Notes On The End Times

For some reason, the study of the end times has been a popular topic of interest to people since the dawn of civilization. How it all ends is of far more interest to people than how it all began. In fact, there is still a lot of resistance to even contemplating how it all began. The intelligent design stuff is, when you’re honest about it, is an argument against even thinking about how life began. How it all ends, the end of all days, is of interest to everyone, regardless of their inclinations.

For Americans, the vision of the end is usually one of two basic plots. One is a swift financial collapse that plunges everyone into chaos. Suddenly the ATM’s and credit cards no longer work. Bank accounts freeze and business grinds to a halt. If England is a nation of shopkeepers, America is a giant shopping mall that happens to possess a space age military. Consumerism is the religion of the people, so it makes some sense that collapse scenarios would start with the collapse of commerce.

Another vision of the end times is the plague scenario. The super-virus is a popular devise to hustle along the collapsing and get right to the end times. The popular TV series Walking Dead is a great example of this. The plague and the zombies are ridiculous, but they not only make for good TV, but they allow the writers to quickly get to the end times scenarios they wish to explore. This vision of the end is really about the beginning of what comes after this phase of civilization.

The current madness may give us a glimpse of how an actual collapse of civilization would unfold. We have both the threat of the super-virus, real or imaginary, and the threat to the cult of consumerism. The reality of the virus in this case is unimportant, because it is assumed to be real. The same is true of the financial markets. We may not be in an historical collapse, but it is assumed to be a real threat. In effect, this is a live action stress test of the system and the people in charge of it.

The first thing we can observe is the great lock-down started when the nation’s circus performers, went into hiding before anyone. The sports leagues and public entertainment operations were the first to respond. One would think that having them continue the show would make sense, in order to keep spirits up during the lock-down, but that was not the case. In fact, the big streaming services downgraded their service quality at the start of the lock down.

Now, you can make of that all sorts of things, depending upon your temperament, but the one important take-away is that the people in charge are not all that concerned about people getting restless in the lock-down. Despite what we are told, they are not terribly concerned with the circus half of Juvenal’s famous line. They could be mistaken about that, especially as this thing drags on, but for now people seem to be getting along just fine with reduced entertainments in the lock-down.

Of course, the lock-down itself is important. The controlling ethos of the ruling class is unfettered movement, yet in a crisis, their first instinct is to halt all movement. The people who just a few weeks ago were singing the glories of the free flow of people and goods are now threatening to weld our doors shut. When the real end times are upon us, the first clue will be a mandatory lock-down of the population with cops in the streets and a 24-hour curfew, except for approved personnel.

Another thing we can observe in the present situation is how the authorities have started to abandon certain duties. For example, cities have started to throw open their prisons, letting the inmates run free. The argument is they could get the virus if locked up in close quarters. That means the people in charge would rather see them raping and murdering in your neighborhood than possible getting the virus and passing it to one of the bureaucrats operating the jails.

We are also seeing the cops abandon their duties. In Cincinnati, the cops are no longer responding in-person to 911 calls. The stated reason is “to reduce unnecessary contact between officers and the public to reduce the spread of COVID-19.”  Presumably, if you call while being murdered, they will come out to identify your body, but if you call while it is just at the home invasion stage, too bad for you. If you want to get a glimpse of what the breakdown of society will be like, think about this.

Some people in dissident circles like to mock the paleocons, but the one thing the paleos got right before everyone else is anarcho-tyranny. Not only do we see this in our daily life in normal times, but it is in bold relief in this crisis. The first instinct of the people in charge is to “tyrannically or oppressively regulate citizens’ lives yet is unable to enforce fundamental protective law.” This is a crucial insight into the managerial system, but also how that system meets its demise.

That’s probably the way in which the great longed for collapse transpires. It will not be a great sudden end that results in chaos. It will not be a supernatural end that suddenly flings us into a post-apocalyptic world. Instead, it will be the slow withdraw of authority, along with the growth of a banal sort of tyranny. It is more cops hassling innocent people for no reason and fewer cops chasing actual bad guys. In time, new social systems evolve to fill in those gaps and provide local order.

The model to keep in mind is probably something like post-Rome Spain. Once the Roman authority collapsed, various barbarian rulers tried to fill the void, with varying degrees of failure. Eventually, local authority filled the gaps, providing order and protection for the people. In time, the Roman villa system became what we think of as feudalism throughout Europe. As the American empire fades, a similar sort of process will evolve. The end will be a whimper, rather than a bang.


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WangWeiLin
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WangWeiLin

It’s possible some of us could experience ‘the end of all things’, but none of us will ever experience the beginning.

John Hinds
Guest

Rather think that “beginning” and “ending” are as perpetual as the Universe itself.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Quarantine yourself from media and you’ll find we’re farther along than it appears. Life on the ground is very different from life in the screen.

Al from da Nort
Guest
Al from da Nort

Wang;
Serious scenario question. Period of the Warring States, maybe _?.

WangWeiLin
Guest
WangWeiLin

If the Warring States period interest you then look up the Chinese series Qin Empire: Alliance. Over 40 episodes, 45 min each. Give yourself 4 or 5 episodes to adjust to reading English sub-titles. Good character development. Excellent costumes. Hokey battles.

Member

Thanks, Z, for the nod to the paleocons’ invocations of anarcho-tyranny. The paleolibertarians have also been on the bandwagon. For some time now, a-t has been the true virus to fear, although so far it has not hobbled the NBA, the closing down of which appears to be the true measure of all things world-ending.

Member

Even money that some NBA players blame Daryl Morey for the Chi-com flu.

Member

And Lebron James, that learned disciple of the Founding Fathers, is moments away from inserting his opinion about it into the public discourse, whether it’s wanted or not.

KGB
Guest
KGB

One thing to pay close attention to in the next fortnight — with the ever-swelling number of “lock down” states — is just how little your local, county and state police are actually there to “serve and protect”. They exist to give butchy shrews, juiced up meatheads, and slimy bullies a make-work job. Well remunerated, I might add. They will defend their turf and their pensions with a passion. Just as we see the state governors strutting around with their cocks out this week, law enforcement will relish the chance to ask for your papers.

Tykebomb
Guest
Tykebomb

There were literally two supreme court cases about this. Police only have to protect those “in custody.” They literally have a constitutional duty to protect inmates from COVID-19 and NOT citizens from criminals.

Member
Felix_Krull

Police only have to protect those “in custody.”

It’s not the police’s job to protect people, except in the sense that they sequester criminals.

And to be frank, I wouldn’t want to live in a society where that was the case: it would require cops on every street corner, ready to “protect” citizens at seconds’ notice – a total surveillance society.

Tarstarkusz
Guest
Tarstarkusz

I get what you are saying and agree that it’s a problem, but there are some pretty egregious examples. When cops shoot someone or even beat someone, there is a principle called “the totality of circumstances” and the “reasonableness” of their actions based on what a hypothetical “reasonable police officer” would do in a similar circumstance and also what they sincerely believed to be true at the time of the action. So if they sincerely believed the ham sandwich in your hand was actually a machine gun and they shoot you in the back, their limited immunity kicks in. Despite… Read more »

Member
Felix_Krull

As the law is right now, cops can watch a serious felony with a high risk of serious bodily injury and or death to the victim and do nothing and still be protected. And that is right and proper, lest you want people suing the police for failing to protect them from every little altercation. The “serve and protect”-stuff is not to be taken literally, except as in protecting society (rather than the individual) by threatening criminals with repercussions and putting them away if they transgress. Protection from violence is – on a personal level – the duty of your… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

Felix nails the dilemma – allowing “failure to protect” lawsuits = nogs suing every time they nog. Might be workable in a civilized White society, like most things presently forbidden to reasonably free men.

If we were free to exercise self-defense, we could take care of the light work ourselves.

Under anarcho-tyranny, you can’t defend yourself legally AND you can’t sue the cops. Lose-lose.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Your only hope is that in a community with some closeness to the police—usually smallish, the police will look the other way at the general populace actions to protect themselves. I’ve seen this first hand along the border in this sector. Any number of civilian patrols work in concert with BP and local ranchers. Takes some time to build a relationship and one needs to respect boundaries, but there was never an adversarial turf war with groups I’m familiar with. We were treated as any other enforcement group. Data shared and even group coordination in efforts. Just keep your mouth… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Guest

Lose-Lose? Unless one realizes that one might have to choose between law and civilization. I mentioned that in passing at dinner after some civilian firearms training at the Jeff Cooper school. The striving bourgeois looked at bit confused, then went back to their dinner and discussing all the ways criminals can beat the system. And discussing their favorite pistol. 🤣🤣. The ROE put this all nicely into sharp relief, being Iraq and all. As I always tell the other leaders in a quiet voice the law is behind me, holding it’s knife. The Law chose this, they seem to understand.… Read more »

Tarstarkusz
Guest
Tarstarkusz

If a cop shoots a guy wanted for having just shot 10 children, if he doesn’t render aid, he can be held liable for deliberate indifference. The totality of circumstances comes into play here. If they are incapacitated from the shot, but still holding the gun, the totality of those circumstances protect the cop. To some degree, I think the concept of totality of circumstances could mitigate the insanity that could ensue from creating a duty to protect standard. You can’t run around screaming about how dangerous your job is and demand all these protections and creating policies that protect… Read more »

Federalist
Guest
Federalist

The landmark U.S. Supreme Court case in this regard is DeShaney vs. Winnebago County (often referred to as the “Poor Joshua” case). The father had legal custody of the child. The child was brought to a hospital and there was a report of abuse by the father. The county Dept. of Social Services (DSS) got a court order to keep the child in the hospital’s custody. At some point, the father regained custody but DSS continued to monitor the father. Although there was evidence of continued abuse, DSS took no action. Later, the child was severely abused by the father… Read more »

Member

And if not for the Due Process Clause that is at times so lamented, the State would be arresting people for no reason right and left and holding them in jail. Tragedies like this one happen, but it is the price we pay for not being subject willy-nilly to that midnight knock on the door.

John Smith
Member

Yes and no. There are two valid sides to this. Yours – which you briefly and eloquently laid out – and theirs. Those guys risk life and limb when they respond to anything. They have to sort out domestic disputes where 99.9% of the time, it is a case of two idiots fighting and the smaller, weaker idiot losing. They have to stand by and let a corruption-infested judiciary undermine them at every turn. Those monsters in prison where not put there by jackbooted thugs and self serving politicos and judges. They were put there in spite of them. Most… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
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Ben the Layabout

Good point. I’d argue that Jungle Law has already existed a long time, primarily in our urban jungles where the, ah, “Natives” live. What else can you call a 50% homicide clearance rate? Meanwhile, idiocy like DeBlasio’s releasing presumably less-dangerous criminals early will of course only add to the criminals on the street. Is it the humanitarian thing to do? Not to the potential victims, I’d argue. Action such as this are, perhaps, the last gasp of a soon-to-die uber-Liberal worldview. Vigilante law is another thing; we are not at that stage (“yet”?) If it comes, that will most likely… Read more »

Tarstarkusz
Guest
Tarstarkusz

Cops are not even in the top 10 most dangerous jobs. The whole “every stop, every call could be one that sends you to your death” is so overblown that it’s comical. This constant harping on “officer safety” has created a pervasive attitude of “us and them” with us being the cops and them being us pesky citizens. Cops will beat the shit out of old women on video and are completely shameless about it. ALL in the name of “officer safety” Not only are cops not in the top 10 most dangerous jobs, the way cops get hurt is… Read more »

Stina
Guest
Stina

By the numbers, I think it is nursing that has the highest morbidity stats in the SOA stats.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Guest

Gee. Politics is power.
Sounds like you might want to consider becoming a cop.

ChetRollins
Guest
ChetRollins

One thing the libertarians get right are the Thin Blue Line bootlickers on the right need to be ruthlessly educated. They are just as bad as the snitches who are calling the cops because they see people playing in a park during lockdown.

Trying to enforce anarcho-tyranny is much harder when everyone hates your guts.

John Smith
Member

What libertarians get wrong is that they refuse to distinguish good cops from bad cops… or even acknowledge the difference exists. and more than a few dissidents are making the same mistake. Further, if you use the bad ones as an excuse to kneecap the good ones… welp, enjoy Lagos, fellas, because that is where you’re headed, and you will get exactly the law enforcement you deserve. I’m kinda thinking the libertarians in Cincinnati will get the law enforcement they always wanted – good and hard. It’ll serve them right too.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Guest

Yes. They get paranoid from drugs, hate the fantasy police coming to take the candy away, then bitch about nogs running wild.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Guest

Sure.

All I’m hearing is the police have the power. Politics is Power.
Why would any politically minded man on the right not consider Being a cop?

And the police aren’t enforcing anarcho-tyranny; that’s the Fat black women in HR. The police are too busy arresting her brother.

And its really no problem enforcing anything if you don’t care about being hated, and are willing to use force.

Sandmich
Guest
Sandmich

The cops in my local township make it their business to hassle trouble makers passing through the main drag that goes from Good Town to Ghetto Town. It’s an inexact science to say the least, but it’s better than nothing.

Al in Georgia
Guest
Al in Georgia

I always thought that police forces were established to protect the criminals from justice rendered by citizens. Citizens justice is binary in nature, either a bullet or go free.

Forever Templar
Guest
Forever Templar

Nice fantasy, but I think most sane people are uneasy with vigilantism. If you entrust an official body to protect citizens from one another, then individuals running around blowing away whoever pisses them off make no sense.

Exile
Member
Exile

The “thin blue line” looks a lot thicker to Chad & Becky Normie today than it did around Christmas. Breaking that conditioning to reflexively “Back the Blue” is a priority for dissidents – consider it a white pill.

Yves Vannes
Member

2 generations ago every car would have stopped, every male attempted to help, every woman to assist the wounded and to watch over every terrified child…and the young boys would have dragged the broken car parts to the roadside. In two generations we’ve replaced this with legalisms and not wanting to get involved or getting one’s hands dirty. Progress.

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

3 Generations more like , maybe a bit less. Economic mobility destroys society. When you know you are going to live in one location, work there, marry there and stay married there , go to church there and very possibly your kids will do the same, you have an incentive to build a reputation as a good citizen. Hell in Mama Proper’s day she was able to borrow a large sum of money b what we’d call a signature loan now on her grandfathers good name and repaid every penny of it, That name still carries weight as does scores… Read more »

Ganderson
Guest
Ganderson

One of the changes that I’ve seen in my lifetime, and I’m 65 years old, is the segregation of economic classes. I grew up in the central city of a midsize Midwestern metropolis. In my middle-class part of town the gamut ran from upper middle class to lower middle class. In my neighborhood there was one little section that was called “pill hill” which is where the doctors lived, or at least that’s what people said. In the rest of the neighborhood we had mostly middle-class blue and white collar types, my dad was an accountant, he was probably on… Read more »

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

I appreciate the story. Where I grew up, an exurb, we didn’t really notice classes since everyone was basically working or middle. There were poor people I was one of them but it wasn’t much of gap. You can blame free trade and automation as well as female entry into the work force fr the decline. Frankly the years from 1973 onward (measure by fertility rate here, it dropped below replacement the year) have been increasingly bad. Restoring the US may not be possible without great difficulty if at all. Making the US work to the benefit of the extended… Read more »

joey junger
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joey junger

I think the most possible outcome has been delineated these last couple decades by James Howard Kunstler in his “World Made by Hand” books. Regarding the cities, and their highly-populated and diverse urban centers, no dystopian scenario is too hyperbolic, and they will be doomed, basically Aleppo but with a rap music soundtrack. Most of what we think of as suburbs are really just what the new Urbanists called “Nodes,” fake mansions (the Germans call them matchstick houses, we call them McMansions) with a fake pastoral, bucolic feel and pretentious “Shire”-based names. These places will probably be abandoned and left… Read more »

UFO
Guest
UFO

Yeah, watch out for Canada. We are in the process of creating a shithole of epic proportions.

Would China try to take over? Probably. But we couldn’t even be taken over by a foreign power: the Indians, Pakistanis, Africans, Koreans, our whole “mosaic” would never let that happen.

I don’t know if we would become a patchwork of ethnostates – or if one group would get the upper hand and just wipe everybody else out. Disaster.

Exile
Member
Exile

UFO, some of our guys are looking at vast, mostly empty Western Canada as a good place to set up our own communities on the down-low. That border’s a lot longer and more porous than Mexico’s and where there’s a White, there’s a way. You’re welcome to stop by for a beer once they get settled.

UFO
Guest
UFO

Certainly will. Hell I’ll move out there if there’s something set up.

Are you in Western Canada as well? I’m stuck in southern Ontario and they’ve flooded everywhere with Indians… even smaller cities and towns. The real small towns are white but there’s no jobs and mostly drug addicts.

I don’t see why Western Canada would be any different they’re just behind the curve a bit.

Exile
Member
Exile

SoCal now, working my way north. I’ll be lurking near your border all summer, some combo of Montana, Idaho and Wyoming. I have old friends who live in Calgary. Considering 80% of the Leaf populace lives within 200 miles of the border, there should be some elbow room left and most pozzed Canadians seem to focus on their urban hellscapes.

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

Some kind of new polity, a right wing populist nationalist , implicitly Christian and expansive alliance wouldn’t be that bad or when the implosion that hard to make happen. Problem is it would be landlocked and resource constrained with terrible weather and limited agrarian land which is not an enviable position. Ultimately though it will come to war, probably ethnic and religious and casualty rates in millions, high percentages. Upside if you make it out or at least your line does, you get a decent nation out of it. Stay nuclear if you can though, its the only way to… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

Ab, I’m more worried about getting the communities together somewhere at this point than the long-term strategic positioning. We’re not looking to set ourselves up as some independent sovereign nation just yet anyway – check out Dutch’s comment from yesterday re: how he sees this playing out short-mid term – that’s where I’m at.

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

Its all good. At least you are working to achievable goals. That is a big chunk of the missing components to a better society all rolled into one.

Exile
Member
Exile

JHK has some great points and he’s one of my favorite Chosen but I get a Paul Craig Roberts vibe from him. He’s Zero-Hedge-bearish on Western Civilization day-in, day-out. With apologies to Jim Morrison, his future’s all certain and the end is always near. Read with a grain of white-pill salt and revise his timelines accordingly.

joey junger
Guest
joey junger

Yeah, all true, but I don’t judge an intellectual by whether or not they correctly predict the future (we have fortune tellers for that). I judge them by whether or not they can diagnose what’s currently wrong. Kunstler’s the second most succinct person in America after Pat Buchanan when it comes to pointing out what’s wrong with the culture, finance, the political class, etc. Yes, he’s a Boomer and Tribe Member but if Charley Pride can sing country music I can live with Kunstler as an honorary white (like Ron Unz).

Member

Nice analogy with Charley Pride. I have always considered him more country than coon.

Member

Awwww, joey. Give Charley a break. He is one of the greatest bona fide country singers to ever come down the pike. He’s a part-owner of the Texas Rangers. Anyone who hangs out with Nolan Ryan Ain’t All Bad. He’s assimilated into Anglo-Saxondom while never goin’ above his sharecropper’s son raisin’. And he’s non-PC. When asked how it felt to be a country music success as a black American, he replied, “Same as it did when I was colored.” Let’s do this. If Taylor Swift, who wouldn’t know a steel guitar if it fell on her, can ever have been… Read more »

Member

Exile, being Chosen, and incessantly immanentizing the eschaton aside, the man knows how to turn a phrase.

ConservativeFred
Guest
ConservativeFred

If I recall, Kunstler was the gentleman that predicted doom before the Y2K computer code crash, and then “Peak Oil” in the mid-2000’s, and now he is a prophet of the latest financial doom. Not that he is wrong in this case, but I take his prognostications with a grain of salt.

M. B. Lamar
Guest
M. B. Lamar

Kunstler was sending out newsletters in the 80s! A charter member of the Peter Schiff Stopped-Clock Accuracy Club.

Kunstler means ‘Artist’. Indeed, said the bull.

Member

Your reference to how Roman Spain came apart is apropos. Another thing to realize is just how long it took for the Roman Empire to fall. The process required at least 300 years to unwind. The wealthy Roman landed aristocrat in his villa was transformed in this period to the eventual Germanic warrior in his walled manorial system, in some cases still living in the old, crumbling Roman structure. (Infeudiation came in the ninth century after Charlemagne.) It is a fascinating transformation, and one that will inevitably be repeated here, though in a hybrid , hi-tech/low-tech version. Some areas will… Read more »

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

300 years to unwind. Is that the flat curve our experts are talking about?

Exile
Member
Exile

If and when we get there, PJT will end up being Nero’d by one of his praetorian strongmen. The struggle to be Humangous of our New End Times will harshly sort the merely rich sheep from the Will to Power goats.

Rwc1963
Guest
Rwc1963

One thing – what will the rich pay the cops with? Fiat money will be useless and since most of the rich man’s wealth is in bullshit intangibles. When the system collapses so does their wealth. Worse there is nothing stopping the cops or goons from simply killing the rich man and taking his swag. As Clinton said there is “no controlling legal authority” to say no to them. BTW this is the situation every rich prepper faces. They know if they bring armed guards with them there is nothing stopping said guards in post-collapse situation from killing them The… Read more »

Member

Remember: we’re talking about an evolutionary process.

Kaiserworks
Guest
Kaiserworks

Payments and transactions will be made in tangibles. That can be pre64 silver or a dozen eggs or the labor of putting a new roof on your house. Just the way it always was and will be again. Green paper is just like Santa, at a certain point you stop believing in it. I and many more every day have already stopped. The balancing act is how to discern when the time has come to divest oneself of the last vestiges of fiat? I suspect that day will be when my mechanic or local farmers market will politely refuse a… Read more »

Yves Vannes
Member

The American Empire will continue to fade…but America itself? It seems much to volatile to slowly drift off into oblivion. If our very serious demographic problems didn’t exist then maybe. But competing racial groups are a lot more volatile than were the competing cultural groups of Rome. Even if we separate, a border between Switzerland and Italy can be manageable but a border between Switzerland and Liberia or Jalisco will boil over. We can probably add to that maybe 20% of whites who are hardwired anti-whites. They will be a lot more destructive and dangerous than any coalition of non-whites.… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

YY, this is a big reason why I’m absolutist re: 110’ing the Chosen on a long timeline. In a post-American low-trust environment, we’re going to have all the trouble we can handle just dealing with genuine GoodWhites, much less FellowWhite shapeshifters.

We simply won’t have the luxury of indulging out-group sympathies, much less subversion and general Talmudry.

Wolf Barney
Guest
Wolf Barney

The paleocons were certainly right about Anarcho-Tyranny (Sam Francis coined the term), but the ONE thing they got right? There are more than one. They were also right about shipping our manufacturing overseas, right about the Iraq war, right about the dangers of the Patriot Act, right about mass immigration, etc…

Member

The Paleos got most things right, any decent dissident should always pay homage to them.

Exile
Member
Exile

A lot of guys seem to be picking fights with the paleocons lately, not that the PC’s haven’t thrown their share of bricks either. Another spasm of the eternal Team Optics vs. Team WYSIWYG debate. The Groypers have caused hope to spring eternal in the breasts of some PC’s – a child shall lead them. It’s the first bright light in their tunnel since Pat Buchanan’s win in New Hampshire, long before Nick Fuentes was born. I’ll pull a lot of punches criticizing guys who’ve been that starved for Good News for that long.

M. B. Lamar
Guest
M. B. Lamar

You seem awfully confident this is a test run. I’m not so sure. I think it’s a controlled collapse. The United States as we knew it, even in its post-1965, post-2001, post-2008 successively diminished forms, is no more. The people are subject now to the rule of petty kings, with no recourse to the law. We all know that freedoms taken or not returned. They’ve pretty much reeled in the entire bill of rights with this one, and beyond.

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

If this is a test run, the Globalists have got to be tickled pink at how well it has gone.

-Almost total compliance
-Dissident voices shouted down
-Zero civil disobedience
-people who loudly proclaim “I don’t believe the Liberal Media” parroting said media’s line at every turn

I didn’t always think that people believe whatever they see on TV. The get-together in the park in Virginia three summers ago disabused me of that notion, and this has really demonstrated how far they can push those boundaries.

Exile
Member
Exile

Meme, I don’t think we’ll get a true read unless/until this kind of shutdown is more protracted. They’ve managed to ride the tiger when it’s a little cranky. but extend this kind of disruption over a few months and you’d see more [redaction]. This thing has only lasted long enough to put us in the denial stage of grief. Stretch this into May-June and you get to anger. Let’s not write Ms. Corona-Chan off just yet – I have a feeling she has a few more moves to make, and I’m not sure we’ve seen the last of her.

Lawdog
Member

Yes. On the whole, we are not impatient people. But let us wait with both hands busy.

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

If this shutdown makes it to June, we’ll be beyond Great Depression levels of economic damage and all the way to Cambodian-style “forced ruralization.”

Exile
Member
Exile

The worst case scenario for the Admin is a re-eruption of Corona in America after they’ve sent everyone back to Shlomo’s salt mines and bragged about their masterful handling of the sistuation, with some snark about how much better we did than China, etc… If the Han get the last laugh, Trump may be the one forcibly ruralized.

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

As badly as we need a Sulla, a man with Jared Kushner whispering into his ear isn’t it.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Yep, we should be near the peak or just on downside by ~April 10 if you follow what’s been happening in other countries. But they’ll hold the lockdown in place until the number fall dramatically so another week or two, so we’re looking mid to late April for people to start going back to work.

However, a lot of schools have been cancelled for the year so that will hold things back.

Regardless, the question is whether the economy will be able to “snap back” after that long of a period of time. I have no idea.

Kaiserworks
Guest
Kaiserworks

“Regardless, the question is whether the economy will be able to “snap back” after that long of a period of time. I have no idea.”

Like a recently deceased body; the hair and nails continue to grow for a time. The US petro-dollar is in the hair/nails stage. There will be no economy to bounce back outside the realm of make-believe. The Plan-demic is the perfect cover story.

Exile
Member
Exile

Serious irony if NYC ends up being the persistent, smouldering hot zone that gets Trump Slo-Joe’d.

On the plus side, if either Trump or Sleepy goes Lukashenko, his reign of terror is likely what, 3 more years before the Fourth Horseman pulls a coup d’morte?

Member

The plan surely is to get Clinton installed as VP nominee, then Joe gibbers into the grave.

Member

Mrs. Bill won’t hand it to Cuomo without a fight. She’s sitting in her muumuu in Chappaqua as we speak, thinking how sweet it is going to be to swoop in and, as measured by all her ham-handed, crazy-eyed appearances, appear to graciously take on the nomination, having not had to utter a syllable to a blue collar or black crowd.

Stirge
Guest
Stirge

I’m not so sure about Cuomo. There are a lot of skeletons in the closet that will come out in a national election. He’s as corrupt as they come

Major Hoople
Member
Major Hoople

A really unpleasant and arrogant man.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Round my way, a week and a half or so after the governor ordered bars and restaurants closed, there are signs of life. It was a ghost town on Monday. Today there was a decent amount of traffic, people on the sidewalk. I think there was enough heat on the gov (or outright defiance) to make him back off a little. My company got a waiver for instance, and by the looks of it we weren’t the only one. Still no bars or restaurants. I feel for those folks. Granted I don’t live in a major city, but I’m encouraged… Read more »

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

If you were in charge, what would you do? The 5% fatality rate of this nasty disease isn’t doomsday but its up to 10 million dead at 2/3rds infection rate and another 30 million seriously ill. Throw in the inevitable economic toll when businesses shut down anyway and the collapse of our lousy health care system and you have a recipe for screwed blued and tattooed. Oh and I used the expression without seeing it below and not a Devil Dog. Its just something I picked up or maybe part of Proper family argot. The lousy measures might mitigate it… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

AB. Your model and fatality rates are incorrect. It’s just that simple. You are not absolved of crashing the economy because your intentions were good. What would I have done? Well, if I were a successful politician, just about the same as currently has been done—because I’d be an ignorant, spineless, simp—incapable of thoughtful leadership and too stupid to understand when the data is incomplete and advice from those so called “experts” is based on modeling and data which are both inaccurate and incomplete. And that’s aside from an inability to even understand that all economic choices involve trade offs,… Read more »

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

I’m hearing a lot of different information from a lot of people and frankly I tend to agree with the people out there in the field who are saying this almost certainly will get really really bad, I’ll use an example here, someone on our side, Aesop the Raconteur is pretty close to Dissident Right (Militia Right but less Libertarian) who works at (his words) Americas busiest hospital , has studied epidemiology and he is saying “we are humped” http://raconteurreport.blogspot.com/2020/03/pull-pin-fall-on-grenade.html the TL;DR is “we won’t have a healthcare system.” which means things that would normally be manageable become a death… Read more »

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

We basically are fucked. Our health care is expensive and substandard do to misallocation of resources. Its about as good as Italy, maybe a bit less. Normally I avoid national Review like it was Covid 19 but this article shows how dire our hospital situation is and note without quarantine could get much worse https://www.nationalreview.com/the-morning-jolt/a-hard-look-at-the-remaining-hospital-capacity-across-america/ TL;DR its really bad. I don’t know if crashing the economy was the right thing to do but its understandable and might have been a good decision. Truth is the US desperately needs new management, one that isn’t old, half senile, corrupt and/or only concerned… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

AB, let’s hope you are as ready to post and admit your error in two weeks as you are to post FUD. As to your sources, get ones with an opposite view. Here’s one to read from Stanford: https://hotair.com/archives/allahpundit/2020/03/17/stanford-prof-coronavirus-may-less-deadly-think-mild-justify-aggressive-countermeasures/ Original ref’s in the article. More like this person can be found all over the Internet—if you look for them. BTW: No where does one deny there is a disease and that people die from such. Only that the effect is way overblown, the “cure” much more risky than the disease, and that an adequate cost/benefit analysis has never been made… Read more »

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

Hell I could be wrong, who knows. I’m reading plenty of “oh shit” articles and anecdotes from medical professionals in the field to be extra cautious. More import than the virus kills which may be low is the spillover effect on the hospital system. Its under capacity, under sourced and brittle. Many people still have no health care to speak of. On top of that our medicine and its precursors are not made here and running out. Capacity and lack of supplies since not made here will kill a lot of people. And note the key article the guy in… Read more »

Forever Templar
Guest
Forever Templar

Funnily enough, national patient capacity and sustainable loads (my own words here since I forget the technical nomenclature) was discussed as a nasty problem in the event of nuclear war with Russia…back in the ‘50s and especially ‘60s. Wasn’t a pretty picture, as I recall, and made even more nasty as the nuclear conflicts were seen as “winnable” and thus civilian casualties numbers were conservative.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Forever. It’s never a pretty picture because it is never efficient to keep such stock piles of supplies laying around for an unlikely and unknowable (resource-wise) emergency.

The best resource is a strong and vibrant economy that can react to such an emergency by production/direction of specific national resources as the emergency dictates. That of course is the very resource that we are now destroying.

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

We are destroying the economy in the same way that running a 1996 Taurus with a rusty frame and bad motor it the ground is “destroying it. I Looking the losses in GDP as percentages of wages and the extreme wealth gap, its a trash economy upfront . Since the US doesn’t even make 90% of the drugs we use on a day to day basis, much of our clothing, consumer electronics and a hundred other things. Our economy is about as vibrant as a grey mat. Until we reclaim the real economy we will be vulnerable to a nation… Read more »

Lawdog
Member

There’s a better way to fix the economy than just sitting on our asses at home as we sink deeper into financial stagnation. Worse, joblessness is horrid for the soul, and indefinite quarantine is not kind to the psyche. For better or for worse, life needs to continue.

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

Fixing anything requires removal of the current political elite, top to bottom. Maybe this can be done via a slow slog through the electoral process, I sure hope so but until the DR and its allies have real power, no change is possible. We had might as well be at home for all the good it does. Now to be fair I’m an introvert and frankly other than not being able to visit the bookstore have barely noticed the quarantine since I avoid public everything by long habit. Hell I have probably gone out more than usual to get needed… Read more »

Major Hoople
Member
Major Hoople

It’s always good to keep an eye on your assumptions.

https://www.conservativereview.com/news/horowitz-coronavirus-begin-us-matters/

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Again, a well reasoned analysis. One doesn’t need to be a rocket scientist to use logical to find contradictions and alternative explanation to data being used to stir panic and create an environment to push political agendas.

Bill_Mullins
Member

I don’t know about where you live, Mr.Lamar (why anyone would take Mirabeau B. Lamar as his patron saint is beyond me) but in Texas these county wide lockdowns are pursuant to a Texas law passed in 1975 and having criminal penalties of fines not exceeding $1,000 and/or incarceration not exceeding 180 days attached. Any licensed Texas Peace Officer may enFORCE such diktats and under Texas law, even if the reason EXCUSE for an arrest is utterly invalid, resisting arrest is still a felony. It is my considered opinion that we are all well and truly screwed, blued and tattooed.

M. B. Lamar
Guest
M. B. Lamar

Screwed, blued and tattooed! Am I detecting a fellow Devil Dog? 2nd Marines. Also – tyrannizing the lawful citizenry while allowing the rabble to run wild is the very definition of anarcho-tyranny.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

The seeds of local tyranny were planted in most cities a good while back under Public Health – communicable diseases ordinances. I remember when we were all going to die of the HIV so they figured out the vectors, made lotsa charts, and issued stay-at-home orders and other behavioral modification laws to flatten the curve. Lol! The fines are under $1,000 to keep them in the misdemeanor camp but as pointed out, resisting instantly escalates into Felony. What constitutes resistance? Well there you go. Its not about the fine as much as the law is a shoehorn of police powers… Read more »

Member

The incomparable James Corbett has a great piece on how the web of Medical Martial Law has been woven around us.
And as always immaculately sourced.
https://www.corbettreport.com/mml2020/

If you’re not slipping Corbett a few Yen a month then shame on you.

Apex Predator
Guest
Apex Predator

It may be the end times but it isn’t from Covid19, its the Clownpocalypse if anything, shutting entire economies down will do FAR more damage and for a longer period than this virus. But in the feminized nanny state clown world, what else did we expect? Anarcho-tyranny is on the rise and is the likely endgame. Start familiarizing yourself with it and get the word out. You will be severely punished for minor infractions while ‘diversity’ will be free to run wild. Clownpocalypse Now.
comment image

Exile
Member
Exile

Apex GIF, AP. Added to the trolling arsenal – thx.

Forever Templar
Guest
Forever Templar

Holy crap that’s awesome. Viewed, stolen, stored, and kept for personal amusement.

Apex Predator
Guest
Apex Predator

I was thinking if someone wanted to seriously take the piss at their office that would make an epic screensaver or desktop background. It says a great deal with a single image and I think even normies would key on it a bit.

Sc rewtaoe
Guest
Sc rewtaoe

Triggered.

With corona enriched tritium.

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

Love the clown. Now there is a long , well established and justified jurisprudence of authoritarian measures used on public health. While 5% projected casualty wouldn’t in the past have triggered this kind of thing society was also much less complex and robust than and far more willing to die. Bluntly though, the weak must knuckle under. For all its arms and bluster the Right dissident and otherwise is weak. Its addicted to law and order lacks an alternative organizing principle, is more individualistic than the Left , lacks even a basic plan on how to impose its will or… Read more »

Phoenix
Guest
Phoenix

Apex-when I read “feminized…state”, the 1st thing that came to mind was how fakebook is full of hysterical, panicking, irrational, illogical women. I’ve never so clearly seen how insane it is to allow them to be involved in the political system in any capacity. I believe that allowing them to vote is a lot of what has allowed the creeping totalitarianism we’ve had…

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

The end of Roman rule is a good analogy. Most people think it will be like the Romans leaving Britain where authority disappeared almost overnight and invaders were literally waiting offshore. But it’ll be more like Spain.

My guess is that cities, counties, states or regions will slowly start to disregard an ever-increasingly inept, ineffective and just random federal (or state) government. Local authorities will bit by bit fill the void of authority, creating their own legal, business and law enforcement systems until someone notices that they’re basically independent and makes it official.

Sandmich
Guest
Sandmich

As long as Fed Bux carry weight this won’t happen since it’s very easy for the central empire to make the cost of leaving higher than the cost of staying (for a slight example, see the Feds “temporary” Medicaid subsidies to the states); it’s like they have their own gold mine up in New York and no one is walking away from that. Many may pin their hopes on the current monetary destruction, but it would be an understatement of the century to say that there are many powerful interests, both foreign and domestic, that want to keep the current… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Guest
Citizen of a Silly Country

Very good point and a major difference between now and Roman times. But a question will be what happens when parts of the country are taxed by the fed gov at a far higher rate than what they get? Over time, that won’t go over so well, especially if the fed gov becomes ever more inept or controlling.

But the issue of currency and financial system is a big one. The Romans used gold and silver. We have the dollar and feds control the dollar. However, failing systems are eventually replaced.

Member

Good comment! My only add is that the local authorities will also create their own system of taxation and only remit to higher authorities amounts that they deem appropriate for the services provided by that higher authority. One citizen is helpless when confronting the revenue authorities but an entire community has a good deal of resistance potential. They might even create their own local currencies backed by gold or other genuine resources.

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

Gold and silver is a must. A gold standard ends up with the rich being bale to control a huge amount of the means of exchange to consolidate their position,

Bryant and his Cross of Gold speech discuss at length

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UV2wRCcWJa8

Its also why the Founding Fathers mandated gold and silver.

With so many people we may even need a D&D standard, Gold, Silver and Copper

Raymond R
Member

A good discussion on the end of civilizations is in “The Collapse of Complex Societies” by Joseph Tainter. His main point is that the solutions to social problems introduce complexity and that complexity has a cost. Eventually, the cost exceeds the benefits as the law of diminishing returns kicks in. It’s not perfect, but it is a useful insight.

Charlie_U
Guest
Charlie_U

Tainter’s “Drilling Down” is definitely worth a read, too, fwiw. Granted, it’s about a different issue, but the themes of complexity and scale — both of which are important, of course — still underpin everything.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

I have become much more interested in how things are being done, and have been done, in Brazil and Argentina lately.

M. B. Lamar
Guest
M. B. Lamar

I look at China as the model. The same oligarchs that built out China have decided, or the house of cards has forced their hand; now is the time to implement westward.

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

badly

Sandmich
Guest
Sandmich

Unlike Argentina, there will be no financial “god” for the west to swoop in and provide a floor for our bad decisions.

Member

I am not sure what it is like in Lagos but here in Indiana it seems pretty much every job is “essential” because almost everyone is going to work three days after the “Hoosier hunker down”. There is a real danger to the ruling class here because it looks like an awful lot of people are simply ignoring the “stay at home” order. I passed a park last night with a bunch of little kids on the equipment with parents watching and a decent number of guys playing basketball. Traffic is lighter than usual and the restaurants are mostly closed… Read more »

mountaindogsix
Guest
mountaindogsix

Good….much the same in most of Texas.

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Not here in the DFW burbs. What with a bare White pop of 45% or so, all the paper ‘murricans and all the NY/CA/IL imports, I’m seeing masks, compliance, and unreasonable panic. Everything is shut. The local Cabelas is open but my son says the only thing they’ve been selling for days now is guns and ammo. The GoodWhites run all the county and local institutions. Add in a Haitian mayor and a repuke party that had its own local magic negro, and I’m real tired of hearing how Texas is different.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

The city to the south of me, smaller and more “conservative”, Is doing roadblocks with checkpoints. Taking ID and asking purpose of travel.

This is the city I was to move to, in order to escape the extreme prog pozz that has rendered my own city full Clown. I move freely here. So far.

A lot of the my corona stuff is looking like a Conservative-Pozz sammich.

Member

I’m not auditioning for the role of Cassandra, but my biggest near-term fear is coming to fruition. It’s only happening across the pond as of today, but I still think it’s only a matter of time before this comes to America:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/03/26/supermarkets-let-10-people-time-tackle-coronavirus/

If you think the economy’s ground to a halt now just wait until everybody has to queue up at 4 AM and stand in line for 8 hours just to buy a government approved number of bread loaves.

Hoagie
Guest
Hoagie

They can make Russians stand in line for bread and they can even make Venezuelan’s, but if you think for one minute American ghetto blacks are standing in line to “buy” any bread you don’t know your inner city Ghetto spades. They will clear those shelves like piranha do a dog carcass. But it’s cute you think they’ll wait their turn like white people.

Member

Eventually, the shelves will indeed empty in Da Hood. This is where we need to be aware that lots of little Katrina-lite situations may crop up in the nice polite white neighborhoods adjoining vibrant areas where the customer limit rules have kept some things on the shelves. This could also happen rather suddenly as flash mobs of vibrants organized by smart phone form to loot particular stores.

Lawdog
Member

Can black anger be harnessed and directed at a specific target?

If their bread and circus disappears, what incentive is there to follow the directives of government?

abprosper
Guest
abprosper

Not much. Around here in Cali rationing is handled by the private sector and the shelves have most stuff even at the big box retailers. Mostly normal. The only thing that is hard to come by is toilet paper and sanitizer which still goes out quick. We expect plenty is a few weeks. We have plenty of food and variety of such also. On the whole, limiting store entry at least at the big boxes made shopping far more pleasant and made it take less time too even with a slight wait out front. Most of us are enjoying the… Read more »

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

While we’re standing in those bread queues, virtue-signaling AWFLs and doughy Soyboys will be online lecturing us about how great it is and about how the everyone except you is now some sort of “hero.”

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Speaking of hero’s. I’m seeing a lot of “thank you for your service” to doctors and nurses. Support our nurses! Ribbons on trees yet to come but the pattern is revealing.

They are getting their 15 minutes. (Plus time and a half). I wonder if they will come to sour on the mantra like so many of the Vets.

But this new forever war is looking up. The great goat-patch grift of AfghanIraq took almost three decades to burn $6T.

Took us three weeks to get to that with the war on ChinaVirus.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Medical professionals at the lower level will most likely get some (deserved) kudos. At the administrative and research levels, not so much. Today’s headlines have any number of these high level “thinkers” backtracking on their “medical” recommendations which have plunged the world into bankruptcy (or as many reasonably argue, just revealed such to a naive world). I understand that the head guru epidemiologist in GB has retracted his predictions—those that shutdown the UK. Now his new “model” shows about a tenth as many deaths and illnesses. The only bright side here is the obvious analogy of false fear mongering to… Read more »

King Tut
Guest
King Tut

The Slavic country that I live in implemented this a couple of weeks ago. The idea is to avoid crowding and it works. The shelves are full, no panic buying and everything is very orderly and calm.

Exile
Member
Exile

The stores I’ve been to in SoCal are using a soft version of this, limiting the number of shoppers. It hasn’t gummed up the gears bad enough to cause any eruptions in my vicinity, but I was shopping in the more genteel hoods, not the barrio or ghetto, and I’ve stayed out of LA since January. Once again, a matter of time and degree – if things got/get worse over a longer period, you’d see a big spike.

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

Here in the Cradle and Grave of Liberty (Massachusetts) whether there is a queue depends on the type of store.
Supermarkets=no queue needed because no limit on number of people inside. Liquor stores (and the Trader Joe’s that sells alcohol) have queues. The chain computer store has queues, only virtual. You physically queue to put your name on a list, then are sent to wait in your car; you get a text when it’s your turn to enter.

People seem to be 99%+ obedient, including me mostly. Baaa! (But I’ve not explored the Diverse diverse areas; no idea about those places.)

Irishfarmer
Guest
Irishfarmer

So about origins and intelligent design: I know that was a point in passing. I did read the rest of the article and it was good. Dont you love it when people ignore the point and focus on a minor detail? But I was around dealing with the evolution v intelligent design thing at its peak before everyone stopped caring. Its not as simple as ID being a way to avoid knowledge, it was a proxy for the wider culture war. I saw the same tactics being used against dissidents today being used against evolution dissidents back then. Very few… Read more »

Eddie Coyle
Guest
Eddie Coyle

Considering your interest in the evolution question you should watch this Hoover Institute video discussion. It convincingly details how evolution as Darwin presented would be mathematically impossible. Knowing the average rate of positive DNA mutations and the number necessary to arrive at any mammalian species today, there has not been enough time. However, they also agree that however it occurred it wasn’t by intelligent design.

https://www.hoover.org/research/mathematical-challenges-darwins-theory-evolution-david-berlinski-stephen-meyer-and-david

Exile
Member
Exile

You can’t use an average to disprove the entire mechanism – almost by definition, the kinds of advantageous mutations Darwin’s theory relies on are outliers. You can say it’s “doubtful,” but that’s a judgment call.

I’m a skeptic of some aspects of “random mutation + natural selection = new species” – we’re missing something. I don’t think Hoover’s reaching that conclusion for the right reasons here though.

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Irish Farmer – thank you for a wise and balanced comment. As someone who is also a Christian with flexible views on how it all began (and ultimately, I don’t particularly care – it’s a moot point) I appreciate your gentle rebuke to those who would paint us with a broad brush.

Member

Those who view humanity as infinitely malleable, view progress/revolution/change as neverending are going to look at the black box of origins and find unguided evolution. People who think man is infinitely malleable are unlikely to be comfortable with unguided evolution. In the extreme case now you’ve got people thinking that basically you can change your sex by clicking your heels together and using the wrong pronouns. This is pretty much a total denial of biological reality. Most of Leftist ideology is at odds with a real understanding of evolution in fact. For instance, one of the things that drives feminists… Read more »

TomA
Guest
TomA

Observe, analyze, predict, and prepare. We have been electing morons and criminal grifters to lead us for a long time now and one could argue that Congress is now ruled by sociopaths. I put the odds at 50:50 between muddle through once again and rapid collapse into anarcho-tyranny. If the former, then put your energy into building individual robustness. If the latter, a new paradigm in necessary. Simple, secret, solo, and spontaneous. It’s the only way to be sure.

NJ Person
Guest
NJ Person

This whole situation is like some weird science fiction movie. I thought we might have hit bottom a couple days ago, but the our “ruling class” seems hell bent with “the pedal to the metal”. Not to unreasonably inject politics, this seems to be the culmination of the periodic hysterias (e.g., Russia Probe, Stormy Daniels, Kavanagh, Jussie Smollett, impeachment). The nihilistic media seems willing to do anything to bring down Trump (and I am no big fan of the Orange Man), even if it means bringing down the country. There is definitely an air of radical chic (excluding Ann Coulter… Read more »

Lawdog
Member

Hopefully, some of us are already meeting up.

Member

Fantastic link NJ. I never thought I’d be recommending something from the NYT but I sent this to my wife who has been absorbing a lot of CNN every morning about this and needs something to counterbalance it.

NJ Person
Guest
NJ Person

The person of whom I mentioned is a regular CNN watcher. I was trying to use the article as a disguised red pill. Any time I see CNN on a TV screen, I get goose bumps. CNN is a threat to domestic order and harmony and reasonably could be viewed as a public health problem. I have a Trumpian family member with a CNN spouse and that hugely disruptive. Best of luck to you.

Exile
Member
Exile

Apocalyptic eschatology is in our DNA. America was settled entirely by people who believed in the Day of Judgment. You have to reach back to pagan antiquity to trace our “pre-apocalyptic” roots – to the Romans, Greeks & Celts. The Norse are an exception – Ragnarok puts pagan Norsemen in Club Armageddon, but their concept of Valhalla and the post-Ragnarok age is a pagan one, pace Marvel Comics. “What happens after Judgment Day” is an evergreen troll for Sunday School smartasses, right up there with “how did Abel have kids” and “if we’re Judeo-Christian, why did the Jews kill Christ,… Read more »

Bill_Mullins
Member

It’s hard to believe, but it has only been 2 weeks since Trump gave that Wednesday evening presser where he announced formation of the Covid-19 task force. It’s only been 2 weeks and yet we live in a completely different world from before. I still have work but my school bus-driver wife sits at home. People still eat but they have to shop early before many staples are sold out for the day. Where once supermarket shelves would be full almost to overflowing, now many shelves are empty and others have only a few token items. People – rightly or… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Per Mandelbrot and fractals, nothing happens for a long time, and then everything happens at once.

Vegetius
Guest
Vegetius

How about that jobless claims report?

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Who cares. Let them eat stox! DOW, its whats for dinner. Sizzle.

Lawdog
Member

Keep that fire burning. You might need it soon.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

True. Somebody is gonna have to burn all these corona bodies.

Jesco White
Guest
Jesco White

Gonna go out on a limb and hazard a guess that what’s happening right now is an attempt to double employment by forcing everyone into de facto 20 hour workweeks through enforced telework. Old people can’t retire and young people can’t find jobs it’s an obvious solution and advances the economic leveling inherent in globalization (wealthier individuals being forced to work less). Haven’t seen anyone else mention this angle.

Screwtape
Guest
Screwtape

Perhaps this is the gig economy acceleration. I see a continual transfer of people from careers to jobs to gigs. Until we come full circle and the norm is subsistence cloud-based labor farming. The bossman is an app or a mega-corp that is both everywhere and nowhere. The labor force is totally fungible and algo-priced just like an uber fare except solving for the lowest price. The gig economy is a leveraged wealth extractor of the timeless modern model of private profit and public risk. Utilizing public infrastructure, the capital “owned” (borrowed) by their labor, and the ancillary costs of… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Gig economy = “I’m so f$%king poor, I have to work three jobs”

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

Cops everywhere lately. Sped by a cop the other day. Not by much but if he wanted to make an issue of it he could’ve. To my surprise he left me alone. Doesn’t usually happen around here.

Member
Felix_Krull

The controlling ethos of the ruling class is unfettered movement, yet in a crisis, their first instinct is to halt all movement. The people who just a few weeks ago were singing the glories of the free flow of people and goods are now threatening to weld our doors shut.

In Scandiland, the border shut-down doesn’t apply to welfare jihadis. I kid you not.

Exile
Member
Exile

Felix, I thought the cursed Swedes were the only Scandicucks who exempted “refugees.” My newly-beloved Norsk & Danes as well? Si at det ikke stemmer…

Member
Felix_Krull

It stemmer on the øre, I’m afraid. They are being escorted by the police directly from the border to Center Sandholm asylum camp, and something similar is happening in Norway.

https://www.rights.no/2020/03/strakstiltak-for-a-sikre-asylsokere-mens-vi-skal-la-eldre-do/

The Greens even suggest that Norway should take more asylum seekers, now that you have all these empty hotels where they could be housed for “free.”

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

This, this does not shock me. I expected this from their current gov’t. Now if the SD doesn’t see a gain from 25% to 50% after this is over I will then indeed be shocked.

Exile
Member
Exile

At this rate, the NRM is going to see major gains. If some wiggas could…

Member
Felix_Krull

Now if the SD doesn’t see a gain from 25% to 50% after this is over I will then indeed be shocked. The thing is, the Swedish government is keeping a level head in the Corona scare, letting schools and businesses stay open, so the government might come out smelling like roses, being seen to keep the Swedish economy afloat while the rest of Europe sacrifices theirs to the panic. Mind you, Löfven doesn’t really have a choice: there are large areas of Sweden where they’d be unable to enforce quarantine measures, and their hospitals would probably not be able… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Report on the news here yesterday. BP captured a pack of Indians (with a dot) on the Southern border. All went through Italy, and Spain to get here. High risk for Corona. All released to a charity program in the city. All given money and bus fair to travel to wherever in the country. Not known where they now are.

Yves Vannes
Member

The ruling class is still engaging in their own unfettered movement.

New England coastline is full of summer resort towns, from Mystic & Westerly all the way up to Bar Harbor & Jonesport. Many of those summer homes are owned by (((New Yorkers))). Normally they show up in mid June and leave in mid to late August. They are already here and more are coming. It began last weekend and it’s been a steady stream ever since. 95 and 1 have a lot of NY plates traveling on them, going north.

Member

I saw a couple of days ago that The Fatherland had implemented the same policy.
https://summit.news/2020/03/23/germany-closes-border-to-europeans-but-migrants-still-allowed-in/

I’m not the only one suspecting a plot to usher in the next Adolf, am I?

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

I suspect that “migrants” do not necessarily need to produce valid identification. In that case, what stops a man from growing his beard, and speaking the words of the Shahada on the border, reaffirming his lifelong faith and “proving” that he is of the correct and desirable demographic. (Or stops a woman from putting on a headscarf over a bowed and subservient head.)

Guess I’m not going to be sneaking into Germany soon though. The beard was getting shaggy and I shaved the damn thing off entirely rather than merely trim it.

G Lordon Giddy
Guest
G Lordon Giddy

Agree completely, it’s a slow demise not a sudden collapse. In a democracy like ours has become the Fed printing money is like a bottle of Jack Daniels sitting on the kitchen counter waiting for the alcoholic to come home from work. Only he is now bringing his banker and his employer and all his foreign neighbors with him. By the time his banker and his corporation and those neighbors take their drinks first their is not going to be much left of the Jack Daniels. Eventually he will need to sober up. Democracy and worship of the Federal Reserve… Read more »

Tarstarkusz
Guest
Tarstarkusz

The Walking Dead should be renamed to the walking poz. As it turns out, homosexuals, lesbians and race mixers will inherit the Earth. It started getting really ridiculous in like the 5th season, but it was in there from the beginning. In the very second episode They needed a bad guy and a way to very quickly establish his being a bad guy. Merle is introduced and he uses the N-word and is mean to a woman and makes her cry. The Mexican gang-bangers are apparently taking care of old people. The stay-at-home wife is being beat by her stupid… Read more »

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

The releasing of the prisoners clinched it for me. I’m going to start learning Polish. I’m of the age where I want to start having kids in about 5 years and no way in hell am I going to raise them in a country that thinks it’s a good idea to releases hordes of feral apes in a time of crisis. The placidity of the normies is fucking breathtaking.

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

Is that your ancestral homeland? Have you looked into their immigration laws?

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

Oh and lets not forget the Fed printing infinite money and buying infinite stocks. What could go wrong? This whole thing is madness.

Member
Felix_Krull

Better apply for a residency permit right now. I bet the Visegraders will very soon be fed up with Western refugees sitting in their expat clubs, spending their savings on cheap beer while kvetching about the local food, local weather and local customs, pining for the Old Country.

Poc or not, mass immigration will inevitably be resented – just look how fed up the British are with the Poles.

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

It’s an incredibly hard language to learn, I doubt too many others would try to emigrate there. I don’t have any savings I’m in my 20s, I would work, maybe as an english teacher. And I don’t have any fondness for American customs, I was born a minority white in SoCal, I have no place where I am from. I am from the mall of America. I have always been an outsider, so there will be no pining.

Member

I am so sorry you never got to experience the real America. Older Americans let you down terribly by letting it slip through their grasp from World War II onward. Actually, the slippage began with the Civil War, but it really accelerated after 1945. We Are The World, and all that

M. B. Lamar
Guest
M. B. Lamar

Anybody who was 18 in 1964 is 74 this year. That explains that. Nobody still making decisions who understands what America is supposed to be.

Member

.

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

“what America is supposed to be”

https://youtu.be/bS4JXh22YCA

Now sadly bygone. Do not forget what was lost. And in a better world may yet be again.
Other “Asha Logos” videos are worth checking out as well.

Paintersforms
Guest
Paintersforms

That’s what grandparents are for. Antiquated notion, I know. Thankfully some still practice it, or did. We’re still out there!

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

Meh, can’t miss what I’ve never experienced. Thanks though, I appreciate the sentiment. I don’t blame boomers, my own generation is pretty shitty too. If I had one wish it would have been for the moving picture to never have been invented. Hyperreality melted everyone’s brains I think. How did they get all that crap done in the 60’s? Media driven narratives fooled everyone, people’s reality is defined by the inputs they receive. As much as we think we know it’s fake it still effects our perceptions of reality. It’s one of the reasons I like Poland, state runs much… Read more »

King Tut
Guest
King Tut

FashGordon, I decamped from Britain to E.Europe 2 years ago. I have never regretted my decision. However, while it is generally a lot cheaper here than anywhere in the West, it can be very difficult for a foreigner to get a job, unless you speak the language to an advanced level.

My advice is that you try to find a way to work remotely, so that you can earn your money from the USA while living anywhere.

Member

you might have a look at the Adriatic States of ex Yugoslavia.

Member
Felix_Krull

I wish you the best of luck. Your age is definitely an asset, but be advised that no matter how well you assimilate, the locals are probably never going to consider you a real Pole. This is not to say they’ll ostracize you or that you can’t have a good life there, but in most ethno-nat countries there’s a subtle, social glass ceiling: you’ll never be truly part of the tribe, although your children probably will, if you raise them Polishly. If I were you, I’d shop around a bit, live a few months in each country and try to… Read more »

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

You both give good advice, I have considered those things. Don’t have that much money and in the process of finishing a Bachelors so while I’d love to spend months surveying the various cultures I’m not sure that’s a practical option. I’d look the same but maybe always have at least a hint of an accent. It’s alright though, there is no community here anyway so being seen as somewhat of an outsider wouldn’t be anything I’m not used to. The teaching job idea is sort of a stepping stone idea, I would be able to get a feel for… Read more »

King Tut
Guest
King Tut

I understand that you don’t have months to spare, but I do recommend a visit, if only for a few days. Get the feel of it. If Poland interests you, then you could do a lot worse than visiting Krakow – wonderful city. You should also consider Prague or Budapest.

Exile
Member
Exile

Fash, I’ll agree and amplify Felix – I went to Europe expecting to like Russia more than Scandinavia b/c muh genes. After experiencing both over four months or so, I’m on Team Valkyrie. Team Natasha is a somewhat distant 2nd now. The social ceiling Felix mentions feels much lower and thicker in Russia than Denmark, Norway or Sweden. Pretty sure that applies the further East one goes.

Mike_C
Guest
Mike_C

“I’m on Team Valkyrie. Team Natasha is a somewhat distant 2nd now. ”

I think we had a fragment of this conversation a few months ago, where I asserted that, regardless of their positive qualities, in general the Slavs are Not Us. Also, Nordiska in its various flavors are much easier for English speakers to learn than Russian.

(Nordiska as in generic nordish Germanic. Finnish is a humbling nightmare.)

Exile
Member
Exile

Agree, Mike – there’s an extra degree of separation there. In fairness to my Grandma’s peeps, America suffers by comparison to Norway and Denmark in many ways. They’re a tough act to follow.

Member

Move to Montana or Wyoming, don’t trouble your mind with silly expatriation ideas. You are an American far deeper than you think.
As far as blaming others for not doing anything about the increasing poz, ask yourself why you want to run away from it rather than fight.

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

I never blamed others for not doing anything. Didn’t mean to anyway, after all I am part of us, some of us are at least trying and nothing I have done has stopped anything either. I wish staying made sense, but with current events as they are, it seems like whats happening right now is that the little of what’s left of small and medium non pozzed businesses will be crushed to dust, leaving only corporate globohomo financially solvent. They will snap up whats left at bargain basement prices with fake money printed and distributed by the fed. The hallowing… Read more »

Lawdog
Member

I’m in the same boat as you. I learned Arabic, and though I learned it fluently, it took years to speak it on a professional level. You need immersion.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

The best “English” teacher I had was a German. He taught German, but was also fluent in Latin and Greek, English and I suspect everything else. In short, just speaking/teaching English, to me means nothing if you are not fluent in the native language of those whom you are teaching a second language. I’m not trained in this area however, just my impression. But I’ll never forget this guy. He taught me more about my native language as a foreigner than I ever was taught in K-12 by so called Americans.

King Tut
Guest
King Tut

Felix, I was living in London when the Polish influx arrived and I never witnessed or detected any complaints about them at all. Most Brits that I knew were fine with it.There may have been some grumbling about the Poles from certain quarters but, in my opinion, that was a displacement activity because they were not allowed to complain about the influx of vibrancy.

Idaho Potato
Guest
Idaho Potato

I had the same amazed and angry reaction to the release of the prisoners as you. It is an abdication of their basic duty to protect the public and a display of whom the elites really value. It’s not us.

Exile
Member
Exile

The Euros in my Shoahing Circle are brushing up on their American English and asking me which states are good to move to, Fash. You may see a lot of planes flying the other direction when you make Polish aliyah.

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

Sure, but unlike them I don’t care about money so much, and I’ve grazed on the grass here in the west, it ain’t greener. Quality of life is what I’m after. And the answer to that question is none. Maybe northern Idaho, a few other places, but long term… America is a sinking ship. I’ve looked into it, every place that is still nice is currently in the process of being made not nice. Myriad NGOs have been hard at work to make that nightmare a reality. On top of that we are almost certainly in for some wicked hyperinflation… Read more »

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

If you have never lived in one place in another country for an extended period of time (multiple months or longer), it is hard to understand what you are getting into. You will be an island of one, and you will find that spending time with other expatriate “yanks” becomes a big deal. Maybe not quite as much, post-Internet, as now you can get your fixes in places like this. Communities matter, and you will have none, wherever you move to in another country. You will meet friendly people, who will treat you like a bit of a novelty. But… Read more »

Yves Vannes
Member

Fash, don’t give up yet. There are still a lot of places in the US that are 95% white at a minimum. If you live along Hwy 90, except for a few large urban areas you will not see many non-whites (excluding Pow-wow Indians). A lot of America is still very very very white. Some of those areas are as big as Poland if not bigger. In a lot of those places a home is cheap as is land. It’s still a place you can raise a family and have a career. With a few acres you can have a… Read more »

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

True, the possibility exists that I might find some slice of real America left and be able to live out my life there in relative comfort. But what about my progeny? What about theirs? I don’t see how this country doesn’t turn into a complete shitshow in the coming decades, to the extent that it isn’t already. Something cataclysmic would have to take place, and I’m not much of a gambler. Never once in my life have I bought a lottery ticket. I look at math, I look at statistics, I look at trends and patterns, and none portend anything… Read more »

Yves Vannes
Member

Whatever you decide to do always give yourself another option if the need arises.

mountaindogsix
Guest
mountaindogsix

An observation from down here in the Republic of Texas. In many areas’ we’re being asked to “shelter in place”…what the hell that means I don’t know. If you issued these as written, in a military setting, there would be chaos. There’s very little enforcement and a ton of ambiguity. I’m not complaining but its still bullshit. You have a good number here complying but it seems far more because of social media. If you walk outside you can’t really tell. Construction goes on, cars are being serviced, restaurants are still shelping out chow. I can’t believe groups of small… Read more »

ConservativeFred
Guest
ConservativeFred

Since 2008, I’ve been of the mindset that the “whimper, not a bang ending,” is the most likely scenario for the end of the American Empire. The whimper will probably take another 40-50 years, so I will not see the ending. I expect a general loss of civility and declining purchasing power, which will be similar to what we’ve seen over the last 30 years. However, the “bang” scenario is also a possibility, and we could be seeing that now. I am convinced that in 2008 we came within 24-48 hours of a banking system collapse. It could happen again.… Read more »

M. B. Lamar
Guest
M. B. Lamar

Agreed! I’d start the clock ticking in 1965.

ConservativeFred
Guest
ConservativeFred

I can agree with 1965. But 2008 hit me on a personal level, with ring-side seats as the crisis unfolded.

Tarstarkusz
Guest
Tarstarkusz

America has been in decline since at least 1970, especially relative to the rest of the world. In the 60s, Americans had, by a very wide margin, the highest income. We owned, per capita, the largest number of TVs, radios, washing machines, dryers, cars, dish washing machines, clothes etc. We had the highest rate of home ownership and were the world’s largest creditor nation. The rest of the world owed us billions of dollars. We were also the most technically advanced. We led the world in basically every good thing and it wasn’t even close. Our infrastructure was the envy… Read more »

james wilson
Member

From 1789 to 1861 to 1933, 72 year spans, a lifetime more or less. Most of the damgage was done by ’33 so now we don’t need a lifetime to make leaps of bad logic, just 40 years to end freedom of association and based money, invade the world invite the world, new world order. One of the olden time historians offered that democracy does not die with a bang but with a wimper. By all means let democracy wimper as a self-segregated peoples learn to shine.

Tarstarkusz
Guest
Tarstarkusz

The problem is they won’t allow us to self segregate. The house my dad grew up in looks like a war zone. It was a nice working class city neighborhood that is now an urban hellscape. Same with my mother’s neighborhood. Over the course of their lives, they had to move 5 times. Their situation was repeated all across the country. I have had to move as well. My entire extended family has fled their homes. This is why all of the cities have giant soul-sucking suburbs around them. It’s why we can’t have something as simple as public transportation.… Read more »

james wilson
Member

That’s the point. When the democracy ends in a wimper people will be free to do that comes naturally and productively again.

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

And then the civil rights bill was passed, Affirmative Action, Vietnam happened and jews took control of the narrative, divorce rates spiked, porn became a thing, drugs, disco, rap, more drugs, consolidation of businesses into a handful of megacorporations. And now here we are. Charles Lindburghs tried to stop this. Sr. and Jr.

Member

A little thought would place the sudden collapse less likely as being darker.
The system is bankrupt, systemically corrupt and irredeemable.
Collapse if necessary and to be welcomed. Why inflict this cancer on three more generations?

Member

Clinically, and clinically only, it’s been interesting to watch Trump’s evolution during this. He started off at the very first press conference looking like a frustrated little boy forced to spend time with the maiden aunts, as they shrieked and kept their smelling salts at the ready, while keeping him from more important things. Then he let himself get sucked in, and trying to play it safe re Election 2020, joined in the hand-wringing to the extent that a strategically thinking alpha male could, always still the grown-up in the room. He still differentiated between hardhit regions and the rest… Read more »

Stranger in a strange land
Guest
Stranger in a strange land

Here we are…meaning the place where Thelma and Louise’s T-Bird has gone over the cliff hanging in mid air but hadn’t actually crashed and burned yet?

Member

Thelma and Louise over the cliff. Heh. Well, ’tis an ill wind indeed that blows absolutely no good at all.

Karl Horst
Guest
Karl Horst

For a look at the effect of Spanish Flu on the world economy and correlation to what we’re seeing now read on. Note this was written in 2007. (PDF download linked)

https://www.stlouisfed.org/~/media/files/pdfs/community-development/research-reports/pandemic_flu_report.pdf

FashGordon
Guest
FashGordon

Can’t work, there was a world war going on. Pointless to compare the two.

Karl Horst
Guest
Karl Horst

The last paragraph sums it up quite well –

“Of course, mitigating a pandemic will require cooperation and planning by all levels of government and the private sector. Unfortunately, a 2005 report suggests that the United States is not prepared for an influenza pandemic…a dose of personal responsibility may be the best ways to protect Americans in the event of a future influenza pandemic.”

In summary, Americans are screwed. With the French and Italians leading the way!

Member

It’s the Spanish and Italians, combined they have 4 times more stiffs than the chinks.
https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

Let’s hear it for the Wops and Dagos, leading the world!

Member

Spain remains an interesting case during the period. In the decades prior to the Visigoths showing up, it was the Vandals, Alans, and Sueves who came across the Pyrenees in 409. One of the interesting things about this history is that – according to the sources, for what they are worth – these tribes were permitted in to Spain by the troops under the command of a rebel Emperor, a Constantine III, who declared himself ruler while in Britain and was able to control Spain and much of Gaul during his run. According to a priest who wrote the account,… Read more »

roberto
Guest
roberto

Latest stats from the hospital I work at. (Major west coast VA med center)

• We received 5 COVID test results today; 2 negative and 0 positive.
Total tests sent: 103
Positive: 3
Negative: 94
Pending: 6

Guest
Guest
Guest

Thank you for posting these numbers again. You indicated that you received 5 test results today with 2 negative and 0 positive. What were the other 3? Inconclusive?

KGB
Guest
KGB

Yes, thanks.

Jim Smith
Guest
Jim Smith

I’d rather go out with a bang.

M. B. Lamar
Guest
M. B. Lamar

We’ve all seen the movies. It starts with an economic collapse, and ends with 10,000 mushrooms. Shall we play a game?

KGB
Guest
KGB

The only winning move is not to play.

M. B. Lamar
Guest
M. B. Lamar

So true. Yet, the game is afoot

King Tut
Guest
King Tut

“The plague and the zombies are ridiculous…..”

This kind of zombiephobic hatred has no place in our society.

Member

We are on our own.
No one is coming to help us.
Serve and protect is a crock.
Everything is more broken than it was.
Gear up and replenish.
No one cares more about you than you.
That’s OK.
It’s also OK to be White.

Lawdog
Member

Not to be a smarm, but it’s “A historical.”

Mark Stoval
Guest
Mark Stoval

“Another vision of the end times is the plague scenario. The super-virus is a popular devise to hustle along the collapsing and get right to the end times.” — Z-man

I would feel much better if the coronavirus was really a super-virus — hell, even really bad flu rather than the wimpy little thing it is. If your immune system is not compromised you will not even notice getting the damned thing.

We are going to die by the policies of the State rather than by virus. That is the future.

Member

Man, this guy (Thomas Nagel, NYU/Princeton) must REALLY not want to think, ya think? Thomas Nagel: Thoughts Are Real By Richard Brody July 16, 2013 The philosopher Thomas Nagel’s new book, “Mind and Cosmos: Why the Materialist Neo-Darwinian Conception of Nature Is Almost Certainly False,” Since neither physics nor Darwinian biology—the concept of evolution—can account for the emergence of a mental world from a physical one, Nagel contends that the mental side of existence must somehow have been present in creation from the very start. But then he goes further, into strange and visionary territory. He argues that the faculty… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

The reviewer’s description is hard to follow but this seems like a variant on the Gaia hypothesis – man was created to help the universe understand itself. It’s a cosmic. overarching vision but it’s not clear that it’s “his.” Outside looking in, he seems to be exploring already-discovered country.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

” man was created to help the universe understand itself.”

kind of like ..
“An oak tree is the way an acorn reproduces”?

james wilson
Member

” Man was created to help the universe understand itself”/ At the risk of getting over my skis, that’s just silly. John Muir took the usefullness of man to the universe in a different direction–That which is excellent remains forever a part of this universe.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

James, haven’t read any more than your synopsis, but it sounds like the kind of thing we would talk about in the college dorms after a few bong hits.

Yves Vannes
Member

Pierre Teilhard de Chardin and the Noosphere

Trojan House
Guest
Trojan House

So cities in Canada are starting to fine people for not obeying the ‘social distancing’ orders. In most cases, $1000 for the first offence. In Newfoundland, you can lose your driver’s license. But like Z says, forget about the everyday crimes being committed. I guess as long as they keep their social distance, go ahead and rob that bank.

Member

“The model to keep in mind is probably something like post-Rome Spain. Once the Roman authority collapsed, various barbarian rulers tried to fill the void, with varying degrees of failure. Eventually, local authority filled the gaps, providing order and protection for the people.” Not sure what your timeframe is here. The Visigoths were foreign barbarians who ruled Spain with the aid of the Roman Church. As a result, it was the only part of post-Rome where the Church was able to actually call the shots (unlike most people’s idea that the Pope ran Europe). Two results: since the Church’s ideas… Read more »

Chad Hayden
Guest
Chad Hayden

What will some of those local authorities that step in? Churches…companies?

DeaconBlues
Guest
DeaconBlues

I looked at the list of things the police would not respond to in Cincinnati. Up here in Canuckistan, my local police would not respond to a lot of those things before COVID. Many property crimes are reported online with no visit by police. Being assured by Ottawa that racism is not winning in the war against COVID 19 is little consolation.

Exile
Member
Exile

Racism may not beat Corona-Chan but it will eventually beat Canada. Soldier on.

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

If Kathy Griffin dies from this it’ll all be worth it. (sadly she won’t).

UFO
Guest
UFO

Why do you think there was the media freakout about Trump’s H&A tweet?

There is not enough supply of these drugs and they need them to be reserved for the elite… can’t have the dirt people being prescribed these medicines as well.

Member

But humanity needs hope

sirlancelot
Guest
sirlancelot

Got linked into some of Matt Bracken’s old stuff yesterday. Should things continue to go south it’s certainly plausible some of his ideas may come true especially if people with the right skill sets organize.

Of course this “neighborhood watch on steroids ” only works with a tight-knit community. When the lights go out and the taps run dry ? Then it’s every man for himself. Timeline till the end ? No idea , but as the wise man Remus would say ” stay away from crowds ” 😉

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Just took my kid to the bank – doors locked. Had to use the window service. Given germs and viruses are transmitted by hand, how this makes any difference eludes me. Then picked up yesterday’s mail . . . to find a helpful little postcard from coronavirus.gov reminding me to “Listen to and follow directions of your State and Local Authorities.” I’d always rather stay home than deal with diversity and clownworld, but this is so far beyond that all I can do is sneer and laugh at everyone. OOOoooohh, we’re all gonna die!!!!!

Hun
Guest
Hun

There is an interesting precedent to the release of prisoners. When the communist block collapsed, the transitional governments decided to release prisoners en masse causing chaos in their countries. This may have been a symptom of changing guard from “inhumane” communism to more “humane” liberal democracy or, more likely, a deliberate action to cause chaos and give the plebs something to focus on, while the various ‘elite’ factions fight for power.

Relevant example from that time: https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1990-01-02-mn-175-story.html

Karl Horst
Guest
Karl Horst

And right on cue the EU never lets a good crisis go to waste…. “European governments are looking at mobile phone data as a strategic tool to contain the spread of the coronavirus. By asking telecoms companies to hand over anonymous data about people’s locations, countries hope to track infections and warn potentially exposed people. With public health trumping privacy concerns, governments are now rushing to adopt sophisticated surveillance tools, Politico reports. The EU thinks the present crisis demonstrates how data can be used “for the common good”, but critics fear practices are being approved that will be hard to… Read more »

Member

The Chinese mandated that people record the QR codes posted at every public location. With tower pinging, data this was used to create to create maps of every Chinese’ travel and their intersection with the diseased: out to two or three degrees of separation. Registering of all cell phones with addresses National ID numbers etc is mandatory, It’s how the got on top of it so quickly. It’s coming to a gulag near you. Soon. I’ve seen reports that the number of cell phone accounts in China is down by 15-20 million. The implication is that this is a reflection… Read more »

Lawdog
Member

How can the highest echelons of society represent the common good? That’s like having Eritrea represent us in the Olypmics. They’re so far removed from us that they needn’t care.

Range Front Fault
Guest
Range Front Fault

“Collapse is a sudden, involuntary and chaotic form of simplification.”–The Mandibles, A Family 2029-2047 While working in water treatment, I also learned the basic economic theorem, as Z comments, you don’t throw $1 million at a $100 problem. You don’t demand as the enviro public does “pure” water because you can’t afford it….with all the regulations, upgrades and $millions spent for the continual upgrades to treatment processes at plants…you will soon not be able to afford your water. Same with the virus. The choice is: Tank the economy to save some lives (the numbers aren’t there), forgetting that when the… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

Range, how are the Mormon men holding up? Taking the lead or turtling with their womenfolk?

No need to ask about the Bugman half – they’re just transplanted feebs from CA for the most.

Range Front Fault
Guest
Range Front Fault

I don’t know how the men are doing. Reminder that back here away from the Salt Lake corridor men aren’t all just city men. We still have ranchers here….sheep, cattle, alfalfa and other ag. Assume ranchers to be somewhat different than in-town guys. Ranchers are out in every frozen snot roast your ass dusty dirty weather and deal in high stakes gambling with their crops both animal and forage. Ranchers must run on testicular fortitude. In-town men are often the usual hive guy. Check out Kurt Schlichter’s Peoples Republic for his take on Mormon ranchers. You may want to cultivate… Read more »

Member

Atheism is so cringe

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Guest

Honestly who do you think these “warlords” that will rule over the putatively emergent feudal system Libertardians and Paleo- junkies so think they desire will be? Who do you think will rule? Who have you described? You’re going to be ruled by Cops locally and Soldiers Nationally. It just happened in LA. The Sheriff who is head of the local FEMA got tired of the local pols stirring the pot and held his own press conference, said I’m in charge not them. The media ❤️❤️❤️ Him in their coverage. It’s natural to ❤️ The Strongman. LA county is releasing non-… Read more »

Exile
Member
Exile

Shorter: REEEEE.

Lawdog
Member

Lol

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Guest

Shorter; don’t care.
We can always get more lawyers.

We can’t get easily more brave men.

And Dear I expect there’s a lot more REEE in your neck of the woods than ours.