get divorced, stuff their folks in nursing homes, or have mid life crisis. The boomers were raised thinking their parents were cheap bastards and bought bigger houses, newer cars, did more shopping, ate more junk food and got fatter. Its certainly a boomer issue. And about LA, you have it backwards. Free shit is why they… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

For a guy who was lecturing us on “Judeo-Christian” ethics and telling us to read the Bible yesterday, your tactical libertarianism in the face of human suffering seems inconsistent. I may be an anti-Semitic quasi-heathen racist who referred to these guys as “street-sh*tting madmen” above, but my days of wishing suffering Whites into the outer darkness b/c “welfare bum losers” ended when I left Objectivism. As Mike Enoch often points out, you can condemn individual behavior but don’t lose sight of the fact that systemic causes create these systemic problems and require systemic solutions. Labeling every homeless dude a bum… Read more »

Member

You have an overly rosy view of the “greatest gen.” My Dad was a WW 2 vet as were a couple of my uncles and my maternal grandfather. They engaged in 50s and 60s materialism right along with everyone else. They presided over it — who is more of a Presidential Greatest Gen icon than JFK?

Oh, my Greatest Gen Dad was married four times. My Silent Gen Mom three. Don’t give me any crap about the moral superiority of their generations over Boomers.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Guest

Generational taxonomy is for divide et impera, and marketing.

vxxc
Guest
vxxc

Meet CyBug; BugBorg

Meet the new Bugman; Cyborg Bugman. Unable to accept death at 61 he has ‘metamorphosed” into CyBug.
Gay of course.

https://www.mirror.co.uk/tech/terminally-ill-scientist-completes-transformation-20871943

Suddenly materialism just became metaphysics.

vxxc
Guest
vxxc

You’re blocking nordvpn it seems again Sir Z

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Guest

O/T but anyone else catching Watchmen? On the surface very PC, and we have to endure Michelle Obama beating up rednecks.

But slowly an undertow builds; and I think the writers are having a little fun ala District 9 with it. We saw JJ Martin do this with GOT quite a bit, and Man in the High Castle highlighted the 1950s and our natural success without the baggage we’ve collected.

Christopher Chantrill
Guest
Christopher Chantrill

Well yes, but.

The current materialism is surely a consequence of the left’s worship of politics, and politics is always loot and plunder.

Plus, the left’s religious agenda is to demolish the middle-class culture of responsibility, which casts most ordinary people adrift.

Plus, the hollowing out of the middle class, with outrageously expensive houses and education, kinda forces ordinary people to focus on their material needs.

Member

To understand the rise in consumerism you also have to factor in the rise in the advertising industry, the breakdown of community and the rise of an elite that is in opposition to the welfare of the majority of the population.

Almost all humans battle over status and will take their cues from society to see what gives them status. At one time it might have meant a large family and role in the community. Now it is McMansions, coal powered cars, expensive phones and hating Orange Man Bad.