Getting Preachy

In the biological sciences, there are a group of measures used to test the health of an ecosystem or the health of a species. In the case of a species, estimates of the population are usually the starting place. Then it may be the population density of the species, which can determine if the pressure is the loss of habitat or some unknown environmental factor that is lowering fertility. It is assumed that a declining population relative to territory is always a sign of crisis in a species.

Of course, these measures are never used to test the health of European populations because that is a conspiracy theory. Everyone knows that all you have to do is utter the abracadabra phrase “conspiracy theory” and all of the related things that are easily observed can no longer be mentioned. Putting that aside, the same measures we use to test the health of a species could be applied to humans. In fact, we could have much more granular and accurate measures.

For example, we cannot know the total fertility rate of a frog species, but we do know the fertility rate of humans. In fact, we could break it down by race and ethnicity if we really wanted to know the answer. We know that the population of European people, relative to other populations has declined significantly over the last century. We also know the population density of Europeans in Western lands, relative to other races has also declined significantly over the last century.

Unlike frogs or bats, humans have quantifiable social habits that are tied to the health and wellbeing of the people. Church attendance in the West, for example, correlates with fertility rates. Across the West, church attendance has been in decline and along with it the overall fertility rate. In parts of Europe, churches are now museums used at Christmas and Easter for largely secular ceremonies. In the United States, the ruling classes mocks and ridicules Christians.

This overall drop in church attendance tracks with the growing social unrest and the alarming decline is social trust. Put another way, a healthy society can have a good government or a bad government, but it can thrive because it has an abundance of social capital as measured by trust its primary social institution. On the other hand, a society in crisis has declining social capital. Trust in the organic institutions like the church, declines, reflecting the collapse in social trust.

There is a lot here, but the one thing we can know for certain is that Christianity in the West is in crisis. That crisis seems to parallel the crisis facing European people, which suggests there is a connection. Maybe the decline in faith is a symptom of the overall decline in the people or maybe all of these measures have a common cause that lies upstream from the culture. The “who decides’ answer is controlling the “how things are decided” side of the formula.


For sites like this to exist, it requires people like you chipping in a few bucks a month to keep the lights on and the people fed. Five bucks a month is not a lot to ask. If you don’t want to commit to a subscription, make a one time donation via crypto. Or, you can send money to: Z Media LLC P.O. Box 432 Cockeysville, MD 21030-0432. You can also use PayPal to send a few bucks. Thank you for your support!


Promotions: We have a new addition to the list. Havamal Soap Works is the maker of natural, handmade soap and bath products. If you are looking to reduce the volume of man-made chemicals in your life, all-natural personal products are a good start. If you use this link you get 15% off of your purchase.

The good folks at Alaska Chaga are offering a ten percent discount to readers of this site. You just click on the this link and they take care of the rest. About a year ago they sent me some of their stuff. Up until that point, I had never heard of chaga, but I gave a try and it is very good. It is a tea, but it has a mild flavor. It’s autumn here in Lagos, so it is my daily beverage now.

Minter & Richter Designs makes high-quality, hand-made by one guy in Boston, titanium wedding rings for men and women and they are now offering readers a fifteen percent discount if you use this link. If you are headed to Boston, they are also offering my readers 20% off their 5-star rated Airbnb.  Just email them directly to book at sales@minterandrichterdesigns.com.


This Week’s Show

Contents

  • Baptists (Link)
  • Methodists (Link)
  • Megachurch (Link)
  • White Christian Nationalists (Link)

Direct DownloadThe iTunesGoogle PlayiHeart Radio, RSS Feed

Full Show On Spreaker

Full Show On Odysee

209 Comments
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Bilejones
Member
2 years ago

Good piece.

The great over-ride to Liberal Democracy being the consensus of ” 50 percent plus one” is the “Our percent plus one Judge” rule. This can and should be addressed by Congress, but will never be,

usNthem
usNthem
2 years ago

A perfect expose in how there is no institution one can bank on to adhere to their founding principles – even the word of God. The only overall apparent principle is getting one’s damn snout in the (((globo-homo))) shekel/opinion trough. Nothing is sacrosanct anymore other than kowtowing to the latest liberal democratic demonic fad – no matter how depraved or far afield from one’s true belief. We can only hope that White western men of true principle will rise and finally put (((globo-homo))) to the sword.

Frip
Member
2 years ago

Some of my experience with religion: At the start, mom Southern protestant. Dad catholic. Mom barely religious. Dad catholic in name only. Both believers though. In their late 20’s marriage on rocks. Mom starts turning slowly to religion. For some reason she thinks I may not live long so she has me born again and baptized when I’m six. She baptized me herself in my bedroom with a bottle of water. People around her were telling her it doesn’t count if you’re not a preacher and if the boy is too young to understand baptism. She pretty much said, “whatever.… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Frip
2 years ago

Powerful stuff. Thanks for the testimony.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Paintersforms
2 years ago

T’was, Painter. Good data.
Thanks much, Frip.

(And thamks Z for an excellent discussion of systemic effects, sans the lens of race, JQ, or party.)

Anonymous Fake
Anonymous Fake
Reply to  Frip
2 years ago

Baptism of infants is fine and even pagans can baptize Christians. Protestants who make an issue of baptism are just looking for a stupid excuse to shatter the Church. Not a serious theological dispute like the filioque. And music does matter. Even wonder why Protestants aren’t able to produce Gregorian/Orthodox chants? Or even monks at all? And yet Protestant regions of Europe always seemed to produce the best classical music composers, so whatever they are missing that erases their ability to produce chants has nothing to do with intelligence or aptitude. I posit that it is a spiritual deficit, and… Read more »

Frip
Member
Reply to  Anonymous Fake
2 years ago

Anon Fake: “Being scared of hell is imperfect contrition and it won’t save you from it, but it’s a good start.” Thanks for the words. And I agree. I always rejected and still do, the “You better believe, because hell”, imperative. However, the idea is not wholly bankrupt or just a handy mental trick. Hell humbles the mind. As does the prospect of eternal nothingness. What is the proper level of pride of mind? Someone behind the scenes thinks it’s far too high. On a different level, this really can’t be all there is. The Southern black man who was… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Frip
2 years ago

Frip, if you could speak now to your hard core atheist past self, is there anything that you could say to him that would change his mind?

I ask as a person who finds little evidence for religious belief in this world although I feel like I am sincerely open to it.

Dave
Dave
Reply to  LineInTheSand
2 years ago

Imagine what a wonderful world we would have if everyone but followed even these six of the ten commandments: 1. No murder 2. No false gods, like entertainers or athletes 3. No bearing false witness 4. No adultery 5. No stealing 6. No longing to have what someone else has The world would be closer to heaven on earth than any of us have experienced. Those and the other commandments are holy because they are not selfish or cruel or animalistic. They go against our seeming-self-interest. Put another way, what is the argument against breaking all of these commandments if… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Dave
2 years ago

I share your sentiments. However,iIn my view, these commandments are genetic within most white people, molded by our evolution in a harsh environment requiring tribes of trust. Those who broke these commandments were cast out of the tribe and died without reproducing much.

Before they were invaded by brown people, most Scandinavians instinctively followed these commandments despite being mostly atheist.

Conversely, no amount of Christianity is going to make a majority of Africans follow these commandments.

Frip
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
2 years ago

“Frip, if you could speak now to your hard core atheist past self, is there anything that you could say to him that would change his mind?” I would wait for hardcore atheist Frip to come strolling through the woods one night. Then step out of the shadows and grab him by the throat and mutter in an intense horror movie voice, “There’s something out there. Run from it and it will hunt you down and eat you alive forever. Be still and let it find you and it will show mercy.” “That’s all I get? Mercy?” “With all the… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
2 years ago

Totally off topic – but it’s Saturday morning and we all usually leave various odds and ends at the most recent thread over the weekend. Per Daily Mail, Jerome Eisenberg has sued LA’s Brentwood school for it’s woke/CRT curriculum – claiming that it’s anti-semitic and teaches Juice are oppressors. What the school teaches, of course, is that White people are oppressors, and they’re not singling out the Juice as special exceptions. In Clown World, I take my ‘amusement’ where I can – and seeing the manipulators eat their own gives me a lovely measure of schadenfreude to start the weekend.

Anna
Anna
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

3g4me: congrats, you achieved a level of so many American Blacks: they hate Jews and Whites even if these groups do something for their benefit. It is a hatred of less capable people to the more talented and prosperous groups. Growing up in the part of Ukraine that belonged to Poland until 200 years ago I observed a hatred for the remnants of Poles still living there. Hatred toward the Russians we now observe in real time. Gosh, they just forbade “War and Peace”. Poles created great writers and composers, Russians are known for same. Ukrainian writers were never translated… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Anna
2 years ago

Anna: Standard crypsis deception. You may have grown up in Ukraine, but you are not ethnic Ukrainian. In previous comments here you made no such pretense as to your ethnic and religious loyalties. Further standard, centuries-old strawman that dislike of the “Special but Equal” bunch is due to envy by the less capable.

I made no mention of Poles and Russians (among whom I have friends and for whom I have admiration) whereas you deliberately use them to deflect the issue which is not about Slavic individuals and achievements, but American Juice and their pretense as “fellow Whites.”

Disruptor
Disruptor
Reply to  Anna
2 years ago

Jeff Epstein acquired hundreds of million of dollar via no apparent means. But we know what he was doing, Jeff was jewing. Working as an espionage agent, using children to create and collect blackmail, blackmail used to generate even more generous handouts from us.

Are we jealous? No. You all have your own moral code, one we wish to be above. We do not want to sink to that level.

Perhaps another roof will appreciate your fiddling.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Disruptor
2 years ago

“Perhaps another roof will appreciate your fiddling “.

Well played.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Anna
2 years ago

Anna show up here on occasion to defend her people vigorously. Yet she never addresses the charges leveled against them. Rather, she accuses the whites who criticize j3ws of behaving like blacks who criticize whites. She is a great example of visceral j3wish tribalism. She harshly attacks the critics of her people, yet due to her ethnocentrism, she has no ability to comprehend the criticisms of her people or even to care what the criticisms are. She just wants to smash those who criticize her group. As much as I value objective truth, impartial deliberation and the ability to criticize… Read more »

TomA
TomA
2 years ago

What comes next . . . As the economy declines and rising inflation makes it difficult to feed the family, more and more out-of-work white guys are going to be lured into Jackboot service as a meaning of putting food on the table. As with the Nazi SS, Soviet NKVD, or Chicom PLA, all tyrants need a thug cadre to protect themselves and enforce their will upon the plebs. Most of the guys joining these ranks will be ordinary Joes just doing a job for a paycheck. And like all paramilitary policing organizations, when they look in the mirror, they… Read more »

Whiskey
Whiskey
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

Unlikely. The military and police are seeing White men leave in droves. Promotions are reserved for Transgender, black, gay, lesbian etc identities and inflation makes pensions have much less value. Ukraine so far is not working out as a CIA Contractor haven, so there is not much on tap to keep ex SEALs, Green Berets, etc. employed and happy. The Navy and Air Force, for example, have a big pilot shortage, and have for years, which has finally impacted the airlines which need the military retirement feeder for pilots. As Charlie Munger notes, people respond to incentives. I have no… Read more »

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

TomA I appreciate the sentiment regarding out of work white guys doing Jackboot service to make ends meet. You haven’t talked to many pasty LEOs I’m guessing. Most of the ones I have contact with are holding their breath until retirement. Some have even left early, leaving much of that big time Vegas cabbage on the table. You are still subject to the narrative. Forget about Ashlie Babbit and the lady who was beaten to death at the Jan 6 event. That was black on white, so it was all good. The issue is, even if you’re protecting the system,… Read more »

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Bartleby the Scrivner
2 years ago

History teaches that the Jackboot ranks will be filled, and the Cloud People know that this cadre must consist predominantly of competent white guys or they have no protection at all. Money talks. It’s sad, but the Ukraine war proves that the elites can get white guys to kill other white guys in large numbers.

As the economy declines, financial stress will drive some people into the clutches of the federal government, while others will join ad hoc militias to defy the fed’s tyranny. These two groups will be pitted against each other. Be smart, don’t play their game.

Whitney
Member
2 years ago

What if it is all true? What if the current destruction that we’re seeing on a truly global scale, people celebrating their perversions and sacrificing their children to State ideals is actually the ratifying of sin and the damnation of souls on a global scale? The secularization of society and the demise of religion isn’t focused on all religion. It’s one religion. The most vicious, visceral atheist who spews at the mouth about religion probably has a Ganesh or Buddhist statue in their house. They think it’s charming or they love the Earth worship of Shinto. The powers that be… Read more »

Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden
2 years ago

The imposition of elite values on the ‘lower orders’ seems to be a perennial source of social change and disruption. The fickle stance of elite classes toward their own cultural heritage does allow them to keep everyone else on their toes (after all, no one wants to run afoul of the rules of society). It also leaves the elite vulnerable to disruption themselves. What was once a revolutionary society can itself be tossed into the trash can of history.

The Greek
The Greek
2 years ago

By the way, Fox News showed its true colors by having a special on a “Brave” family that began transitioning their daughter before she could speak into a male. Thanks Fox! Doing your best to wake up normie and send him our way.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

National Review made the CONSERVATIVE CASE FOR TRANSGENDER RIGHTS a number of years back, so the dullards at FOX are just following suit. Con, Inc., is a bitter joke in a death spiral now.

The Greek
The Greek
2 years ago

Maybe Christianity itself has root problems that are bearing these fruit. Just as Islam can be easily interpreted to require war with, conversion, and subjugation of non-believers, there is a lot of scripture that is easily interpreted as everyone is equal under the eyes of god, everyone is created equal, love thy enemy, pacifism, giving sanctuary to illegals crossing the border, etc. The DR loves to rail against blank slate egalitarianism as the root cause. However, I’d like to point out that China explicitly believes in its own version of Marxist egalitarianism, but still put its own people first and… Read more »

Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

This is an interesting question. Christians managed to put their own people first for centuries no matter how much their priests may have preached otherwise. A variety of factors may have played into this, including the relative precariousness of life overall before the advent of modern medicine and other fruits of the scientific revolution. But only in this era, to my knowledge, have some Christians and post-Christians seemed so driven to self-immolation of their societies. Christians to have shifted from looking at their individual fallen nature as the enemy to their own extended ethic and social groups as ‘the enemy’.… Read more »

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Iron Maiden
2 years ago

The actual Christian values just come down from the elite at any point in history. Christianity is violent when they need soldiers, pacifistic when they want to prevent civil unrest, xenophilic when they want to bring in migrants, xenophobic when they need to get rid of an ethnic group, prosperity gospel when they want consumption, and the simple life when they want you to accept penury.

The Greek
The Greek
Reply to  Ploppy
2 years ago

I’m not so sure about that. The root of Christianity is pacifist. I believe Greg Hood at American Renaissance had a good piece on this a year or so back, but during the crusades, the church really had to do some cajoling and moral gymnastics to get Europeans interested in fighting. This was in large part because the people felt such an offensive war was contrary to Christian doctrine. As you stated, this is an example of the elites getting their way, but the heart of Christianity is pacifist and egalitarian, and that root rot will always be present, just… Read more »

RoboFascist 1st
RoboFascist 1st
Member
2 years ago

For those of you needing a line on political Zionism and the perversion of Scripture I recommend Stephen Sizer and Christian Zionism Road Map to Armageddon 2003. You can download a pdf for free here- https://www.stephensizer.com/books/christian-zionism/ A summation of this originally British Zionism (approx. 1820) heresy would be- “If Almighty God won’t restore the Jews to Palestine… then we will just have to do it ourselves.” 200 years later what you get in US government, media and church world… It is interesting to observe Evangelical Christians doped up on political Zionism telling the Palestinians that they are not entitled to… Read more »

Hemid
Hemid
2 years ago

Real-world Christianity is an absolute enemy of *us* and a far greater threat to our survival than any other religious/ideological phenomenon (yeah, even those).

Anyone who claims Christianity’s name supports it as it *actually exists*—and all it means now is replacing us with Somalians and molesting little boys.

Gonna “not real communism” about it? Get in the fucking ditch.

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

Z, Trump was brought up in a Presbyterian family. (Shudder.)

trackback
2 years ago

[…] ZMan’s weekly podcast. Highly recommended. […]

Fakeemail
Fakeemail
2 years ago

Christ was not well-known for his self defense. He prayed for those murdering him. Good thing he came back to life tho!

Frip
Member
Reply to  Fakeemail
2 years ago

“Christ was not well-known for his self-defense. He prayed for those murdering him.” That’s called having a flare for the dramatic.

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
2 years ago

Gay marriage and stripping religion from public schools were not 50% plus 1, they were 5-4 affairs that never had anything like popular support. Even one of the most progressive states in the US, California, strongly voted against gay marriage. Quite a bit of the evil of the last 77 years came from the bench overturning what voters thought. Really, we have FDR to thank for this (not to mention the tribe’s influence in the court). There is a reason all this stuff started in the post war period. By the time he died, he had appointed the entire supreme… Read more »

Steve (retired/recovering lawyer)
Steve (retired/recovering lawyer)
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
2 years ago

I took a degree of umbrage at Z’s contention that “democracy” was what caused gay marriage, secularization of schools, abortion on demand, etc., because it was precisely NOT a democratic process that resulted in these things. As you point out, survey after survey as well as actual balloting has proven that the majority of Americans OPPOSED these things, and they still do. These, and other destructive practices were all imposed from above, as it were, not as a result of some groundswell of support by a majority of citizens. Pretty much every societal change since the ’60’s has been implemented… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson

There’s quite a bit of merit to what you wrote, Steve. Leftwing Hawaii, for example, was the first state to have gay marriage, which was judicially imposed, and that decision was overturned decisively when a referendum was held almost immediately.

My take is that the Cloud’s perception of “democracy,” which just happens to line their pockets even more, was imposed via their judicial puppets. It isn’t liberal democracy as we understand it and was understood for thousands of years, but The Cathedral’s interpretation of it. What we now call “liberal democracy” is blatant totalitarianism.

Drew
Drew

Democracy is a system, not necessarily shorthand for, “laws passed by direct voting with universal suffrage.” Democracy purports to have the backing of the majority, but it is fundamentally a moral claim, not a factual claim. As long as the people administering and enforcing the system believe that they have the support of the people, it doesn’t actually matter whether the people are consulted or not. They rig elections for their benefit, not ours.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
2 years ago

Wait just a minute there Tars;

I was told that we live in a “Democracy”, and people voted on what they wanted. Are you telling me that of the 33 states that held referendums and votes regarding homosexual marriage, and rejected homosexual marriage, were ignored?!

Say it ain’t so! What about “We da pee Poe” and Muh Constitution??

Next thing you’ll be telling me we gonna have mail in voting months before and after an election.

Stop it already!!

James J. O'Meara
James J. O'Meara
2 years ago

It is interesting, is it not, that the 3 main religious factions in the USA (Orthodoxy is an ethnic niche for grandparents and Episcopalians angry about women bishops but who don’t want to become papists) each is tasked with promoting one element of our doom: Catholics: mass immigration Mainline prots: globohomo Evangelical prots: Zionism Of course, there are overlaps, but as I say, each seems to specialize in one strand. Now, the comeback is “But… they have been infiltrated and subverted from within.” Well, if that’s true, then that shows they cannot and never were able to “protect society” or… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  James J. O'Meara
2 years ago

Excellent observation regarding the trichotomy. Once you point it out, it almost seems like a division of labor, although I doubt that it was consciously planned.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  James J. O'Meara
2 years ago

I attend a Latin Mass and although we are a small congregation, I can tell you that we – including our priest – recognize the tribe for what they are, the people of the lie.

SidVic
SidVic
Reply to  Steve
2 years ago

I always look to the Supreme Court. Catholics doing fairly well with numbers. Down to one lousy WASP, far as I can tell. The jiuce, ahem, over represented.

Intelligent Dasein
Intelligent Dasein
Reply to  James J. O'Meara
2 years ago

First of all, you are an idiot. Second of all, it is not the role of religion to “protect society.” The role of religion is render due worship and service to God. Third of all, the rules of society are not something posited by men. Society has a form of its own, which is actualized by men living by natural virtue. Christianity assists with this and even commands it, but that is not the reason for its existence. Fourth of all, the rot that exists, either in the Church or in society, is in each case cause by men not… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Intelligent Dasein
2 years ago

“It is not the role of religion to ‘protect society.’ The role of religion is render due worship and service to God.”

This is why Christianity loses. Would you speak your words to the men at the Siege of Vienna?

SidVic
SidVic
Reply to  Intelligent Dasein
2 years ago

Well, You don’t want the religion to undermine society. At the very least. It’s more a render unto Caesar what is his type of thing.

Panzernutter
Panzernutter
2 years ago

Satan is real. After last night’s tv programming, I’m starting to believe it.

https://youtu.be/Jefl9jdOfpY

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Panzernutter
2 years ago

Yes, He is.

“Our J6 coverage tonight brought to you by Pfizer…”

Wait, you thought the Antichrist was a man?!

Ploppy
Ploppy
2 years ago

Frankly I don’t see any hope for Christianity unless they do something like “Christianity 2.0: Screw the meek.” Nietzsche was on to something with the idea of slave morality. You make the traits of losers into moral virtues in order to attract all the resentful peasants under one banner to overthrow the strong, but the problem for Christianity is that they got outplayed by leftism which had an even bigger tent by adding the kinds of perverts that the Christians couldn’t tolerate. Now they’re trying to play catch-up by including the perverts as well, but that just makes Christianity another… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Ploppy
2 years ago

You have Nietzsche substantially correct. The only amendment I would make is that the slaves create their own morality (religion) not with the intent to overthrow the strong (the “Master morality”) so much as to defend against him/them, the Noble or the “blond beast of prey” that is a law unto himself. Unless I quote him out of context, he also opines that primitive Christianity (e.g. what the actual apostles of Jesus lived) probably would never have gained much traction, had not St. Paul and perhaps others incorporated beliefs from Plato and “pagan” religions that were popular in that era.… Read more »

Spingerah
Spingerah
2 years ago

Churches around here are flying pride and tranny flags. That tells me all I need to know.

acetone
Member
Reply to  Spingerah
2 years ago

Where is around here? What denominations?

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  acetone
2 years ago

I have Unitarian and Mennonite hives that are both flying the alphabet soup flags within blocks of me.

This is on the city line of a blue zoo in western NY.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Not Eau Claire.
Please, gods, not the most gorgeous place in all creation.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

St. Johnsville?

Spingehra
Spingehra
Reply to  acetone
2 years ago

Puget sound area, Western Washington,. Seattle.
Seattle is Sodom & Gamora rolled into one.
Would it be wrong to pray for a nuclear cleansing?
I promise I wouldent look back.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Spingehra
2 years ago

You can bet the Naval Base Kitsap on the other side of Puget Sound is a priority nuclear target for the Russians and Chinese.

Carl B.
Carl B.
Reply to  Spingerah
2 years ago

You must live in a Blue s***hole. Here in the rural South there are no faggot flags flying on the churches.The

BTW, the best “conservative” TV show on the air Tuesday and Thursday nights is not “Tucker” it is “Flashpoint”. These guys(the four regulars are all pastors)are rock hard conservatives and one, Lance Wallnau , is as knowledgeable and based as they come.

Watch it if you dare.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Carl B.
2 years ago

It is the mainline denominations in anything larger than a small cities. I doubt there is a Congregational Church in a town of more than 100k that isn’t flying the alphabet soup flag. I am in a red state in the Midwest and they fly it here.
Congregational, ELCA, and Episcopalians are among the worst.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Carl B.
2 years ago

Do they discuss racial differences? If not, they will lose regardless of how rock hard their conservatism is. It’s all been tried before and failed. That’s why we are where we are now. Aside from the defence of the 2A, conservatives have done nothing but lose.

Frip
Frip
Reply to  Spingerah
2 years ago

I could see them flying gay pride flags. Like, a small one under the American flag. But you’re saying they added a tranny flag under the rainbow one? Perhaps you exaggerate.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Frip
2 years ago

Heh, “War of Northern Aggression”: WoNA for short. Name of a Mumford and Sons song. Always came to mind whenever Ethnarc uttered that name. I guess my time in the military made me acronymize overly long proper nouns, or the conditioning is hard to break after so many decades.

The real Bill
The real Bill
2 years ago

Denominational splits are nothing new. I believe the first wave of them happened around the time of the War of Northern Aggression, when many (perhaps all?) American denominations split over the issue of slavery. The Presbyterian church split into two main factions, which today are known as PCA and PCUSA. PCUSA is the liberal, gay-lifestyle-affirming, gay-ordaining branch, five times as big as the PCA, but declining in membership. What it means for a church to affirm and embrace woke liberal values, of course, is that they are choosing to ignore the plain words of both the Old and New Testaments.… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
2 years ago

Faith is part of positive identity. Skepticism would be part of negative identity. Multi-faith, like multi-culture, is no identity. The strange part, on the surface, is that faith by definition is unproven. So positive identity would also be, in part, unproven. But I suppose that would be the aspirational part. The creative part that by will changes conditions. I guess that’s lefty’s opening, the aspirational and the need to believe, which righty has neglected in recent decades. Which also seems to be taking the initiative rather than passively waiting for the other side to piss the public off. I’d also… Read more »

Pozymandias
Reply to  Paintersforms
2 years ago

I think this is very true. Inspiration leading to aspiration. For a long time we had a sort of secular faith in science and progress that led to practical results like the Moon landings, computers, molecular biology and countless other things. A sort of secular Christendom coasted along for generations but with a stylized spaceship slowly replacing a cross. Ad astra! Even many on the Right including very smart men in my family read things like Analog or even Popular Mechanics and thought the future portrayed there was possible, even likely. Eventually “the Left” became less about better working conditions… Read more »

miforest
Member
2 years ago

https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2022/06/in-america-but-not-of-america these folks are reproducing . they have some issues , but they are a ongoing concern. there are things to learn here.

fakeemail
fakeemail
2 years ago

Nothing new in this article, Z-man. We KNOW the demographic catastrophe was all engineered with primarily 2 basic steps:

1) Transfer TRILLIONS of dollars from family-formers to incompetents, idiots, and criminals.

2) Create feminism to explode marriage and teach women it’s better to double the labor force, pay taxes, and decrease wages than to take care of kids.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  fakeemail
2 years ago

The fundamental corrosion of feminism is that it teaches young woman that marriage is a competition rather than a union. Woman now marry for reasons of economic security (enforced by divorce laws) and the husband is just a vehicle for this journey to economic independence. Young men are figuring this out now and the result is that most woman (even the few remaining good ones) get treated like whores rather than wife material. This vicious cycle is another factor in declining fertility.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

It’s pretty telling that the system has been configured to heavily incentivize one party to break the marital contract to their great benefit.

Somehow fixing that would be a great start in moving back to a healthier culture and society.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
2 years ago

If anybody’s looking for a solution to the human condition, the Creator gave you one:

White People.

Famine, pestilence, want, violence:
Buddy, we do it all. Even speed, or flight, or air conditioning.

We can’t eliminate these things, but, by gum, we sure do get a handle on them.

Waiting for the cavalry?
You were already sent.
You ARE the cavalry. So get to it.

Barnard
Barnard
2 years ago

You have Andy Stanley and other megachurch pastors dead to rights. A couple of things to point out, these churches have been hammered by their long Covid shutdowns and are only running at about 40-50% of their pre Covid attendance levels. Stanley’s eight locations are probably only getting 15,000-16,000 per week now. Willow Creek Church in suburban Chicago recently announced they are laying off 30% of their staff. These churches all have names that either make them sound like a country club or they use a random action verb like “Embrace” or “Celebrate.” Pastors like Stanley aren’t all that concerned… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Barnard
2 years ago

This LGBTQ+P is a shit-test. If they do not kick out all involved, they will have failed the shit-test. Even if they “win” the battle, the war will be lost. Everyone involved must be excommunicated. It’s the religious equivalent of conservatives who are only concerned with “yelling stop,” it is not enough. You must impose a large cost. These LGBTQ+P don’t care about the religion. They care about themselves. Their sex lives and their anti-Christian so-called “lifestyle” are their primary focus. You don’t join a church so you change it to be more to your liking. The church can either… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
2 years ago

Sorry Barnard, I have no idea how this ended up being a reply to you.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
2 years ago

Tars: Not just the aggressively sexually confused – but also the parents. Of the handicapped, or severely allergic to PB, or whatever. “I’m terribly sorry your child suffers from ‘x.’ How disappointing you can’t conceive. How awful you suffer from addiction to ‘x.’ I understand it must be a burden – we each have our own, albeit some lesser and some greater. I can offer you sympathy, but not social compensation. Human society will not reformulate to best serve your personal interests and needs. Look not to man to make you ‘equal’ but to God for empathy and compassion and… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

It’s funny to me how so many people love to bear a cross, so long as that cross is paper mache and doesn’t actually weigh anything. Whether it’s a handicapped person or a PB allergy, they proclaim their cross loudly, but then expect everyone else to change so that carrying that cross is no real big deal and many cases, greatly benefits them over where they would be without the cross. Take the T in LGBT. Why is it not “acceptable” to carry the very small and light cross of not being able to compete in amateur or professional sports?… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
2 years ago

Good grief. Do you know how long it took Mayor Pete to learn to chestfeed?

Tested, he was! Strained to his very limits!

Frip
Member
Reply to  Barnard
2 years ago

I just watched a bit of Andy Stanley for the first time. What a joke. Says so much without saying anything. Very modern and unmasculine way of speaking, in that as an authority figure, he can’t make an authoritative statement (give any opinion / make any point) without spending 60 tedious seconds apologizing and qualifying the opinion. That cycle repeats for an entire sermon. 1,2,3. Pre-point qualifications. Brief point. Post-point apologetics. Speakers are hyper-aware and intimidated by the societal spotlight on them. Pleading before the current values. They know that the values are feminine-driven now, so whether in speeches or… Read more »

Frip
Member
Reply to  Frip
2 years ago

More accurately, the more animated and theatrical public speakers are, the more psychopathic they probably are.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Frip
2 years ago

I have heard his sermons compared to TED Talks before, I agree and don’t think he would be offended by the comparison. Andy Stanley is the son of Charles Stanley who was a prominent pastor in Atlanta. He had a TV and radio ministry similar to what the Zman described starting in the 1970s. Andy just followed in his footsteps and took it to the next level. The last 10-15 years he has consistently moved left as the popular culture has demanded it. It is ridiculous to describe what he is promoting now as Christianity.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Frip
2 years ago

In college, we would watch Jimmy Swaggart, pre-scandal, for the comedy. He was very energetic and entertaining.

Frip
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
2 years ago

LineIn: Same. Me and my brothers used to have a blast watching Swaggart. Proper Southern man’s man. (Psychopath, but still. I mean, who of us aren’t, really.)

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Frip
2 years ago

It must be an ancient problem. 19th century Prussian philosopher Friedrich of Röcken 🙂 recounts that
Epicurus (4th century BC) derided Plato and the Platonists; he called them Dionysiokolakes (“Flatterers of Dionysius”), meaning obsequious friends of tyrants; “They are all ACTORS, there is nothing genuine about them.” (Nietzsche, Beyond Good and Evil, I, 7).

Armenio Pereira
Armenio Pereira
2 years ago

That the plutocrats, kritocrats, kakistocrats, “democrats”, faucicrats, gate-o-crats and other schwab-o-crats are insufferable SOBs is by now a more than widely agreed upon opinion (in these circles, I mean); eventually we will have to move on from there and do something, or nothing.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Armenio Pereira
2 years ago

You somehow omitted the Kikeokrats.

Armenio Pereira
Armenio Pereira
2 years ago

To flee l’ennui – that’s the name of the game
We do it – the Universe does it
You can elaborate – there’s no need to complicate
The Everlasting Dissatisfaction keeps things in motion
That’s all there is to it – it’s all we ever need to know.

(to be forgotten is to be forgiven)

Melissa
Melissa
2 years ago

The Mormon church recently renovated their temple located in DC. After remaining closed for several years due to covid and then the reconstruction, it is now open to the public before it’s upcoming “dedication”. Some friends who are members of the LDS faith walked through recently and told me that the only major difference they noticed is fact that the walls are now plastered with artwork displaying black families and mixed race couples.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Melissa
2 years ago

I can believe it. Seems that many mainstream denominations have “written off” their once White constituency and are in overdrive to replace them with the new population of minorities. Butt’s in pews are all that counts it seems—which is why I’m non-denominational.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

Mainline denominatins are part of the anti-white Power Structure. There’s really nothing more to it than that.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Melissa
2 years ago

Is that the one you can see from the Beltway? Where back in the day some wag spray-painted “Surrender Dorothy” on the side of the overpass? That was pretty funny, TBH.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  RoBG
2 years ago

RoBG: I remember when that was under construction. We used to refer to it as Cinderella’s Castle or The Emerald City.

Spingerah
Spingerah
Reply to  Melissa
2 years ago

Churches around here are flying pride and tranny flags. That tells me all I need to know.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Spingerah
2 years ago

Churches should be separated from faith I think. The church (in the various guises) as a function was to my mind essentially a pre-electonic media. The church was in every village and town, broadcast the instruction messages to the population while clothed in the vestments of faith. Particularly in Europe one can see that the church’s decline is correlated time wise with the increasing access to the TV/Print control paradigm, so was not really needed anymore and is withering away as the modern “religion” messaging is passed through media instead. The TV and personalities are no different than priests and… Read more »

The real Bill
The real Bill
Reply to  Melissa
2 years ago

The backstory to that is that for most of it’s history, the Mormon Church officially viewed Blacks as second-class citizens, on the reasoning that they had been cursed by God. Both Joseph Smith and Brigham Young defended the institution of slavery. Blacks could attend Church but were not allowed to join the Priesthood or enter the Temple. It was only in 1978 that Church leadership announced that God had changed his mind about Blacks, and revealed that change to Church leadership: Blacks were now free to be full participants. So it makes sense that the LDS Church is bending over… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  The real Bill
2 years ago

The real Bill: The LDS leadership has been groveling for years now. Most of their converts are non-White – bringing lots of Mestizos and Samoans to Utah to marry their White daughters and erase their original sin of raycissm. Beyond sad. The Mormons I’ve known were generally solid people, but I can’t say their beliefs ever appealed to me.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  The real Bill
2 years ago

Ja, that was the old “Children of Ham” doctrine concerning blacks. When I was in college, Haverford to be specific, in the early 70s, some earnest young male Mormon missionaries visited the campus center. They got a lot of grief from the black students, as I recall.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  The real Bill
2 years ago

The Mormon earlier belief is surely a derivative of the Curse of Ham or the Hamites. Those interested may research the terms. Very old indeed is the belief that the Negroid race is cursed. Whether or not there is any basis to such a clearly untrue, obviously racist, elitist belief, I leave for the reader to decide. 😎

B125
B125
2 years ago

Hard to say what the answer is. Canada has even less Christian influence. It is somewhat similar to what KL described. (I am ignorant about Catholicism so I won’t talk about them here). There are a handful of non-denominational / former Baptist churches around with conservative messages. They don’t have much influence on greater society, but more as clubs for White people with common sense (ie. not totally insane). These aren’t a bad thing. There are also some Pentecostal / charismatic churches. Don’t know much about them except that they seem to be for mentally ill / insane people. Hey,… Read more »

Maxda
Maxda
2 years ago

Church and denomination splits are going to keep happening. Even to the Catholic Church eventually.
The pattern that will keep repeating:
Church splits between the traditional bible-based and the woke.
The lefty church goes off to die a slow death because why bother? If I want to worship the state and celebrate homos, I could stay home and watch MSNBC.
The bible-based church grows quickly until the woke types start causing trouble – rinse and repeat.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Maxda
2 years ago

Maxda: In church as elsewhere – White people urgently need to relearn social exclusion and shunning. The genetic aberrations and spiteful mutants used to be marginalized; now the putatively normal abandon everything to them and start anew . . . again and again and again. Spandrel’s bio-Leninism or Ed Dunning’s mouse utopia – our social environment is killing us. Without a Christian moral compass or historical cultural traditions (Zman’s “who decides”) White people have lost their moorings. Mengele was not evil because he was a notsee, but because he had no moral limitations regarding medicine and ‘science.’ Yet today those… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Maxda
2 years ago

Not a new phenomenon. During my very brief flirtation with the Roman Catholic church, a Monsignor told me there are no less than 25,000 Christian denominations. Two millennia’s worth of civilization flux explains much: The bread and wine is/isn’t the True Body and Blood, heretics should/shouldn’t be burnt at the stake, women are/aren’t to be ordained, it is/isn’t acceptable for priests to seduce female laity and/or bugger the altar-boys, and so forth. Socially similar groups will naturally settle out too, hence the various ethnic or social belief groups that self-select by denomination.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
2 years ago

What a spectacular post, Z. It is a rather big piece of meat to tear into with only an hour for your presentation. There is a lot going on here.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Glenfilthie
2 years ago

One of your best, Zman.

Get to a certain age and you think “maybe I’ll go back home to my faith now that I’m older and wiser”….only to discover it’s turned to ashes in your absence.

Also: Every time I hear “diversity is our strength!!!”, I remind myself God destroyed the Tower of Babel for a reason.

Krustykurmudgeon
Krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

i’m an agnostic so take what I say with a grain of salt. My view is that if you’re a pastor – speak from the heart and be sincere. Like it reminds me of the king of the hill episode where Hank says “you’re not making Christianity any better but you are making rock music worse .” It’s one of those things where if you’re trying to write a book and you have an idea of what you want to write and try to fit everything through that square peg – you might not like what you end up with.… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
2 years ago

My understanding–and correct me if I’m wrong–is that, while belief in God is declining in Old Europe, it is holding relatively firm in AINO. (Canada, New Zealand, Australia, I do not know.) However, in AINO church attendance is certainly in decline. This suggests to me that people in AINO who used to attend churce, now worship privately, or in small groups of likeminded souls. Christianity, in other words, has separated from the Church. My personal situation reflects this. Prior to the Covid Captivity, I attended a Methodist church regularly. Imposition of the mask, however, put the kibosh on that. Simultaneously… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

Ostei: I believe there is a decline in Christian belief, not merely church attendance, in AINO. A significant part of this is population replacement, of course. Add in the destruction of the nuclear family and the church’s embrace of popular culture to attract the crowds, and of course sleeping in on Sunday seems more appealing. We stopped attending our Episcopal church years ago when it pushed women ‘priestesses’ after initially standing firm against homosexuality. We tried various other churches, both independent and denominational, but really never felt any of them were ultimately more than any other social group or club… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Ever looked at the Eastern Orthodox Church?

I’m asking for a friend.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Bilejones
2 years ago

Bilejones: I’ve visited a number of them here and abroad and they are beautiful, but from a very different cultural tradition. And I seriously doubt my husband would be on board.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

3g4me, where do you place yourself in the Catholic-Protestant divide? Can you give your thoughts on why you are Catholic or Protestant?

You are one of the few Christians whom I find credible and I am curious.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  LineInTheSand
2 years ago

Line: Thank you for your trust in my credibility. I am definitely a Protestant, but I really don’t fit into one single category. I find the historical structure of the catholic (deliberate small c for traditional meaning of universal rather than modern sectarian definition) Christian faith very appealing. The multiple traditional daily prayers or ‘hours,’ the feast and holy days of the liturgical calendar, various cultural traditions transmuted into religious ones – all these seem, to me, to give a very logical structure and order to individual and social life. I don’t observe most of these, but I that’s due… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Thank you. When “Faith and Heritage” was active I was a regular reader as I was with “The Thinking Housewife.” Gosh, that’s 10+ years ago. I found both by reading Laurence Auster’s blog.

I hope your views become more influencial among Christians.

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

God resides in your soul. No one needs a bible thumping faggot, demanding money, to find Him. He’s already inside of you, waiting for you to wake the fuck up. Time in nature, being around animals…you can sense it. He is right there. Shlomo is scared shitless of this, you or I connecting to God…thus the endless distractions, madness, media, a shithead cacaphony with no end.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

The Methodist Church, interestingly given its Woke/Marxist leadership, is in the midst of a schism and it looks like the traditionalists have the whip hand. This is in no small part due to individual congregations owning their own property. The Woke/Marxists, of course, have insisted on keeping the name so they can wear the skinsuit until it disappears altogether. It is an interesting study in how to combat this evil across the board but the final chapter hardly has been written because certainly the tax authorities will be turned on the traditional Methodist majority.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

That’s right. I remember several years ago the Methodist council shot down heauxmeaux becoming preachers. That was a proud and glorious day for the church.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

I am certain the Eye of Sauron is on the Protestant schisms and will go after the tax-exempt status of the breakaway traditional churches. I do not discount the Catholic Church having a similar schism is another Red Pope is elected, too, and equal Regime hostility being directed at the traditionalists. Z hit on it well. The leadership of these churches, just like the corporations, propaganda organs, the Academy and all the other elements of The Cathedral, are self-interested sycophants. The Regime’s primary problem with a crackdown on the traditionalists is the presence of non-Whites in these congregations, but that… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

Also, Ostei, from what I gather the gay pastors were shot down for economic reasons. The only places where Methodism is growing, primarily Africa and to a lesser extent Korea (which also is Globohomo-lite) and the rest of East Asia, are far more opposed to sexual deviation. The liberal leadership only now has baked into the cake that those areas will follow in the footsteps of the dissident American majority.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

With the disclaimer that I never took this faith stuff very seriously, even as a small child, it even made me raise an eyebrow in late 80s/early 1990s (my late 20s, early 30s) when the infrequent Methodist or Lutheran church I visited sported a female pastor (priestess?). 🙁 Anyone else notice the slow drift to newer extremes, or lows if you prefer, as even fairly recently adopted “morality” is declared obsolete? Using sex as an example, consider the “liberation” of women, allowing them to step into roles long forbidden, now including many churches. And the latest seems to be a… Read more »

Stephanie G
Stephanie G
2 years ago

Here in Europe especially Britain Christianity has been in decline since 1918. The First World War fatally holed the good ship Christianity below the waterline. Many who lost fathers,sons,brothers,uncles and nephews asked themselves why a good all merciful God would have permitted the horrors of the trenches and the slaughter on an industrial scale. Mothers,wives could not come up with anything faintly resembling a satisfactory answer. Google The Somme and Verdun,look at the images of the trenches,the vast ocean of mud,the landscape dotted with blackened stumps of trees. Soldiers with that ‘thousand yard stare’ poison gas attacks, deliberate attacks on… Read more »

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Stephanie G
2 years ago

I wonder how many Christians actually read that Bible, much less study it. People seriously expect God to protect them as they do the most unbiblical and ungodly things. My mother in law did that: her youngest sone was born with heart problems and when he passed – she threw her morals and faith out the window. In her case it was just as well, she was one of the holier than though types. Without religion to abuse she actually became a tolerable woman for awhile… and then progressive femcnut shitlib wokism came along and she jumped right aboard and… Read more »

btp
Member
Reply to  Stephanie G
2 years ago

It may be true that lots of people figured God was the kind of guy who would make every day wonderful – a sort of 20th century Prosperity Gospel, teleported to the UK from Alabama, I guess – but I never had much sympathy for that viewpoint. Sympathy for the suffering, of course, which is profound. But those villages in England who lost every young man aged 18-30 are not the first villages to be so afflicted, neither will they be the last. But it does seem that a people who obviously never thought about the problem of evil until… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  btp
2 years ago

Superb post. As dreadful as the Great War undoubtedly was, does anybody imagine it was as horrific as the Black Death? Yet the latter apparently occasioned no crisis in Christianity, let alone its demise.

The World Wars are surely a partial explanation for Christianity’s disappearnace in its homeland, but only partial. Other more important forces are at work.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

Some earlier, trumpton I think, suggested it was the proliferation of mass media including film starting with WWI. Sounds quite plausible.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

Just to be clear I think that mass media and established churches are essentially the same thing, It is not that mass media killed religion, although on first glance that appears strongly correlated, it is that church was no longer needed to fulfill the control/manage role that media took over, and technologically beaming into every home from central transmitters meant you did not need to maintain a physical building in every village any more. The church is not the same as a religious faith and they serve 2 different functions. Its just that when the control mechanism changed, most NPCs… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

@trumpton:

Viewed as a control mechanism, yes, that point is sound. But I’m even more in agreement with my earlier semi-misunderstanding, which was the mass media imposed a new type of faith that the various regimes wanted installed. Maybe that’s a difference without a distinction, but there were elements of traditional Christianity that ran counter to what became liberal democracy, and those heresies had to be supplanted.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

Yes I agree with that part of it as well.

The distinction is as you say moot. One is a continuation of the other, with a small change in direction.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Stephanie G
2 years ago

Why does God allow “bad things” to happen to “good people” is a tell of sorts for a child-like understanding of God. Not much can be said to those people, except that they were raised with a fragile and very breakable understanding in their faith. Such people are like leaves in the wind, they blow hither and yawn. To such, I can only recommend more study—say starting with the book of Job, under a good and experienced pastor.

fakeemail
fakeemail
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

“Not much can be said to those people. . .”

Too flippant. I think they’re waiting for a half-way decent answer that isn’t some wordy blather about the gift of free will, mysterious ways, or something.

“The more words you speak, the less they mean. So what good are they?”
Ecclesiastes 6:11

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  fakeemail
2 years ago

The book of Job has the official “answer”. God’s reasons/reasoning is unknowable and that is the Word. Therefore faith comes in and must be relied upon. The reason these “believers” have this question is that they never developed an mature understanding beyond that of a child, i.e., that God is like a powerful parent that will protect them from all evil and the invariable mishaps of life. Free will is not a “gift”. Your understanding is faulty if you believe that. Free will is an essential part of man and the basis for belief/faith. Without free will there is no… Read more »

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

Some people have no interest in God’s willingness to allow abject horrors to happen, do not take solace in knowing “Oh it will all make sense one day” while you watch true suffering and slaughter. I say this as someone who fully supports, this as the basis of Western Civilization. That isn’t a child like understanding, that is a realistic human desire to question, Job’s trials or not.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

What’s really odd is how that type of person never asks himself why he allows bad things to happen to other people. Of course answering that question answers the other question, which is probably why it’s never asked.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Stephanie G
2 years ago

Stephanie G: Blaming God for the moral failings and evil choices and actions of men is merely another iteration of “MY God wouldn’t do ‘x’.” Expecting the world to be both rational and moral is to ignore human nature. People aren’t looking for genuine faith, they are looking for magic answers and cures. Incantations to create paradise on earth. Except humanity is flawed and always has been. People have individual will and have always exercised it. The constraints that used to be imposed by community and faith have been discarded and Clown World is the result. War and slaughter and… Read more »

Drew
Drew
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Really, the question is, “why doesn’t God do more than issue commands to prevent men from doing evil?” Or, “why is God’s attempt to prevent evil limited to merely having a law against it?” It really clears up the situation to ask it this way.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Stephanie G
2 years ago

You summarize that history very well I think. Much to the dismay of many, I cite Nietzsche way too much here. But he’s the epitome of just the late 19th century European thought you describe. He is credited (correctly I believe) as the origin of the famous “God is dead” saying. This scene appears a few times in different books: A madman babbling to the crowd: “God is dead, and we have killed him.” It’s also worth mentioning that the context of these scenes is far from joyous, some victory of secularism over faith; no quite the opposite, it was… Read more »

Maxda
Maxda
2 years ago

My wife and I moved south a few months ago. We were already in the process of withdrawing from our liberal Presbyterian USA church – could not take the politics, heresies, and covid bs any longer.
In the south, we have visited a number of conservative bible-based churches which are great. Missouri Synod Lutherans, Presbyterian Church in America and ECO Presbyterian churches. There is even an Anglican Province of America church nearby that still uses the 1928 American Book of Common Prayer for worship.
The difference in the community is noticeable.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Maxda
2 years ago

Enoch Cade has related his experience with the Russian Orthodox church in his city down South. Maybe worth adding to your search. Russian Orthodoxy suffered a lot of tribulation with the advent of communism in the homeland, and perhaps experiencing such persecution had a long-run beneficial effect on the doctrine and practice.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Maxda
2 years ago

Somebody should produce a study showing where each denomination falls on the politcal spectrum. If accurate, it would save many people a lot of time and trouble.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
2 years ago

I don’t think there is a tremendous difference between what the Soviet Union did to the Orthodox Church and what the United States has done with Christianity in general. Both absorbed the church and turned it into an agent of the State, although in the early days of the USSR there was violence that has not come to the United States yet (I think the totalitarians who run this country will focus more on individuals than organizations for the foreseeable future). American churches, with courageous exceptions, basically are public schools now–hotbeds of indoctrination and propaganda. As you mentioned, the focus… Read more »

Severian
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

I’ve been saying for a while now that a smart Apparat — please note the caveat — would embrace all the old symbols, as a way of papering over the fractures with a veneer of unity. All revolutionary movements have to create their own unifying symbols (say what you will about what the Soviet hammer and sickle stands for, it’s a hell of a piece of iconography). But the clowns who run AINO are all nihilists; they’re physically incapable of creating anything. So what they should do, and I think will do, is try to repurpose the old symbolism. Whatever… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

It would be the right move but that faction is not in control. As it is, you will be expected to stand for the Rainbow Ol’ Glory at the XPA golf tournament while LIFT EVERY NATION AND SING is belted out, and, if you must celebrate at all, a Holiday creche complete with Three Wise Non-Binaries with a pansexual in the manger.

I’m glad, really, because I have a VERY time celebrating the Fourth with friends and family these days.

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

The Swastika, thousands of years old, makes the hammer/sickle look pretty fuckin gay, brother…thats why the Nose is so afraid of it.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

Absorbing not the same as repression. The church thrived in the Communist block, albeit underground. The people clung to it as they experienced the horrors of communism. Poland is a very good example. Even when still officially communist, they could not resist the Pope visiting and saying mass to a million+ believers. I’ve never thought of the church in the USSR as being an agent of the State, rather an alternative to the secular government. But I’m not a scholar in that area.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

As Russia appeared on the ropes in 43/44, Stalin readily absorbed the Orthodox Church into the State. The Patriarch more or less was a KGB functionary who paid lip service to Christianity. When Kerensky died in the United States, not a single Russian Orthodox Church on American soil would give him last rites or a funeral service, and he wasn’t even a Marxist although he was blamed for the corruption of Christianity even still. Kerensky had to find a Moscow-friendly church in London. That schism between the collaborating Russian Orthodox and its American counterpart lasted until Putin.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

So one man in Communist enthrall constituted the entire Orthodox Church? Hell, today we have a Pope Francis. Does that mean the entire Catholic Church is now some budding socialist-homosexual enclave? One man is just that, a man, not the church per se.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

The Church and congregants are distinct, so, yes.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

Jack Dobson: Excellent insight. And, forgive me for noticing, but the inherent antagonism to Christianity in both the former USSR and the former USA – while couched in terms of political philosophy – in reality sprang from the same ethnic and religious roots. Any history of who challenged early American state laws regarding religious oaths and requirements for office holders, or “blue laws,” or school prayer, demonstrates this decisively. Same as any slight delving into the ethnic background of the most militant ‘atheists.’

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

The Welsh really have wrecked Christianity, haven’t they?

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

Don’t you mean neo-Palestinians?

Coalclinker
Coalclinker
2 years ago

A re-Christianization of the West is nowhere near a close reality. When it does occur it will be from a small remnant living in a new dark ages. It is at that point population growth will begin after a nadir of population, as will a restoration of civilization and science. The imperial decline of the United States and its puppet states known collectively as Western Europe are all part of this great cycle. We have a long way to the bottom, and most people still don’t recognize the danger signals. It can still be saved but the chances of that… Read more »

Gunner Q
Reply to  Coalclinker
2 years ago

Every Orthodox Church I’ve seen is set up as a colony. Total refusal to adopt the local culture, language etc. Zero efforts at evangelism. Their nationalist tendencies keep them away from Globohomo but also thwart them from being Christian towards outsiders.

The neighborhood I grew up in is now Armenian Orthodox. Even their architecture is in-your-face anti-American.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Gunner Q
2 years ago

Gunner Q: There was always an ethnic aspect to the split between the Western and Eastern branches of Christianity. Some excellent insight into this in the defunct but still archived blog “FaithandHeritage.com” which defends both Protestant Christianity and kinism.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Gunner Q
2 years ago

Given the decadence of the surrounding “civilization” that we lament here today and elsewhere I daresay that hostility to the outside community and its “values” is a shrewd survival tactic for a small enclave.

Fritz Berggren
2 years ago

Loved this show. Spot on. I’m hopeful that legacy Christians — the descendants of Christendom — return to our Monarch by the hundreds of millions. Probably not in my life time and it won’t be peaceful. But it is necessary. There can be no Christian church, in the long term, without Christians nations (bloodlines/races) with a corresponding state that supports that goal. The Christian reconquest of Iberia (~710 to 1492) from the Muslims is the role model, even if it takes seven centuries.

KL
KL
2 years ago

Here are my predictions for how religion will develop in the US over the next few decades: -Liberal Catholicism will eventually exhaust itself and the leadership of the church will start to get more conservative/trad-leaning. It will look more like the current leadership of the USCCB (Abp. Gomez, a conservative, is President, the bishop of the Anglo-Catholic Ordinariate created by Benedict XVI–which explicitly does not use the Novus Ordo Missal in favor of what is basically the TLM in English–is the head of the USCCB’s liturgy committee), than the crop of liberal US Cardinals Pope Francis has selected, all of… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  KL
2 years ago

If the gays and the chosen people are any indication, it’s actually more effective to have a small, radical contingent that can efectively organize and infiltrate institutions than a plurality of milquetaost people.

Grill Americans are mostly useless even when they agree with us, except for the small portion that can be radicalized.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Chet Rollins
2 years ago

Chet Rollins: “So then because thou art lukewarm, and neither cold nor hot, I will spue thee out of my mouth.” Revelations 3:16

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Chet, in case my meaning is unclear (which upon later reading I realize it might be) I am trying to demonstrate that Scripture confirms what you wrote. Zero criticism implied, but rather confirmation.

aNewBanner
aNewBanner
2 years ago

The decline of Christianity in the West is a death from a thousand small cuts. It was clear, even in the late 20th Century, that there was something seriously wrong with society. In one sense, this is nothing new. Christianity often appears to have one foot in the grave and seems to leap from one crisis to another. Vibrant Christian societies are the exception to the general rule. A decaying Christianity is often a symptom of a decadent culture, propelled by the energy of its past. The path forward lies, in part, by founding and organizing new organizations and, if… Read more »

mikey
mikey
2 years ago

This phenomenon has been already been analyzed by someone who knows what he’s talking about.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
2 years ago

Good podcast Concerning the condition of the church a couple of thoughts Christ Himself said that not all who call me Lord Lord will enter the kingdom of God and Christs message to some churches in John’s Revelation vision was not very positive and even hostile in some cases. Christ’s message to one church in particular if my memory serves me correctly was that He would spew it out of His mouth. Concerning the rainbow churches and multiculturalism. The Apostle Paul did not travel around to Athens and Corinth and Ephesus declaring you guys need more Vandals and Egyptians here!… Read more »

c matt
c matt
2 years ago

Like Belloc said, the Faith is Europe and Europe is the Faith.

3 Pipe Problem
3 Pipe Problem
Reply to  c matt
2 years ago

If that’s true, then the state of affairs is sad indeed. I believe the level of ‘belief’ ignoring it’s manifestation in church attendance, in Europe is even worse than in the coloniies.

btp
Member
Reply to  c matt
2 years ago

He said “the Church,” which is a little spicier of a take.

Xman
Xman
2 years ago

Spot-on.

If bull giraffes in sub-Saharan Africa started having anal intercourse with each other instead or mating the cow giraffes, or if the cow giraffes started killing their offspring and reproduction rates declined precipitously, university biologists would fly in from around the world to determine what the source of the problem is and try to implement breeding programs to prevent the giraffe from going extinct.

When white humans start having anal intercourse with each other and aborting their offspring… U.S. Embassies fly the gay pride flag and lefty nutjobs try to assassinate Supreme Court justices.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Xman
2 years ago

I’ve found it odd that the most demonized early theraputics for the coof are also powerful anti-parasitics.

One could view the response to those theraputics as an organism moving to protect itself against a threat.

Then again, it may just my tinfoil hat constricting the flow of blood to my brain.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Speaking strictly to the Covid-19 pandemic, for those not familiar: What Howard alludes to is that very early in the pandemic, literally almost at the time the virus was first discovered/announced, there was a concerted and international move to ban, discourage or withdraw from easy availability (e.g. over the counter) the availability of such drugs as ivermectin and HCQ, both long in use as anti-parasite drugs. This, it is alleged, was to remove cheap and easily available therapies that would have impeded or prevented the emergency approval of newer drugs (and later, the “vaccines”) which, without exception, were on-patent, extremely… Read more »

bob sykes
bob sykes
2 years ago

The reproduction rate is below replacement in nearly every country in the world, except for sub-Saharan Africa. Japan’s population is already declining, as is the White population in the US. Whites are a minority in the under 15 age group. The cause of the reproduction failure in most of the world is most likely the education of women. In Western countries, which generally lead the world in women’s education, there is a direct negative correlation between years of education and reproduction. Women with PhD’s or MD’s or LD’s usually have no children. There is no mystery about this. Women’s reproduction… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  bob sykes
2 years ago

It seems to be a multip-pronged issue. Environmentally, I’m not sure the stats, but there are a shocking number of people in my social circle who haver fertility issues, and these aren’t the typical people who went on birth control until 35 or are morbidly obese. There’s also a psychological softness of modernity that perhaps makes people not have children because they are too mentally soft to handle the grueling nature of raising children every day. The girlboss can fell powerful in her make work PM job, but make her get up 5 times a night to feed a fussy… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Chet Rollins
2 years ago

Chet: Wholeheartedly agree.

KL
KL
Reply to  bob sykes
2 years ago

The gap between industrial civilization and agrarian civilization is just as great as the gap between agrarian civilization and tribal hunter-gatherer societies that preceded it. The last 150 years or so (230 for the UK) are freakish and totally unique to history, there are no useful historical precedents to judge this kind of society against, and we have absolutely no idea how its all going to end up. Instead people tend to take modernity for granted, and believe inevitable and easily predictable march of progress.

Mr. Generic
Mr. Generic
Reply to  bob sykes
2 years ago

We can continue to enjoy the benefits of modern civilization while also thriving as a society if we just have the fortitude to put women in their place.

fakeemail
fakeemail
Reply to  Mr. Generic
2 years ago

So very much this.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  bob sykes
2 years ago

Women are crazy, given. Maybe exacerbated by knowledge, I’m not sure. I think being an intelligent woman must be a burden in any case. It’s the license to be crazy they’ve been given. I’ve known a few women I would’ve been happy to marry, except that they had no sense of how to treat a man. Drive you away and at best wonder why, at worst punish you for it.

Vegetius
Vegetius
Reply to  bob sykes
2 years ago

We really need someone with the skills to explain the Japanese collapse.

It started sooner than it did in the West and went much faster.

Yet so far as I know this happened without a noticeable collapse in religious observance (harder to measure in Japan).

Japanese women were not subjected to Judeo-feminism, either. At least not in any way.

I have heard snatches about policies instituted during the US occupation, but can’t really point to anything.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Vegetius
2 years ago

My guess: they wanted to be ‘western’ after the war and, being Japanese, purified and perfected the essence of it.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Vegetius
2 years ago

I’m pretty sure, but not certain, that McArthur had the Japanese Constitution rewritten to give women the vote. Not feminism as we currently experience it, but the starting point that most everyone mentions of our decline. It also took us about 50 years after to reach Gloria Steinem type feminist philosophy/antics.

Strike Three
Strike Three
Reply to  Vegetius
2 years ago

The most recent polls taken in Japan indicate they are 88% atheist. The only nation with a higher percentage than this is China (at 91%). Mind you, that’s atheist; a much stronger term than “irreligious.” Have you ever watched any Japanese anime? I’ve watched some with my 16 year old son. That stuff runs the gamut from silly secular fun to fetishistic perverted to satanically immoral. (I don’t watch any of the vile stuff; I’m a Christian). If the anime is an indicator of what is going on in the minds of creative Japanese people, then all they’ve got going… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Vegetius
2 years ago

There’s something about prosperity, education, and lacking any real struggle that does wonders for killing TFR. The Japanese are a culturally, ethnically, and linguistically (for the most part, Kansai and Okinawans have their notable dialects) homogenous people. They are very conformist, too. Ideas, fashionable trends, etc, spread much faster and are adopted much faster when everyone is like each other. Also so happens changes appear much more rapidly and apparently. Homogeneity and cultural solidarity are two things nearly impossible for modern Westerners to comprehend. As to specific reasons, the Japanese themselves struggle with explaining it. As you noted, Judeo-X (AKA… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
2 years ago

The part about participation in the rules of a Church is also very open to chicanery by people in power. The people running these “listening sessions” always design it to come to their predetermined conclusions. There were a couple cases of Bishops getting together for a Synod and meeting documents leaking that literally had nothing to do with what happened in the Synod, likely because they were written before the Synod ever started. Then after they publish their “findings”, usually with some sort of policy change, they’ll finger wag the conservatives with “consensus” or “obedience”, to get them to fall… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

The main flaw I note in today’s essay is this: Zman seems to implicitly assume that the entirety of the West’s decline can be laid to the loss of Christian faith. I realize there are a lot of believers here. I am not one of them. With that caveat, I hope you will still consider my argument. Christianity can and does offer a moral, social, etc. framework for a society. But it does not have sole claim to that. I can cite you numerous other cultures in world history that are non-Christian and yet those cultures survived and at times… Read more »

Hun
Hun
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

I think it’s a symptom and a cause. Over the mid to long term, people who lose faith have nothing left except the immediate gratification of entertainment and shopping. Kids don’t fit with this.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

You are being disingenuous, Zman. I count at least seven (7) cases where you specifically cite Christianity or Church in your essay. I concede that you do not explicitly claim loss of religious faith as a primary cause, but I stand by my claim that you imply this; my observation supported by your heavy emphasis on the decay of religious observance. “Getting Preachy”? Just so*. Despite my nit-picking, I fully agree with your conclusion, that “[m]aybe the decline in faith is a symptom…” and that it may be due to a “common cause that lies upstream from the culture.” That… Read more »

Eloi
Eloi
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

You use a semicolon wrong. “my observation supported by your heavy emphasis on the decay of religious observance” is an absolute phrase, not an independent clause.

Maxda
Maxda
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

I strongly suspect that the it is more than a symptom. At least a strong contributing factor.

Anonymous Fake
Anonymous Fake
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

It’s a cause too you know.

Eloi
Eloi
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

Actually, he explicitly notes correlation, not causation: “That crisis seems to parallel the crisis facing European people, which suggests there is a connection. Maybe the decline in faith is a symptom of the overall decline in the people or maybe all of these measures have a common cause that lies upstream from the culture.”

AntiDem
AntiDem
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

The Western Civilization cannot be restored without Christianity. That’s because the Western Civilization is, roughly, the Christian religion + the White race + the cultural and philosophical legacy of the Greco-Roman world. Strip out any of those elements, and what you will have will no longer be the Western Civilization, but something else. That something else may be good or bad, but it cannot be the Western Civilization.

Your aims may be different than mine, but speaking for myself, what I am interested in is the restoration of the Western Civilization, of which I am inordinately fond.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

Is the Muslim culture a product of Islam, or is Islam its cause? The only point Z man made wrt Christianity and European civilization/culture is that the two appear inextricably intertwined. Like Anti-Dem points out Western Civ = Whyte Pipo + Xtianity + Greco Roman Legacy.

Correlation may not prove causation, but correlation is a necessary, if not sufficient component of causation.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

Ben: Religion and culture are certainly entwined, but that does not automatically negate the reality and truth of either. Those Westerners who adopt Islam also consciously choose to adopt Arab cultural habits and behaviors, which are further reinforced by the religious/cultural community. The problem in the Christian West was the assumption that spreading religious faith would lead to the automatic assumption of western culture. That, of course, did not happen. For every Christian who marvels at the number of oriental “Christians,” I can show you all the specifically named “Chinese” or “Taiwanese” churches in America – with their entirely oriental… Read more »

TomA
TomA
2 years ago

Connecting dots. In a democracy, selecting political leadership is largely determined by voting patterns and the degree of election fraud that is permitted by law enforcement organizations. Voting patterns are largely determined by the quality of the electorate, their susceptibility to media indoctrination, and habit. For example, stupid people tend to be easily bribed for a few shekels. Same for being influenced by targeted media campaigns that push the right buttons. And, of course, tribalism is why 90% of blacks always vote Democrat. This fraction of the electorate has now been dominant for over half a century and will only… Read more »

JEB
JEB
2 years ago

Correlation does not equal causation. The decline in European fertility can’t have anything to do with declining religious faith, because fertility has been declining everywhere in the world outside of sub-Saharan Africa, including in militant theocracies like Iran. The true cause is the modern lifestyle, which makes it difficult and expensive to have children. Unique in the world, the people of sub-Saharan Africa lack the intelligence to create societies that support the modern lifestyle for most members of those societies, and this social failure is being rewarded with massive reproductive success. This is Darwinian natural selection turned on its head,… Read more »

TomA
TomA
Reply to  JEB
2 years ago

Without imported food stuffs from the West, sub-Saharan Africa population growth would be famine-limited. This artificial population bomb will eventually flood into Europe and kill off those Western societies thereby limiting the food production available to ship to Africa. My guess is that the Cloud People intend to use genetic engineering to solve this problem via covert intervention in African fertility dynamics. mRNA-based vaccines can be a vector for this type of population control.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

I feel like the Clouds are working to starve Africa because the Africans largely rejected the coof injections.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Wild Geese: Do you really think so? I think they’re working to starve White people. Africans are always starving (at least since my earliest memories) but this will further impel them to Europe and America and the further erasure of White, Western civilization. In other words, if some brown/black people starve, that’s a bonus, but the main goal is the elimination of Whites. And Whites – particularly throughout Europe – are the most vaxxed.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

3g4me-

I tend to agree they want the European peoples gone first, since they know that is the one group that could implode their evil plans if they ever stopped grilling and started organizing.

Something odd is most certainly going on with the jabs. Ed Dowd was just on Bannon’s show explaining that there was a sudden spike of 3 million new disabled people in the 2021 stats. It would interesting to see an ethnic breakdown of that spike.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

The two are not mutually exclusive, but… We have ample evidence of the Great Replacement. It will result in either a larger population or the annihilation/genocide of one group at the expense of the other. The Regime’s unhinged response to people noticing, even if not reacting yet, makes me think genocide is the more likely goal. You get a sense of terror inside the Imperial Capitol. Much of it is the typical feminized hysteria that grips society now, but not all of it. The Senate Republicans’ collaboration with the Left to grab guns all of a sudden probably indicates the… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  JEB
2 years ago

Agree totally. The only thing I’d add are a few. Often overlooked in the fertility decline is the widespread availability of artificial birth control. Also, Africa’s and to a lesser extent other regions’ phenomenal population growth is substantially completely due to outside technology and aid. These regions have never been capable of supporting themselves (at current or recent population levels.) Without exception, ALL of the above were Western inventions and/or the aid comes from the “West” (affluent nations.) This, of course, is unnatural. Nevertheless, Darwin’s principles are always and everywhere active. As noted, what has been “selected for” the most,… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  JEB
2 years ago

JEB, pretty much my thinking as well. Children no longer have an economic benefit in a rich welfare State, and that’s most everywhere now. Even third world holes like India.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  JEB
2 years ago

“… decline in European fertility …” All women want sex, but not all women want babies. The invention of easily accessible and highly effective pharmaceutical birth control short circuited the evolved instinctual behavior that used to result in babies. Now, European women who don’t really want babies do not have them. This process was mitigated in the early years of modern birth control by inertial cultural pressure, but that has since eroded everywhere but sub-Saharan Africa where culture is still HIGHLY tribal and patriarchal. It’s actually not a problem in and of itself. If Western Civilization were left to its… Read more »

Enoch Cade
Enoch Cade
2 years ago

FWIW. I belong to a Russian Orthodox parish in a large Southern city. We have been seeing a huge inflow of converts, mostly from the evangelical churches, most of whom (in aforesaid Southern cities at the least) took a total knee to the “powers and principalities” represented by BLM and Antifa. I’d expect this trend to continue.