The Spirit Of The Age

There are two general ways in which people follow the law. One group is careful to stay within the letter of the law. If there is any question about their compliance, they have well thought-out arguments about the precise meaning of each word and phrase within the law in question. The other group is concerned with the spirit of the law. They understand that language is not always precise, so they think about what the lawmakers intended when they crafted the specific law in question.

Both approaches, as is true of every human activity, are prone to corruption. The letter-of-the-law side will play fast and loose with the definition of words, often feigning ignorance about the meaning of common words. The famous sociopaths Bill and Hillary Clinton have always been fond of this. Bill famously challenged the meaning the word “is” in one of his depositions. This is probably the most extreme example of tactical nihilism ever committed. The Clintons were trail blazers.

Corrupting the spirit of the law is a tougher process. It requires the corrupt to recast history in order to mischaracterize the intentions of the lawmakers. The usual form this takes is another type of tactical nihilism, in which the corrupt claim the people who wrote the law never intended its current use. The gun grabbers like to play this trick when talking about what the Framers meant when the put the right to bear arms in the Bill of Rights. They simply lie about what can be easily confirmed.

Because restating the past is difficult, the corrupt tend to congregate in the letter-of-the-law end of the pool. We see that with the seditious conspiracy to overturn the 2016 presidential election. The people involved were wholly invested in finding loopholes and exceptions in the letter of the law. During the virus panic, some information has been declassified, showing how these guys parsed the law. Supposedly there is an investigation into all of this, but that is probably a myth.

The dynamic at work leading to this conspiracy was something like this. Someone high up in the Obama administration decided to use the surveillance agencies for domestic spying, which is in direct violation of the law. There’s a mountain of testimony from lawmakers, who crafted the laws creating these powers, that they were to never be used to spy on Americans. Even today, grammar school children are told that only despots spy on political opponents, so the intent of these laws is clear.

That’s why the Department of Justice, the FBI and the CIA have ignored the spirit of the laws and instead focus in the letter of the law. Like Bill Clinton warming up for a deposition, they pored over every word of the regulations in order to craft fraudulent warrants and court filings. They did so in a way that could allow them to muddy the waters if they got caught, by claiming simple errors of fact were just honest mistakes, not an effort to mislead the court and get around the law.

This is the nature of the subversive. The reason he focuses on the letter of the law is because he is at war with the spirit of the law. His first step in killing the law and what it represents is to strangle its spirit by denying it exists. First, he denies it in his mind then he denies in his actions. You see that with the FBI agents involved in the Spygate conspiracy. They hated that they could not spy on Americans, so they first denied they should not be doing it then found a way to do it.

This is not a unique to the FBI. It is just one of the many corrupt institutions in present day America. You see this hatred for the spirit of the law in the Senate’s conduct during the FBI scandal. They surely know the laws in question were never intended to be used as political weapons, but they don’t care about intent. From their perspective, the law is for the commoners they try hard to avoid. You’ll note that Richard Burr sits on that committee, the guy fond of trading on his insider information.

In The Spirit of the Law, Montesquieu observed that every form of government has a principle that motivates the citizenry. In despotic societies, it is fear of the ruler that inspires the people. In aristocratic societies it is the love of honor or the desire to attain greater rank and privilege that inspires the people. In republican societies, it is virtue that inspires the people. By virtue, he meant the willingness to put the interests of the community ahead of private interests. To sacrifice for the greater good.

Montesquieu can be forgiven for not anticipating the development of what we now call liberal democracy. Even the most radical mind of his age would have scoffed at the idea of giving women and criminals the franchise. They would have doubled over in fits of hysterical laughter at the assertion that all people are equal. They surely would have assumed you were mad if you suggested there were more than two sexes. Not so long ago, what we take for granted was beyond the realm of imagination.

Still, it is worth considering what it is that motivates the citizen in the liberal democracy, as it is certainly not virtue or honor. We see that with our public officials. They may seek rank and privilege, but only through the most craven and dishonorable means available to them. They are happy to sacrifice your interests for their greater good. In fact, the only time they work together is when it is time to siphon off more of your greater good in order to top off their tanks of greater good.

That leaves us with fear as the great motivator, but not fear of the despot. Instead, it is a fear of the law itself. Every new law brings new opportunities for the liberal democratic ruling elite to torment the public. Since words have no meaning and the spirit of the law is strangled in its crib, the law is whatever the ideological enforcers happen to think it means in any given moment. The public is left to the mercy of a ruling class filled with self-righteous anger at the people over whom they rule.

This is the spirit of our age, the liberal democratic age. The great fear of the law is actually a fear of order and stability. A hatred of it, in fact. The liberal democratic regime needs to feed its sense of necessity and it can only do so in a crisis, so it creates panics and emergencies. What we are seeing in this virus panic is the full flowering of liberal democracy. It is a world of the forever present, because it is without law and a world without order. It is a world with no tomorrow.


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Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
8 months ago

“When I use a word,” Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, “it means just what I choose it to mean—neither more nor less.”
“The question is,” said Alice, “whether you can make words mean so many different things.”
“The question is,” said Humpty Dumpty, “which is to be master—that’s all.”

Whitney
Member
Reply to  Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
8 months ago

I read Orwell’s Animal Farm yesterday. I don’t think I’ve read it before. It’s really more of a booklet than a book. You know he’s a great writer and he has some wonderful insights but he did think that there was an idyllic period that lasted for years after the totalitarians took over. And in The Road to Wigan Pier, he didn’t see any way out of the underclass class ever getting work ever again since war was totally out of the question. That was a 1938.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Whitney
8 months ago

I just (re)read it a few weeks ago. Here’s a joke for those who’ve read it, and not a spoiler for the dullards who send their days watching Netflix 🙂 Not only are the humans and pigs playing poker, but the government has decided that to make everybody happy, the entire deck shall consist of Ace of Spades.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
8 months ago

The Law is behind me, holding its knife.
The Law chose this.
The Law is behind me.

– The Rules of Engagement taught me the above. Every soldier of any rank who serves with me is told my rule of law; The Law is behind me.

The Law betrayed us, put it behind you.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector

Really Z, are you in mourning for the law?

That’s like mourning the passing of someone who tried to poison you but poisoned themselves.

I guess Mr. Z is a Protestant at Heart.
Having no Canon they tried to replace it with Law.

Which they then frivolously outsourced to the J-s.

I remain a Papist in exile, so I can only laugh. Speaking of the passing of poisoners. 🤣

“ The letter-of-the-law side”.

Side. Yeah, side. Sure.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

“The letter-of-the-law side”
“The spirit-of-the-law side”

Two sides of the same coin?

Irishfarmer
Irishfarmer

*cringe*

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout

Both canon and cannon have been problems of civilization. I’ve no idea if Zman is a lapsed member of the Church of Rome, but I remain suspicious that he does not post on Saturdays 😀

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

Seventh Day Adventist, perhaps?

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

“Be silent! Keep your forked tongue behind your teeth! I have not passed through fire and death to bandy crooked words with a witless worm.” – Gandalf

Your Grima… er, I mean gamma is showing again Dear Ben.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
8 months ago

In my youngster NormieCon days, I remember Rush saying “when the Clintons violate the letter of the law, they quote the spirit of the law, and when the violate the spirit of the law, they quote the letter of the law.”

Bigger picture for today….what incentive exists for any of the usual suspects NOT to do what’s described above? There isn’t one, and that’s how you know the system is broken and in need of replacement.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Reply to  MemeWarVet
8 months ago

The next tactic is to attack the character of the accuser and the final to threaten the accuser.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaedhiel
8 months ago

Then the step after that is where Ben Shapiro tells us to accept the accuser’s moral framing

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  MemeWarVet
8 months ago

IOW, sophistry. Sophistry permeates public discussion in the US and probably the English speaking world in general.

Really, the law is whatever they say it is. The courts completely ignore what the Constitution actually says and invent things the Constitution does not mention at all. This is mostly done by sophistry, word games.

Is it really a surprise that they do this when law is so heavily influenced by Jews who pride themselves on their verbal abilities?

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  tarstarkas
8 months ago

Yes, good point(s). Or to quote Browne more-or-less: “The government will change, repeal or ignore the law when it suits their purposes.” So will corporations and individuals especially if you add “when they can get away with it.” Disclaimer: the words above mean whatever I want them to mean, and the meaning may change without advance notice.” 🙂

DLS
DLS
8 months ago

This is why the left pushes the “living constitution” nonsense. The law means what they feel it should mean. It’s also why they use selective prosecution. One of the most dangerous realities to our side are Soros funded local prosecutors who ignore left-wing violence, but become Inspector Javert to every right-winger who defends himself.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  DLS
8 months ago

And yet CivNats continue to believe in their precious Constitution.

They really believe that its magic words will protect them.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
8 months ago

From Game of Thrones to Nancy Pelosi at the SOTU. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jvB_qGhyg_k

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  DLS
8 months ago

You should look up the current prosecutor of Philadelphia, Larry Krasner. A raving SJW whose campaign was funded by Soros. He campaigned on a criminal justice “reform” platform. This was not empty campaign rhetoric. He has utterly destroyed Philadelphia’s law enforcement abilities. His office refuses to press charges or lowers chargers and rarely seeks bail. Even before Coronachan was used an excuse to empty the prisons, the Philly county lockup was like 1/2 empty. I’ve seen stories of guys out on bail twice over (arrested, bail, arrested again while out on bail and given bail again) for violent gun crime… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  tarstarkas
8 months ago

I agree. It will only get worse as the white population decreases because the wealth disparity will look more and more unjust to these people.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  tarstarkas
8 months ago

“What insanity, unthinkable today will be the norm in 20 years?”

Provocative question. What is insanity today? White homelands? History is seldom linear.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  King Tut
8 months ago

Unfortunately, you can find quotes bemoaning the leftward movement of society every generation going back hundreds of years. The good stuff that is unthinkable today will likely be even more unthinkable in the future. Things are just way more likely to get worse than to get better.

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
8 months ago

Things are just way more likely to get worse than to get better.

That’s just entropy, AKA the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics as expressed in social systems. Over time, everything turns to shit.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  tarstarkas
8 months ago

“Unfortunately, you can find quotes bemoaning the leftward movement of society every generation going back hundreds of years.”

True indeed, but then what is “leftward” these days? My various chums from my lolbertarian days regard the concept of “white homelands” as entirely socialist and, hence, left-wing.

tristan
tristan
Reply to  King Tut
8 months ago

That is because they are to put it kindly dickheads.

Whitney
Member
8 months ago

Bill and Hillary Clinton might be the most famous sociopaths but that has definitely trickled down through the halls of power. I mean look at that loser bully Chris Como. He was caught out of his house when he was supposed to be quarantined, hanging with his family and another person, a police report was filed it made news and he still filmed his heroic emergence from his basement after his two-week quarantine sometime later. It boggles the mind really.

ChetRollins
ChetRollins
Reply to  Whitney
8 months ago

Trump’s “because you’d be in a jail” quip at the second debate won him the election because he was the first challenger to say the quiet part out loud.

Sandmich
Sandmich
8 months ago

so it creates panics and emergencies
— A smidge optimistic perhaps in thinking that they do this intentionally instead of constantly doing it accidentally through their own incompetence.

Drake
Drake
8 months ago

Even more than the law, people fear the LEGAL PROCESS these days. All the Constitutional guarantees of speedy fair trials are long forgotten. An arrest and prosecution on any felony (i.e. gun possession in New Jersey) probably means loss of job and bankruptcy just to cover the legal fees. They broke Michael Flynn on the wheel of legal process without any actual evidence.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Drake
8 months ago

Nay, that I mean to do. Is not this a lamentable thing, that of the skin of an innocent lamb should be made parchment? that parchment, being scribbled o’er, should undo a man? Some say the bee stings: but I say, ’tis the bee’s wax; for I did but seal once to a thing, and I was never mine own man since.

Naturally, the Lawyers have Re-Interpreted Shakespeare. – John Paul Stevens, “As a careful reading of that text will reveal, Shakespeare insightfully realized that disposing of lawyers is a step in the direction of a totalitarian form of government”

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  Drake
8 months ago

Yes. I point that I have made many times is that the process IS the punishment. Most people simply cannot afford the ruinous cost and disruption of defending themselves. Even if they are successful, they are still ruined. Of course, TPTB know this.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  King Tut
8 months ago

Many foreign countries have a “loser pays winner’s legal costs” system in place for civil torts, lawsuits and such. Sometimes with the requirement to post a bond. I would add criminal trials too. I think that is a great idea and it’ll be in my list when the new constitution is drawn up 🙂

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

Britain is one of those countries.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

Some states in the U.S. have similar rules. Unfortunately that doesn’t apply to criminal cases where cops and prosecutors can ruin you without any consequences to themselves.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  Drake
8 months ago

Drake, the same is true in Britain in criminal prosecutions. A judge does have the power to order the state to pay the successful Defendant’s costs but application is rare.

tristan
tristan
Reply to  Drake
8 months ago

What consequences. Even when such a thing occurs. The tax payers end up footing the cost. So in the end you are always paying for your own costs. Whether you win or not.

Police suffer consequences for false and perjured prosecutions so infrequently its an outlier at best.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

That ‘loser pays’ law has a lot of downside too. Imagine being hit by a car and then being forced to not only have to pay all your bills and legal fees, but paying the phony internally generated legal “bills” of the insurance company!

Or the kangaroo court that ruled against Tommy Robinson and forced him to have to pay the state’s internally generated “legal costs” after harassing him.

This system is even more ripe for abuse than our system.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  tarstarkas
8 months ago

“That ‘loser pays’ law has a lot of downside too.”

Correct. Most civil cases in Britain are a 50/50 proposition. The cost of losing is just catastrophic and most people are unwilling to risk that. Can’t say as I blame them.

The real problem is an inequality of arms. The British state or globohomo (but I repeat myself) has bottomless resources. Even if they lose, it’s just chump change to them. So they can afford to keep losing until they win.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

This won’t work since State assets vastly outweigh individual ones and the State can just beat you into the ground and than jail you till you pay for it, Also corporations can do the same, sue “big co” and they can spend limitless sums to see you destroyed and make you pay for it after. Real reform means changing laws, enforcing laws against cruel and usual punishment and for speedy fair trials a ban on plea bargains and probably a barrister system where you don’t know if you will be a prosecutor that case or a defense attorney. This will… Read more »

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  King Tut
8 months ago

I don’t know if you’re aware of it or not,but U.S.prosecutors have the HIGHEST CONVICTION RATE in the world. Even in nations ruled by dictators, prosecutors lose more than they do here. IMS, the U.S.Conviction rate is in excess of 95%.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
8 months ago

It’s largely a function of plea agreements. We’ll charge you with 3,000 years worth of offenses and you can roll the dice or you can plead guilty to three years.
There’s also the matter of gross imbalance in the Judges application of the law. If a prosecutor promises a snitch a reduced sentence, better visitation rights, etc that’s just fine. If a defense attorney offers a defense witness inducements that’s witness tampering.
The law is a tool of the State, not a defense against it.

Diversity Heretic
Member
Reply to  Drake
8 months ago

Mark Steyn has commented on something similar on the civil side, given the interminable defamatioo suit brought against him by some professor: “The process is the punishment.”

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
8 months ago

The other thing Steyn said, which I think applies, is, and he was talking in reference to something that world class scumbag Pierre Trudeau did/said- and I quote from memory- “ burning down barns isn’t wrong because it’s illegal, it’s illegal because it’s wrong “.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
8 months ago

A good example of this is that White Christian baker in the USA (Colorado, I think) who is pretty much under constant siege by the forces of globohomo. He is eventually vindicated but so what? The point is not achieve any sort justice or legal standard. The object is to break him. Eventually they will succeed.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Drake
8 months ago

This is true, but not universal. It is the tyranny part of anarcho-tyranny. While you are being bankrupt by the system and facing very real prison time, the “POC” masses are going through the catch and release system and not paying a dime either directly or through taxes.
It is the Houston County “judge” (not really a judge, just an odd naming convention) who tries to release 4000 violent convicted criminals from prison while saying people not wearing masks will be subject to $1000 fine and 180 days in jail!

https://noqreport.com/2020/04/22/joe-gamaldi-lina-hidalgo-houston-face-mask-court-order-harris-county/

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  Drake
8 months ago

Speaking of the “legal process” The whole process begins with an indictment/accusation made by the government. The trial takes place in a “court house” owned by the government. The accused is tried before a judge paid by the government. They’re tried by a lawyer paid by the government. They’re defended by a lawyer who holds his/her license from the government. And to keep everything orderly there’s a guy/gal off to one side – armed to the teeth – paid by the government. What part of the above sounds in any wise like a recipe for anything which could even remotely… Read more »

Barnard
Barnard
8 months ago

“The gun grabbers like to play this trick when talking about what the Framers meant when the put the right to bear arms in the Bill of Rights. They simply lie about what can be easily confirmed.”

It amazes me they get away with ignoring the what the men who wrote about the Bill of Rights said about the meaning and intent of each amendment. Private ship owners at the time had the same firepower on board as the military did. They clearly did not oppose this.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Barnard
8 months ago

Two of the biggest distortions are that the 2A is really to protect hunting and that “well regulated” means controlled by the government. The original intent was to protect the citizens from the federal government and well regulated meant well armed and organized.

TomA
TomA
8 months ago

Nuts and bolts. Good decent men at the bottom of the law enforcement pyramid will now arrest a mother shepherding her children in a playground (and yes, that includes handcuffs and a ride in the police car, all played out dramatically in front of her kids) because these officers have been trained to follow orders (no matter how insane). Do this often enough, and you eventually get to officially sanctioned genocide. It’s just a matter of time and repetitive practice. When a tyrant gets the taste of power on his/her lips, the addiction is overwhelming.

Member
Reply to  TomA
8 months ago

Good decent men at the bottom of the law enforcement pyramid will now arrest a mother shepherding her children in a playground (and yes, that includes handcuffs and a ride in the police car, all played out dramatically in front of her kids) because these officers have been trained to follow orders (no matter how insane).

Where’s the evidence that they’re good, decent men, again?

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Vizzini
8 months ago

The screening process for new LEO recruits is actually pretty good at weeding out the psychopaths. And a lot of the people attracted to this occupation are ex-military. Meet and talk to some of these guys and you’ll find that they are pretty normal and hate being ordered to do stupid things. However, almost anyone can be corrupted if the system is set up that way.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  thezman
8 months ago

Once upon a time, they used to hang horse thieves and consequently the town only needed a sheriff and maybe one deputy. For anything bigger, you’d round up a posse of armed ranch owners.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  TomA
8 months ago

That only worked when the guy you planned to hang either wouldn’t shoot back or your guys didn’t mind a real risk of few of them dying,

DLS
DLS
Reply to  thezman
8 months ago

It’s the difference between golf and other sports. Golfers report themselves for rule violations even if no one else sees them. All other sports range from getting away with what isn’t seen to actively cheating.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  thezman
8 months ago

In grad school I remember being told a story, perhaps apocryphal, although the professor was a fairly down-to-earth, balanced man, about Korean strong man and President (1980-1988), Chun Doo-hwan. Chun had come to the United States in the late 50s to attend the combat school at Fort Black in North Carolina. On one occasion he was driving back to his abode in the dead of the night and came up on a red light in the middle of some podunk, 4-corner town. There was a car in front of him and the light turned red. He noticed that the person… Read more »

Member
Reply to  KGB
8 months ago

I swear I thought that story was going to end in an assassination attempt and Chun Doo-hwan fighting his way out against overwhelming odds. I’ve seen too many action movies. It was the bit about combat school that pulled me in.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  TomA
8 months ago

So so some spine and don’t take the job. Its not like you’ll actually make a difference or be allowed to change anything and there are other ways to make a living.

HomerB
HomerB
Reply to  Vizzini
8 months ago

John Law: Do you know why I pulled you over?

John Q Public: Cuz you’re a cop?

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Vizzini
8 months ago

“Where’s the evidence that they’re good, decent men, again?”

Why else would you go into law enforcement if not a believing you are solid, good, and decent in morality? Everyone else entering the profession is just a suppressed adrenaline junkie looking for a way to get their rocks off.

Member
Reply to  Forever Templar
8 months ago

Some people just don’t get your satire.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  TomA
8 months ago

I honestly don’t think it’s out of line to predict, some time in the future, whites will be gathered, lined up and openly executed in front of pre-dug disposal pits. It won’t be in total, and will be given some bovine excrement of a term, like “ridding of dangerous insurgents”, but the start down the road has already begun. White are becoming a minority in America, constantly insulted and worst -dehumanized, the critical step in marking anything as disposable. Seen it happen before.

Lawdog
Lawdog
Member
Reply to  Forever Templar
8 months ago

While I think something like this is a ways off, I could see a form of state-backed reparations being enacted. White taxes and such — kinda like jizya. This is why I am moving to the south before I turn 30. Privacy. Solidarity. Community. Self-sufficiency. You’ll never make pizza like we do in NJ (nor will NY), but I’d bet the ribs are better.

I’ll also miss how we just make fun of each other all the time in NJ. It’s how males bond here.

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Lawdog
8 months ago

Lawdog – We don’t want to make pizza down here like you do in NJ. Like I said yesterday – don’t say that sh*t if you’re moving down South.

Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 months ago

It was a storybook romance, until the pizza arrived.

Lawdog
Lawdog
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
8 months ago

Vizzini

Hahahahaha!

Lawdog
Lawdog
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 months ago

But sir, I reckon there’s opportunity for a jersey-style pizza joint down south (strongly Informed by southern traditions, of course). Tomatoes are our specialty as peaches are Georgia’s.

Although, I have heard we yanks have a little more trouble starting businesses down there. Is this true?

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Lawdog
8 months ago

We have Jersey/Brooklyn style here in the South. You’d have no problem starting a business. For example, within just a few miles of my humble abode:
Pizza City New York Style
Tony’s New York Style Pizzeria
Frankie’s NY Pizza
Try not to cringe – but what we need are some Chicago style pizza places.

Lawdog
Lawdog
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 months ago

When my grandmother passes, I will have the means to do so with my wife. That is, if the state doesn’t pilfer our family treasury as badly as I think it might.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Lawdog
8 months ago

Whites don’t have that much money or stuff o take and are well armed. If we steadfastly refuse to learn to organize, we deserve the boxcars. My suspicion is that Whites are starting to learn to get well organized at protests for guns, jobs and elsewhere and for less above board things, in quiet private places. Given how unstable things are, well it won’t be pleasant. Given the stories I’m seeing, the US may soon have real serious food shortages anyway either induced or because we simply built too brittle a system to save a few bucks. This could be… Read more »

Lowe
Lowe
Reply to  Forever Templar
8 months ago

@ Forever Templar The reason whites won’t ever be mass executed the way you describe is, who is going to do it? Asians, Hispanics, Blacks? None of those people can accomplish anything on their own. Everything from the clothes on their backs to the plumbing in their walls was given to them by white men. One white man is worth one hundred of any other race. By the time the rising tide of color is high enough to drown the last whites, there won’t be enough guns and bullets available, and they won’t know how to make more. They don’t… Read more »

Georgiaboy61
Georgiaboy61
Reply to  Lowe
8 months ago

@ Lowe: I heard an exchange, or maybe read about it,some years ago. Perhaps the story is apocryphal, perhaps not – but here it is anyway. A regular dude, a white guy, was in the black part of town at some store or other – a curb market or convenience store – and some brothers came in and started talking smack about how they were going to stick it to “the man,” to people like our pale-skinned protagonist. How they were going to come to his neighborhood and terrorize it and then burn it down. The white guy listened for… Read more »

Georgiaboy61
Georgiaboy61
Reply to  Forever Templar
8 months ago

@ Forever Templar: Re: “I honestly don’t think it’s out of line to predict, some time in the future, whites will be gathered, lined up and openly executed in front of pre-dug disposal pits.” Some may accuse you of panic-mongering, of fear-mongering,but there is more than a bit of truth in your statement. The late Dr. R.J. Rummel studied genocides and mass killings virtually his whole career as a political scientist. He made many important discoveries and insights, one of which was that such acts of mass bloodletting do not occur in a cultural-political vacuum, but instead occur by a… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  TomA
8 months ago

Just wait until the pension disappears and see how dutiful the police are. Same reason teachers maleducate children, nurses and doctors stick you with needles full of God-knows-what. Money, even more than power, is the chief corrupting influence— and they print the stuff out of thin air!

Even more than money, the debt it represents, and willingness of people to go into debt. Slavery, Inc.

BTP
Member
Reply to  TomA
8 months ago

You have to wonder what would happen if someone did that to your own wife. That cop had a choice – he could have exercised discretion, he could have let the “lawless” behavior go the way the Portland cops do with Antifa. But he didn’t.

Put yourself in the shoes of her husband for a minute. This happened, now what?

Hun
Hun
Reply to  BTP
8 months ago

>now what?

Nothing. You live in a tyranny and have a family to take care of. Superheroes only exist in movies and only a moron, an autist or desperado with nothing to lose would confront the system head on.

At best you may try some indirect action, if you have a reliable network and have the ability to mitigate the risks to your loved ones.

Hun
Hun
Reply to  Hun
8 months ago

Downvotes, really? What are you going to do? It’s easy to act tough on the Internet but real life is different. I talk from experience from living in a totalitarian system. Something Americans don’t understand. You don’t live in a free country anymore. Act accordingly. If you want to confront the system, you have to consider how it will affect your family. How is that a difficult concept to understand? Confront the system head on and your whole family will suffer. That is how these things always go. You need to keep a cool head and resolve the situation with… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Hun
8 months ago

All those millennials with no family, no career, an axe to grind with boomers, nothing to lose…

Hun
Hun
Reply to  Paintersforms
8 months ago

They are low T, though.

joey junger
joey junger
8 months ago

Rex Lex or Lex Rex? goes the old debate. Is the King law or is the Law king? We can’t even begin to answer this question in America because we have to pretend we don’t have a King, or multiple not-so-benign despots floating around. Normie cons think the Constitution is King; progressives think anyone who isn’t white or male has a right to rule as the personal king over everyone who is white or male, in perpetuity, as revenge for history. Jeff Bezos or Mark Zuckerberg and everyone with a top secret clearance at any alphabet organization thinks they’re king,… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  joey junger
8 months ago

Reminds me of one of Murphy’s Laws of Combat*: “Both sides are convinced they’re going to lose, and they’re both right.” 😀
*One of the great office humor posters from the pre-internet age. Also available via Google.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

I’m glad I never shared a foxhole or a patrol with you. AK-47s and landmines are deadly enough without a steady drip of ear-poison.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
8 months ago

“ it is the world of no tomorrow”
Just shop and consume on the credit card of course.
The national credit card.
And that terrible virus!
Stop everything!
White man shut down your small business!
Now I must take all my stuff I got from the stores and the mall and Amazon and go hide under the bed.
When can I shop again?
Hey white guy just turn your business back on again so I can shop.
Maybe it’s not so easy this time.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
8 months ago

Poetry for our time.

nailheadtom
8 months ago

The law, in spirit or in letter, is ignored by many because it simply doesn’t make any sense in a particular instance, doesn’t provide for needed exceptions, or is unlikely to be enforced. For instance, even in the wilds of bush Alaska there are fish and game laws. The locals violate the Migratory Bird Treaty because they need the protein, shoot moose out of season for the same reason, and know that if they can’t hear an aircraft flying nearby they’re unlikely to be caught gutting a moose. There’s no guilt in defying a law meant for tourists rather than… Read more »

tristan
tristan
8 months ago

I read “This is the spirit of our age, the liberal democratic age” as
“This is the spirit of our age, the liberal demonic age”.

It seems more fitting somehow.

The Booby
8 months ago

“The great motivator”

I think we know what the motivator is in Karen nation:

https://www.zerohedge.com/personal-finance/we-have-become-karen-nation

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  The Booby
8 months ago

Pity the girls actually named “Karen.” Now they’re like the guys named “Dick.”

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  LineInTheSand
8 months ago

Used to know a guy who I thinks dad was named Dick Head. Got a lot of snickers from JR High kids.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  abprosper
8 months ago

Dick Head used to run around with Mike Hunt quite a bit…

Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 months ago

We had an assistant high school football coach / gym teacher named Dick Hole.

Lawdog
Lawdog
Member
Reply to  Libertymike
8 months ago

lmao.

HomerB
HomerB
Reply to  The Booby
8 months ago

Thanks for that link! Some money quotes from this article I missed, although I read Z-H fairly regularly: “In truth, if you were real men you’d grow up and spend that time acquiring skills to become a man worthy of allaying the fears of all the Karens you say are destroying your favorite stories. Who knows? You might even get laid!? Just sayin’” This speaks to my personal experience. Living in the NYC corridor, between that shithole and Fairfield County, CT, and including Westchester County, I get to interact with men that have acquired the following skills: a. Sit on… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  HomerB
8 months ago

You stopped the quote too soon. This was pretty good too: “But it means looking in the mirror rather than at porn. So I guess that’s a non-starter.”

Screwtape
Screwtape
8 months ago

“A world with no tomorrow”. Liberalism is a death cult. But anyhow, a world with no tomorrow is an important feature of our fear-panic inspired totalitarianism. A world on the precipice, be it virus or climate or a question of bathrooms, does not have time for the old ways; no, we need to move forward to defeat the great threat. We are all in this together. Perhaps the End of history had this part right. A perpetual Today World can only exist if History is killed. So they obliged. Without history, tomorrow is an abstraction entirely up for grabs. The… Read more »

The Booby
Reply to  Screwtape
8 months ago

The Mother Earth cult became the unofficial state religion back in the 60s and 70s. It’s a secular religion. Problem is, with secular religions there’s no god whose judgments overrides the opinions of mere men. That’s why looming apocalypse has to be an integral part of any secular religion. Omnipresent impending doom is necessary to keep people afraid, compliant, and to justify its high priests’ demands for more and more power.

Keep in mind, the Booby’s firmly an agnostic, he’s not preaching any particular religion here, just stating the facts about the pernicious nature of secular religions.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Reply to  Screwtape
8 months ago

If you wake up and don’t wanna smile
If it takes just a little while
Open your eyes and look at the day
You’ll see things in a different way

Don’t stop thinking about tomorrow
Don’t stop, it’ll soon be here
It’ll be better than before
Yesterday’s gone, yesterday’s gone

——————-
Christine McVie
god i can’t stand her voice

Dr_Mantis_Toboggan_MD
Member
8 months ago

I remember the Lewinsky scandal from when I was in college. The pure salaciousness of it overwhelmed the realization that the rule of law was being undermined in a way that would have serious consequences in the future. Oral sex not being sex and the quibbles over “is and alone” still echo today. We let that deviant and his evil wife off the hook completely. The economy was too good to change horses, even though the 90s boom was a function of new, emerging tech companies and was like the Emperor, totally lacking substance. The boom of the 90s happened… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Dr_Mantis_Toboggan_MD
8 months ago

Yep, the intent was to protect us from the National Guard.

Letter of the Law
Letter of the Law
8 months ago

One example of corruption of the letter of the law is how gun grabbers are trying to redefine “well regulated” in the second amendment to mean “everything is banned except for what we say isn’t banned, and we can add to the list of banned stuff anytime we want.” In reality, “well regulated” when written simply meant well-trained (that’s where the idea of a “regular” soldier or militiaman comes from). The spirit of the amendment was to accommodate free association: all free white men were encouraged to self-organize and to conduct any self-training with arms they saw fit to function… Read more »

BTP
Member
Reply to  Letter of the Law
8 months ago

Was doing a little reading up on Lexington & Concord. It was interesting to see how the patriots had organized patriot militias – drilling, organizing and all that – along the route. They seem to have been paramilitaries, with paramilitary training. Gage really was trying to solve the problems by confiscating the weapons of the locals.

Alzaebo
Reply to  Letter of the Law
8 months ago

“Well regulated”: trained as a group capable of following the Prussian code of arms, the military gold standard of its day.

Now, Prussia and the German region were some 1600 independent duchies, not yet integrated into a nation-state as they were under the great Bismarck in… 1880, I think?

So the ‘Huns’ often formed autonomous mercenary corps not only for self defense, but for hire.

More like the Mongols or Vikings- or Teddy Roosevelt’s Raiders.

Each state, by the way, has irregular militias that offer training to civvies and are legally recognized, under the Constitution, per state law. Hint, hint.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
8 months ago

The spirit of the 14th Amendment was to grant citizenship to American blacks yet somehow they finagled birthright citizenship from that.

Alzaebo
Reply to  LineInTheSand
8 months ago

From my web notes:

In the Plyler v. Doe case of 1982 the United States Supreme Court made it illegal for states to deny education to illegal aliens, then in the same case on an unrelated subject the Court said that children born to illegal aliens on American soil are by definition American citizens.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 months ago

“Supreme Court Opinions about Birthright Citizenship and the 14th Amendment”

https://www.numbersusa.com/news/supreme-court-opinions-about-birthright-citizenship-and-14th-amendment

Mark Stoval
Mark Stoval
8 months ago

“For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong.” We get those from the bureaucratic state all the time. This lockdown over a version of a Corona strain is a fine example. Destroy a hundred million lives to save a few months for some grandmothers. The one thing to remember is “Every decent man is ashamed of the government he lives under.” Our Empire has spread death and destruction at home and around the world from the very beginning. We keep finding ways to make it even worse, but there really was no “good old… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Mark Stoval
8 months ago

Agreed! I’ve always thought that people should be allowed to do what they wish, as long as they don’t make a mess for others. But the devil’s bargain part of that should include: “You will pay the price for any misfortune you bring on yourself. We will not (indeed, often can not) rescue you.”

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
8 months ago

“Corrupting the spirit of the law is a tougher process.” I would suggest a third corruption of Law; bureaucratic devolution into morass. The power of law is bestowed by Congress to a bureaucracy and that bureaucracy is given carte blanche application to address some emergency. “Emergency powers” beget “the way we live now” which eventually begets “it’s been this way as long as anyone remembers.” It’s the reason the Bureau of Alcohol and Tobacco keeps adding letters until it becomes the B.A.F.T.E. It’s why our cell phone bills carried a surcharge for the Spanish American War a hundred years after… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
8 months ago

As to spying on citizens inside the boundaries of the country being illegal, the violation of that is of a piece in denying the existence of borders and boundaries in the first place. Just because they make up all this crap as they go, ad hoc, as necessary, sometimes the overarching philosophy of it all simply falls into place and shows a certain consistency.

BadThinker
BadThinker
8 months ago

When I hear the term “The Spirit of the Age” (Zeitgeist) I think of CS Lewis.

‘…The Spirit of the Age wishes to allow argument and not to allow argument.’

‘How is that?’

‘You heard what they said. If anyone argues with them they say that he is rationalizing his own desires, and therefore need not be answered. But if anyone listens to them they will then argue themselves to show that their own doctrines are true.’

From Pilgrim’s Regress. Probably Lewis’ most esoteric book, but in my opinion, one of his best.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  BadThinker
8 months ago

I’ll have to try that one. I liked Screwtape Letters the best. Dry English humour 🙂 and pleasantly short. Even a Lutheran-agnostic-Catholic-athiest (yes really) could enjoy it!

AntiDem
AntiDem
8 months ago

>”Still, it is worth considering what it is that motivates the citizen in the liberal democracy, as it is certainly not virtue or honor.”

The desire for – in fact, the demand for the right to – “free” government money, and consequence-free cummies.

No, really, that’s all that motivates citizens in a liberal democracy. There’s no great mystery to it. It really is just as simple, base, and banal as that.

Alzaebo
Reply to  AntiDem
8 months ago

Get the cheese!
……
“But wait, wait, Larry’s caught in the trap”
……
“Screw Larry, get the cheese and let’s scram”

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
8 months ago

A permanent state of crisis justifies a permanent state of revolution. And a permanent state of revolution is the only environment in which the Left can be remotely satisfied.

Alzaebo
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 months ago

A Permanent Revolutionary Committee.

How is that even linguistically possible?
It may sound like English, but it ain’t English.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
8 months ago

“””They may seek rank and privilege, but only through the most craven and dishonorable means available to them. They are happy to sacrifice your interests for their greater good. In fact, the only time they work together is when it is time to siphon off more of your greater good in order to top off their tanks of greater good.””” This is Lemon Socialism for the ruling class. Their failures are made whole and better by retaining subsidies and profits while the public purse pays for its failures, costs and growth. Over the past dozen years the public purse has… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Yves Vannes
8 months ago

YY, as usual you’re on track with this distinction. The “tactical socialism” we need to employ to counter decades of “tactical libertarianism” (profit for Them, “creative destruction” for Us) has been so oooga-booga’d that any mention of turning their own tactics on them smacks of Black Magic and Devil Ju-Ju to many guys on the Right. The tools we want in our toolbox in terms of monkey-wrenching Shlomo are not the ones we’d use to DIY our own societies from the wreckage. Meta-political thinking requires binocular “is-ought” vision. Decades of Red-Blue colored glasses have resulted in political color-blindness, lack of… Read more »

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  Exile
8 months ago

This entire episode is showing us that we’ll need to descend to an abyss that is a lot deeper and darker before our side gets serious.

Alzaebo
Reply to  Yves Vannes
8 months ago

They can find $15 trillion for the Masters of the Universe, but not for our pension system.

Happy thought- they can’t find $2 billion to harden the grid, either, not in 30 years…

So if a solar flare or EMP strikes, all the low-voltage chips in the coming 5G Internet-of-Things will fry.

Your smart frig, self-driving car, CCTV cameras, the surveillance state- all toast. C’mon, Zeus!

Epaminondas
Member
8 months ago

Between 1964 and 1968 the US Constitution was thoroughly gutted. The damn fools who carried out the surgery were totally unaware at the time that they had killed the patient. They went to their graves with the proud expectation of being forever lauded as “virtuous”. If our side ever wins, they will be dug up and thrown into the nearest landfill.

Dave
Dave
Reply to  Epaminondas
8 months ago

Look up, and then read, “American Malvern”.
Then you will understand that the gutting of the Constitution was no accident. The “surgeons” were very aware of what they were doing.
Real elites, and in this context it means Anglo Protestant brahmins, have been talking about, and planning for, globalization and world government since before most of us were born.
No accident at all.

Exile
Exile
Member
8 months ago

Our Anglo-Saxon common law tradition was a formalized, written transformation of the older tribal practice of leaving judgments to wise men based on tradition. Celts & Teutons, for all their lack of written law, had a sophisticated oral tradition administered by druidic and bardic classes and largely enforced and honored by the warrior class. The ancient Greek and Latin tribes developed similar oral Homeric-style customs long before they started writing. Written law is considered an “evolution” from these oral traditions but these “advances” come with their own downsides that are often ignored to better fit the “arc of history” narrative.… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  Exile
8 months ago

“a good place to start would be the judiciary – make their power commensurate with their accountability.”

This, x 1000.
Reintroduce personal risk into the system.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

Zman, overall a good post. Re the Montesquieu words: “In republican societies, it is virtue that inspires the people. By virtue, he meant the willingness to put the interests of the community ahead of private interests. To sacrifice for the greater good.” Well I’m sorry but this just aroused my inner Ayn Rand 😀 She would have criticized (correctly) as follows. In the first place, a virtue is a desirable quality, nothing more nor less. In the second place, she’d have called his “virtue” as “altruism,” something she abhorred. She, or a Harry Browne would claim: In a free society,… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

If you want to live in a community, you have *duties* to the community. Period. One of those duties is to put others ahead of yourself; (child-bearing) women and children first, for example. The libertarians fill up the life raft with old men and then wonder why there is nobody to carry on civilization.

True Virtue is beating Randroids with a crowbar until they regain their sense.

Alzaebo
Reply to  BadThinker
8 months ago

Rand, Goldwater, Milt Friedman- they turned a workable compromise, Tenth Amendment classical liberals, into free-trade, homo economicus libertarianism.

Hollywood gave all the TV time in the world to evangelical grifters, making the long scholarship of the Christians into a Third Temple showcase of buffoons.

Do these have any connection with the 60s Cultural Revolution that Epiminondas mentions above, the one kick-started with the assassination of our first WASC president?

BTP
Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

@Ben –

Fuck that shit.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 months ago

The “Spirit of the Age” has been Randian since at least Reagan. How has that worked out since 1980?

Where are all the John Galts and what does this system offer Eddie Willers??

Rand’s system is largely fantasy-fuel based on her adolescent INTJ vision of human nature.

A state that refuses to coerce pro-social economic behavior b/c ideology (or just plain corruption hidden under a Randian fig-leaf) has left the atomized, forcibly- libertarianized populace defenseless against the organized collective force of Woke Capital.

Anarcho-tyranny = Randian fiscal policy + Woke social policy.

King Tut
King Tut
8 months ago

As if right on cue, from the London Times

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/we-need-big-brother-to-beat-this-virus-5b0njl68r?fbclid=IwAR0ZxcfKLKqRdlBMrP2m7WDkmceKEOP0YGxrlY8MAeSzPywDsNI7S8VyOSo

The article is behind a paywall but that doesn’t matter. Everything you need to know is in the headline and the photo.

This is the Gynocracy, the Rule of Karen.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  King Tut
8 months ago

Depaywalled:
https://archive.is/3P6Rc

Britain has been too slow on many fronts in the first weeks of this crisis. We must now take seriously the example of other nations who have successfully restored some normality to life, and rapidly develop a system of digital surveillance that is comprehensive and useful enough to map and break chains of infection extremely quickly.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  BadThinker
8 months ago

So the prisoner can have parole if he agrees to an ankle bracelet?

Dave
Dave
Reply to  BadThinker
8 months ago

This response, and the growing drumbeat for turning the West into a China style totalitarian surveillance state, has been in the works for decades. 9/11 was used as an excuse to radically expand emergency powers. Now, the virus, just as the number of deaths in the U.S. and Europe is shrinking, is being used as an excuse to create an Orwellian nightmare, and at least half the public will go along with it without question or complaint. I never thought they would just roll it out all at once, but here we go folks. Put your seatbelt on and get… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  King Tut
8 months ago

“Shut up, or my Big Brother will beat you up!”

Maus
Maus
8 months ago

Trial lawyers have a saying: If the facts are against you, pound the facts and argue the law (i.e. the letter). If the law is against you, pound the law and argue the facts (i.e. the spirit). If both the facts and the law are against you, pound the table and shout like hell.

H I
H I
8 months ago

“Someone high up in the Obama administration decided to use the surveillance agencies for domestic spying, which is in direct violation of the law.” Here’s one problem: the separation between CIA and FBI is not mandated by law, but by a post-Watergate executive order (12333). What’s the penalty for violating an executive order? You can certainly be fired, but can you go to prison? We’ll see when Durham comes down with indictments. In any event, that post-Watergate executive order needs to be replaced with a law with criminal penalties.

greyenlightenment
8 months ago

Trump criticized Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp’s decision decision to reopen sooner than expected. I was watching a video in which billionaire trump supporter Dan Peña expressed support for the shutdowns and predicted things would get much worse. One thing I have noticed is, the very wealthy, on either side of the aisle, want these shutdowns to last as long as possible and believe or want to believe that Corona is serious enough that it justifies the measures being taken. It’s only the middle-class who are expressing the most skepticism. The middle class are the only people not out of touch… Read more »

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  greyenlightenment
8 months ago

Well, today we got the first batch of generalized anti-body testing results in these parts….and as predicted, a fuck ton of people tested positive. And this is in the densest mortality region of the country. So suddenly with a true denominator, the CFR on this is going to plummet.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Reply to  SamlAdams
8 months ago

yes, Cuomo claims 20% of NYC residents would have antibodies from being infected, based on a “random samples” taken across the state. That would be 1.6million out of 8million city dwellers. Yet only 3500 have died; the other 1.597million have recovered, probably not even realizing they had been sick.

edit:
3500 died in Brooklyn; NYC total “includes 9,944 victims who tested positive for the disease plus 5,052 people who showed tell-tale symptoms of the virus but never received a test.”

Hun
Hun
Reply to  Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
8 months ago

This is how they will maintain the desired mortality rate – they just classify all deaths as caused by coronavirus.

First they added people who died “with” the virus to people who died “from” the virus. Then they added never-tested people with allegedly “tell-tale” signs of the virus. And then they add every other death so that the reported mortality can stay high as testing shows increasing share of population with antibodies.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  greyenlightenment
8 months ago

As an opportunity to gain power?
Did you just come out of a Coma?

They have DISPLAYED and VALIDATED their power. They have the power.

“It’s a class issue”….the last gasp of the Kulak. Why yes, it is. Citizen.

Red has been put in their place.
The so called middle class is filling out PPP applications.
.

Hun
Hun

If they were confident in their power, they would not have to display it like this. There is not a one true king ruling above all and that is the problem.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Hun
8 months ago

This is true, its a blob of expertise.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  greyenlightenment
8 months ago

If we’re strictly talking money America’s Billionaires are $280 Billion richer now.

But this wasn’t about money, it was about power. The power has been validated.

You will see that Red map change colors now. When you need govt handouts, you vote Democrat.

If you ever want a moments peace, or to even dream of working to improve yourself – vote Blue.

Like the signs say in Cuba; Socialismo or muerte.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
8 months ago

Just told my FB peeps; vote democrat or we’ll never go back to work, never get a moment’s peace. COVID is just the capture of the nation, at last. Its Impeachment with Conviction on a National Scale. VOTE BLUE OR STARVE. Now it serves us all rightly so for voting for welfare for decades then trying to stab the state by voting Trump. This is simple; Politics is Power. Its important when you’ve lost to quit before you’re ruined, esp when you’re already being ruined. Vote Blue, or starve, bankrupt, homeless. There’s not enough welfare to put everyone on it.… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector

Downvote the horrid truth all you want.
Vote Dem or eat from dumpsters.
That’s the deal.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector

Interesting – for all the Bile and venom towards democracy on these pages when I point out that its really over now, I am vilified. How very human. Knowing it was mere illusion and almost devoid of any power – when informed that now you have only the choice between submission or starvation – response is to recoil in anger. Very human of course.
Above all else we desire power.

Compsci
Compsci

No, you’re voted down for trolling.

Alzaebo
Reply to  Compsci
8 months ago

Sorry, Compsci, but vxxc is emphasizing.
This hit him hard- and I agree 100%.

Ba’ath Party member, or one will never get a chance. Corona just de-Nazified the right wing.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 months ago

No Troll. Literal 100%. We vote Blue, we talk Blue or we go on welfare – the Trump economy and most importantly Trump voter were just forcibly bankrupted. No troll. No snark, just literal. Power just showed its real muscle. Even further; Only a Republican, Hell only Trump COULD shut down the economy. If a Dem POTUS had tried this we would have had a revolt. We followed a Lion who turned Judas Goat. Trying hard to be optimistic; this may work to advantage. I have long thought voting was only part of the solution (legitimacy) and its known what… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member

+1 from me, FWIW. Voting your own side and voting party-line are almost entirely opposed strategies.

Righties who’ve spent decades dissing Blacks who vote for “muh Democrat Plantation” despite the ruin of their hoods should consider what the GOP has done to their burbs.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Exile
8 months ago

We’ve got to free the conservatives from the Republican Plantation!

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  LineInTheSand
8 months ago

Only a Republican could or would shut down the country.

Only the Nixon of our times could go China in America.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Exile
8 months ago

Rogo, thank you.
I have no voting strategy now, perhaps it will come.
I’m just pointing out; the ruin will rain down from above until we vote Dem, or perhaps in future RINO slate. There will be many plagues, all of which will increase our ruin and economic repression.

COVID is decades of Economic ruin happening in weeks. Unless you’re connected, this lesson will not be lost on anyone.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member

Look at what Trump just did. His moratorium on immigration lasted what, half a day? And in the middle of all this and what will come it will be a pathetic 10% reduction in immigration? With 30% to 50%+ unemployment. VXXC is right. Red is simply the rearguard of Blue, it always has been. Let’s bury the false friend so we only have one target. We need clear battle lines and we are never going to get that as long as the GOP gets to play toy soldier. Vote Blue to bury Red. Then maybe enough of our people will… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Yves Vannes
8 months ago

I wasn’t even being accelerationist. I was saying literally we’re being forced onto the Dole cuz the Dole votes Blue. I was also saying that we’ll never have a moments peace, prosperity or any normalcy while we challenge the system. No. This is their answer; National shutdown, national welfare. Trying to be ah positive – Ah er Ah Organize to fight, or give up. I don’t fear war. I do fear welfare. Welfare? That is too much to ask. Death is inevitable, welfare is not. One is honor, the other shame. Trump had a choice during the coup of war… Read more »

BTP
Member
8 months ago

It’s consistent. Our society values license more highly than anything else and is at war with everything that limits license – family, patriarchy, tradition, religion, and as Z points out, law. It’s part of a long process – we can think of Henry VIII’s insistence not merely that everyone acknowledge his power but that they pretend to believe his acts were just. It was a precursor, in some ways, to our own totalitarianism. Our age is not content to police acts, it wants to police your soul. This is why the idea we can fix this with laws is absurd.… Read more »

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
8 months ago

“The protesters out there wanna work? Well, tell them they should get a job as an “essential worker””. –Andrew Cuomo. Spoken like a true overlord whose family has now entered the third generation fastened to the public teat (and the Kennedy Trusts).

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  SamlAdams
8 months ago

I almost vomited when I heard His Highness expound on the serfs.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  tonaludatus
8 months ago

I laugh when they experience serious mask slips.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  tonaludatus
8 months ago

He deserves to be punched in his ugly mush. For starters.

Alzaebo
Reply to  SamlAdams
8 months ago

Can I watch the coronation of King Cuomo the First?

Or will it be pay-per-view, members only?

“And YOU, Nurse Karen, just won free tickets!”
(Camera zooms to her surprised face, shining with tears of happiness, then pans her cheering multiracial family)

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
8 months ago

Z Man said: ” What we are seeing in this virus panic is the full flowering of liberal democracy. It is a world of the forever present, because it is without law and a world without order. It is a world with no tomorrow.” Yah! The bleaker the better. Now your singing my song. As I always say, if you don’t live in a bottomless pit of despair your not paying attention. But seriously. let’s face it folks, humans are to stupid and flawed to keep the world in one piece for more than a few years at a time:… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
8 months ago

“…if you don’t live in a bottomless pit of despair you’re not paying attention.”

Haha! Three cheers, that just made my day!

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 months ago

I guess I’m really good at paying attention.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 months ago

Alzaebo said: ” Haha! Three cheers, that just made my day!” “A weird time in which we are alive. We can travel anywhere we want, even to other planets. And for what? To sit day after day, declining in morale and hope.” ― Philip K. Dick, The Man in the High Castle “I don’t like hope very much. In fact, I hate it. It’s the crystal meth of emotions. It hooks you fast and kills you hard. It’s bad news. The worst. It’s sharp sticks and cherry bombs. When hope shows up, it’s only a matter of time until someone… Read more »

Bill_Mullins
Member
8 months ago

Every new law brings new opportunities for the liberal democratic ruling elite to torment the public. Since words have no meaning and the spirit of the law is strangled in its crib, the law is whatever the ideological enforcers happen to think it means in any given moment. Thus modern laws are written (literally crafted) in such a way as to make them open to any interpretation the ruling elite (and their enforcing thugs) choose to give them. I have read that there are so many laws on the books today that the average citizen commits at least one outright… Read more »

Lawdog
Lawdog
Member
8 months ago

CNN: We are waging war against the virus.

But no great war was ever won without economy.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Lawdog
8 months ago

The series of wars that will ensue will indeed have to be fought on the cheap.

Lawdog
Lawdog
Member
8 months ago

Also, Is it possible that the state would covidstrike the protesters? “See, those selfish demonstrators are causing thousands of deaths!” But I’m probably just paranoid. Not actually being sarcastic.

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
8 months ago

why can’t you spy on political opponents if you’re a [democratic] president – no senate is going to vote to remove you.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
8 months ago

Perfect post.

Winnie the Pooh
Winnie the Pooh
8 months ago

Police at the start of the virus hysteria: “We’re not going to waste our time with nonviolent crime.”

Police just a few weeks later:
https://mobile.twitter.com/vicenews/status/1253354334043213830

If nothing else, I hope this hysteria makes it clear to the dissident right that the police will never be on our side. Their function is purely to babysit diverse criminals and shield them from the consequences of their bad behavior, nothing else.

d.deacon
d.deacon
8 months ago

agreed Mr Zman. we are at the logical endpoint of the “pure reason” age. this is why Montesquieu and the republicains/enlighteners had it wrong. yes, virtue, however you define it? greater good than what other good? which interests of what community? as always, materialists looking at the processes, without looking at the particulars, and the Uncaused from where all proceeds. by looking at processes, they can reify law, and since law is only written and words change meaning according to the media, then the bourgeois commie-corporate elite that writes the laws wins. the commie side wants peasant’s lifestyle, the corporate… Read more »

John Henry Eden
Member
8 months ago

“…they poured over every word …” The correct term is ” pored ” Don’t look ignorant to critics.

Georgiaboy61
Georgiaboy61
8 months ago

Re: ” Even the most radical mind of his age would have scoffed at the idea of giving women and criminals the franchise…//…They surely would have assumed you were mad if you suggested there were more than two sexes. Not so long ago, what we take for granted was beyond the realm of imagination.” Huh? What ‘we take for granted’? Speak for yourself, sir. Sex is biologically-immutable, and are there two of them – male and female – in the human animal, notwithstanding how much that reality drives neo-Marxist social justice warrior types over the edge. The leftist neologism “gender”… Read more »

Normie
8 months ago

And in 20 years those of us who have children will be laughed at by said children that we let racists vote… again, people with no kids don’t have to worry… and anyone with no kids should have no vote… #sad