Propaganda 2.0

Many of us have had that strange experience where the media is suddenly interested in something about which we either have involvement or have direct knowledge. It is a strange exhilarating thing to see people on TV or at a major media site covering something or someone you know. In most cases, that moment of exhilaration is then followed by a brief moment of confusion, then irritation and then maybe anger. Without fail, no matter how simple the topic, the media will get the important parts wrong in some way.

My first experience with this was in the early days of the internet. This was right around when the first ISP’s were mailing people diskettes with offers to try this new thing called the internet. I was on a sports statistics mailing list and somehow the local news got wind that there was a “secret cable operating on the dark internet.” Apparently, someone showed one of the lunkheads an e-mail from the list and they reacted as if they witnessed black magic. Whatever the cause, it was suddenly a media story.

The person assigned to “report” on this secret cabal on the dark internet went on television and said a bunch of things that were obviously not true. In fact, it was clear to me the person had made the whole thing up. What was fascinating to me is they made up some anecdotes to add color to their tale. In other words, this was not just laziness, but a calculated decision to create a fictional tale, rather than report the news. Given the way TV news works, it also meant everyone at the station was in on the scam.

It was a moment of clarity, but as Theodore Dalrymple wrote about last week, even knowing the news is all fake, I still have to fight the urge to believe it. When they report on what I know, the rational part of the brain is jolted into action and I can see straight away that they are spinning fabulous tales. Maybe I will go on-line and point out the nonsense to those who may care about it. When the topic is outside my sphere of knowledge, I’m tempted to just accept what is being presented without thinking too much about it.

The reason the plutocrats prefer narrative journalism over actual reporting, of course, is it lets them set public opinion. We’ll get a dose of that this weekend as the actors and actresses of cable news explain to the world why we must go to war with Venezuela to stave off a humanitarian crisis. Most people know little about Venezuela, other than the fact our rulers are mad at the local ruler. That leaves the press to fill in those massive gaps with made up tales of horror from so-called experts on the subject.

As Dalrymple pointed out toward the end of his post, “One cannot live in a state of permanent skepticism about everything.” Most people are trusting and most people are wired to trust authority. That’s why we have propaganda. It works on that innate trust people have in authority. It’s not limitless, of course. The people living in the old Soviet Bloc evolved a morose cynicism, after decades of being lied to by the authorities. The same thing is happening in America, as people adapt to the reality of fake news.

Even so, some portion of the public can be counted on to believe what they are told, no matter how absurd. The Left has always relied on this to hold their ranks together. The people inclined to radical politics are in search of salvation, so they are inclined to believe more than most. The confirmation they find among their radical soulmates on the Left keeps them in the fold, even when their leaders are revealed to be frauds or contradict themselves on matters of faith. Belief is a powerful narcotic.

That raises an interesting corollary to Dalrymple’s line about living in a state of perpetual skepticism. Can a society exist in a state of perpetual fiction? We seem to be managing it, as most of what fills the public space these days is made up, either by our rulers or the various scammers allowed to work the crowd. The public space is now just a sea of nonsense and lies that no one can trust. We live in an age where even the weather forecasts are created to sell ads. Yet, the people manage to bugger on.

Maybe that’s what we are seeing in the information age. It’s Propaganda 2.0. Instead of trying to mobilize the crowd in support of the rulers, the point is to atomize the mob by turning everyone into a cynic. After all, if you can’t trust anyone, even the people in charge, then how can you conspire with anyone? Even if you find some safe space to conspire, how can you get others to join the conspiracy? In order to prevent resistance to their rule, the rulers have eliminated the social medium it requires to thrive.

Of course, by vaporizing social trust, the people in charge have eliminated an important medium through which they can maintain power. On the other hand, maybe soft-power has evolved to the point where social trust is no longer useful. Look at Venezuela. It’s clear that the US is slowly squeezing the life out of the country’s ruling class. They are doing so in a way that will cause the public to blame those bad rulers and welcome the handpicked good ruler, even though everyone knows he is a puppet.

It’s a great example of how social war has evolved. The local rulers are using the old methods of information control. They have state media repeating statements from the ruler, blaming some outside trouble makers and all the usual stuff. The US is not saying much, other than pointing out how awful it is that the power grid keeps failing. Of course, the US is probably behind the sudden rash of explosions, but that’s not important. What matters is Juan sitting in the dark, wondering when he charge his mobile again.

newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Pickle Rick
Member

That’s why those old Sicilians had omertà. And when the Feds finally broke that cultural firewall, the ability of the mafia to operate was destroyed because you couldn’t trust anyone.

We have to close ranks in a similar manner with our own code, or we lay ourselves open to infiltration and destruction.

Sean Detente
Member

Dude, you’re gonna have to shower and put on some clean clothes before you “close ranks” with anyone. Rick and Morty fans deserve their own work camps.

Pickle Rick
Member

I am the Solenya.

King Tut
Guest
King Tut

“This guy is a friend of ours. He’s a goodfella.”

Member

In the mafia, wasn’t it the case that if you introduced a guy as “this guy is a friend of mine” and the guy was a fed or later became a rat, didn’t you get whacked?

King Tut
Guest
King Tut

I believe so. If you “vouched” for a guy and he turned out to be an undercover cop, then you got the death sentence.

Xopher Halftongue
Guest
Xopher Halftongue

The Feds and their informants are all bluepilled on women (see the fake dossier against Trump). The RedPill test is the first step at ferreting out Fed informants.

Member

When I was young, I read a bunch of 18th 19th and early twentieth-century literature for whatever reason but one thing I’d noticed was that journalists and actors were universally reviled in all these times. Everyone knew they were degenerates and fabulists. A change in thinking came about, It seems to me, when bunch of movies were made by the demonic cesspool in Hollywood in the sixties and seventies about how great journalists are and now we think all these people are worth listening too. And then the journalists turn around and write about all these wonderful do getting actors… Read more »

Yves Vannes
Member

Maybe what we now face is a problem largely due to democracy and mass culture.

In times past you could poison the king and a few of his retinue to change things.

Now things need to devolve into mass collapse and mass warfare to turn things around.

tullamore92
Guest
tullamore92

“A change in thinking came about…in the sixties and seventies about how great journalists are…”

I agree with the premise, but I’d date it earlier, maybe even to the earliest days (watched His Girl Friday recently, made in the late 40s I think, and based on a play from the 20s or 30s; in concerns the newspaper business, guess who the hero’s were?). In fact, if I wanted to get my tinfoil hat out, I might could connect a certain subset of the population to that steady, positive portrayal.

Member

good point. And of course Superman was a journalist.

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
Guest
Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman

True, but in “His Gal Friday,” the journalists were shown to be liars. Very clearly shown to be totally dishonest liars–as opportunistic as any virus ever even thought about being.

Dr. Mabuse
Guest
Dr. Mabuse

Maybe it was Watergate that pushed the image of the heroic journalist, crusading to fight evil. Before that, reporters were not necessarily BAD characters in movies, but they were not glamourized. They were often physically unprepossessing, scruffy, slightly disreputable rascals, but redeemed by a golden heart. Think of “Mr. Smith Goes To Washington”: the press ends up on the side of the angels in the end, but for most of the film they’re shown as cynical opportunists.

ChrisZ
Guest
ChrisZ

Great observation, Whitney. It seems to me that the period you mention–the 18th to early-20th centuries–may have been an unusual period in history. Printing/publishing had created, for the first time, the possibility for a truly “mass” media. But it was a media of the word–the audience was insulated from the subtly persuasive (and even hypnotic) effects of personality, because it didn’t transmit through the printed journals and books that were the medium for mass communication. Even if you were going to a political event (like the Lincoln-Douglas debates) or a dramatic production (like a Shakespeare play), the actual figure speaking… Read more »

Rcocean
Guest
Rcocean

Some famous NYT reporter/editor wrote something similar in his autobiography (can’t remember specific name). Before WW2, Journalism was considered a low-class profession that quality people (especially intellectual Jews) stayed out of. Bascially, just a bunch of drunks who hung out at the police station or the local courthouse. The man’s parents were horrified he went in journalism. Then that all changed after WW2. Suddenly “reporters” were foreign policy experts, and asking Presidents questions on TV. People started to worship Edward R. Murrow. It became a lucrative and powerful profession. Now, we’re going to back to previous times. Everyone knows 90%… Read more »

Glenfilthie
Guest
Glenfilthie

I respectfully disagree. You can set your watch and warrant to the mass media – IF you know how to read it. First of all, assume you are being lied to. Look closely at the evidence they offer and never take it at face value. Look at who the villains of the piece are, and who the heroes are, and who their masters and vassals are and look at THEIR agenda. Read between the lines. Finally, consult the punditry. For me it’s reflex now. One of the tricks I learned from this blog – is looking up the authors of… Read more »

Ivar
Guest
Ivar

Glen, if you were around during the Cold War, you will remember how the Sovietologists used to comb the government-approved news coming out of Russia, looking for signs and portents. Who was standing next to whom on the reviewing stand on Lenin’s tomb was a big deal. We Americans (and Brits) of the nasty, hateful persuasion are reduced to doing that now, in our own countries. I suspect most on this list have gotten pretty good at it.

Member

Obligatory Michael Crichton Gell-Mann Amnesia Effect reference.

Larkin Lover
Guest
Larkin Lover

So I read about this, and it seems Crichton himself is being slightly disingenuous. Mistakes in a subject like advanced physics are a result of inability of lay people to understand it, whereas disinformation about Palestine has to do with the establishment not wanting us to understand the facts, mistake of the head versus heart. And Gell-Mann, not to judge him, don’t know about his politics, is the sort of person who might be highly susceptible to this type of “confusion.” The takeaway point is that journalists are incompetent AND mendacious!

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Many years ago (decades?), there used to be classifications of reporters. For example, I remember that scientific reports were often presented by the designated “science” reporter. The point being that such news of a technical nature was a bit too technical for a typical reporter’s competence and/or needed certain vetting best done by a more knowledgeable and specialized individual. This obviously this is no longer the case. Now we see “news” casters (really actors as Z-man points out) spewing talking point after talking point, citing “fact” after “fact”, without the slightest understanding of what they are talking about. A simple… Read more »

Member

Even then, it was all Kabuki theater. The long-time science reporter at the newspaper I worked at back in the 80s-90s had no formal science training. I corrected him once on an article where it described the electron as “the heaviest particle in an atom,” explaining that an electron was smaller than a proton or a neutron by many orders of magnitude and he just dismissively told me “That’s what he [the source] told me.” There have never been any requirements that a reporter on a particular beat has deep knowledge of the subject he is covering. It’s always been… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Vizzini, point taken. I was fairly young when I remember listening to such reporters. They probably could have sold me the Brooklyn bridge.

As an aside, your point on reporters gravitating to fields they have an interest in, but perhaps little knowledge, e.g., sports. There is now reported in use at newspapers (and really is not new, I saw such demo’d 20 years ago) an AI type program that actually writes the local sports news automatically from fed scores and player names. That’s how little value added the typical sports reporter brings to their job. 😉

Severian
Guest

Sports “reporting” is the classic example of why nobody needs reporters in the first place. I actually did some “sports reporting” in college, for one of those little startup local indie rags that flourished right before the Internet blew up. My first “story” involved asking the quarterback about the last game. Since I actually knew something about football, we talked about coverages, reads, interesting stuff to people who are interested in football. The “editor” sent it back — all the readers want to know, said he, was why the QB threw that interception in the 4th quarter. “But that’s what… Read more »

PawPaw
Guest
PawPaw

In the early 80’s I was working in a large metropolitan news paper putting the finishing touches on the new computerized type-set system that was going to put all the old grubby, ink-stained type-setters out of work. [yes, at that time they were still setting rubber letters backwards in big round steel drums].On one of the floors was a large glassed-off room where a dozen guys in 80’s era sports jackets were sitting at long tables, smoking furiously, and watching small televisions while taking notes on yellow pads. This was the “sports dept. ” It was laughed at even by… Read more »

Member

[yes, at that time they were still setting rubber letters backwards in big round steel drums] They were very likely recently setting lead letters a line of type at a time (generated from machines called “Linotypes” appropriately enough) backwards on large flat frames. The rubber drums were actually a step later after phototypesetting really started taking over in the 70s — offset lithography. That step can remain at the press end regardless of whether the pages are laid out by computer or not. And nothing is actually laid out in rubber letters or etched in rubber. Metal plates are made… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

I actually bought and operated one of the early Linotype photo type setters in my department. Could never figure out why the hugh keyboard with all the funny keys and characters until finally told about the history of such machines in the industry. Anyway, it was a godsend. Prior to laying out our books and paper manuscripts for publication, we had to send typewritten paper to the publisher, then edit his galley proofs. Time consuming. When mathematic equations were used, the publisher usually simply photographed the equations and placed them inside the paper/book as photographed—the effort at copying was too… Read more »

Member

Look at Venezuela. It’s clear that the US is slowly squeezing the life out of the country’s ruling class.

I don’t support US involvement in Venezuela, but it seems to me it’s hard to argue that Maduro is doing a pretty good job squeezing the life out of the political class (and every other class) in Venezuela all by himself (of course, I can only assume that from reading the news…)

Larkin Lover
Guest
Larkin Lover

Yes, the wiser I become, the more I realize we’ve all entered Hoax World together. But I think it was worse in the before internet days. Before everyperson had a voice, I think there were things made out of whole cloth, and not just the big thing we all know about.

JohnTyler
Guest
JohnTyler

“It was a moment of clarity, but as Theodore Dalrymple wrote about last week..” For those of you that haven’t read any of his books, you should. Suffice it to say, he is hated by the liberal establishment in the UK (he is British) and the USA. As for Venezuela, the life began being sucked out of that once relatively wealthy nation by the rulers their citizens FREELY placed in power; the communists Chavez and now Maduro (their version of Sanders or AOC here in the USA). Being communists, they have a natural affinity for destroying a nation (and filling… Read more »

Rod1963
Guest

Do you really trust a bunch of smear merchants who in past times gas lighted us into a illegal and costly war with a country that was no threat to us. One that cost the lives of 4000 Americans and 3 trillion dollars. A news media that openly and repeatedly lied to us that Trump works for Putin and that Hillary should be president. How about Iit cheerleaded the destruction of Libya and covered up our attempted overthrow of Assad of Syria. Or maybe how they sold us that NAFTA would be good for America. I could go on about… Read more »

Member

I really enjoy reading Dalrymple’s books about the lower classes in England. I’d describe them as the show Cops in book form.

pyrrhus
Guest
pyrrhus

The term for the belief that while media reporting of stories you know about is totally wrong, other stories might be true, is Gell-Mann amnesia, after the Nobel Prize winning physicist..My wife and I have each seen perhaps a dozen news reports about matters of which we have intimate knowledge…None has ever been close to correct..I don’t believe anything reported unless I can find substantial backup, and I assume spin on everything with political implications.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

I agree, everything I have seen in the national press, which I know something about, is completely wrong and probably mostly fabricated. I suspect it is a combination of point-of-view and the need to put things into some sort of story, rather than the reporting of facts on the ground. As to Venezuela, one report I saw, a man-in-the-street interview, suggested that most Venezuelans aren’t interested in protesting, they are jaded as to the real-world attractiveness of any politicians, and just want to find a way to survive into the next day. I don’t have any reason to believe any… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

One aspect of incorrect/ignorant reporting almost always involves statistics and the scientific method when reporting on the latest research “finding”. This covers a large swath of the “news”. A little knowledge of the scientific method, and stat’s, and perhaps a little simple math goes an awful long way toward the general cynicism wisely noted by Z-man. Indeed, this is so much of the “news” today that I fondly remember my commutes with the children to and from school while listening to the “news” on the radio. Everyday, we’d discuss the newcaster’s report wrt their conclusion and the data they reported… Read more »

Badthinker
Guest
Badthinker

Even worse is that most scientists are far too certain of their results because they use awful statistical methods. The whole field of stats is an exercise in overcertianty.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

It would seem that destroying the trust in the overall society will lead to people to place their trust in small groups, whether they be based on race, ethnicity or religion. As I’ve said before, we’re all Jews now. Time to start acting like it. Create a community within the larger society and police it. If someone doesn’t act according to our norms, i.e. loses our trust, throw him out. See how he likes to trying to navigate a trustless society without the help of a group that he can trust. This destruction of trust in the overall society will… Read more »

Member

Deep down I think we all know that we live in a world of lies but the lies are comforting because the truth is so depressing. People that have figured out what is really going on are often miserable and angry, always fighting off the black pills. Believing a comfortable lie makes it easier to sleep than an uncomfortable truth.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Owning the black pill and still getting up and going each morning anyway is a personal decision. It’s all up to you. One thing to understand is that seeing things a certain way is not the same thing as being in a position to do anything about it. Many people seem to completely overestimate their ability to make a real difference. I attribute that to the unrealistic expectations set in the public schools.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

In there lies the cause of the depression, powerlessness. Some interesting monkey studies of 50+ years ago illustrating this.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

The cause of depression is powerlessness, and an additional frustration is “trying to do something” when it is actually banging your head against the wall. The opportunity to “do something” is not dictated by you as to timing and strategy. The best you can do is prepare for various opportunities. The opportunity to make a change will be offered at a time and in a manner particular to some so-far unknown future moment. The opportunist takes advantage when that moment becomes available. Why did Trump run in 2016, not earlier or later? Preparation met a specific opportunity.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Yep. Losers often resort to the slight, “He lucked out” to excuse themselves. And as you pointed out in your last line “luck” is when opportunity meets preparation.

May we both be “lucky” before we pass.

Badthinker
Guest
Badthinker

It’s more than that. It’s often found when someone has no meaning to attach to their lives. Men find meaning in what they do, women in who they are. Hence why we have an epidemic of female depression – they’re all trying to find meaning in men’s work, instead of in being wives, mothers, and the social glue that connects us together.

Drake
Guest
Drake

I was in a combat unit in a war. Some of the retrospective stuff with interviews of Vets on the History Channel is pretty accurate. The real time news reporting – complete nonsense. I saw some of the CNN coverage of the Gulf War. It was just sensational ratings bait.

Member

The public space is now just a sea of nonsense and lies that no one can trust.

I suspect this was always the case. Certainly, perusing the history of the fourth estate does not lead me to believe otherwise.

But now that we have the internet, we suddenly see deception, the curtain is pulled aside. Watching this cataract of lies, we experience confusion and angst: “What can we even believe in anymore?”

The stable public space we used to have, was stable because most everybody bought the lies.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

The Comments section and Twitter destroyed journalism. The comments quickly exposed the reporter’s lies and misrepresentation. Twitter allowed everyone to see the personal bias and vacuousness of reporters.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Excellent point, Citizen.

tullamore92
Guest
tullamore92

Why don’t we ever hear about the time US agents had Chavez tied up in the back of a plane and headed out of Venezuela? Did I dream that?

Mcleod
Guest
Mcleod

I think my oldest (14 yr old son) gets all his news from 4chan. Holy shit the stuff that comes out of his mouth. It’s not that he’s wrong, it’s the fact that he needs to separate “being woke” with “being woke” at school. The state may be using official media, but no one is listening.

SidVic
Member
SidVic

My 12 yr old daughter told me a program we were watching was pozzed. The program was, in fact, quite pozzed. nevertheless, we sat down and had “the talk” (neonazi version tm). Derbyshire has nothing on me 🙂

Mcleod
Guest
Mcleod

They’ve been told they’re evil YT their whole life, so they’re just rolling with it. I’ve had to have the winning the battle, losing the war conversation with the kid.

SidVic
Member
SidVic

I hit the genetic lottery with my wife of 20 yrs. Two national merit scholars and counting. Finding out now I was kept in the dark about about many controversies with my children in the past. Apparently I’ve been pegged, unfairly IMO, as intemperate and they only bring me into the inner confidences when they got a nail and need a hammer. Just found out last week that my oldest daughter (5ft 120lb) caused two black girls to transfer to new schools in her sophomore year. Their parents complained about the bullying. Surveillance tapes saved her as they showed 4… Read more »

Member

20+ pull ups for a guy in his prime is pretty good.

Regarding the incident with your daughter and the nasty negresses, kudos to you for giving credit to the cuck principal. It is a reminder that even a cuck can marshal the stones to do the right thing.

Member

The news was always fake and there was a narrative. Before, it was basically a secularized version of the Gospel. Emphasizing the Angel over the Animal. It was toward virtue and greatness. It tended to cover up the scars and warts and exhort men to strenght and courage. That may have been the undoing, finding out that there was no Santa Claus, but war crimes on both sides, cronyism, corruption, cheatng. Sometimes our fallen nature was exposed, and we wondered at the lie. Today, it is reversed where America does nothing right, Western Civilization is barbaric, and barbarians are noble… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

It’s called “alignment”. The Western propaganda complex used to be largely aligned with the adult male nominally Christian WT. All the special interest groups have wrested the alignment of the propaganda machine over to their preferences. Which means the culture now emphasizes the grasping, immaturity, and unreal outlooks of those special interest groups. Alinsky well understood how to convert the alignment of the propaganda machine to the crazies.

Larkin Lover
Guest
Larkin Lover

That was a really great assessment!

Unreal City
Guest

In the room the women come and go,
Talking of Maya Angelou.

— updated Prufrock

LineInTheSand
Guest
LineInTheSand

Your post is painfully true.

TomA
Guest
TomA

If the US goes full tyranny, it won’t be a band of conspirators (or revolutionaries) that stop it. That model is obsolete for many reasons. But there is an effective alternative that does work. Because of fake news, everyone thinks that some foreign hacker has brought down the power grid in Venezuela. Not so. For a power grid (and generation stations) to be reliable, you need to do regular maintenance and repair. And for that, you need trained and experienced technicians who do their job properly. One pissed off technician choosing to be sloppy in a covert fashion can have… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Or you get the affirmative action hires to let things go down over time, as the skill sets are maladjusted to the task at hand. Gets you to the same place, over time, in a different way.

TomA
Guest
TomA

The corollary to this is that we are now producing more SJWs than Votech apprentices, and the labor pool is degrading at an alarming rate. When I was a young man, everyone I knew got their hands dirty working under the hood of an old car. Now, they all play video games all day every day. Very sad.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Not to mention complexity and intelligence to bring up such a complex system. Lose a significant (critical) fraction of your support staff and viola, your first crash is your last. Same situation can be found in any IT center of sufficient complexity. Been there, done that.

Rod1963
Guest

The same is happening in IT as industry and the government outsource it to H-1B’s from India and China. And at the same time we get record number of successful hacks against industry and military sites. Gee I wonder if there is a connection. Silicon Valley is now 75% Hindu and Chinese nationals. How long will it be before they start working for India and Xi? No one would know because whites have been froze out except at the very top and they can easily kept in the dark. This is why I partly laugh at the Deep State. These… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Rod, you are assuming the Deep State wants competency in all these critical areas. A case can be made that they prefer incompetency, so that the resulting failure can play to their ideas of total domination by the wealthy, and the idea of their buying their way out of the suffering endured by others. Stupid, to you and me, but they don’t think like we do.

Severian
Guest

I think your “atomization” theory is correct. Dalrymple himself reported a Romanian intellectual saying it’d take five generations for their national psyche to recover from Ceausescu, and the Securitate’s signature tactic — ostentatiously following random people on the street — seemed designed to atomize. The USSR has been gone nearly 30 years, and I can still spot an old comrade who grew up under the Iron Curtain. Organized resistance is impossible when nobody trusts anybody.

Member

Correct. Atomization is why any right wing organization is either infiltrated or run by feds. They don’t want people who distrust the government to be able to trust each other enough to do anything about it.

The Babe
Member
The Babe

Maybe that’s why the totalitarian media is going so hard after private individuals, like the meme-consuming grandmas, and swastika-beer-cup guys, even though they committed no crimes. To terrify people out of even private association.

Rod1963
Guest

The government was only one causative agent , there was also out of control capitalism and technology did the rest. Collectively they brought about the isolated individual and the degraded state. They dissolved the old ethnic neighborhoods, familial bonds, local communities the lodge system and churches that composed a social safety net and communal sense of well being for many Americans up into the 80’s. Carrol Quigley in his last paper AFIAK was one of the first to talk of it. http://www.carrollquigley.net/Lectures/The-State-of-Individuals-AD-1776-1976.htm Lewis Mumford also wrote about it. Though he put more bluntly. Psychologist Jordan Peterson in his lectures speaks… Read more »

The Babe
Member
The Babe

“‘An ambassador is said to be a man of virtue sent abroad to tell lies for the advantage of his country; a newswriter is a man without virtue, who writes lies at home for his own profit.’

“To these compositions is required neither genius nor knowledge, neither industry nor sprightliness; but contempt of shame and indifference to truth are absolutely necessary.”

From this excellent essay by Samuel Johnson:

https://www.bartleby.com/380/prose/436.html

Donzie
Guest
Donzie

Z,
I did a lot of work in the oil and gas industry, including Venezuela. Chavez’s oil minister, Ramirez, openly talked about how the country was purchasing political support for the Bolivarian revolution not only in Venezuela, but also in Cuba, Ecuador, and Bolivia. They did this by spending down their oil wealth. Ramirez, always maintained that they would be able to consolidate the “revolution” before they went broke. They would then build back up by predation – Peru, Argentina, Colombia.

So much for their financial models.

Jim Haples
Guest
Jim Haples

Msz Arden, ‘This is not who we are.
‘The people who were the subject of this attack today, New Zealand is their home. They should be safe here. The person who has perpetuated this violent act against them, they have no place in New Zealand society.’