The Reforms Of Z-Man

In the 6th century BC, many Greek city-states were succumbing to one man rule, which they called tyrants. Today the word conjures images of a ruthless and cruel autocrat, but in that time is simply meant a dictator. The reason for this would be familiar to anyone living today. The elite gained an economic stranglehold on society and used it to subvert the political system. The great inequality in Athenian life meant that the bulk of the citizens were becoming victims of a predatory elite.

In order to avoid what was happening in other city-states, the Athenians decided they had to reform their society, but could not trust the existing elites to do it. Instead, they turned to the wisest man of their age, a man named Solon, who is remembered today as one of the Seven Sages of Greece. He was given temporary dictatorial powers in order to push through economic, political and moral reforms. The goal of these reforms was to address economic equality and restore political stability, in order to avoid tyranny.

If we look around at America today, the similarities are obvious. Instead of rich landowners preying on the populace, it is a handful of megalomaniacs, who rule from atop global corporations and hedge funds. The normal democratic system of governance has broken down, so that the desires of the people are ignored, while the small donor class wields the state as a weapon against the people. Another weapon against the people is a vulgar popular culture, aimed at undermining public dignity and self-respect.

Clearly, reform is needed. Increasingly, people are coming around to the idea that what is needed is a Pinochet, who will fumigate the political class and deal harshly with the moral and economic predators currently atop the system. It’s why calling Trump a dictator has only helped his cause. The people who voted for him are not so sure it would be a bad idea if he assumed dictatorial power. In the spirit of Solon, are there reforms that could be implemented to arrest the decline into tyranny?

The first thing to acknowledge is that “get back to our constitutional roots” is the sort of thing a moron mutters to himself while watching the news. The people saying this really should be rounded up and shipped off the Africa, where they could be eaten by the natives. Similarly, rolling back the laws and legal rulings of the last 150 years is not happening either. Reform is not revolution. The way to prevent a violent end is to push through changes that could be accepted, maybe grudgingly, by the elites.

The first reform would have to be an amendment to the Constitution enshrining free association and private discrimination as a sacred right. The core idea of America was always the idea that it was a big country and people could self-segregate. If it was not working for you in the town in which you were born, you could head off to another town to find a better situation. You can’t have a mobile, self-segregating population when they need permission from the state to associate or disassociate with one another.

The trouble with mobility in a democracy is people can move to a new place and then organize to vote for things against the wishes of the locals. New Hampshire, for example, has been ruined by people from Massachusetts moving there to escape taxes, but then voting for drunken Hibernians as soon as they get a ballot. An amendment to tie voting to your place of birth not only solves this problem, it makes immigration useless as a political weapon. You cannot import new voters. This amendment would be retroactive.

A third amendment would alter who votes in Federal elections. Universal suffrage is every bit as a crazy as open borders. It lowers the intelligence of the electorate and encourages the worst habits of the political class. An amendment fixing the voting age at 35 and assigning one vote per family household solves this problem. That’s right, only the married can vote. Maybe some allowance for homeowners could be considered, but the family is the future and voting is about the future, so you have to be future oriented to vote.

Those are big reforms that would face a lot of resistance from the billionaire predators that prosper from the current corruption. That would necessitate a pruning of the billionaire class. Bluntly, no one is going to care if Tim Cook is stripped of his wealth and thrown in a dungeon. The world will not change if Jeff Bezos drops dead tomorrow. The cemeteries are full of indispensable rich people. Therefore, the advice of Thrasybulus is warranted, which means an orderly trimming of the financial elite will be required.

Some lesser reforms to the political system would also be required. Restoring the Senate as the house of the states, by repealing the 17th Amendment is one reform. Another would be the elimination of tax breaks for charitable giving. Charities have become money laundering operations for political activity. That would also get rid of the vast sea of not-for-profit think tanks that saturate Washington. Some would survive, but only those that do legitimate work on public policy. This would restore some transparency too.

The whole point of democracy is for the elected officials to work a hedge against the rich and powerful exerting control of society. Addressing the money problem in politics is another small reform. In Federal elections, all money must go to candidates and be reported to the public, Further, no candidate could accept money from outside his state or district. The use of front men to evade this rule would come with a draconian punishment, like the stripping of all assets and permanent banishment from the continent.

There are plenty of other small reforms that would go a long way toward restoring stability and trust in public institutions. Presumably, if the big items are passed, the new political class that would emerge could address those smaller items. That is, of course, is why these sorts of reforms could never pass. Political reform in a democracy is about altering the political class. The only alteration they could tolerate is that which entrenches their position as front men for the cosmopolitan global elite.

I’ll just note that Solon was able to get his reforms implemented and once they were in place he gave up power and left the country. The Athenians swore to abide by them for ten years. Within four years, the old social rifts re-appeared, along with new ones created by Solon’s reforms.  It quickly became clear that the reforms could only last as long as Solon was around to lend his moral authority to them, as well as work out the new problems he created. The Greeks were right back where they started.

Eventually, someone named Peisistratos, a relative of Solon, rose up to become the tyrant and impose order on the Greeks. Solon accused the Athenians of stupidity and cowardice for allowing this to happen. He was right about the first part, but completely wrong about the second. The Greeks were being practical in the face of an impossible problem. In time, democracy returned, drawing from the reforms of Solon and the lessons from the period of reform and tyranny, suggesting democracy is a result, not a process.

newest oldest most voted
Notify of
SB7
Guest
SB7

4 years ago, no one could have believed an outsider billionaire like Donald Trump would win the presidency. Just as today, most people would laugh at the notion of an Alexandria Occasio winning. And after her disastrous term in office, the people righting the ship with, oh I don’t know, say Alex Jones …

Saml Adams
Guest
Saml Adams

Occasional-Cortex exploited a tactic used in a few other state level elections around here. Her backers looked at the primary turnout numbers and realized they could set an ambush in a single party district. Same happened with the State Senate in my district. Then they ran a hard leftist with a core that would turn out and dumped the incumbent. But be wary of Occasional. People with just enough intelligence to hold one idea in their head, but lacking the additional bandwidth necessary to contemplate any contradictory evidence are dangerous.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

She is a dingbat, but it is obvious there are people behind the scenes putting her and potato Beto up for election. They will be told what to say and what to do. The scam proceeds along.

Corn
Guest
Corn

Speaking of Beto, what is this guy’s appeal? Does he have any substantive ideas or proposals? Or does he just look good in a suit?

I’m not a Texan so I didn’t follow his Senate campaign, but I have seen self proclaimed fans of his on twitter (all female) say vaguely sexual and somewhat creepy things about him.

Babe Ruthless
Guest
Babe Ruthless

Beto is entirely the creation of the media. Look at the surnames of the people who have written the most fawning puff pieces of him. It’s all part of the Plan. As for Beto himself, I think it goes without saying that a Quisling like him is traitor of the first order.

Moe Grimm
Guest
Moe Grimm

The sub-species of “educated” white wimyn now component the scourge visited upon Western Civilization said to inhabit regions in and around Blue Hives… philadelphia suburbs, metro NYC, etc.

DrDog
Guest
DrDog

Beto is Obama with white skin. Nothing further needs to be discussed.

OregonGPx
Guest
OregonGPx

Agree. Even if if not, she’ll be thoroughly swallowed up be the swamp.

the Russians
Member

They’re the same as tur’doh although they may not have “part time drama teacher” on their list of credentials….if it goes off script, hilarity ensues. It’s a gd tragedy.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

In the long run, she would be more dangerous to the Dem party, than to America as a whole. I say Bring It On, and be prepared to be ridiculed for 4 years. The harder Left she is, the better.. for us.

maximus
Guest
maximus

Just wanted to say I am stealing your last sentence, its good.

Moe Grimm
Guest
Moe Grimm

And that she, on behalf of C.D. NY 14, defeated none other than Joe Crowley. Joseph. Crowley. Insofar as extremes are concerned, let this sink in. I was born in this district fifty-six years ago. A drive through NY14’s streets, be it Queens or across the Tri-Borough in the Bronx is these days a visual exercise in discovery itself.

Steve
Guest
Steve

I agree but you’re leaving out one other very important reason why she upset the incumbent – her ethnicity. On the night she won her primary one of the things she told the crowd supporting her was, “You sent a message tonight, you replaced one of them with one of your own.”

Moe Grimm
Guest
Moe Grimm

Well stated. Nor would those besides of course the normies and Neo-Jacobins have predicted the top of the L.E. food chain as the Dept. pf Just-Us and their armed proxy jackboots the Famous But Incompetent have devised and then executed the attempt to first block, and when it failed, frame this lawfully elected President. This is unprecedented in the entire history of our Republic and in comparison renders “watergate” to the realm of a Class B Misdemeanor. Last month a large swath of this as presently composed electorate made a decision, probably also unconsciously, to end the congressional level investigation… Read more »

Drake
Guest
Drake

Retroactively tying voting to our place of birth would have interesting consequences in places like MA. While people in red states get pissed about liberals from CA moving in, the opposite is true too. I grew up in MA and knew I wasn’t going to stay in that leftist dump from the time I was in high school. I worked there for a few years after college, then left and never returned except for family visits. Every place I’ve been since, I’ve met many similar MA refugees who loved some things about the state, but will never live there again.… Read more »

Glenfilthie
Guest
Glenfilthie

I wonder if it’d change things. MA would still be a leftist nuthouse as would California and other blue sewer states. They would still continue causing all kinds of problems for their neighbors and the rest of the country. I’ve been told that the bulk of progressive lunacy is confined to the big cities.
Like Solon, Z would solve a lot of problems but he’d create a lot too. I don’t think a peaceful resolution is possible. Somebody is going to have to get culled or genocided first.

Drake
Guest
Drake

Sure – cut the cities and the rich inner suburbs out of any state and it turns deep-red. Even NJ and NY.

Member

Hillary majority vote was the same count as four NYC boroughs. The ff’s were geniuses to conger up the Electoral College.

Drake
Guest
Drake

The one thing that’s kept it going this long.

Member

When “they” finally get rid of the Electoral College, this country will then absolutely be a democracy. It may be possible that a Convention of States would avoid an all-out civil war. Or cause one. I pray for my country.

Member

Why would you want an absolute democracy unless you think people are interchangeable? Think it over and I believe you will realize our system is one of sheer genius and flexibility.

Bonnie Jorgensen
Guest
Bonnie Jorgensen

The Constitution is not the problem. An article 5 controlled by leftists…. no thanks.

Moe Grimm
Guest
Moe Grimm

Actually I believe I read and saw the map with counts from the (4) of 5 NYC Boroughs (exception Staten Island) needed a slight read fractional “assist” from metro Lost Angeles county. One of the few instances the JYT was useful. State of NY: For NY State: https://www.nytimes.com/elections/2016/results/new-york
and too, Lost Angeles county: https://www.nytimes.com/elections/2016/results/california. Again, the wisdom of our Founding Fathers was and remains profound. In this instance their look into the future and subsequent codification of the Electoral College.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

New York City, when I was young, had a persistent call to become “the 51st State”. Perhaps they were on to something. Let them go their own way and stew in their own filth.

BestGuest
Guest
BestGuest

Here’s the thing: MA used to be a conservative state. If you don’t believe me go look at the records. The transition began with mass immigration to the urban centers and mill towns and spread from there. Curley was a crook. Re-elected from prison. That didn’t bother his voters in the least. The majority of his voters’ descendants never stopped voting that way. That’s why we had the Bulgers and the current MSP scandals.

Drake
Guest
Drake

New Jersey was a very conservative farm state. A no-income-tax haven until the mid-70’s.

c matt
Guest
c matt

The problem with tying it to birth state is that, if you left that state, you really have no “skin in the game.” Tying it to marriage (with widower/widow carrying over the right) and land ownership is better IMO.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Part of the problem here is : there’s too much to vote for. One of the premises of the country the way it was founded – was that there were a whole list of things that were simply not considered to be the purview of the Federal government. “Progressives” have incrementally dumped one thing after another into the bucket of the Federal government – so that now the right to vote has absolutely become vital because you’re either getting free shit – or paying for it. I have read numerous stories from the times before FDR pushed thru all sorts… Read more »

Lester Maddox
Guest
Lester Maddox

The longer this tragedy continues, the more convinced I become of the absolutely mortal damage Lyndon Johnson did to this country, partly in altruistc benevolance and the rest in craven political demagougery.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

The fact that you’re beginning at Lyndon Johnson is part of the problem.

Member

Altruistic benevolence from Lyndon Johnson???? That’s crazy talk.

Swrichmond
Guest
Swrichmond

None of it was benevolent.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

People keep concentrating on voting – and I still think the problem is finances. Maybe you can’t fix the financial issues without fixing the voting issues first, but after a few decades of watching this insanity – I am still firmly of the opinion that much of this leftist lunacy exists simply because the people who engage in it are inside a financial bubble that feeds their craziness. Harsh times beget hard people. Soft times bring soft (in the head) people. We have soft times because of massive funding of softness – and other shennanigans like deficit spending , crazy… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

re: massive sinkholes of money..
When Guiliani was mayor of NYC, 20+ years ago, the annual budget was about $25 Billion; now it’s $83 Billion. That’s approximately $25,000 per taxpayer per year.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Imagine a world where that budget is cut in half- and tell me how much leftist lunacy survives the meltdown. How many women are going to keep opening their traps about equality – if NYC turns into what it was like back in the 70’s when Kitty Genovese got killed and nobody paid attention? How many leftist loudmouths get disappeared on the streets of NYC with no police follow up – when the budget doesn’t allow it? Again – this is why I say money is a HUGE part of this leftist problem. And it’s why there is such a… Read more »

Sandy Hooker
Guest
Sandy Hooker

What if we went back to a policy of naming people outlaws, meaning they would no longer enjoy any legal protection and could be killed on sight by anyone without fear of arrest or prosecution. Shitavious and his diverse band of gang-bangin’ homies would come running for the relative safety of a prison, and pedophiles would be hanging from lightpoles as an enduring warning to anyone else contemplating becoming a fondler.

Stealth Spaniel
Guest
Stealth Spaniel

Kitty Genovese was killed in the early hours of March 13th 1964. It was a ’60s thing of not getting involved. NYC really is a great city, if only they’d get rid of the politicians and the Elites. Everyday New Yorkers are terrific.

Member

So maybe we settle for a Putin instead? I see you gave this some serious thought and if we can get a quorum here I will cast a vote to affirm your proposals. I am married and over 35. These are not constitutional crisis times but far more drastic in need of drastic measures. I fear something like a major financial meltdown (we all know it is coming) may be an impetus to start this. Unfortunately the effects from it won’t really bring about anything or anyone which will return us to a more saner and moral country. Still some… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Everybody always just assumes that there will be some giant financial crisis. I’m not so sure that this will happen. Yeah, yeah, fiat currency never works and central banks are loaded with debt and the welfare state is untenable. Maybe, but the world economic machine is pretty productive. All those goods and services are real. Debt gets wiped away all the time through bankruptcy. That’s what should have happened to the big banks in the financial crisis but didn’t. Instead, the government nursed them back to health on the backs of savers. Regardless, the real economy is very productive, thanks… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

Why does everything you propose sound like it’s straight out of the Dem playlist? It all seems like the type of class-warfare they like to promote.

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

Because the US is ass deep in class warfare mainly by the rich against the working and middle. The poor are mostly tools of the rich and since Clinton can’t really be said to have that much political clout Wages measured as percentage GDP are less than half what the were in 1973 and 40% of that GDP is government spending. A bigger economy masked some of the effects but people are not doing well and this is caused by the wealthy’s policy choices and little else In some sense the sudden appearance of all the commies is a natural… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

I’m not endorsing those “fixes” to the govt’s problems; I’m simply saying that a Dem-dominated government could pass those measure and keep this crap-ass ship going for a very, very long time.

Rod1963
Guest
Rod1963

I used to hear similar happy talk from RE agents who thought the $1 million dollar tract home would be the norm and that RE would never go down. That was in early 2007, by 2008 these RE agents were out of work. The whole system almost collapsed in 2007-2008. If it wasn’t tor TARP we’d have had a revolution in short order once the big banks started closing for good. Right now the real economy is shrinking not growing. Jobs are still being off shored or foreign workers brought in to replace Americans. Real wages have no increased. Medical… Read more »

Member

Thanks Rod, couldn’t have said it better.
The illegals rape of our SS etc, boils my blood.
No wall needed if you take these damn gibs away.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

David, what you suggest is often called “souring the milk”—you can use this concept whenever you hear a politician talk about illegals and the solution to “the problem”, to know that they are bullshitting you to your face. That includes Trump and his wall. No serious solution can be proposed that does not undertake to prevent non-citizens from working and receiving welfare. And those proposals currently are….

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Look, I’m not endorsing those measures. I’m saying that a Dem-led government could and would implement them, allowing them to keep things going for a long time. Naturally, middle class whites would get whored but what’s new. Also, the economy is not shrinking. GDP per capita is higher now than it was in 2008. Granted, almost all of that wealth has gone to the top 1% and what’s left over went to the remaining top 9%, but the economy IS growing. https://tradingeconomics.com/united-states/gdp-per-capita-ppp Now, could a debt crisis cause a huge recession? Sure. ’08-’09 nearly sent us into a depression. It… Read more »

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

Rod1963, yes, and similarly, go to any court system and it’s 90% blocked up with illegal immigrant crimes and other issues. We in the U.S. hemorrhage money on illegals. Go to any charity, it’s 90% serving illegals.

Joachim
Guest
Joachim

You’re mistaken, Commie. We just need to sit in our basements, polishing our AR-15’s until the salvific Crash arrives, spontaneously transforming the minds and souls of whites, ushering in a millennium of boomer-con heaven-on-earth. I can see it now, whites draped in American flags, standing before an image of the Gipper, teary eyed as “God Bless America” is played on loud speakers. The return of our Constitutional rights to free-markets, with an added amendment requiring substantial marginal-tax cuts every 6 months in perpetuity, will bring an era of unrivaled plenty for all. McMansions and Applebee’s will be everywhere, and in… Read more »

johnmark7
Guest
johnmark7

Caesar is coming. Trump is merely a herald. One reform would be to make financial foundations spend 100% of their yearly income and an additional 10% from their financial investment capital. That way they’d work themselves out of business rather than becoming liberal sjw sinecures and funding mechanisms for radical politics.

Drake
Guest
Drake

Sulla’s reforms of Rome worked too – until Sulla wasn’t around to make people follow them. It’s one of those basic flaws in government. Us conservative types who want freedom, a decent society, and not much government, don’t want careers in government or to be constantly worrying about it. The leftists who worship the state are willing to spend their worthless lives in and around government. So eventually, we wake up and realize that the statists have created some kind of government monstrosity. Then we have to purge and restart with new rules about how the statists can’t take over… Read more »

Severian
Guest

Democracy returned “in time.” Heh. That’s the understatement of the year.

Chaotic Neutral
Guest
Chaotic Neutral

I like it for the most part, but part of the reason for lowering the voting age to 18 was vietnam. You can’t disenfranchise military age males. Old men love sending young men to war. It’s the greatest football game on earth! It’s entertainment. Arena sports are a symbolic substitute for war in our civilized era. Also, it serves as a mechanism of removing sexual competitors. Part of sexual competition is the elimination of rivals. Younger men have an advantage because they are of course more handsome and virile. There is a powerful biological impetus for older men to send… Read more »

Member

Perhaps military service is one more requirement, along with being married with kids, needed to exercise the franchise.
1. Future orientation (being married with kids)
2. Willingness to sacrifice (volunteering for potentially lethal military service)
and maybe
3. Real property owner (have a stake in status quo/stability)

Member

No. The day after you made that rule, whole classes of safe military service would be invented as a way to qualify for the franchise and to protect the scions of the elite and pay them for doing so

Heinlein was naive.

Member

Maybe so. The cynicism requisite in order to keep up with our foes rises nearly exponentially as time elapses.

I could respond and say, “limit it to combat arms” but then they’d classify everything “combat arms.”

I fear that knowledge of the foe is some sort of Cthulhu-esque trade-off: the more you know of the foe, the more cynical or insane you become. When you finally understand them completely, you are too cynical or mad to be effective.

Drake
Guest
Drake

I liked Heinlein’s idea that ONLY honorably discharged should be allowed to vote. Another way to achieve the same thing Z proposed – only people with a real stake can have a say in government.

Member

See my post above. It would never work out in the real world.

Issac
Guest
Issac

Having men who have not married and sired a child serve in combat is an abomination anyway. Virgin sacrifice is not good for any society. And before anyone runs on the tangent of male expendable nature, recall that as close to a 1:1 male to female ratio is also required for stability. Excess women is how you get spinster harpy cat crones.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

And excess men (China has 55M) gets you war.

Issac
Guest
Issac

Excess of either is a destabilizing factor.

Member

It would be the responsibility of their respective heads of household to look out for their interests.

The proven problems with youth voting and voting by people who are net consumers of government resources outweigh the interest in the franchise for young men of military age. Let them marry, if it’s so important to them.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

A lot of problems, such as why not allow military personnel to vote, are potentially solved via a more elaborate definition of sufferage from “universal” to “earned”. In Z-man’s criteria, an arbitrary age requirement of 35 (let’s leave out the other criteria for the moment) still implies that a voter at age 35 is competent to vote. I disagree. Half the people in my county are property owners and over 35 and we still have a crappy local government. But I like where Z-man is heading—it’s the right direction.

Pursuvant
Guest
Pursuvant

Interesting, to have the notion that you can save the country/world by shifting it around, changing the rules, and so on. This world is a wasteland, everywhere you look relatively speaking, and it’s not because rules. The fabric of many many human beings has changed in my lifetime, to ego centric, ego reactive, separate beings on damn near sociopathic autopilot 24×7. Society has always been a system you had to live within, but in the past individuals had temperament to use/bend the system to accomplish meaningful human purposes. Now the system eats us up and relieves us of our humanity,… Read more »

Hendrick
Guest
Hendrick

The voting age was lowered when there was military conscription, though it was almost ended by the time 18-year-old voting came into effect. There is a volunteer military, at least for the present. People under 21 can ‘vote’ by not enlisting.

The “old enough to fight implies old enough to vote” argument was always bogus anyway. There are plenty of voters over 21 or 25 or even 35 to send young men to war, especially since younger people don’t vote much.

LFMayor
Guest
LFMayor

Z, the issue with the elites is that they’re ignorant. Hardship, real struggle, various elemental lessons that the unwashed lowers like us learn and re-learn simply don’t exist for them. They won’t consider any compromise, inflated ego, overstated intellect and simple plain ignorance will necessitate violence, that surest of educators. Orderly Pruning, as you said! Name your effort that and you might be shocked at the support that shows up from nowhere (that being a synonym of flyover).

Member

America does have that 2nd Amendment thing… the fundamental problem is there aren’t enough people motivated to actually effect a change in direction. It is clear democracy is a cause of problems not a solution for them but it isn’t clear how some kind of systematic organisation is to arise to counter globo-homo financial interests. They’ve got all the money in the world which seems to be the crucial factor. Nobody is going to press that red button and I don’t believe it will all collapse of its own accord, excepting some unforeseen (unforeseeable) extinction level event, because (much as… Read more »

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

The 2nd Amendment reflects three functions of the militia. Security against invasion, suppressing insurrection, and finally removal of a tyrannical government. The militia system effectively collapsed after the War of 1812, as a large portion of the country had no interest in fighting. For all intents and purposes the militia was formally abolished in 1903, the National Guard is a legal fiction that is mostly funded with federal dollars. Absent the functioning of a militia, the 2nd Amendment is vestigial.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

What the older generations here will remember, and I learned only as a secondary experience, was the “militias” of the 1990s. These organizations had a relatively large footprint, but disappeared after the OKC bombing. These organizations were flawed from the start, as they never sought affiliation with the state. In effect they wanted a recreation of Shay’s Rebellion, which the Constitution was a reaction to.

Primi Pilus
Guest
Primi Pilus

Recall there are both the Organized and Unorganized militia (10 USC Sect 246). Yes, the former was radically changed with the Militia Act of 1903 (the Dick Act), and it functions now with approval of the federal govt …. contrary to the founding concept. This is achieved through funding control, as you point out. But the Unorganized Militia is still there too, its mission intact and not dependent on funding from on high.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Yep, this talk of economic collapse “real soon now” seems odd. What percentage whites and mixed is South Africa? It may finally be coming to an end in a few years, but it hung on for 20+ years with whites and mixed being what ~20% of the population and the other 80% being African. The United States will be more than 25% white and Asians for a very long time to come. What’s more, the other big demographic group will be Hispanics not Africans. This country is a very, very long way from economic collapse. Not social collapse may be… Read more »

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

South Africa has been propped up by China, the EU and India have also made questionable “investments” that mask bribery. Furthermore, South Africa itself bailed out Zimbabwe through free electricity and illegal immigration. My namesake also has conned numerous Westerners into buying Israeli-cut shiny rocks, without which the Oppenheimer fortune would disappear and take the ANC down with it.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Imminent collapse sans catastrophic cause would seem somewhat remote, but a reduction in wealth and standard of living seems much more likely. As we reduce the white population, we reduce the average IQ of the nation and more importantly the critical fraction of the population with high enough IQ to keep a highly technical society like ours operational.

scrivener
Guest

The government is always an agent of the rich and powerful. Even in post-colonial America, the officials were all landed rich men. no indentured servant was in Congress. The difference in America is that the government was severely hampered in powers (enumerated powers) and divided up into States, judiciary, administrative, legislative, and limited by an explicit bill of (individual) rights. So the government could only do so much to favor the rich and powerful. As limitations on the government fell DC got richer and bigger every year – its product is pushing people around, – and the average person got… Read more »

SR Lovett
Guest
SR Lovett

I like your ideas for reform,I like even better the idea of having our own Pinochet

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

The reform ideas will never take root. Helicopter rides are a real world possibility. More likely is a systemic meltdown that solves the problem of the blue cities in an organic fashion. Just be sure to have a way to discern the locals from those fleeing the cities…

Babe Ruthless
Guest
Babe Ruthless

Read an interesting article about how Pinochet killed far fewer than left-wing South/Central American and Caribbean leaders, like Che Guevara, and left behind a country in much better shape.

It’s just a question of who writes the history books. That’s one area where our guys need to step up, big time.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

No new amendment on immigration, or does that fall under the “small reforms” category? Regardless, as much I like these ideas, they are just stopgaps. The issue is and always will be mixing different racial, ethnic and religious groups in a single territory. You will always be trying to make the best of a very bad situation. It’s untenable long-term. The freedom of association targets that issue, but, like the Constitution, it’s just words on a piece of paper. What is that compared to genetic differences. Words can always be changed. Definitions of words can always be changed. Genetics change… Read more »

Member

Repeal the 16th, 17th and 19th amendments. Our system rapidly deteriorated due to that malicious burst of meddling. Actually Zman’s proposed voting scheme would take care of the 19th.

bpromethiusb
Guest
bpromethiusb

my first thought on reading this one was the 16th amendment has to go as you say. add to that the federal reserve act, and whatever enabling legislation survives review with that change must be accorded attention as well. there is no higher truth in our corrupt times than that implied by: “Permit me to issue and control the money of a nation and I care not who makes the laws.” Mayer Amschel Rothschild, founder of the Rothschild international Banking Dynasty, 1790 the greeks did not have to contend with a corrupted money system – in this world, that is… Read more »

TomA
Guest
TomA

Those are intelligent ideas rooted in a pragmatic perspective on modern life. They might even work if the bulk of society was healthy and robust; but alas, it is neither and the trend is downward. The history of evolution on planet Earth suggests that a different kind of fix is inevitable, and even an artificial hurry-up version is likely going to overwhelm even “the bet laid plans of mice and men.” Short version, if you’re in the smart/strong cohort, you’re chances are better.

Saml Adams
Guest
Saml Adams

Funny thing about growing up with exiled Cubans…always thought Pinochet was a guy with the right idea. Wasn’t until I went to college that I found out he was apparently an evil dictatorial fascist. Thankfully history has been his friend. At my old firm, Chile was the most profitable operation in South America and had been for years.

Member

… and still is.

John Smith
Member

There’s better ways to handle the problem of stupid people voting. Rather than thinking in terms of who should vote, we should be looking hard at those who shouldn’t: – convicted felons and criminals – people on welfare – govt workers – illegal immigrants Also, yes we need to trim the elite class; but how to go about that? Welp- like it or not, the US Constitution will tell you exactly who needs to be taken out – and that’d be the guys that try to subvert it for personal gain. That will kill many birds with one stone. If… Read more »

Issac
Guest
Issac

Sometimes the best reform is allowing the political class leeway to further alienate their population. Trump, if he fails to deliver any reforms prior, should be voted out in 2020 so that alienation can continue apace. The illusion that he provides to boomercons in particular is disruptive to the natural process that leads to “pruning.”

Tekton
Guest
Tekton

Pre-US Constitution, we were in fact a Christian nation. The 17th century colonists came here for the express purpose of building the Kingdom of God, and they established their society to carry out that role for themselves AND their progeny. Their systems of law and governance were based on the biblical scriptures and their founding constitutions specifically stated that. They were white Europeans, mostly British, and overwhelmingly Protestant. This WAS the founding nation which displaced the aboriginal peoples and took dominion of the continent from sea to sea. The so-called “ratification” of the US Constitution in 1789 was actually a… Read more »

Member

Fine by me. But each state would be its own country.

Yves Vannes
Member

Even in a small city state like Athens these reforms were short lived until a heavier hand took charge…

We face a continental scale problem with significant region differences, serious logistical problems and the invasion of outsiders who will never acclimate to our or their satisfaction.

I don’t see any workable alternative to balkanization. That or a bloodbath.

james wilson
Guest
james wilson

Exactly. The US population, as a whole, is far too degraded to support a single serious federal reform. That can only be done locally–very locally. Balkanization is a term that carries negative vibes. Better to observe how the Swiss govern–by county. The county is the citizen’s primary government, both taxes and rules. A citizen will move to the next county (or threaten to) to benefit himself through those difference, but he can’t vote unless they say he can. This is original federalism. Switzerland began a slow slide however in 1971 when women were made eligible to vote (county by county).… Read more »

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

Changing suffrage in any way that effects the Left will have to imposed by force. A vote in reality is very little real power by itself but almost no one willingly gives up power and without votes the Left Mob would be powerless While I am exceptionally glad that people here are discussing options, too many reactionaries avoid the topic. Without an idea of what to fight for you can’t fight and as autistic as it sounds , policy is the core of what is fought for It fires no one up other than Melvin Nyquist accountant at large but… Read more »

Issac
Guest
Issac

Regional diffirence is vastly overblown by nostalgics. The homogenizing force of rapid transit and instant communication have made culture far more level outside of the most rural areas. The left is also not interested in losing any territory as they ascend. Red states that don’t have a burgeoning brown population will get one and the new manifest destiny will be to resettle a microcosm of the world’s non-white nations into every city and state.

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

Yes, Biden’s 1980 Refugee Resettlement Act could be immediately halted with President Trump’s signature, yet he has not acted, nor spoken of it, that I’ve heard. Ann Corcoran posted on her informative refugee resettlement blog for years and just threw in the towel a couple weeks ago to “take a break.” I think actually she’s given up. https://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/ After flooding our country with peasants and savages and placing batches of them in communities where there still might be a factory making wrapped sliced cheese or file folders or something, the white American workers are laid off and replaced with the… Read more »

james wilson
Guest
james wilson

That is true until you shrink the region. States are too large an entity to effect normal human differences, but counties are not.

Member

I like a lot of Z’s suggestions but they aren’t going to happen. They may have happened if the heritage Americans were still 80+ % of the pop and controlled the institutions. But we will soon be a minority and none of these suggestions are going to be embraced by our Jewish and Chinese overlords or our replacements. I don’t mean they won’t vote for them. I mean that they and their (((sponsors))) will be in positions of power. The whites that will still be powerful are on their side against the masses of bad whites. Any dictator/tyrant will be… Read more »

Member

Did Zman say no force would be required?

Lance_E
Member

At least the old landowners and robber barons rose through their own personal abilities and achievements. The average CEO, like the average politician, is an interchangeable cog put there by an indifferent committee. He doesn’t care what happens to “his” company in 20 years, only what he can get out of it in the next 2 or 3, usually by selling out to special interests.

Peisistratos only reformed a city-state, and Athens didn’t last long afterward. It’s a nice thought, but it isn’t practical for the American Empire. Our options are (a) Caesar Augustus, (b) breakup or (c) collapse/conquering.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds
Freddo
Guest
Freddo

No taxation without representation, or: if you have a job and pay taxes you deserve a vote. But: if you draw a government check, you loose the right to vote.

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

Define taxes Most poor and working class people pay taxes at the State level and often Federal specifically Social Security and the like. I get the desire to not deal with redistribution but you really don’t want to end social security or the rest. This won’t result in anything good. Basically the GDP will contract by around 1/3 much directed at the working and poor people. Less business revenue means lower wages and if wages don’t go up, the population will not stabilize ever. You can’t lower the cost of living low enough to make having kids plausible in a… Read more »

Member

No net income tax at the end of the year? No vote. Bring your 1040 to the voting station.

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

The poor aren’t the source of the problems or even most of the spending. Its old age related (pensions and medicine) and military All those people pay taxes. Also you require the consent of those poor to have a republic, they get a vote on what qualifies as “just consent” as much as you do and if they chose to withdraw it can end the Republic just as fast as your side. And no you can’t separate the nation that easily either, the poor and wage starved working people are all around you and while not as well armed, don’t… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

But then the cucks lose their shield, “Social Security is the third rail!”

Matrix
Guest
Matrix

Won’t Get Fooled Again The Who We’ll be fighting in the streets With our children at our feet And the morals that they worship will be gone And the men who spurred us on Sit in judgement of all wrong They decide and the shotgun sings the song I’ll tip my hat to the new constitution Take a bow for the new revolution Smile and grin at the change all around Pick up my guitar and play Just like yesterday Then I’ll get on my knees and pray We don’t get fooled again The change, it had to come We… Read more »

Chris
Guest
Chris

Excellent ideas for reform. Can’t see them happening, short of an outright revolution unfortunately. Still, concrete prescriptions, however hard to implement, are better than hand-wringing and whining. As usual, kudos to Z for his insight into the present mess.

A.B. Prosper
Guest
A.B. Prosper

Nicely said.

Jack Boniface
Member

And: Abolish the Federal Reserve Board. It’s not just nutty libertarians who call for this. The pre-1913 system was much better. The Fed is run by banking oligarchs for their own benefit. Just look at its $16 trillion banking bailout of 2008, paid for by everybody else.

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

I hate to be the shill for the Fed, but the pre-central bank era was wrought with numerous financial panics and bank failures. That sounds eerily similar to the current problems with cryptocurrencies. The problem is the lack of oversight by Congress. It was Congress that authorized the Treasury to sell the bank stocks, forfeiting hundreds of billions in dividends that would otherwise have accrued to the federal balance sheet.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

LOL.

Get the politicians involved in the issuance of money?

Hahahahahahaha.

Hello Weimar Republic and hyperinflation.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Inflation of the money supply is a tax on you by the oligarchs. He who gets to spend the inflated money first – makes out. Everybody else further on down the line gets screwed. The screwing can be quite easily demonstrated by going online and looking for “value of US dollar over time”. From 1796 or whenever it was the dollar was created – until something like 1895 (going from memory) – the value of the dollar bounced around. But the fact is that in 1895 or so – the dollar was valued at 96 cents. So if you stuck… Read more »

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

Calsdad, I’m sorry for my ignorance, but how does the dollar fare in relation to other currencies? Is this how all countries do it with their currencies or… ? Is it like this everywhere or are we especially bad? Finance is a language I don’t speak, unfortunately. But based on what you said, it sounds like a total screw job to me!

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

It’s been worse in other places. Germany, Zimbabwe, Israel, and Venezuala all come to mind. I think you’re choosing the wrong yardstick to measure by though. I would spend some time reading Martin Armstrong for a better idea of the historical yardstick to measure by – since most of the issues around money have repeated themselves over and over and over again over thousands of years. https://www.armstrongeconomics.com/blog/ The libertarian/Austrian economist types will say we should have “honest money” – and what they mean by that is something that may go up and down in value (like the dollar did during… Read more »

Wilbur Hassenfus
Guest
Wilbur Hassenfus

Who bells the cat? We won the presidency and got nothing but a four year (I hope) lull in the rate of acceleration of some of the abuses. Our rulers won’t make any real concessions to anybody who hasn’t demonstrated a will and ability to throw their friends out of helicopters. Even then, they’ll find a way to screw us. You have to replace them. But with what? Our NPC permanent civil service won’t implement any changes unless the new boss hangs a few examples in front of the federal building, and even then they’ll drag their feet, obstruct, and… Read more »

Member

Some Marxist reporter a few years ago wished for the same thing: the dictatorial powers of China “just long enough” to push through action on climate change. As always, it’s who gets to pick the dictator that creates the biggest hurdle. I would actually tie citizenship to military service, and nobody under 25 votes unless they pay a net income tax at the end of each year. You 1040 form becomes your voter registration. The reason nobody would long mourn the loss of Cook or Bezos is that there are plenty of people climbing the ladder to take their place.… Read more »

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Bodies in military service = extra manpower for extranational activities undertaken by the elite (means empire for the ignorant) Empire = destruction of your nation , and invasion by representatives of the invaded peoples said empire comes into contact with when it goes into their nations. Do any of you guys pay attention at all? Ever since the US became an empire – people from every single place this country stuck it’s troops into – have flooded into this county. It’s something I brought up as far back as the 90’s when Bush engaged in Desert Storm – and I… Read more »

Member

I didn’t say universal military service. It should remain a volunteer force. That makes citizenship and affirmative choice unlike a draft which is compulsory.

Service in state militias, National Guard, should count.

Also, what do you think the odds are of military adventurism if the voters are the people being sent into combat?

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

The chances of military adventurism is zero – if there is no military capable of adventuring.

That was the point of the militia – which was under STATE control. And it’s exactly why it was eliminated in favor of the National Guard – which is ultimately under FEDERAL control (and therefore usable for overseas adventures).

Who went around confiscating firearms in New Orleans – was it the true militia – or the National Guard?

Wilbur Hassenfus
Guest
Wilbur Hassenfus

The only semi-plausible move is for us to adopt the Arkansas Suicide strategy: If somebody with power makes a decision that harms our interests, he may accidentally shoot himself three times in the back of the head in his sleep. Let that happen often enough, and the others will be suitably encouraged. But again, who bells the cat? Nobody on our side has the will and ability to take any meaningful action. If they did, they would. I certainly won’t, and neither will you, and anybody who tries to talk you into it is working for the FBI. Remember also… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Guest
Al from da Nort

One seemingly eternal source of ever-spreading elite disfunction, IMHO, is that their spawn tend to revert to the mean in character, intelligence and drive. So, driven by elite females, elite parents ‘need’ to find elite-level sinecures that fund elite-level lifestyles for their merely average (at best) descendants, using their political power. Obviously it is ‘better’ (in their eyes) for the polity to supply these extra funds than it is for the elite to reduce their own conspicuous consumption, e.g. through promoting elite austerity as an ethos, as did Solon. Absent reform or overthrow* this process continues down through a few… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

I vote aye:
“there are approximately 1.75 million nonprofits in the United states that annually generate nearly 2 trillion dollars, which is 9 percent of the U.S. GDP.”

Not “tax the rich”, but tax their money laundering, tax evasion, and virtue signaling. The poz shouldn’t be a cost-free benefit.

DLS
Guest
DLS

Only one reform needed for the House and Senate. Pull congressmen from the general voting age public, similar to jury duty. No campaigns or money involved. No pensions or lucrative lobbying gigs after your service is over. Bribery laws would be strictly enforced. As WF Buckley wisely said, “I would rather be governed by the first 2000 people in the Boston telephone directory than by the 2000 people on the faculty of Harvard University.”

thekrustykurmudgeon
Guest

Z – I disagree with abolishing the 17th amendment. Why not just abolish the senate altogether? Like it seems redundant and also a violation of OMOV

Member

OMOV?

thekrustykurmudgeon
Guest

“one man one vote”

DeBeers Diamonds
Guest
DeBeers Diamonds

One man one vote is a perversion of the Constitution imposed by the Warren Court. The true value is “no taxation without representation”. And also “no representation without taxation”.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

So Krusty, you just want mob rule? Senate is based on an equal and independent say in Federal control by States, which were independent countries at first. Popular election of Senate by the mob is a relatively new abomination. OMOV is itself an abomination as it assumes the premise that all men are equally able to understand complex issues of State and will vote for the general good. The Founders did not believe that either. A simple conversation with a random sample of people on the street will show you They were correct.

thekrustykurmudgeon
Guest

they already ruled in the 60s that OMOV applied to states so why not apply it to the federal government?

The girl with far-away eyes
Guest
The girl with far-away eyes

Your first reform clashes with your second. If I’m born in State A and move to State B before I’m old enough to vote, I could have decades of voting in a state I don’t live in. How considered and practical would my vote be? (No “skin in the game”, to quote a book I haven’t read.)

You could maybe fix this: you can only vote where you were born, and you have to be living there.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

People can’t seem to get it thru their thick heads that all of life should not be determined thru voting. That’s the root of the problem – and it’s one that has been slowly and incrementally introduced by progressivism – to the point where every single thing you do in your life is politicized and therefore subject to “democracy” and “voting”. One of the things the founders in this county tried to be clear about – was that the Federal government had only certain powers. What this meant was that certain aspects of society (and therefore life) – were simply… Read more »

Mark Hastings
Guest
Mark Hastings

Nicely put. I currently own a condo in a big old mill. Sometimes I actually attend association meetings just to hear the insane ideas the members have and want to put to a vote.

Nathan
Guest

So true. I am ready to scrap voting all together, at least for now. The same with “muh Constitution.” Just don’t ask me what comes next. We can figure that out later once we excise the cancer.

Babe Ruthless
Guest
Babe Ruthless

The ghost of my 20-year-old libertarian self just fainted.

Member

Voters and politicians must have skin in the game. Citizenship requires paying taxes on income/land above a minimal amount, being over 35 and married. Service in the combat arms while under fire could substitute for land ownership, ie you risked your life for your country. All elected offices have both a minimum age limit and a requirement to have children in wedlock. That way you have a future you are protecting. The Presidency probably needs a requirement to have grandchildren. Also, states must be allowed to have land based senates to balance cities. All voting to be done in person… Read more »

Drake
Guest
Drake

There are several aspects of the old Roman Republic that I agree with. Voting publicly and in person is one.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Well thought, quality diagnosis.
One leetle problem…

The immivaders aren’t invading, they’re invited. There’s a reason most of them are fighting age males, promised pay in privileges, benefits, and women.

Voting While White will be more than a taboo, it’ll be a crime right up there with Speaking.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Here’s a JQ-free pocket history of how our modern oligarchy formed;
Oil was the sugar in the petri dish that fueled horizontal expansion.

“How Big Oil Conquered the World”
https://www.corbettreport.com/bigoil/

Longish, but not cluttered; just enough detail to keep the story moving, and move it does.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

As Dutch said yesterday, we were born at the right time. We lived in an era of abundance, promise, and miracles, more than any other. We were at the party, and the world can kiss my ass. From Zerohedge: Since 2014, the Chinese nomenklatura has rolled out NeuroCap “…in factories, public transport, state-owned companies, and the military to increase the competitiveness of its manufacturing industry and to maintain social stability,… Emotion surveillance. Mental health facial tracking. To watch us with untiring attention and with the training to spot our most fleeting micro-expressions. The wireless sensors are concealed under a normal… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Forgot this other nugget from ZH:

“The Next Generation Of “America’s Thought Police” Is Being Birthed On Our College Campuses”

They’ll be running things soon.
Have a nice day!

Backwoods Engineer
Guest
Backwoods Engineer

“The first thing to acknowledge is that “get back to our constitutional roots” is the sort of thing a moron mutters to himself while watching the news. The people saying this really should be rounded up and shipped off the Africa, where they could be eaten by the natives.” You write such a violent defamation, then go on to propose Constitutional amendments, and even a repeal of the 17th Amendment? If you mean to throw the Constitution out, then advocate it. If you mean to only reform it, then stop defaming those of us who wish to return to it.… Read more »

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

The first Democrat to advocate for breaking up Comcast, will be the Democrat who beats Trump in 2020. The Republicans are the problem. Democrats are just being Democrats. Even rank and file Republicans believe that “the free market” is interchangeable with “oligarchy” or even monopoly. Libertarians love to talk about “natural monopolies” as a good thing. Bezos is king of the jungle because he just ran a better company with better ideas. He deserves to OWN an entire marketplace. Such is his reward. Then you have dime-a-dozen cranks like Paul Ryan who would sell their mothers to any Fortune 500… Read more »

rich whiteman
Guest
rich whiteman

This kind of talk gets me excited about martial law and increased police state activity. Directed by the Good Guys, of course, as a massive backlash against the corrupt stew of excrement DC is.
We need a real Crisis – a true Alinsky-bomb to go off and startle the populace into accepting the reforms suggested by Z Man. A little peace and quiet would sure be nice around this country. Even if it was only temporary and ended up like the Greeks.

Steve Ryan
Guest
Steve Ryan

Z, we really need to stop giving traffic to those who hate our existence. No more wikipedia links, please! Infogalactic is pretty much just as good, and isn’t SJW infested. Here is the link to Thrasybulus on their site: https://infogalactic.com/info/Thrasybulus

Moran ya Simba
Guest
Moran ya Simba

I too have toyed w the idea of ‘one household, one vote’. I think there is something to this idea. I also believe Pinochet was a hero, not a villain (I think this may also be, partially, true of Franco). Some pretty interesting ideas here

Roe vs. Godzilla
Guest
Roe vs. Godzilla

This reform stuff is all dandy, but it’s really just a sugary parfait of intellectualizing and wishful thinking. Like the old joke goes… “First, They came for the blacks; but I didn’t speak out, because I wasn’t black. Next, They came for the Shapiros; but I didn’t speak out, because I wasn’t a Shapiro. Then, They came for… actually, once they got rid of the blacks and the Shapiros, all the really big problems pretty much sorted themselves out on their own, so They stopped coming for anybody else, and things went back to normal. Thank heavens I didn’t speak… Read more »

Member

Instead of trying to find things the elites would grudgingly accept, and sending “get back to the Constitution” to Africa, send the elites to Liberia until it is fixed (and require them to accept ebola immigrants).

If the elites resist, they can be placed on some spiked fence (e.g. the White House) after being – well I was thinking of guillotine-ing but I think slowly burning the body starting at the extremeties slowly until only the head is not cremated would serve justice – social and natural law – more.

sirlancelot
Guest
sirlancelot

Chucky and Nancy meet an untimely demise. The president shurgs his shoulders and continues on. More and more enemies of the state have unfortunate accidents .

The message is sent. The democrats and their financiers have proven they have no use for the Constitution .Things won’t change until they get a taste of thier own medicine.

Hypothetically speaking of course for any of our government friends listening in.

Mr. Random Commenture
Guest
Mr. Random Commenture

One suggestion: Only allow parents who don’t work for the government or receive welfare to vote. They are the only class that has an interest in a better future.

Allow government workers and people on welfare to pay back what was given if they want to vote.

Joachim
Guest
Joachim

“The first thing to acknowledge is that “get back to our constitutional roots” is the sort of thing a moron mutters to himself while watching the news. The people saying this really should be rounded up and shipped off the Africa, where they could be eaten by the natives. ” Come on Z-Man, a message centered around the Constitution, free markets, tax cuts, regulation cuts, and “bootstraps” is totally effective at inspiring economically disaffected whites to throw themselves into revolt, facing doxxing, imprisonment, death, etc. without flinching. American Conservatism, the Gipper, the Chamber of Commerce, et al have the answers.… Read more »

Shrugger
Guest
Shrugger

And that, my friends, is why Joachim won’t do two shows a night. Bravo!

Ned2
Member
Ned2

Tying voting to place of birth would prevent millions of legal citizens of the rights granted them when they became citizens. What about US citizens born overseas? We moved from a liberal shithole to a deep red zone. Does that mean I have to go back there to vote in person, even though I don’t live there or pay taxes there? All of this is too complicated and impossible to enforce. What if we limited voting to those who pay taxes? Simply having to show a valid I.D. would go a long way to correcting our broken system. The simple… Read more »

Heresolong
Guest

I hate the fact that I could only vote in a small suburb of Chicago, where my father attended grad school and had his first child. I haven’t lived there since I was six months old, but I have lived here for twenty years since shortly after I got out of the Navy. On the other hand, I wouldn’t be able to vote in federal elections either because my marriage didn’t work out so as an educated and responsible male who has never collected social welfare payments I would have no voice at any level. On the gripping hand though,… Read more »

Member

Really good ideas. And they are not possible under the current global order (yes, it is a global hegemony) because the essence of them is restoring the nation. And nations are no longer permitted under the terms of the global order. So, to effect this change requires all nations to throw off globalism, which is very difficult to imagine, short of a total systemic collapse. Maybe that is what we should put on our Christmas wish lists.

Name (required)
Guest
Name (required)

A reform which would eliminate seats of Leftist power would be to limit the vote to those who live outside of urban areas. If a square mile has more than 640 dwellings, counting apartments, no one living in it gets to vote. Combine that with your other suggestions.