Cui Bono?

Early in my working life, I found myself managing a few salesmen, along with some entry level managers. Since my area of responsibility only required three salesmen, it did not warrant a sales manager, so that duty was mine, as well as operations. It was a good training job for a young guy. One thing I learned from the sales guys is something that stuck with me forever. That is, no one cares about a deal more than the salesman working the deal. He’s the one that will make it happen.

You see, even in a big company, every salesman is like a small business. His expenses are his time and his revenue is his commission. The really good salesmen are shrewd in how they spend their time, never wasting a minute on a bad deal. They never fight the commission structure. If selling the crap product gets a bigger commission, then they sell the crap product. If the product is so crappy, they can’t sell it, they find a new job where they can hit their commission goals.

Since sales drives everything about business, it was a great lesson about the reality of business and bureaucracy. The managers have goals and they try to craft incentives so their people naturally work toward those goals. The trouble is, they often see the world through their own myopic eyes, rather than through the eyes of their people. Alternatively, they will foolishly think their people will make personal sacrifices on behalf of their goals. They think everyone cares about their deal as much as they do.

We are seeing this play out in the response to the pandemic. The people making the models and making predictions care about things that are important to them. It has always been assumed that they care most about being right, but as the models have failed and they are now “updated” on a daily basis, it turns out that accuracy really was never all that important to them. Marc Lipsitch, the guy largely responsible for the panic, was never all that concerned with being right.

Similarly, the people making public policy were always working their deals, rather than working your deal. By that I mean they were not issuing crack down orders on people because it was good for the public. They did it because it was good for them or at least they assumed it was good for them. It is why we had a race between states to see who could arrive at the most absurd policies. The nation lies dormant now because of a bizarre beauty pageant among the nation’s governors.

The response from our imperial rulers to this shuttering of the country is another deal that means everything to the people who passed it. Trump and Congress were really proud of themselves for having done the deal in such short time. It turns out though, that the deal was a great public relations stunt, but not much of a deal for the nation’s small business people. This post at the Federalist walks through the math of the Payroll Protection Act. Be prepared for breadlines this summer.

Of course, the most glaring example of this is the health care system. In response to a theoretical problem, it is in the process of creating real problems by faking death certificates and indefinitely postponing medical care for people with real diseases, in order to perpetuate the crisis atmosphere. The system is acting in the interest of the system, because the people at the top making the decisions care about their deal more than anything else. They closed the system to save it from the virus.

All of this should be a good reminder about the reality of anything that has the word “managed” in its label. Whether it is a managed health care system or a managed economy, the people doing the managing care more about their deal than anything else, thus the system they manage comes to reflect their interests. The stone-heads on our side cheering the crisis and demanding managed health care and a managed economy will soon find out what that really means. Enjoy the bread lines.

Of course, the stone-heads will argue that destroying the civil life of the country is the price to be paid for discrediting the current order. That may be true, but that does not mean the people cheering it will suddenly be vaulted to the top by the people being made to pay the price for this disaster. Again, those people at the top with the monopoly of force will surely take care of their deal before allowing anyone else to profit from the turmoil that is coming our way this summer.

The point of all this is even small organizations become very complicated in a hurry, because people have lots of priorities individually, which can coincide with and contradict their collective priorities. Fine tuning those while working your own deal is beyond the skill of most managers. It is why bureaucracies become self-serving and why managed anything is a fool’s errand. Whether it is managed economies or managed health care, eventually, the deal that matters most is the manager’s deal.

Circling back to those salesmen I managed, the second big lesson I learned in that job was from my boss. I complained to him that the commission structure I inherited worked against our interests because it was too complicated to manage. He told me to make it a flat commission on gross, but that I was responsible for the performance of every deal I signed off on going forward. It did not take long for the sales staff to know what was good business for me and what was a waste of their time.

That’s the lesson the stone-heads from the planned economy camp and the free market zealots never grasp. The choice is not between a system managed by angels or a system run by the invisible hand of magic. The choice is always between clarity and opacity. When the incentives are clear and individual interests are clear, everyone makes better decisions and demands more rational sacrifice. When those things are hidden, it is when our virtues are soon turned into vices.


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292 Comments
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Siddo
Siddo
6 months ago

Bummer. I checked in expecting the podcast! All the days seem the same with the flu scare lock down.

Sandmich
Sandmich
Reply to  Siddo
6 months ago

Same, though it happened to me last week after getting “Ground Hog Day’d” the rest of the week.

Vegetius
Vegetius
6 months ago

This event has also revealed that our thing isn’t ready to win a church softball game, much less wage actual struggle for self-determination.

John Smith
John Smith
Member
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago

I despair that it ever will, Veg. You need at least a triple digit IQ to get here, an addiction to red pills and common sense, and the ability to think critically just to get here. The guys that built our nations had courage, the smarts to sacrifice today for a much better tomorrow, and good women to support them. We don’t have any of that. This can only end one way too. We will not vote our way out, and to get out would actually most likely involve killing some people… probably a lot. Given that our women are… Read more »

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

Hard times create hard men. I have faith we will get our shit together as necessity demands. The current period is a strange one and there is a great deal of confusion and denial going on. This should abate as reality sets in and the situation becomes clearer. I don’t know how rough any of you have had it in your lives, but in my experience, when your back is against the wall something changes inside you and your full potential is activated. Adversity breaks some, but others it forges into iron. A decadent society fosters an indolent and apathetic… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

We live in interesting times. Sadly, the skill set required by a Gaucho (Argentina) for optimal survival are not the same, and largely in conflict, with those the civilized man from Buenos Aires would require. For those not familiar with Latin America, you can substitute “savage”, “tribesman” or even the Appalachian Red-Necked Beer-Bellied Deer-Hunter (or equivalent bird for other parts of the land) for the first category; the 2nd will encompass nearly everyone who lives in and depends on the infrastructure the civilization provides. It is no doubt true that hard times create hard men; the problem is that it… Read more »

Chester White
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

Back against the wall is called death ground. You either fight or die. No other choice. Cortez burned his ships in the Gulf, putting his men on death ground.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

The wymyn are going to in for a big surprise when all this fetal positioning gets us to a point where some very hard men are going to have to take over to get things right again. The girls will be lucky if they’re allowed a set of car keys, let alone professorships and managerial positions where they can grouse about the patriarchy that gave them more than any other population of women have ever had. They could end up in burqas, which would actually be a measure of justice for what they have brought upon us.

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

I think of them more as children who are doing what they are told to do by big daddy media academia government industrial complex. Same goes for the feminized men. We need to be the young lion that takes on big daddy lion and wins to become the new big daddy of the pride. Once the new big daddy isn’t some anti-white misanthropic yid collective who considers it their mission to terrorize the “evil nazi descendants” (i.e. all white people somehow) the machine they will no longer control will stop making the women (and feminized men) so terrible.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

I think deep down the wymynz are just itchin’ for some male to come along and put them in their place. Thus their submitting to all this Moslem immigration without so much as a by your leave. In the subconscious of their subconscious, it’s the ultimate romance novel, surrendering to the swarthy dominant male. Actually, it’s a twofer . . . they get to virtue-signal with a minority and stick it to dear old white dad at the same time.

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

I don’t agree with that, if I thought Angela Merkel represented all our women I would seriously look into whether it is possible to turn yourself gay. I do agree that women want to be led, but I don’t think swarthyness has anything to do with it, most of the men where I live are swarthy and I do better than any of them. Feminized men are a turn off though, and our small hat media and educational system has damaged many of our guys horribly.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Vikings… I think you are right about the romance/virtue signaling thing with gals. Deep down they think Omar Sharif or Antonio Banderas (playing an Arab) will come and satisfactorily ravish them, (but still see their inner beauty of course), and take away all that nagging need for decision making. Been to Saudi Arabia. Seen men driving their gaggle of garbage bag shrouded women around. It’ll be interesting when our gals find out that there is a 98% chance their future Arab master looks like Yasser Arafat, smells like buttered sweat and cigarettes, and thinks any sexual pleasure his women get… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

also, the husbands think nothing of passing their wives around to their brother or cousins. community property.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
6 months ago

In some tribal societies, nearly ALL property is considered communal. Perhaps not informed by Islam, however. I think this is common in the worst-off African countries. I read a piece on Senegal and this was a prominent feature of the (lack of) local economy. You come from a large extended family, which you are expected to support (and vice versa). If you ran a tiny business and were even able to make a profit, you would have to share the spoils with your extended kin. No word on how (or if) losses are similarly distributed. In any event, very hostile… Read more »

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

This fucking attitude is exactly why women turn you beta cucks down. “Women are all whores who want brown dick, woe is me! MGTOW” Quit the pity party and man up and maybe a woman won’t be immediately turned off by the smell of your weakness. All your bullshit excuses for your own inadequacies are paper thin, women don’t want a brown guy they want a guy who’s not a whiny pussy. If my anecdotal examples aren’t enough go look at the data from dating apps, you have a huge advantage just by virtue of being a white guy. If… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

Fash, I’m a girl and I think I have a little insight. Young white men need to get some testosterone pumping, and women won’t have to seek it elsewhere. But until then, hormones, not to be denied, are leading these females in other directions. The evidence is all around you in public places. A good first step is to quit buying products the ads for which portray white guys as idiots, and let the company know that you’ve quit buying its products because their ads portray white guys as idiots. Young women’s natural instincts are also going to lead them… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

FG, +1 with caveats. There a huge systemic problems with the sexual “marketplace” nowadays. MGTOW is a survival strategy for sh*tty times. It’s a bitch to learn how to be a man and handle the WQ in normal times, much less the Age of Pennywise. Considering how many guys grow up without a strong man around now, 10x harder. You’re on-message in terms of telling guys not to despair-pill and cope-out but a lot of guys are stuck in a dilemma of society’s making. You have to find a way to make it work, guys. Cut yourself some slack and… Read more »

UFO
UFO
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

I agree in part, Fash. There are alot of loser white guys around. Alot of white guys are smoking huge amounts of weed, or are fat, or just play videogames. If not that they’re super beta and feminist. There is literally no excuse for being fat, or being a pot-head. Alot of white people of all ages also despair when things fail. They get depressed when they fail, or in this case get rejected. Just don’t have the chutzpah I guess. Non-white males have infinite chutzpah for white women. I’ve had so many disappointing experiences, failures, rejections, insecurities, and lonely… Read more »

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

Your friends should not give up, take a break from dating and other stuff, get a nice manly hobby, go hiking, do some leather work, learn to work on cars, or learn how to use shop tools and make stuff, etc. Work out, pump iron and stay away from the high carb crap that fucks with our mood. And they need to stay away from Pot. There is a reason the elite is pushing that crap. BTW the rest of the stuff you mention is spot on. “Our Thing” should have e-books explaining what you posted To help them. That… Read more »

Chad Hayden
Chad Hayden
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

This is correct. A lot of girls are curious about the assorted mystery meats but their heart’s desire is for a strong white man. This is true for most non-white girls too. Exhibit A: AOC.
The problem comes when there are no strong white men. Then white girls turn into forbidden paths. In my experience it’s actually easier in a city with few white men than in the heartland where buff white dudes abound.

UFO
UFO
Reply to  Chad Hayden
6 months ago

In a diverse city there’s diverse choosings. A woman of any race is happy to jump into bed with a white guy, especially if he’s not a loser, in decent shape, and carries himself with confidence. While in the Canadian rustbelt I had the same issues – there’s always some jacked dude in his 30s with a big truck taking all the women. Women like manly guys regardless of what the media says. In Toronto there’s a ton of Asian women who would love a white guy’s attention especially given the ton of betas around. Of course, Our Thing is… Read more »

Chad Hayden
Chad Hayden
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

Good point UFO – part of what makes the cities easier is the large number of non-white women to lend social proof.

Another oft passed over point is how much easier it is to meet women when you walk everywhere. The subway was heaven. Part of the atomization problem is that suburban design limits human contact. It’s home –> car –> destination –> car –> home. In avoiding blegs we created a new problem.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

Yes, PM, all the while turning their nose up at Lawrence of Arabia . . .

I’ve seen the pictures of English girls in burqas. In fact I’ve seen some American girls in burqas. I read one quoted as saying that Islam provides her protection. Feminism threw young women to the wolves. Some, even if only a few, may see a slightly-moderated Islam as salvation. Or maybe not slightly-moderated. Either way . . .

UFO
UFO
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

That’s the way it’s going, anyways. Secular white people will be extinct faster than we expect, with Amish, Mormons, Muslims, Haredi, etc. filling the void. The White Death is emptying out rural America and the Amish are filling in. People raised in those insular communities no longer find the World quite so attractive… and it’s not the English that the Amish are going to find out in Philadelphia or NYC in 2020. Joining a religious community is the religious answer to MGTOW – eschew the shiny lights of hookup culture in exchange for a boring but stable existence. Not looking… Read more »

Mike_C
Mike_C
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

“any sexual pleasure his women get is laughably problematic.”

Cliterodectomy performed by a grandma with an old razor blade = problem solved.

For bonus points: infibulation

And if anyone doesn’t know those terms, now would be a good time to learn what they mean. Add them to Matt Bracken’s “Ten Arabic Words: Bracken’s Challenge to National Security Professionals” (at GoV)

Alzaebo
Reply to  Mike_C
6 months ago

Mike_C, they’re called ‘shorn’ women. Their husbands absolutely hate it; in Egypt its the women who do it to their girls. What I want to know is when the slave-mark of Shechem (circumcision) became standard practice, routinely done in American hospitals. I get blather about 19th c. anti- masturbation quacks, but this is a procedure, with specialists, coding, insurance payment, etc. It does permanent brain damage. I think it may explain much of the soy in America, why we gave up so easily to the massive brainwashing. The muslim practice of ‘initiation’ without anesthesia on much older boys and girls… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

You make it sound like all Islamic countries treat their women as property, denying them any self-assertion and keeping them in their place. Hmmm, maybe these Arabs are onto a good thing? [evil grin]

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Zman hints at this occasionally. Is there psychology or sociology to back up this claim? And a quite depressing condition, if true! It’d be wonderful to be able to play the white knight. Given the present system, Don Quixote is far more likely to lose his job, be socially ostracized, and face civil or criminal charges. Besides, in the story most of his damsels* turned out to be whores anyway! Reality really sucks, especially when you’re being disabused of your cherished ideals. *Or just dull, ugly women when viewed up close. One woman was a too-virtuous shepherd who indirectly leads… Read more »

Mark Taylor
Mark Taylor
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

When women sew chaos that leads to males fighting they get to choose from winners. It’s setting up their own hierarchy, and then choosing from the ones at the top.

I don’t know if women do this on purpose or just lack the instincts to avoid it. Either way, it’s a good reason women shouldn’t make political decisions.

“This” society was won with blood from men, the next one will be as well. Therefore men should be the ones deciding its direction- since they pay for it.

John Smith
John Smith
Member
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Don’t get me fuggin started! My wife is good (after all, she married a good man!)… and she can see this thing for the hoax or panic it is. But… fricksakes… of the half dozen women I met today, all of them clucked about the lockdown and made a big show of social distancing… and every single one of them had to blab about some relative or friend that needed to be scolded for not social distancing or being locked down enough. The sheer vapid stupidity of this has them all in lockstep too. Our gracious blog host has spoken… Read more »

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

A little White Sharia is more likely or maybe White Kampuchea.

Looking at the longer than any of us will live picture, the US will be mostly White Opt Out Religious people since they the only people with high fertility. Even Latinos won’t have kids in this mess.

Future women will have a few duties, farming (or trade) wife, mother and church and jack for freedom.

This kind of sucks because that frisson caused by the mix of modernity and tradition makes for alluring and interesting women instead of tractor people but so be it.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

It will be worse than burquas.

It will be true equality.

Not from their husbands, but their sons.

Kentucky Headhunter
Kentucky Headhunter
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago

Search for: Church League Softball Fistfight – Tim Wilson

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Kentucky Headhunter
6 months ago

Search anything by Tim Wilson. He describes the South I grew up in.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago

…and we’d likely be arrested, or at least issued citations (by glove wearing deputies, we’d hope), for having an unlawful assembly. Unless we could convince the law that playing softball is protected religious expression 🙂

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago

Quite so. The problem unlike the first American Revolution is that our side has not defined anything that they are for. Our side is vague, nebulous, overly intellectual. I once called it a kegger for intellectuals and that’s what it basically is. Where is our Tom Paine and a modern “Common Sense”? We don’t have tit. There is no outreach to the working class as we have nothing to offer them even in the way of what we stand for. Instead we engage in circular firing squads blaming Boomers, the Silent Generation, etc for why things went to shit for… Read more »

Mark Taylor
Mark Taylor
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago

Our thing seems fine to me. This panic revealed libertarianism is a dead end and when people are sufficiently concerned they drop it quickly. It revealed that anti-foreigner sentiment is pretty much boiling, and ready to spill over.

We don’t need a team of geniuses. The left uses their army of morons. If anything not having an army of morons is the disadvantage we suffer from.

M. B. Lamar
M. B. Lamar
6 months ago

I so enjoy reading your posts. This is very true. We should have a requirement that you can’t be a politician without spending some years in the private sector. What? You’ve never managed so much as a a shoe store, but you want to be hold the number one job in the United States?

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  M. B. Lamar
6 months ago

I would add to the wish list: term limits. Mine would allow no repeat terms in office. How about enforced periods of not being in any elected or appointed office? I want my politicians doing the job they are being paid for, not to be running for the next office they want to fill.

CaptainMike
CaptainMike
6 months ago

Thinking ahead to The Summer of Our Discontent, Zman I hope you have a plan B to get out of Lagos should things go sideways there. If the gibs keep rolling in on schedule I suppose things won’t change much for the no-job demographic. Riots can start for really bizarre reasons sometimes though.

It truly is amazing how myopic all the people in power, with guaranteed government checks and big TSP accounts are completely failing to see how this shutdown is destroying working peoples’ lives and livelihoods.

tristan
tristan
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

It seems to me they made that choice at least 30 years ago.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

The Fed is feeling those tremors. It just announced another $2.3 trillion injection into the economy. Most of that will go to existing programs, propping up the IG market (i.e. Wall Street gets to buy bonds guaranteed by the Fed at 5% when treasuries are paying less than 1%), the muni bond market except now the fed is going lower down the chain to smaller govts and small business loans. Hell, the fed is buying student, car and credit card loans. Technically, the fed isn’t buying stocks, but it’s doing everything possible to keep the market from crashing. Hell, the… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

The working class figured it out long ago because they got destroyed long ago. Now the pain moves up the socioeconomic ranks looking for new human resources to exploit, now the educated white collar middle class starts to get it as they feel the pain. These are the same who were calling me racist scum even a few months ago. It’s hard to like them even though our interests are lining up. Erstwhile mercenaries. More forgiving to be done I guess. EXCEPTIONS as always!

ConservativeFred
ConservativeFred
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

A significant majority of the middle and upper middle class came from middle class backgrounds – really no surprise. The economy of the last 20-30 years has allowed them to self-isolate from the lower class. If you are in the middle class or upper middle class and spent a summer working in a factory, kitchen, or outdoors (almost anything with your hands), you are the exception. Your Naxalts come from this small demographic. The past weeks have been black-pilling and sad, as I don’t believe much can be done with, or for, the majority of the middle and upper middle… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  ConservativeFred
6 months ago

Certainly. In a different time I’d have been one of the exceptions, but I figured great difficulty ahead so I took my bachelor’s and got to work. Take the hit in your 20s instead of middle age, get a broad and practical skill set, get prepared to dig in. Starting to look like one of the few examples of good judgment from my youth 🙂 The bubble people are going to suffer.

Alzaebo
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

Why we older guys are panicking is because we can’t get a job either.

We lack those years to develop employable skills;

employer insurance incentivizes, no, mandates not hiring anyone over 50 and has worked against over 40s since tax policy brought it in;

Sancho and Maria now hold the blue collar and entry level jobs we used to be able to fall back on, same as with our young guys and gals.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

Maybe it’s the optimist speaking, but I think that will change. People are going to have to rediscover value beyond the bottom line.

Dave
Dave
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Rahm Emanuel’s brother was being interviewed on Pravda last evening, and actually said the shutdown will have to continue for at least another year!?! This is after a Dr. Redfield, one of the heavyweights at the CDC, just stated that the number of deaths was going to be ” much, much lower ” than expected. None of these geniuses are on the same page, or even reading from the same book, but many of them think you can keep this economy frozen, and tens of millions out of work, for more than 12 months, without mass civil unrest. Our betters… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Dave
6 months ago

A Democrat saying for at least another year means until the election is over and (he hopes) Trump is out.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

If the Dems somehow retake the White House watch how fast they and their media tools do a complete 180.

Don’t be surprised when you hear this at a press conference in that timeline:

“Covid-19? Oh, we revisited the data. Turns out, it’s just the flu, bro.

Next question!”

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

Exactly. Or, to gain even more control, “Uh-oh, here comes Covid-20,000to the 10th power and it’s even worse. Face masks at the ready. Stay in your bedrooms. If you see someone going in the kitchen, call the police.” Which reminds me, are Oath Keepers saying anything about following these local Stalinist measures that are becoming commonplace? This will be a test of their steadfastness.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

If Trump gets re-elected we’ll see, “Airborne AIDS, ” within six months.

Or the Deep State may get so fed up with Trump that they move straight to the, “Executive Action, ” phase.

Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

Now I’m frightened, it’s coming clear as day.
We’re about to become Berlin.

Alzaebo
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

I do see this as punishing the serfs for voting Trump here, for Yellow Vests and Brexit there.

We were getting “dangerous ideas”.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

We were getting dangerous ideas. I also get the sense that the Cloud People running Sodom-on-the-Hudson and Gomorrah-on-the-Potomac felt that we serfs have it far too good.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Dave
6 months ago

Yes words can; the adults are in charge.

The green zone kids are all grown up and in charge now.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

All I see from the middle class is its going comatosely into that good night. Hope something changes my mind. They think they’re going to vote for Trump again and everything will be okay. They don’t realize we’re probably too far gone for that to do any good. Maybe hunger and losing their homes will shake some of them out of their blue light stupor.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

While my husband and I are solidly middle class, his first job was working in a gas station. Out of all his friends from life, perhaps one – the buddy from Alabama whose relatives owned that gas station – is somewhat a race realist and can be talked with. Everyone else, particularly those he knew when we were DC denizens, are blind as bats both racially and economically.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Dear Z: the Hour is later than you think. I don’t suppose you ever saw Iraq or the Green Zone in person? My Dear Sir; we are now governed by the Green Zone Kids. Really. All grown up now: the adults in the room. The Green Zone Adults now have America. They have DC, they have NYC. You may rely on them to enjoy it. As you note Blackrock is at the head of the line, I’m sure Halliburton isn’t far back in the queue. Our Fronde du Trump is over. The adults are in charge now. If they has… Read more »

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  CaptainMike
6 months ago

The people of whom you speak, are either too stupid to see it, or
can see it but simply don’t care. Or, in the bizarro world they inhabit – they see it and ‘care’ – but in a way that allows them to be the heroines who get to save humanity and without having their hair mussed.
In the real world, when the destruction they’ve wrought eventually knocks on their door, twill be hard lesson learned too late.

Member
Reply to  CaptainMike
6 months ago

As I recall from my days in MD the law there is that all alcohol has to be sold in liquor stores. In most other states you can get beer and wine at the supermarket. If I were stuck in Baltimore I’d be worried about interruptions in the booze supply or riots at the liquor stores. Gibs ain’t worth shit if you can’t get your 40oz on.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  CaptainMike
6 months ago

Change may not come until the no-longer-working people start to destroy the lives or at least livelihoods of those who rule over them.

joey junger
joey junger
6 months ago

Another problem with the wonkish/quantitative types is their total distrust of anecdotal evidence. Yes, your anecdotal evidence is based on what you personally see and feel, but you have to balance the numbers with what your heart and your eyes tell you. My neighbors always seemed peaceful and now I can hear them screaming at each other (the wife lost her gig, and the man is a “progressive” stay-at-home type). Fruit is literally rotting on the field and the vine in Deutschland because the Romanians and other seasonal workers (not illegals) can’t come in. These people have no Hartz IV… Read more »

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  joey junger
6 months ago

I have that problem with the actuaries right now. They are delighted that no claims are rolling in. Keep trying to explain to them that their modeling has to account for what happens if that business no longer exists.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  joey junger
6 months ago

Indeed. The model fetish, much like the tech fetish in general, assumes a moral quality for its own sake. These tools become beyond reproach, a kind of territorial guarding by the credentialed that ends up functioning like a rolling the bones mythology that often ends up undermining most of their utility. Once deployed, common sense and most other low hanging observations are treated as luddite threats to the magic box. I see the common sense vs modeling as yet another way in which the cloud and dirt just aren’t going to see the world in the same way. I once… Read more »

Model Fetish
Model Fetish
Reply to  Screwtape
6 months ago

Exactly, this entire “pandemic” is just another model fetish that spiraled out of control. I don’t think it was conspiratorial (at least not initially), but now it’s just another runaway train of divorced-from-reality decisions driven by Fauci-esque modelers.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Model Fetish
6 months ago

Imagine the modelers delight that Americans bought it all hook, link, and sinker. I was looking at an American flag last night and thinking that we don’t deserve to see it waving in the breeze anymore. Our new flag should have a mask and nothing else. I pledge allegiance . . .

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Our flag should have a yellow chicken on a pink background.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

After this episode, I never again want to hear someone unironically say, “the land of the free and the home of the brave.”

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

Land of the meek and the home of the slaves.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
6 months ago

Haven’t you been paying attention?
“Land of the “FLEE!” and the home of the plague”

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Fly a Betsy instead.

Member
Reply to  Model Fetish
6 months ago

Modeling, whether of climate, epidemics, or the way a car crumples when it hits a wall, are just supposed to be tools wielded by sober and intelligent people who understand that initial parameters and foundational assumptions are critically important. The problem is that, while almost nobody but automotive engineers cares about crumpled sheet metal, everyone cares about weather and disease and that makes these things political. So you go from a realm where engineers are in control to one where politicians are in control. The scientists and engineers are always mainly concerned with how well their models fit reality and… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  pozymandias
6 months ago

And most people are not equipped to analyze all this. Thus, they are at the mercy of Fauci’s whims.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Screwtape
6 months ago

The fundamental problem with the models being thrown around during this plandemic is that most of them are terrible.

I get that medicine is not engineering and the criteria for success is not the same between those fields.

That said, if I went to production team meetings with models that were as far off as the University of Washington or Imperial College I would have been walked out of the building years ago.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  joey junger
6 months ago

Spergs. They have a hard time making the human connection.

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

What’s ideal is the combination of the sperg and the grug.

grug + sperg = Grerg Ubermensch

Alzaebo
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

Grerg Ubermensch:
A redneck with a great set of tools.

Or, anybody not in Admin.

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  joey junger
6 months ago

There’s certainly a lot you can miss if you only take into account that which can be quantified. Those types have enormous blind spots.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  joey junger
6 months ago

Joey – Very well said. Yes, we all know the difference between anecdotes and data, but multiple anecdotes are what constitute data and too many (Cochran, Sailer, et al) cannot see beyond their tidy little numbers and graphs.

Dave
Dave
Reply to  3g4me
6 months ago

In recent days Steve has taken to writing as if he didn’t unequivocally accept the absolute worst case scenario from day one.
Some of his regular commenters are ever so gently bringing that fact to his attention.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Dave
6 months ago

Dave – Sorry, I know he’s a lot of guys’ hero, but I stopped cutting Steve slack a long time ago. He’s been stuck in the same ‘ironically noticing’ rut for over a decade now, and he utterly panicked about the plague.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Dave
6 months ago

Was just listening to Molyneux. He said we’re getting a preview of communism. Later he asked the back-to-work crowd how many lives are worth it. I thought ‘Stef, how many lives saved are worth communism?’ This whole thing has been an eye opener.

David_Wright
Member
6 months ago

What’s the protocol for bread lines? Do we get a number like at the deli counter, or an umbrella if we stand out in the rain? Is it just bread or is that just a euphemism? How will white folks fare in such a system? So many questions since I never had to do this before.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

You download the breadline app onto your phone, which allows childless shrews and other AWFLs to virtue-signal about how wonderful it is to #sharetheline

M. B. Lamar
M. B. Lamar
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

#SoupIsGoodFood

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  M. B. Lamar
6 months ago

The new virtue signaling . . . #IDidn’tEatToday.

theRussians
theRussians
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

…and are required to grant full access to your contacts and files, of course.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

Hahaha. The bread line selfies posted on Facebook will be hilarious as they transition from virtue signaling to food panic.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

Will they still proudly hold the “Immigrants welcome!” signs?

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
6 months ago

Even when they’re skinnier than Karen Carpenter.

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
6 months ago

…we’ve only just begun….

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
6 months ago

And then there’s their other hit, prognosticators that they were: (Because of Social Distancing I Don’t Want To Be) Close To You.

Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

I’m looking forward to YouTube videos of SJW wammen with purple hair yanking each other’s piercings out over cans of tomato soups and hipster nu-males trying to figure out how to throw a punch.

Alzaebo
Reply to  pozymandias
6 months ago

Good time for a flash mob!

#RodneyIsKing
#ShoppingSpree
#BlueLightSpecial

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

Only then will they understand the foolishness of the great toilet paper crisis.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Nah, lines mean people will experience shame and stigma. Can’t have that. Its all going virtual! Amazon is awarded $5T gov’t contract to manage fulfillment of the National Mac N Cheese Act, commits to next day delivery of gubmint cheddar, bread, eggs, and milk for low-income earners. Apple is awarded $2T Gov’t contract to supply freedom fones to low-income earners to facilitate access to Amazon’s new ‘every fridge full’ Program. Comcast & Netflix are awarded a $1.5T gov’t contract to provide basic internet and media streaming service to every household qualified under the Mac N Cheese Act. Google will be… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Screwtape
6 months ago

I hope it’s the “National Mac N Cheese Act” and not the “National Bug Meat Act.”

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  LineInTheSand
6 months ago

Bug meat optional. But if you don’t eat yer meat, you can’t have any pudding.

We love our freedom, after all.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

What’s the protocol for bread lines?

No automatic weapons, no explosives.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

You can rest assured the vibrancy will cut in line and whitey will not say or do jack squat.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
6 months ago

I disagree. Stress can make tempers flare and sometimes this could work to the advantage of the white man and to the black man’s disadvantage, particularly if Jamaal is at a numerical disadvantage. Alas, there some people who don’t know how to “act white” when it may be essential to survival.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
6 months ago

Locally, we call majority those who won’t act white “millennials.” They won’t do jack squat to jammaal, who is probably a stepsibling from the virtue signaling.

ronehjr
ronehjr
6 months ago

White nationalists who want to use this crisis to discredit the current order by making the govt give us free stuff are simply going to turn White people into serfs. And the jewish capitalists(I also decry them) they so decry will have even more power to implement the race replacement the are currently engaged in. People like Enoch have to understand that weakness never defeats strength, even if it has morality on its side. If White people in North America are to survive, it is because we have enough wealth to incentivize our people to take our own side.

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  ronehjr
6 months ago

Our people are not going to take their own side until they have nothing left to lose. The personal cost is too high and the “prisoner’s dilemma” is in full effect. If whites stop were to stop working to maintain the system and instead be leeches on it like the POC, it would collapse. We will never have enough wealth while the rothschilds et. al. control the financial system and through it, our government. It is rigged in such a way as to prevent that from ever happening. Your idea is a pipe dream, not even Henry Ford could even… Read more »

ronehjr
ronehjr
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

If White people stop working we will simply be replaced the same way we are being replaced now, with perhaps greater urgency. We have no power right now. We need to regain power in a generational manner. It will not happen overnight.

Vegetius
Vegetius
Reply to  ronehjr
6 months ago

Enoch’s ‘deal’ depends on him not understanding anything that reduces paywall subscription numbers, and Striker’s red-brown shtick is popular.

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago

The national socialism “shtick” is popular because it has an actual historical track record of working. Go read up on Mussolini’s rise, Uncle A, Franco. Conservatism has a track record of conserving nothing. It’s a impotent trap for people who might otherwise achieve something politically. If it wasn’t for blacks and now the POC rainbow, we would already have a less capitalist country, just like every other white country on earth. The USA is dead last among white countries on health outcomes, educational outcomes, level of wealth stratification, etc. We are the only country who’s average life expectancy is decreasing.… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

“The national socialism “shtick” is popular because it has an actual historical track record of working.” Lol. It’s appealing, sure, but it’s resilience as a national system sucks. Don’t believe me? Your pining for something that never was. “Go read up on Mussolini’s rise, Uncle A, Franco.” More importantly, read on their respectful falls. You can point to any number of magic Jews who contributed to their failure, but truth is national socialism has a fan base relegated to a tiny fringe. It didn’t have the resiliency required to survive beyond a brief period and has too much baggage associated… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago

Ah, yeah, I have a notion their subscription base is shrinking. Their better hosts have disappeared and the remaining leadership sticks to the same moldy schtick. Their free content output has shrunk considerably and the (paid) forums are a ghost town. What free stuff is still left has either went on to greener pastures or backstopped to external sites. You’re not missing anything in neither paid content nor inane TRS cheerleaders posting reddit-tier echochamber garbage. The smarter forum users have either left or been banned for raising complaints. I don’t even mean banned for shitposting, but banned for merely bringing… Read more »

Mike_C
Mike_C
6 months ago

“people have lots of priorities individually, which can coincide with and contradict their collective priorities”

Well, that means that “people” are confused and foolish and they suck. Personally, the only priority I ever consider is, “But is it good for the …”

Eh. Never mind.

Chester White
6 months ago

We have had breadlines for fifty years, made invisible by food stamps.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Chester White
6 months ago

Yes but A.C. (After Covid), there will also be a gluten-free bread line.

The cloud obscures reality from view and then gaslights what remains in plain sight. Its why noticing is a crime.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Chester White
6 months ago

Imagine how all this is indoctrinating children 12 and under. The big show is their parents cowering and not raising any hell about house arrest. All these infernal masks are the natural outcome of the every-child-in-a-bicycle helmet mindset. Needless to say, mine never wore one. When this is all over, and the statistics tell the truth, is anyone going to say, “We were wrong.”? Not the politicians. Not Fauci & Co. Not all the women and betas who breathlessly (sorry) lived every minute orgasming to the fear porn. Surely none of the little tinhorn dictators sprouting up like weeds all… Read more »

David_Wright
Member
Reply to  Chester White
6 months ago

So obvious I missed it.

Not that you are him but Chester White sounds like a Tiny Duck alias.
Haven’t seen him here for a good while, think the virus got him?

Chester White
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Still coughing.

John Smith
John Smith
Member
6 months ago

A good salesman will manage the manager.

Mine only got in the way and I thought nothing of pushing him aside when he got stupid and going right to the president of the company to get what I needed. I was not a popular guy in the office, but I got paid on commission, and what was good for me and the company was not good for the office people who saw me only has somebody who only threw more work on their desks. Looking back at it… it was a toxic place to work.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

Aren’t most? Well set to music by the dB’s “Working for Somebody Else” (lyrics)
http://thedbs.com/lyrics/som_working_for_somebody.html

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
6 months ago

Would add that increasing complexity brings increasing narrowness of expertise. If I listened only the IT guys, would spend hundreds of millions on technology–since more tech “solves” all problems. But if I listened to the finance guys–I’d never make any investment since riding what you have to ground produces the best cash flow. The actuaries can give me a perfect view of what happened in the past decade, but not the future. And don’t get me wrong all these guys are brilliant. But narrow. What our “expert-ocracy” lacks are good shot-callers. I think you are seeing that in spades right… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  SamlAdams
6 months ago

“If I listened only the IT guys…But if I listened to the finance guys…”

A soyboy, a goy, and a Rabbi walk into a Starbucks….sure there’s a joke in there.

tristan
tristan
6 months ago

I would extend this and point out that perhaps the incentives on the inside are perfectly clear. Its just to us they look opaque.

This asymmetry produces a lot of the confusion as to why certain things happen. They look nonsensical to our incentives but are perfectly rational to those who have a hidden reward system of supra-national organization positions and graft kickbacks. Just becaase you do not see the chairman’s stock option deal, does not mean the whole company is not targeted to this end.

Dave
Dave
Reply to  tristan
6 months ago

Financial elites have been pretty open about wanting to reboot the global economy for years. They are using this “crisis” to attempt exactly that, but not all factions are on board. Major moves are being actualized behind the scenes, and most of us will never know exactly what happened until the UBI is rolled out or we all go cashless or Bill Gates demands we all get vaccinated with his special digital markers, but we should be prepared for a rough ride as various power players make their moves. We all knew this day was coming, but you can never… Read more »

theRussians
theRussians
Member
Reply to  Dave
6 months ago

Many years ago, I had all my assets frozen by my ex’s lawyer for 6 months. since then I have been busy squirreling it away as a single fella. I still work a part time job that covers all the bills but have been essentially retired for almost 6 years now, somewhat counting on my savings and pension to carry me to the end from whatever point I finally decide. I did not think that personal equity would ever see the chopping block, at least in my time. The move to go cashless and electronic, given time, would have me… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  theRussians
6 months ago

“I had all my assets frozen by my ex’s lawyer for 6 months.”

HOW THE F*CK IS THAT EVEN POSSIBLE

(Note to self: The judges. First, the judges.
How tf are gag orders even possible)

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  theRussians
6 months ago

Child support is something I’ve not had to pay, but I did work for several years in an office next to a computer that held a child support database 🙂 Good citizens tend to think that anyone who won’t pay support must be a heartless heel. This is often true of course, but overlooks the many people who WISH they could pay the full amount but simply CAN’T, at least if they are allowed anything to live upon. This problem will only get worse now with the recess/depress-ion underway. When a man (or woman) has lost his job and has… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Incentives matter.

The hard part is figuring what motivates people. With salespeople, it’s fairly obvious. With others, it’s more difficult. Regardless, where most people (and bosses) fail is in assuming that other people are motivated by what motivates them.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Citizen; Of course you are right that incentives matter. But even to salesmen it isn’t *only* money that incentivizes. Back before the Powerskirts showed up and wrecked everything, we found that we got more bang for the incentive buck by having a fancy trip to a tropical location, with wives, in winter and a plaque to hang in the office forever. Seems that they ordinarily blew through their bonus in about a week with only a paid-up new furniture set to show for it. Or worse yet, they merely got to clean up the credit card balances so they could… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Al from da Nort
6 months ago

we found that we got more bang for the incentive buck by having a fancy trip to a tropical location, with wives, in winter and a plaque to hang in the office forever. Can be done for a lot less. Back in the day when we had civilization, it was quite common for Danish companies to stop work an hour early on Fridays and have beer on the company tab. This was usually done on an office-by-office basis, so you’d rarely have more than 15-20 people, and it was understood as a forum for generalized observation and venting about the… Read more »

UFO
UFO
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

Replaced with diversity seminars and (((team building exercises))).

Not that you’d actually want to hang out with your colleagues these days. Diversity tends to ruin things.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Al from da Nort
6 months ago

Al, it was a regular and well known thing in the sales/trading teams that bosses would encourage young guys to buy (finance) into the ‘lifestyle’ early on. This meant stretching for that fancy car, high rent or mortgage, expensive suits (back when they wore them) etc. because they knew that a lot of money moved thru those guys and they didn’t want them getting ‘soft’ or complacent. Instead, they wanted them strapped with debt, totally dependent on that job and its outsized earning capacity. Bonus and promotion season was when you were expected to purchase-up into the next rung, leverage-up… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Citizen – The founders of what started as a small business where my husband works are really into the “We’re a family and we’re in this together” thing, and trot it out every Christmas, although my husband no longer recognizes 75% of the people at the party. The salary structure is deliberately opaque, the sales incentives have been replaced by annual goals, and after ‘x’ number of years the employee gets a nice plaque and pat on the back. My view of them might charitably be described as how Bob Cratchit’s wife viewed Scrooge.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

My old company had reserved parking for managers. One year they took it away, and a coworker of mine, who had a great spot by the door, complained about it for 10 years. Even in years with great bonuses he complained.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  DLS
6 months ago

Having a defined place is important to people. Losing that legibility leads to all sorts of existential angst. Even if his spot was further away, the fact that it was *his* was something.

Member
6 months ago

Self interest is different from selfishness. Sales makes the world go round. The natural inclination seems to be that any achiever will insulate themselves from unwanted or unwarranted control by others. Salesmen seem to be some of the best at limiting outside control. They are in control until they’re not. When you have your head up and your helmet on temporary loss of control is no big deal. You roll with the punches. Be prepared. A teaching learned in Scouts. Everyone’s deal is different. Let your conscience be your guide. If you have one.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  JMDGT
6 months ago

I had mine removed to make room for all my sarcasm 🙂

Bill_Mullins
Member
6 months ago

Be prepared for breadlines this summer. Hell! We’ve got the damned things around here NOW! The local food bank is giving away groceries and people are queueing up (in their vehicles and masked/gloved, of course) for free food. Not sure what folks’ll do come summer when we’ve been released from house arrest and many small businesses have closed permanently. Sidebar: I spend my days driving around delivering food. Some of the things I see make me so sad I almost want to weep. Two examples: 1. Parks/playgrounds closed. The playground equipment is wrapped in police tape. 2. As I drove… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

But the stock market is doing great!

Investors are betting that the fed and Congress can fix this mess with unlimited money. They better be right because if this doesn’t work, there’s nothing left to stop the crash. As I mentioned above, the fed and Congress have done the equivalent of a general bringing up his reserves. If they fail to hold, the battle is over.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Seriously, this is just getting comical. The Fed can now buy junk bonds. Junk bonds. The Fed is back-stopping everything. What could wrong.

The market is rallying, but it should be afraid. If all of this works, the upside is fairly limited, but if it doesn’t, the downside is huge. Asymmetrical bet.

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Agreed. How would you define, or what would be an example of an ‘asymetrical bet’? Short selling?

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
6 months ago

Yikes. Short selling is brutal. You have to be a master to enter that world. To me, the current stock market is an asymmetrical bet. The S&P is back up to almost 2800. It’s peak was just under 3400. I highly doubt that it will hit it’s former high anytime soon. I mean, there will be some sort of recession and thus lower earnings. Therefore, at best, the market could rise another 10%, maybe 15%, and for that to happen, you need to near perfect V-shaped recovery. However, if people lose confidence in the Fed or the economic news is… Read more »

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Good advice. Thanks. I don’t have the stomach to play in the short sell game.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
6 months ago

Other than my iffy suggestion to obtain loans or grants during the crisis and … just hold on to the money dispensed, all I can offer is: In my current pathetic stock speculations, I have been waiting to buy in to (so far) either a few shale oil producers, but only near the recent crash lows — OR — (newest hatched plot), wait to buy into a ETC that shorts oil after a run-up (e.g. near its pre-crash high). Between the two, I recommend swilling at the public trough. It has become the default way to make a living in… Read more »

Dave
Dave
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

I think, and fear, that the real power players want a crash, which would give them the room to move in and institute the kind of sweeping changes the financial elites have been discussing for years.
The virus may be a random act of nature, but there is nothing random about the draconian measures officials have taken in response to it.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

I’ve lightly toyed with the idea of getting in line for a “business loan” or whatever type of Federal largesse is in the chute. Mind you, I’m not advocating fraud. I don’t even own a business.* Usually there are hoops to jump through. Point being: a lot of people will be carrying away buckets of money that they won’t ever pay back. The smartest ones will be those who aren’t even legally obligated to pay back.AIG, Goldman, whoever this time is raiding the FED. You might as well get a piece of the pie while they’re indiscriminately giving it away.… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

A great stock market, right now, creates an additional perverse result. Capital will flood into stocks instead of small businesses. Why take a risk in a small business with tight margins, when you can score big and easily in the markets?

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Dutch
6 months ago

Who is even going to want to open a small business after this?

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Dutch
6 months ago

This whole fuc$ing thing will likely be a boon to big corps and a killer for small businesses. Big corporations have far more money to weather this storm. The dumb big corps that don’t have cash can quickly and easily get a flood of money from the Fed to get through this. Small businesses will either get nothing or much less. Big corps will own a lot more of the economy after all of this is over.

The Right Doctor
The Right Doctor
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Small businesses are free associations. They are battalions in the battle against globalism. They must die.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Dutch
6 months ago

Don’t overlook my comments above. In a crisis the government wants to be savior to everybody. That will mean dispensing cash to anyone with a “need” of whatever plausibility. Now, the small business is the one that usually gets screwed. The big business doesn’t want you as competition, but will gladly buy out your assets when you fail. The bank could care if you live or die, but especially if the government is guaranteeing everything, will give you loans on some terms. An unprincipled man might see if “small business” really required any proof that such a business exists, if… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Depends on the lucidity of those in power. I read that Hitler, in his last days in Berlin, was issuing orders to brigades that no longer existed. 🙁 You can say he was an evil man deserving of his fate, but the morally righteous are no less immune to the “lost our minds” problem.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

Anecdotally I offer: in my area one local church’s “food pantry” limited the field to those who could prove limited income/disabled (SSI/whatever); even with that restriction had to turn away would-be beggars. And this was well before the coronavirus. I don’t know the current status of the food pantry because my own organization’s use of the church is suspended due to regulations. Even if the gibs is allowed by the law, I wonder what organization would brave the potential lawsuits due to the epidemic? In the rush to be the savior of all, one thing I have heard nary a… Read more »

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
6 months ago

>>>The stone-heads on our side cheering the crisis and demanding managed health care and a managed economy will soon find out what that really means. Enjoy the bread lines.><<

Name names, damnit!

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

Erik Striker says, persuasively, that every economy is managed, it’s just a question of whether the managers are visible or hidden.

That’s an interesting question to pose to Z and those of like mind: Has there ever been an economy that wasn’t managed?

Of course, there are degrees of economic management, so maybe Z just wants an economy as unmanaged as possible?

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
6 months ago

A system that provided for autocracy when necessary (e.g. the Roman dictatorship) and had practical kludges to balance the system’s rough-edges of “principle” (e.g. the Roman Tribunate) would be preferable to either a fully-planned economy or muh invisible hand.

Balance. A Third Position.

I’d rather have an overt authoritarian state than a covert pretend-democratic oligarchic state.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Given that all economies are regulated, is our current USA economy managed as well?

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Example: the referee in a WWF cage match

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
6 months ago

Z’s plucked the low-hanging fruit – that’s why mentioning Striker here is a waste of time. He’s had bad takes before, QED.

Does Scandinavian-level socialism = regulated, or is it managed? What and where are the color-bands on the spectrum running from no-private-property-rights state-ownership Communism to laissez-faire capitalism?

You can’t answer those questions without some “Talmudry,” as Z uncharitably terms “nuance.” Talmudry = nuance in bad faith.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

FTR, I don’t agree with NazBols or Tankies in general for all that they have some good takes.

For all that China = America is an inapt or inept analogy though, America’s outcomes are certainly rigged at this point. We crossed into stage-managed exploitative despotism some time ago, semantics aside.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I’ll agree to disagree, Z – some “middle-men” are more equal than others and the Tribe in particular is willing to take economic damage to advance an anti-White agenda – Woke Capital for instance.

One reason I don’t think we’re in a stage-managed hoax right now is the extent of the damage and destabilization. This isn’t serving elite interests anymore. Jews aren’t that magical.

There are legit questions as to whether the overall response has been an overreaction, shambolic, etc… but the idea that the virus itself is a hoax is Alex Jones territory.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Middlemen, mandarins, out of touch, incompetent, delusional, larpy, bored. Lots of sci-fi out there. It’s a real virus, just not the plague we’ve been told.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Again, two things can be simultaneously true. The severity and threat of Coronavirus was a stage-managed hoax but the response has been unexpectedly destabilizing and damaging and shambolic. The Cloud People are heavily invested in China and knew soon after this first erupted how lethal and infectious the virus was (easily spread and not terribly more lethal than regular flu). Whether that information was obtained through government intelligence services or private business contacts is irrelevant. A decision was made to play up the virus via the propaganda organs and create enough economic uncertainty that the public would accept the power… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

Deleted
This is top tier stuff, lads

Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I would contend that things like affirmative action are certainly “A set of outcomes enforced by the state”. Our government also desires the outcome of having a strong military and so funds that deliberately. There’s also the massive funding of “higher education” which produces the highly managed result of millions of credentialed fools indoctrinated in Leftist ideology and props up a massive academic-industrial complex which wouldn’t exist without this subsidy. I see regulation more as things like pollution standards, and rules that affect insurance, banking, corporate governance, etc…

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
6 months ago

Has there ever been an economy that wasn’t managed?

Free markets stop where companies begin – it’s not like employees get to vote on their boss.

Chester White
Reply to  LineInTheSand
6 months ago

Somalia. They last bastion of laissez faire capitalism.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

Managed economy, planned economy, regulated economy, quasi-market economy… This entire article and thread is reminiscent of Spencer carrying on about imperium after he had been completely de-platformed and couldn’t organize a bowling team. We’ve always had a mixed economy and we always will. Different castes evolved and organized their politics, their social arrangements, their economics and their religion differently. If we ever return to normal we will do so again. Whites have almost no institutional power. The dissident movement has zero. Our job is to get as many whites to become aware of group interests as possible. That means a… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

S’okay. I don’t follow the soaps anyways.
Just the one show that I can’t miss.

Exile
Exile
Member
6 months ago

“Of course, the stone-heads will argue that destroying the civil life of the country is the price to be paid for discrediting the current order. That may be true, but that does not mean the people cheering it will suddenly be vaulted to the top by the people being made to pay the price for this disaster.” Fair-weather dissidents will argue that pulling punches is the price of good optics. That may be true, but that does not mean the people cheering them now won’t resume kicking them once this disaster is over. And their trophy case will still be… Read more »

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Tell me how fighting on Shlomo’s side will lead us to victory?

You said just yesterday that the collapse of the Soviet Union is our best-case scenario (a statement I wholeheartedly agree with). When that comes, people will look to those who were on record against the discredited old order. Better to endure the temporary pain of standing on an unpopular position now.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

Tell me how I’m “fighting on Shlomo’s side.”

As for standing up for unpopular positions, Meme, how has that worked out for Conservatism for the last 50 or so years? I remember when populism wasn’t a dirty word here.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Supporting Shlomo’s biggest hoax since the Hall of Cost would certainly be serving Shlomo’s interests, wouldn’t it? Trump got elected on a National Populist platform, so clearly there’s an audience for it. “Populism” is fighting for what the little guy knows to be true, but is afraid to say. The little guy knows this whole PLANdemic “crisis” is phony. He’ll be more receptive to that message coming from a normal-looking person, not a slovenly lummox wearing the insignia of a nation his grandfather fought to defeat. Meet people where they are at, and bring them to our side. Pace, then… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

Talk about Magic Jew theory, Meme. Let’s game this out a bit. If Shlomo has hoaxed us into a panic, we’re supposed to fight him with our capital-T Truth which will be so self-evident and persuasive that Chad & Becky will flock to our banners post-hoax b/c Logos – or simply Deus Vult? 1. Speak Truth 2. ??? 3. Ethno-state. Show your work. Hint – 2 needs to include proving that this was a “hoax.” 70% of the public doesn’t consider this a hoax. And stop fitting me for a Nazi suit, Meme. It’s a weak straw man, particularly where… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

“Hint – 2 needs to include proving that this was a “hoax.”

Absent dead bodies are proving sufficient proof as this goes along. Making a link to “who” is a bit more difficult but may not matter.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Wait, so you don’t think this is a hoax? Have you not been reading Z’s columns for the past month?

Your statements above seem to be based on the premise of winning some grand, glorious victory, either at the ballot box or of the Tricorner Hat variety. Neither is going to happen.

Right now, our goal is to wake people up and create opportunities. Being clear, concise, and consistent against this madness is the best option available.

But if you think supporting GloboHomo’s fake and gay PLANdemic is a viable option, I’m all ears as to why that would be.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

Meme – hoax or overreaction/panic with our enemies making the most of the crisis? There’s a huge difference between the two, both in fact and as effective memes.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

C’mon, “overreaction/panic with our enemies making the most of the crisis” is literally what a hoax is. Assuming otherwise is allowing them to hold frame and control the language.

GloboHomo is too smart to invent things out of thin air….All of their lies are built on some kernel of reality.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Adolf? Really? You’re trying to make this personal and I’m not taking the bait.

Is this where I’m supposed to fly off the handle and start rage-sperging to prove your straw man?

No thanks.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I’m maintaining my sense of humor in the face considerable static this morning, Z – not raging, no worries. You’re the one who pivoted to 1.0 in a serious tone – it’s not as if I’m not justified in doubting your jocular intentions when you go Godwin on me.

I spent 20+ years hearing Jon Stewart do his clown-mask vs. news-mask routine. I’m a product of a low-trust environment.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago
Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Enoch’s big on the National Bank idea. I look at that like healthcare – proles should have a national bank for prole-level checking, bills etc… with private options – a parallel market. Dirt People customers have no leverage or advocacy in the present banking system.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

A National Bank? I can’t imagine who’d control that!

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

We’re posting Stormer links now, Meme? You want to drag all of this over here really bad, don’t you?

Enjoy the trolling and in-fighting. On-side agitation isn’t my thing.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Care to read it and tell me where Anglin is mistaken?

Again, all ears…

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Glass-Steagal repeal was a huge boondoggle for Them and another knee-capping for Us. I don’t think we’ll ever get those horses back in the barn, though.

Let’s give minimum wage guys a National Bank option more like credit unions used to be. And rev the credit unions up again. Anything that forces more options than cartel Big Banking – probably our biggest single obstacle beyond media in terms of institutions rather than tribes.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

The split was retail/commercial v investment banking.
The former cash and loans etc. The latter Stocks and Bonds and ownership transactions etc.
Slick Willie fucked it up.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I’ve worked for big banks with commercial/wealth/retail divisions. The Retail division is the redheaded stepchild that nobody wants to deal with. A necessary part of the organization so they can pretend to care about customers, and a good source of cash to tap for ‘reserve ratios’ (the loans themselves are made with magic money), but the leaders of the org really want to go where the big money is – mid/large companies, institutions, and the financial markets. Retail wise, you’re better off in most ways with your money in a credit union.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Jew-Jitsu. I’m stealing that.

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

The only way I ever see a realistic possibility of the current order being replaced by something better is if the populations complacency with it is seriously disrupted, it doesn’t matter if people don’t like the current rulers, nothing will change. People have to absolutely abhor the current rulers for anything to really catalyze. “Cheering” I am not, rather I see silver lining in that a possible opportunity is arising in the midst of all this tumult. I hate being stuck at home as much as anybody else. I’m just okay with paying the price of a bit of pain… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

When you think about it, being stuck at home with hot running water, a/c, netflix, and Cheetos is about the best damn war ever.

And delivery! Pizza is so 80s.

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

So this begs the question, how then will things change? Because on our current trajectory even home confinement, draconian measures, and crushing unemployment are not enough to get Joe Normie off the couch. This on TOP of the various slings & arrows we’ve suffered for the past few decades to normalcy, privacy, freedom, rights, etc. I’m a very straight line logic type so forgive me for being obtuse but if the current situation isn’t causing mass defections to ‘our thing’ what further abuse will? Contra-that, a full reset may very well do that. I am a burn it down guy,… Read more »

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  Apex Predator
6 months ago

None of the effects are being felt yet. Joe Normie is currently sitting on his couch watching netflix like a nerd on summer vacation.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  FashGordon
6 months ago

This isn’t quite true. Hell 1/3 of people refused to pay rent this month already and layoffs are at crazy town levels. Starvation and deep hunger haven’t set in but I’d argue a lot of people are deeply upset and restive. I hear fairly sane people indulge low grade chatter about the purge already. Its dumb as hell but its kind of a metaphor for cleaning house and Z-Poc and all that Thus far a few weeks have been managed well enough for such a brittle economy and a better idea hasn’t percolated through the system so might as well… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Who said anything about Hamback or any other 1.0 larper, Z? They make great straw men though, I’ll say that for them.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

That reminds me. Alexander Cockburn, a raging Trotsyite, was for unknown reasons a go to op-ed writer for right-center dailies maybe fortyish years back. Yet twice in twenty or so years that I read him he made the correct call; more remarkable since no one else did, or dared to anyway. The one I remember was the day care child sex ring witch trials. He was first out of the gate to call it as it was and for quite a while the only one.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  james wilson
6 months ago

JW, Counterpunch would publish stuff no one else would – including Schanberg’s “Tokyo Rose McCain” stuff that cross-posted at Unz, IIRC. AC & Chris Hitchens seemed cut from the same red cloth. Enemy of my enemy on occasion, but never more adjacent to my interests than Bradley Manning was.

Avery
Member
Reply to  james wilson
6 months ago

Slight correction. Cockburn was a Stalinist, not a Trotskyist. Maybe that’s why Cockburn was right every couple of years or so while the neocons/ Christopher Htichenses of the world – Trots – were never right.

Z Listener
Z Listener
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I wanted to complement you on the recent podcast about plagues. That taught me, as a healthcare professional, quite a lot. It was a nice change of pace.

FashGordon
FashGordon
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

That thing was horribly planned, they should have stopped after the torch march. I was hearing right wing normies all over the place talking about how we finally have white people standing up for themselves that night… It was really uplifting to see the huge outpouring of public sentiment in our favor… but then the morning circus happened… five steps forward and twenty steps back. Also, if they were going to protest something I can think of at least a dozen better issues to rally around. How about affirmative action? What about refugee resettlement? What about forced busing? How about… Read more »

BTP
Member
6 months ago

Been building models for big companies for a while, now. Because I’m weird, I fought against the most important lesson for a long time. It’s this: the least important thing about building models is that they be correct. Amusing example. I worked at an institution that was looking to reduce fraud with debit cards. Rather than, like, make better models, they just tightened up the rules. So, our call center guys were wondering what the hell was driving all this new call volume and the answer was that they had made it so that, if a customer went to the… Read more »

Alzaebo
6 months ago

“Whether it is managed economies or managed health care,”

That’s my vote.
That’s what I think we’re being herded into-
the dole and NHS, regardless of what the smart set says about UBI or ‘socialized medicine’.

5G automation looms over the Internet of Things.
“Nationalized” sectors? Multinats are gonna turn away the gibs and a free hand?

Long on Jolly Roger Inc.
They’ll make us beg.

You offer a bag of candy- Trump- you snatch it away, and then say, “okay, you can have one piece, if you’re good, you might get two.”

Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

Born into a soft world, I wanted to leave in one. Still, I must admire the leadup: lockdown conditioning, starting with Virginia Tech, Boston Bombers, Parkland, and now a repo blowup *cough* Corona *cough*.

The missus thinks this was supposed to be a controlled burn to eliminate some old, sick Chinese deadwood- they have pension problems too-, but it jumped the fence and caught the whole forest on fire.

So the governors saw their chance.
Like a dark mirror Magna Carta.
No more Yellow Vest silliness, you schlubs.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

This shut-down is absolutely destroying the private hospital system (might be what the pay-walled NY Times story was about). With all routine and elective medical care on hold, hospitals are furloughing staff and hemorrhaging money.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Drake
6 months ago

Its not like we can make basic drugs or many supplies anyway. We have a medical system so long as the Chinese think we ought to.

Truth is we need reform, some kind of private/public hybrid has been shown to work elsewhere, give very good results and cover more people a lot cheaper.

The financialized system we have now provides bad results and high costs and needs to go.

We also need to make stuff we need here and control immigration
for a real fix but good luck getting that.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
6 months ago

” The choice is always between clarity and opacity. When the incentives are clear and individual interests are clear, everyone makes better decisions and demands more rational sacrifice.” ——— I had always assumed this was an underlying principle for most people in the dissident movement at least at the group level. The fracture in the movement seems to be more about what is meant by “rational” sacrifice. The reaction to Corona has given us a gift. Clarity is beginning to shine through the cracks in the opacity. One group see the cracks as enough the other wants to shatter the… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Yves Vannes
6 months ago

All of that. We’re stuck with the pain, we may as well make some gains. It’s what Leftists do – and how they always win against guys who won’t fight on their level.

Chad Hayden
Chad Hayden
Reply to  Yves Vannes
6 months ago

I was kind of excited about that bill when I first heard about it. I had actually forgotten about it since nothing had materialized…going to pay out in September…what a joke

Horatio
Member
Reply to  Yves Vannes
6 months ago

Plus, the 2 camps are only arguing about what to root for rather than what to do.
Watch Asha Logos latest video on The Phoenix Project and join a group of doers. For every 5 hours you spend posting, you can spend 1 doing.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  Horatio
6 months ago

In a sane world he would have his own parking space at a major studio.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
6 months ago

“When the incentives are clear and individual interests are clear” There are no incentives for those who remain funded from the Magic Money Bag regardless of circumstances and outcomes. If an axe got taken to government jobs, there would be an instant revolt of the Mandarins and the system would collapse. Hence, the Cloud People have every incentive to keep those particular people in place and happy. It is obviously untenable. Watch for the day the private jets take off for Auckland one last time. That will mean the Managerial Class is about to see their checks bounce. It probably… Read more »

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
6 months ago

Perhaps too early for the millenium award, but the Darwin Award for this century must surely be shared by our very own Stone Heads / Cloud People. Impossible to single out any one individual who has contributed to human evolution by selecting themselves and everyone else out of the gene pool via death or sterility by their actions – you take your pick.

Epaminondas
Member
6 months ago

And of course one of the reasons why government is inherently bad is because of the hidden agendas which lie within each bureaucracy. Featherbedding goes along with government. Because of this opacity, those of us being managed never really grasp the reasoning behind so many pointless, arcane rules. For a bureaucrat, meaningless complexity is a virtue.

Z Listener
Z Listener
6 months ago

What is a “stone head?”

stone heads
stone heads
Reply to  Z Listener
6 months ago

Stone heads are ideological lunkheads who get to celebrate chaos and starvation because they’re personally comfortable and insulated from the fallout, like the TRS guys. Just like the dissident left in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, it’s easy for a certain wing of the dissident right to fantasize about and cheerlead system collapse because they’re comfortable and insulated from the shock. They DO acknowledge the immense pain that the white working poor will have to go through, but to them it’s all worth it for the abstract goal of collapsing the system. They’ve also acknowledged system collapse won’t… Read more »

Z Listener
Z Listener
Reply to  stone heads
6 months ago

Is it a known expression or something z made up?

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Z Listener
6 months ago

I always thought my friend Bob made it up in the summer of ’93 when he said, “I’m stoneder than I thought I was.”

Pete
Pete
Reply to  Z Listener
6 months ago

A stone head is characterized by a Tourette’s-like syndrome causing the stone head to repeatedly blurt out “stonks”, “money machine go brrrrrr”, “big line go”, “gay op”, “muh conomy” and a variety of other meaningless mouth noises.

Tyler, the Portly Politico
6 months ago

Another insightful post, Z. I’ve never worked sales (a deficiency, I’m learning; I’ve been a teacher most of my adult life, so I know a lot of trivia), but I’ve had plenty of bad managers. I wrote a post with a similar angle the other day, “The Tyranny of Experts”: https://theportlypolitico.wordpress.com/2020/04/07/the-tyranny-of-experts/ The piece definitely owes a great deal to your writing and analysis, particularly one of your recent posts about the myopia of medical professionals, who fail to acknowledge—or simply don’t care to acknowledge—there are trade-offs involved in shutting down the entire country to fight a slightly nastier version of… Read more »

Lorenzo
Lorenzo
6 months ago

Good one, ZMan. Really good.

Tacitus
Tacitus
6 months ago

Can’t forget those utopians and central planners who benefit ideologically. Advancing this agenda to it’s ill fated conclusion gives them hope that their personal life choices are valid. Vicarious secular salvation.

The DC area, particularly Montgomery county, is full of those types. These are also the types (personality archetype) who clamored for communist revolution, and as Yuri explained, are the first ones lined up against a wall and shot. The truest believer turns into the most bitter cynic. This is a weapon that we should learn to take advantage of.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
6 months ago

Re the linked Federalist article: While insightful, the author missed the biggest reason the PPP has and will fail, an omission that shows although The Federalist remains edgy for a conservative site, it is still cucky. I have seen upfront that most of these federal non-Cloud People bailouts are targeted towards populations likely to riot, a sort of reverse-redlining. An assumption is made that the melanin-deficient for the most part will not apply and dutifully mouth the pulling-up-by-the-bootstraps inanities. Well, Hell’s bells, guess who showed up for tea this time by the millions? Mnuchin didn’t see that one coming and… Read more »

Trapped on Clown World
Trapped on Clown World
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

The Federalist, like every single Conservative Inc site, is nothing more than a gatekeeping operation. Do you ever wonder how these places make money? They have almost no advertising, no subscribers since everything is freely accessible, and a seemingly endless rotation of 20-something writers.

The NYT’s has subscribers, the WaPo has Bezos, HuffPost has advertisers. I’m baffled as to the existence of places like the Federalist, National Review, American Conservative, etc.

UFO
UFO
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

Are you suggesting that whites have showed up for welfare in the millions?

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

White owned businesses have shown no qualms about going after the helicopter money being distributed through the SBA whether they need it or not. They should go after it, it is their taxes being given away over a business shutdown they had no input into getting. During the 2008 crisis many of these businesses didn’t want to participate in government handout programs unless it was a matter of their survival. Now they understand the system is breaking down and they are trying to get what they can before it is all gone.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Barnard
6 months ago

It’s exactly what is happening, Barnard. PPP wasn’t designed for that contingency. Whites jumping at gibs has the corporate cuck types panicked in a way the virus certainly doesn’t.

And, yes, whites need to put their feet on the Magic Money accelerator. Next round will likely be mean-tested in a way to make sure they can’t.

UFO
UFO
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

We have good teachers. The non-whites the cloud people have imported have taught us how to be pigs at the gibs trough as well. Are they going to explicitly ban whites from gibs next time? That would be a ballsy move.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

Don’t discount the Clouds’ Mandarins easily could be that explicit. My guess is certain zip codes and addresses are going to the front of the line even now. Anyone seen a black or Hispanic owner on the tube bitching about no gibs? I haven’t.

The easiest way to burn the system is to follow the vibrants’ lead on gibs even though it will require some creativity. All the squalling in Congress now over adding Magic Money to the PPP is because whites got or tried to get on the gravy train. It’s glorious.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

The assumption was that Y/T was wealthy enough to pay for welfare that most of them would never use until they were rather old. Well decades of societal mismanagement and wage arbitrage has led to a situation where that is no longer the case Along comes this crisis now we are borrowing half the GDP in one stroke to keep the economy from a deflation spiral. If we were smart we’d buffer the very basics and allow (paraphrasing the late Treasure Secretary Mellon here) the rottenness to be purged from the system but the rich would be wiped out and… Read more »

The Right Doctor
The Right Doctor
6 months ago

In today’s innumerate world, the numerator makes the headline but the denominator misses the deadline. I’ve been screaming headlines saying 10,000 DEAD. More people than that die every day in this country of stuff too boring to mention.

This is an update on the ratio of WuFlu deaths to date to influenza deaths in an average year (389K), worldwide. If it reaches 1.0 then we’ll truly have a new flu-class killer on our planet.

Today’s ratio:
4/9/20 0.23

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  The Right Doctor
6 months ago

I should have added this to my other comment on models, but I will talk about the so-called, ‘data,’ being touted in this situation. It’s hot garbage. The numerator is too large and the denominator is far too small. The CDC has issued marching orders to mark just about every death as, ‘CV-19.’ The testing regime in place is laughable. It is under-counting by at least an order of magnitude. It’s also certain that NYC is purposefully overcounting deaths to feed the media narrative. Then, as you mentioned, the way the media touts the numbers is designed to create maximum… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
6 months ago

I’m not sure the extent to which Big Media is “managed,” but it has been readily apparent to me from the beginning of this fiasco, that the media was never remotely concerned with telling the truth about CV. Rather, they sensed a financial mother lode, the Story of the Century. So they manufactured it. They took a novel virus with a pedestrian mortality rate and transmogrified it into the Black Death, all to fatten their accursed wallets. The image we’re receiving about the “Pandemic,” is not a true bill; it is a wildly distorted caricature. But reality doesn’t sell; Armageddon… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
6 months ago

And just think, OK, of all those coronavirus vaccine TV ads and the revenue they’re going to bring in. This gift will be giving into perpetuity, especially since the vaccines are probably going to become mandatory. Good thing, since the consumer item ads are going to be a thing of the past.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Of course!

Why do you think the media is totally uninterested in the hydroxychloroquine treatment success stories being reported all over the US and the globe?

Hell, Algeria, a country that normally moves at a pace between a glacier and a snail, is reporting success with hydroxy and has ordered enough to treat 325,000 cases.

Meanwhile in the US, this known drug needs years of controlled studies and the focus is on developing an expensive wonder vaccine that is a fool’s errand because we already know vaccines are not effective against coronavirii.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

Wild Geese – As an aside, Dr. Birx’s daughter just happens to work for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. They’re all in bed together and all in on this whole thing. Regardless of whether it was planned or an accident, I think we can all agree they’ve not let a crisis go to waste and have big plans for us all.

Alzaebo
Reply to  3g4me
6 months ago

Dr. Birx’s biggest priority before the spotlight was American taxpayers providing circumcisions for millions of Africans.
Maybe they had an outbreak of Onanism or something.

Now you know how she got the national spotlight.

(ps- white women didn’t invent radical feminism, either.)

bilejones
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

The story so far.
The corrupt banks were bankrupt.
There was an outbreak of flu, not many dead.
The media turned the outbreak of flu into a plague.
The politicians shut down the economy to combat the plague.
The economy entered the greatest depression.
Tens of millions lost their jobs in 4 weeks.
The unemployment rate hit 40%.
The Fed threw $trillions at the banks to “combat the great depression”.
Between 8-12% of Fed money trickled down to main st.
The banks were bailed out.
The depression continued for a generation.

Not missing anything so far, am I?

tristan
tristan
Reply to  bilejones
6 months ago

The usual arc is then a massive meat-grinder war to get rid of the surplus and cement the position of those middlemen who are far too important to fight and must stay behind for the good of the country.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
6 months ago

It’s depressing to think we could be led by Joe Dementia Biden and nut job Kamala Harris and we all know Kamala will be our leader. But Trump is better in appearances to some of us but with incompetent results. I do think we are still red pilling though and unfortunately if this economic situation gets out of hand the red pilling will only grow. Bad for the nation but perhaps good for us? I don’t like rooting against the nation It’s still my nation in some ways. But Homo Economicus is the prevailing order. Until something changes that? Buckle… Read more »

NJ Person
NJ Person
6 months ago

In the realms of money and power, here is a suggested start to a cui bono list. 1. The media. Hysterias increase viewership and power. 2. Politicians. They now wield powers that Louis XIV and Marie Antionette would envy. 3. Health officials. They seem to be directing our entire society without any significant challenge. 4. Lawyers. As mentioned on Radio Derb, the attorneys never seem to lose. 5. Government workers. Their paychecks are guaranteed. Less clear are the effects on pensions which will require more borrowings for bailouts. 6. Corporations. Some like Amazon may well profit. Others may hold even.… Read more »

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  NJ Person
6 months ago

Old folks living off their savings and social security are big losers. Yesterday, I was in the local food store (suburban Boston) and the produce prices made my jaw drop, I think 33% average increase is rather an underestimation.

The Right Doctor
The Right Doctor
Reply to  tonaludatus
6 months ago

California produce-picking crews have been reduced to 1/2 or 1/3 of normal, spreading the workers out. (The machines generally accommodate a worker for each row of crops and are usually 30 rows wide.) Having workers every second or third row means the machine has to work ‘round the clock to get the same yield. A 33% increase in produce prices is just a down payment.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  The Right Doctor
6 months ago

Boo fucking hoo. If the crews were permanently reduced to one-third of “normal” the machines would be redisigned to make it up. They only reason that evolution isn’t furthered is abundant invader labor.

Mark Auld
Mark Auld
6 months ago

Who are these stoneheads on our side you are referring to who seem to be socialists? They did not cross the same Rubicon that I did.

Irishfarmer
Irishfarmer
6 months ago

One unexpected side effect of this “crisis” is that it incidentally revealed a lot about the character of a lot of people in the dissident camp. People i used to respect and follow obsessively, or at least just find interesting, have been discredited by this. I wont name names because thats gay, but i will say that i have more respect for Paul Ramsy now than i did a couple weeks ago. Its like theres this alternate reality people are living in where the entire country is on death’s doorstep and we need to accept anything no matter how ridiculous… Read more »

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Irishfarmer
6 months ago

Social media consumption has a lot to do with it. Our guys are not immune to the toxins, eg the incremental transition into feminized emo repeaters. This is amplified and accelerated when the already atomized daily life is almost completely siloed in these stay at home times. Stepping away is wise. I am heading out to hike around a lake.

Alzaebo
Reply to  Screwtape
6 months ago

Haha! Thanks, fellas, I needed that. Why?

I haven’t gone hiking or grilled or anything in years. Never saw TRS or Netflix.

I’m not going out to the lake, either.

Instead, I’m driving from L.A. to New Hampshire.

Felix Krull