The Rule Of Knaves

Note: I have a new post up at Taki this week. I think that will be a regular Monday thing for a while. I also have a SubscribeStar post on the #100 movie of all time, Yankee Doodle Dandy. I’ll be doing a few movie and TV posts there every week, just as a change of pace. I’m going to work on the top-100 list of great movies and the long list of terrible movies, plus other stuff.


It is an axiom of liberal democracy that the best way to distribute anything is through the mechanism of the marketplace. Everything from consumer electronics to pollution credits are subjected to the power of the market, under the belief that this is the best way to determine value. Of course, if everything is subjected to the marketplace it means everything has a price. That means something only has value if that thing can be turned into money in the marketplace.

While it may not seem like it at first, this is a very radical idea. For most of human history it was assumed that the most valuable things were those that could not be purchased at any price. Loyalty, honor, virtue, patriotism are just a few examples of things that have value, but you can’t put a price on them. You cannot put a price in your good name, for example, but you defend your good name, because it has value so dear that it cannot be purchased. It can only be given away.

The implication to this axiom of liberal democracy is that something only has value if you can put a price on it. Taken to its logical conclusion, it means those things that we used to assume you could not put a price on either lose all of their value or they get cheapened so they can be bought like any other item. This is the subtext to the Hunter Biden laptop from Hell. It’s not about the salacious material being dumped on the internet, but about what is says about the political class.

There’s no need to pretend there is a mystery here. Hunter Biden was selling influence and access to foreign players. He was hired into a no-show job by a Ukrainian oligarch so that oligarch could get special treatment from the Obama administration. He cut deals with Chinese Communist Party front men for the same reason. More important, there was nothing all that secret about his dealings. It was well known in Washington that he was trading on the family name. It was expected.

What the Biden story reveals, or maybe underscores, is that in Washington, everything has been for sale for a long time now. Those things that could not be sold to the Chinese or the Saudis or the Israelis simply had no value. This is something the Chinese have understood since Charlie Trie was a bagman for the Clintons. They have been buying up everything Washington has to sell ever since. This post on how the Chinese are buying up America details many of the lesser known deals.

The temptation is to write this off to normal human failings. After all, political corruption is the second oldest profession. That satisfies the need to reduce things to the personal and avoid looking at the larger picture. In this case, Hunter Biden is a degenerate grifter who traded on the family name and his father went along with it. If this were an isolated example, that may even be the right answer, but this is not an isolated case. It is just another example of a long running phenomenon.

For example, when Hillary Clinton was at the State Department, millions of foreign dollars flowed into the Clinton Foundation. No one ever asked about this or thought it was an odd thing. Even after she setup that e-mail server in the family toilet, no one questioned what was happening. It was just how things were done. Note that nothing happened to the Senators who made millions trading on Covid information that was not available to the public. It’s just the way Washington works.

Circling back to the Hunter Biden story, what has been revealed thus far is that the political class did not think it odd for the son of the Vice President to be cutting deals with shady Chinese nationals. That raises the question. Who else has been willing to make a deal with the Chinese? It’s quite obvious that Hollywood sold out to them and Silicon Valley, but what about Washington? If the Chinese will give crack head Biden millions, what will they give someone important?

Again, it is tempting to reduce this to personal corruption, but a guy like Joe Biden was not always this corrupt. He was a blowhard and a braggart, who often made a fool of himself, but he was not a crook. Nancy Pelosi, who is getting implicated in this Hunter Biden scandal, was not a crook. She was an ideological berserker, but not the sort to sell her office for a quick buck. Over the last three decades, even the ideologues have come to believe that everything should have a price, even them.

What is becoming clear is this is beyond personal corruption or even a culture of corruption in the political class. It is a new moral order that has arisen. Since the market decides value, that means everything has a price and those things that cannot be monetized no longer have value. All of those things that are required to make popular government work, like loyalty, honor, virtue, patriotism, have seen their stock collapse and they have no value to the political elite.

Montesquieu argued that the force that made aristocratic government possible was the love of honor. In despotic states, it was fear. In republics it was virtue. Modern theorists argue that morality is the spring of democracy. It may be that the driving force of liberal democracy is the absence of any moral code. The liberal democratic ruling class is one without scruples. The heart of the empire is an open air market where everything is for sale.

The question that naturally follows is how a society can function when it is rooted in perfidious treachery and the rule of knaves. What reason would anyone have in remaining loyal to a system where the people at the top of it are willing to sell your loyalty? Worse yet, they are willing to use their power to crush anyone that questions the propriety of putting everything on the auction block. Rule by knave quickly begins to look like the worst form of despotism.

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Bilejones
Member
1 month ago

You do realize that at some point the sweat-shop of little illegal immigrant z’s churning out the torrent of content will be exposed, don’t you?
Corbett has a number of pieces on the hell-hole that awaits Hoi Polloi in the new normal.

Last edited 1 month ago by bilejones
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Bilejones
1 month ago

Corbett has a number of pieces on the hell-hole that awaits Hoi Polloi in the new normal.

Get ready for permanent medical martial law, mandatory vax, and internal travel controls for starters.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Get ready?

It’s already here !!!!

Burrow
Burrow
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

I don’t know about that. For a long time my local multicultural department store broadcasted totalitarian messages in the parking lot demanding people social distance; inside the store, arrows were painted on the floor of every aisle telling people what direction they were allowed to travel. Both are gone now. I’m guessing they were removed because multicultural America isn’t much into obeying regulations and civic virtue. Many Hispanic countries, for instance, are famous for drivers disobeying traffic regulations, driving in the wrong lane, ignoring stop signals, etc. As America Hispanisizes, you’ll see the white left having a more difficult time… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Burrow
1 month ago

When I think about this stuff I’m always reminded of Orwell’s 1984. In that book, about 85% of the population consisted of “proles” and 15% were Party members. It was only the Party members who had the 2-way televisions watching them at all times. The government didn’t give a fuck about the proles and let them do what they wanted. What I see is that it’s sort of becoming a mark of status for the vapid white bugmen around here to wear their masks everywhere and do exaggerated acrobatics to get out of your way if they see you coming… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Bilejones
1 month ago

A few posts back he posted a picture of his library full of monkeys and typewriters. No secret.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Forever Templar
1 month ago

“It was the best of times, it was the blurst of times” — stupid monkey!

Tirel
Tirel
Member
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 month ago

One of the first 3 seasons, probably..

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Bilejones
1 month ago

The infinite number of monkeys randomly pecking at typewriters is an ancient thought experiment. It’s true that given enough writers, that eventually everything that ever could be written will be written. Of course if you do the math, the numbers are truly fantastic, far more than would be possible in the universe. This theme is well explored, ususally with entertaining twists, in science fiction. For example, Jorge Borges’ famous short story “The Library of Babel.” In jest, this story is closest to Z’s dilemma: Even if you have all those primates producing copy, imagine the hellacious job the editor will… Read more »

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

I saw the math once for simply recreating “to be or not to be”. Even that was astronomical. 😉

Gravity Denier
Gravity Denier
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Speaking of libraries … my local branch of the county system (open to each “customer” for 30 minutes per day) has an artistically designed banner behind the checkout counter: Knowledge Is Power How public libraries have degenerated in my lifetime. No longer are they intended to offer the building blocks of wisdom. They are knowledge factories, and knowledge is useful for power. The perfect authoritarian message. Not having been in the library since spring because it was closed for Con-vid Disease, I was shocked at the new template. The children’s section is practically as large as the adult section, and… Read more »

Rhodok
Rhodok
1 month ago

It is becoming increasingly clear why Q-anon is so hated by the elite.

“The Ticket” is not only offered, it is enforced.

I just hope we can find our way back.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Rhodok
1 month ago

Q is hated because it’s believed, not because it’s believable. Q’s predictions have been wrong so frequently that, frankly, you’d have to be pretty dense to continue believing them. Elites hate Q because citizens now have articulated reasons to dismiss the (moral) authority of the government.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Drew
1 month ago

The media’s obsession with Q is bizarrely intriguing to me. My initial reaction to Q was that it was fabulist troll, latched onto by losing righties as a mis begotten hope / revenge fantasy. Which would be IOW just another tool of control by the establishment.

But then the state media went berserk. Which is very odd and doesn’t mesh very well with my original thoughts on it.

el-porko
el-porko
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

Whether Q is real or not, the media is losing their sh!t and Normie is asking some questions. Both are positive and/or entertaining results.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  el-porko
1 month ago

They even made it into the Japanese media. Those crazy trump supporters and the like.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

Q always struck me as gay. But the media reaction to it is just awesome. As a psy-op against globohomo, it’s great. Sign me up!

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

While Q is mostly full of it, the nature of its posts automatically make readers ask, “well just how many pedophiles are in power?” Too many, to be sure, but not nearly as many as Q would assert.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Drew
1 month ago

Well then, the question Q is posing to normie civnat is: How many pedophiles in power is TOO many? One? Three? One hundred? Of course, the answer is “zero,” thus leading for a call to purge the elite.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Educated.redneck
1 month ago

That’s not what Q is saying at all. No one, except for brazen pedophiles, would say that any non-zero positive number of pedophiles is an acceptable number to have in power. Q’s message is that the ruling elite are all degenerate and morally bankrupt to an historically exceptional degree and Donald is the only doing anything about it. Consequently, the only thing you need to do in this fight is support the president, whatever that means.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

It is psyop. It does not matter if the narrative is Santa Claus running a mating experiment of unicorns with space aliens; the point is that this narrative is delegitimizing the elite and setting the stage for wholesale replacement of the elite. This is the same thing as “me too,” or “white privilege.” The Enemy’s psyops narratives run from demonstrably false to straight up oogily-boogily supernaturalism, but THEY WORK. Tokyo Rose wasnt demonized because she was giving factually innaccurate information. “Pedophist Cabal” is the modern “let then eat cake.” Does not matter a single guillotine swipe if it is true… Read more »

AnotherAnon
AnotherAnon
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

It was bizarre when Hillary lost her hot sauce over Alex Jones, on the campaign trail. Seriously, of all people to worry about, she picked Infowars?! It was just too hard to disappear Asange. Shortly thereafter, AJ was disappeared by Twitter. Maybe Q is Alex’s “revenge”.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Drew
1 month ago

Elites hate Q because citizens now have articulated reasons to dismiss the (moral) authority of the government.”

x a trillion

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

I thought “Q” was the same thing that was in the briefcase in”Pulp Fiction”.

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  Drew
1 month ago

Q is nutty but its easier for people to believe crazy things when the whole world doesn’t really make sense. As Z said, there’s nothing mysterious about the Hunter Biden situation. He was selling influence to foreigners based on his being the son of the VP. Joe was obviously involved. Why did he think foreigners were paying his crackhead son millions? A major political party’s presidential nominee is caught red handed in a scandal orders of magnitude worse than Watergate and that borders on treasonous. Yet the media won’t even talk about it. Unless you’re very young, you almost certainly… Read more »

ExPraliteMonk
ExPraliteMonk
Reply to  Federalist
1 month ago

He received millions of $ in bribes from the Chinese Communists to write laws favorable to China and unfavorable to us. That is treason.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Federalist
1 month ago

The thing you (not to beat a dead horse) are missing here is ALL of our enemy’s very successful psyops have been out and out lies, pure malarky, and yet they work! “McCarthyism,” Tawana Brawley, Tonkin Gulf, yellow cake, systemic racism, etc etc etc. They are all beyond-belief levels of stupid fantasy, but they have moved the world and killed millions and brought trillions of dollars to the shysters selling The Narrative. You got to get with the program: truth and believability are outdated nullities; the only thing that matters is success, efficacy, and power in an existential total war.… Read more »

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  Educated.redneck
1 month ago

I’m not sure what it is you think I’m missing. I don’t disagree with anything else that you said.

Maus
Maus
Reply to  Educated.redneck
1 month ago

So “truth and believability are nullities” is the root of the problem. Whether vampires or werewolves actually exist is apparently irrelevant. What matters is are you on Team Edward or Team Jacob. Who has more power? Whose “narratives” are more cool and edgy? Who pays better bribes? This is a recipe for unending struggle over tawdry scraps.

Member
Reply to  Drew
1 month ago

It’s funny, in a way. I’ve been telling my cousin for years that Q operates on the “it’s just over the next hill” principle. The latest revelation is just proof that full exposure is just over the next hill. I never tried to talk him out of Q, I just said things like, “If that happens, I’ll be thrilled, but I’ll believe it when I see it.” Of course, nothing would ever come of the latest QAnon post, and over time my cousin started letting go of that. I think what has the elites freaked out about QAnon is what… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by hokkoda
ChetRollins
ChetRollins
Reply to  Rhodok
1 month ago

After Epstein, even the apolitical are now thinking the ‘cabal of elite satanic pedophiles’ hypothesis sounds more plausible than the official narrative.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  ChetRollins
1 month ago

the normie majority doesn’t really wanna talk about it, they don’t care about the reality they find themselves in, don’t care about their history, everything is primal to them, they can only relate to their surroundings, they don’t know why current affairs are the way they are, events just happen for the sake of happening, it’s like with atheists who think universe just happened out of nowhere.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

Normie just wants to grill, chill, and watch endless joggerball.

ExPraliteMonk
ExPraliteMonk
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

We hire representatives to represent our interests so we don’t have read and vote on every nitpicky piece of legislation.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  ExPraliteMonk
1 month ago

So they don’t do it for us.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Everyone wants to chill and grill but reight now nornie stopped watching ball which suggests things are getting as WRSA would put it “sporty” out there

Drew
Drew
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Can you blame them? That’s much more enjoyable than obsessing over pedophiles and satanists. Obviously, if that’s their main concern, then perhaps they ought not have the right to vote, but it would be a bit strange to knock someone for not being interested in depraved and/or esoteric matters.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

Every last one of them a product of public schools.

ChetRollins
ChetRollins
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

Honestly, they shouldn’t have to. Most people should just be able to live in their community with people who share their culture without thinking of anything happening thousands of miles away.
The fact we need them to pay attention now shows how horrifying the current situation is.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  ChetRollins
1 month ago

Slight disagreement, Chet. No, women and children (but I repeat myself) shouldn’t need to pay constant attention to politics and world affairs. Men, as the leaders they were designed to be, need to keep track of what’s going on and plan ahead. I spare no criticism of modern women, but men have to get back into authority and the mindset of future planners for their family and their people.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

comment image

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

Or, as my fairly-recent daughter-in-law told my son, “I’ll do the cooking and cleaning and making babies. You build a better world for us.”

Tirel
Tirel
Member
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

Awww?!!!!!

Drew
Drew
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

The old saw is that too many cooks spoil the soup. While each man ought to lead his home (property, wife and children), having a lot of men making decisions together is generally counter-productive and indecisive. We don’t need most men to be politically informed and involved, we just need enough men to do that.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

Good dig there at the end! As one of those atheists, I wanted to respond something like: The Theists want us to believe in an intial Creator. But even if that could be proved, Science is justified in asking “Very well, where did HE come from?” There is no way to identify the first cause. With a goal to establishing a truce on such untimately unanswerable questions: Can all sides agree that the Universe is a certain way, even if we can’t adequately explain how, why, or what came before. Alas, even that is a tall order. It’s understandable, maybe… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

The last few hundred years can be seen as a crisis of authority. Liberal democracy first attempted to re-base societal legitimacy on the god of Reason during the French Revolution. Eventually this proved unworkable and so the present system of increasingly crass mass democracy developed. The ultimate arbiter of everything is now just supposed to be whatever 51% of whomever happens to be living in an area thinks is correct regardless of its reasonableness. The nature of the crisis is illustrated by an old bit of computer humor that I will quote in full**: In the days when Sussman was… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by pozymandias
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  ChetRollins
1 month ago

and the Andrenochrome thing was also believable

Them bagging on Q, I think, is really them scared that the andrenocrome thing had a ring of truth to it

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

Elizabeth Bathory was centuries ahead of her time when it came to anti-aging treatments.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

As a Floridian, in school we had to learn all about the Fountain of Youth

This has been going on for some time lol

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

The Corps of Engineers long ago, mapped it, built a waterway and a dam, and now it irrigates a citrus orchard 🙂

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

I mean, we know Sandra Bullock (et al) smears severed baby foreskin on her face for “beauty treatments”; if you confess to that in public, what are you hiding?!?

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

The believable part is that the evil that animates the ruling class has no problem with child sacrifice. Whether or not they drink the blood for energy or whatever is allegorical. The fact is that we have scores of millions of our children imprisoned in a web of lies right now that is draining them of their vitality – their very futures, because Covid or Climate Change or Racism and so on. It is not the allegory that TPTB fear, in fact they often embrace the fantastical to keep the truth in plain sight obscured by the claims of the… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Screwtape
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Screwtape
1 month ago

brilliantly stated

WCiv...---...
WCiv...---...
1 month ago

Nihilism. When there is no check on our behavior, hedonism, greed, and selfishness is sure to follow. If there is no God to answer to, no higher authority, no shame, non-judgementalism, then morality is self defined, which means, anything goes. The mentality of a person who would pull it out and start working it in public! Patriotism, loyalty, selflessness, virtue, pride. What’s the point? Life is short, live it up, for tomorrow we die.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  WCiv...---...
1 month ago

also speaks to the lack of desire to continue one’s family tree That to me is something I just can’t get my head around. How can anyone not want his family name or his own DNA or blood to pass on, ideally into perpetuity? Once you mentally and spiritually make a break from that, who knows what happens to the person. I can’t see how Mother Nature would take kindly to it. In fact my belief is that nature turns the person psychotic so they become so undesirable for mating purposes that life can rid itself of these strange defects.… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

From one point of view, life’s sole purpose is to reproduce itself. Dawkins The Selfish Gene and I’m sure other books make this case very well. Evolution says, indeed that bad genes that do not favor survival tend to disappear. It’s also fair to call civilization a rebellion against Nature. Every time that we provide extra care for a person who suffers from a chronic, especially congenital, disease, we are being dysgenic (techncially, only if that individual breeds and passes on presumably inferior genes.) The argument is similar for other bad behaviors, even if there is not a clear genetic… Read more »

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

As a drollery afficianado – that there is exemplary.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
1 month ago

It is. Nonetheless, humanity is more than merely those of breeding age.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 month ago

True, but it does seem that the wisdom that comes with age does in fact benefit those of breeding age — completing the cycle

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Yes, but then why would Nature instill in us a “caring gene” for lack of a better term if it were evolutionarily disadvantageous? One of those paradoxes….

Captain Obvious
Captain Obvious
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

Yes, but then why would Nature instill in us a “caring gene” for lack of a better term if it were evolutionarily disadvantageous?

See my reply above here; John B Calhoun seemed to think that caring was LEARNED behavior, not inherited behavior.

Captain Obvious
Captain Obvious
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Evolution says, indeed that bad genes that do not favor survival tend to disappear. It’s also fair to call civilization a rebellion against Nature. John B. Calhoun doesn’t say this in so many words, but it’s difficult to read Death Squared and not come to the conclusion that Calhoun felt mammalian nurture – and even mammalian copulation – to be LEARNED behaviors, not inherited behaviors: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1644264/pdf/procrsmed00338-0007.pdf …Turning back to the end of Phase C, the seeds for eventual destruction may already be seen to have been sown. By midway in Phase C essentially all young were prematurely rejected by their… Read more »

Captain Obvious
Captain Obvious
Reply to  Captain Obvious
1 month ago

I suppose the Nature -over- Nurture interpretation of Calhoun’s work would go something like the following: At peak population density, only the most ruthlessly psychopathic of the rodent males & the most hopelessly narcissistic of the rodent females were able to fight through the masses in order to partake of sexual congress, but after several generations of selecting for those traits, the surviving rodents were so psychopathically narcissistic & narcissistically psychopathic that they couldn’t even be bothered to think naughtly little rodent thoughts about initiating copulation. In that interpretation, to the extent that “Civilization” was necessary to produce a hopelessly… Read more »

Maus
Maus
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

So, all those thousands of men and women who chose celibacy instead of family to be of greater service to a wider community (the Church refers to them as saints and holds them up as worthy of emulation) were actually unnatural defectives? Western Civilization begs to differ. When you want to promote the positive good of increasing the TFR, why must you resort to negative generalities? Instead of trying to shame those who have decided against biological parenthood, why not talk up the joys of children and family life. As my mother used to say, “You catch more flies with… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Maus
1 month ago

I get your point. My “answer” is that within any segment of the population are people who, in being celibate, provide a value to those around them. My uncle, for example, who never had kids, is an extra good uncle perhaps because of it. He has treated me as a son, which was a great benefit to me and gave me a different adult view of things my dad never could. I think there are people who know deep down that they shouldn’t have kids. For whatever reason. If they are comfortable with it, I presume it’s because it’s meant… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Falcone
3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

Brilliant essay at Counter Currents by Greg Johnson about love of own’s own and the importance of identity. A teaser: “Love of our own is a birthright we claim of others and an inherited obligation that the next generation claims of us.” Much more well worth reading.
https://counter-currents.com/2020/10/three-pillars-part-3/#more-122750

Tirel
Tirel
Member
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

I’ll. Be one of those… Breaks my heart… I. Would love to be the father of 12 white Catholics, but the world is set up against that , thanks to no-fault divorce! Thanks protestants!

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Tirel
1 month ago

So much of the angst people have I think traces to a simple lack of comfort in the world around them. They feel naked and alone in a cold cruel world. And when you have a big family, be it immediate or extended, you experience a calmness and groundedness (I am sounding like Updike with these “ness” suffixes) that, no matter what happens, you still feel that people are looking out for you and that makes life so much easier to deal with. Out here in Los Angeles with so many people without family around, there is a stark contrast… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Falcone
B124
B124
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

Family becomes more important especially as “diversity” increases. In an all white society of individualists you might get away with it but we are in an increasingly tribal world.

White trash (i use the term loosely) always have a team to play for. It’s the atomized bugman who is all on his own. I always know I can go home, and my dad brothers uncles are always on my side.

That’s why I plan to have a big family.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  WCiv...---...
1 month ago

Nihilism is not required. Whether or not a God exists is a matter of personal faith. As I understand it, Hume and others showed that morality cannot be derived from nature. Or, you can’t derive an “ought” from an “is.” Ultimately, all morality is a human invention. For example, many of us would probably agree that poor people popping out babies they can’t support is generally a bad thing for society. But consider that Nature only “cares” about reproducing the species. Whether the new creature will grow up in apalling poverty or in a stable middle-class home are irrelevant; indeed,… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Whether or not a God exists is a matter of personal faith.

Not really.The existence or not of God (however defined) is an absolute.What is a personal matter is whether to believe or not.

Tirel
Tirel
Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Good grief. The amount of atheists and permanent wandering doubters in the DR is really a turn off.

WCiv...---...
WCiv...---...
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Right, nihilism is not required. A population of people can decide to live together and share a set of values, agree on first principals, and even decide that some things are sacred. It’s when others, who do not share those beliefs invade that population, that trouble and conflict begins. Sacred values confirm a willingness on the part of a group of people to share beliefs, even when such beliefs are unprovable. It is called civilization, and that population can grow and thrive if they are willing to support one another and to protect it.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  WCiv...---...
1 month ago

Put otherwise, “the whole of the law is do as thou wilt.” Gee, same ol same ol.

Tirel
Tirel
Member
Reply to  Educated.redneck
1 month ago

“””Religious neutrality is an impossibility. No one can serve two masters. Either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be subject to the one and despise the other. That is God’s word and therefore an article of faith… There are no neutral governments, no neutral schools, no neutral press, no neutral clubs, no neutral families … This applies to the life of nations. Periods of neutrality are periods of transition, of groping indecision. They are times of twilight between day and night. After the time of neutrality comes the time of service of one master, in… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Eric Davenport
Alex
Alex
1 month ago

I think its an important point, in that the typical “ideological berzerkers” are selling out on all sides right now. Anyone remember Dan Rostenkowski and the Post Office Scandal or the House Banking Scandal of the 80’s and 90’s? This was equivalent to stealing from the petty cash drawer, but you would never find these folks doing anything that would actually impact the nation’s national security. Due to the global economy and America’s central place in it, there is no other way to get rich in DC, aside from selling out the country or acting as a clerk in wrapping… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Alex
Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  Alex
1 month ago

“Rosty” seems almost cute by comparison….

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Alex
1 month ago

Rostenkowski, at the very worst in the modern age, would be forbidden from engaging in foreign lobbying for six months, retroactive to the date he was busted. What a quaint memory, thanks.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 month ago

Indeed. When viewed in the context of present day Banksterism (where fines are paid with fiat money and nobody goes to jail for bribery, fraud, or money laundering) Rostenkowski is practically a model of probity.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Alex
1 month ago

Anyone remember Dan Rostenkowski

A curio – I was dining with a friend at Gene & Georgetti the day Rostenkowski was released from prison. Rosti and three others sat at a table by us, it was only the five of us in the restaurant plus staff, formally closed. My friend represented the owner. Outrageous amounts of the best food and booze flowed and I heard candid talk seldom heard since. That was the day I learned how shite actually works in America, and how our history was manufactured.

Crispin
Crispin
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
1 month ago

Looking forward to your book, Mr. Rodent.

Tirel
Tirel
Member
Reply to  Crispin
1 month ago

Hah!!!

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
1 month ago

Dating myslef here – but I can go all the way back to the Otto Kerener days and Sec of State Paul Powell’s shoe boxes of cash in his closet. More recenty – Rob Blago. Rosti, just another in a long line of IL….rascals.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Alex
1 month ago

but you would never find these folks doing anything that would actually impact the nation’s national security.

Underlying all of the insanity of elites is high level Hubris. The idea that America is supreme and nothing will undermine or even challenge that supremacy. They don’t see themselves “selling out” to China or anywhere else. Instead they see themselves conning those rubes out of a few shekels.

Biden inadvertently revealed that attitude months ago when he was asked about the threat from China and responded “China?, come on man, China ain’t a threat to the US.”

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

 The idea that America is supreme and nothing will undermine or even challenge that supremacy.

For all the wrong reasons, it is going to be absolutely hilarious watching the diversity go up against China or Russia.

Hell, I bet the diversity would struggle with Turkey in an actual stand-up fight.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Hell, I bet the diversity would struggle with Turkey in an actual stand-up fight.

What the hell are you talking about? You know you’ll be in trouble when you’re engaged by the guided missile cruiser USS Diversity flanked by the USS Empowerment and USS #StrongAndTrans.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 month ago

USS StunningAndBrave to the rescue!

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 month ago

More truthfully, USS DunningAndKnave.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 month ago

I knew it was over when they christened the USS Harvey Milk.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 month ago

God blind me! A quick Google reveals that USNS Harvey Milk is a replenishment oiler. Something tells me that Harvey, no doubt always appreciative of lubricant, is smiling down on us all.

Based5.0
Based5.0
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 month ago

Up at us. Up.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Remember how the troops sent to help the border patrol were whining that they had to eat MREs when there was a Jack in the Box in town?

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

Thanks.

The comments on that story are typical, depressing normie civnattery.

I thought pilots had to stay in pretty good physical shape. Neither of those young women appear to be in anything other than average condition for their age.

You’d think that is a must now, because military pilots will be replaced by cruise missiles and drones on all but the most specialized, delicate missions.

Last edited 1 month ago by The Wild Geese Howard
usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

If any lack of ability or a few needless deaths threaten our glorious diversity, well we can’t have that – that would be the real tragedy. Remember that asswipe general who said something quite similar after the Ft. Hood massacre?

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  Alex
1 month ago

Big Dan got shafted for having dipped into the cookie jar but that does not mean that everything got accounted for. We know that most people do negotiate down their indictment and skate away from the rest. I am not saying that Rosti had other issues, I do not know but I do not believe either that only big time urban pharmaceutical distributors get to plea down to a simple “non-violent possession” charge.

Ganderson
Ganderson
1 month ago

I know I’m gonna sound like my old 1970s commie self here, but I’d have difficulty voting for a Senatorial candidate whose husband was the Chairman of the NY Stock Exchange, or whatever he is. It supports your point that the GA Republican party didn’t say errr… no, you can’t run, it looks a bit dodgy.
Maybe Loeffler is our (to the extent I still consider myself a Republican) Ilhan Omar.

Milestone D
Milestone D
Reply to  Ganderson
1 month ago

My brother, who lives in Georgia, made the same observation to me yesterday. Loeffler has no qualifications and the stink of inherited money is off-putting at best. Yet the Ga GOP elevated her to high office for no other qualification other than access to money and perhaps that she looks good on tv. Bizarre.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Milestone D
1 month ago

Good looking and non threatening is a primary qualification for Senate today.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Milestone D
1 month ago

She and her husband both are transnational financialists who gave money to Romney. She is a globalist traitor.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Horace
1 month ago

Other than at the local level giving money to politicians strikes me as masochism. There are charities that do good work that could use the money and you’ll never be outspent by the donor class.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Ganderson
1 month ago

Honest Conservatives don’t want money men running the country either, Its one of the few things the Reds got right.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  abprosper
1 month ago

I like a doctor analogy. Dr’s have two primary functions: diagnosis (what is wrong) and prescription (treatment plan to fix what is wrong). Genuine right, as opposed to money-first establishment cuckservative, has a significant overlap with the left in diagnosis. It is in prescription where the left goes off the deep end. Their prescriptions fail every single time.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Horace
1 month ago

As I’ve noted before, Communist are very good at diagnosis but the only treatment they know is bleeding.

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  Ganderson
1 month ago

right but look at who is his opponent, a commie https://twitter.com/i/status/1320741979764879360

sentry
sentry
1 month ago

“It is better to entrust the government to one than to many” Thomas Hobbes
the more politicians(with executive power) a country has the higher the chance they’ll sell their people to israelites & other similar figures(universal truth)

Last edited 1 month ago by sentry
OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

I think that this is one of the most important points for any society to consider. Unfortunately, along with blank-slatism and other fads, the concept of democracy is embedded in the populace. I recall an instance where I was talking about the benefits of ‘single person rule’, and was immediately taken to task for not respecting what ‘democracy had done’. Oh, I respect it alright… It has wrought hell. I think that chapter 5 or 6 of Hayek’s Road to Serfdom has the best explanation of the problem of agreement between various parties. The idea being that people can endlessly… Read more »

sentry
sentry
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 month ago

politicians have sympathies to their sugar daddies, apparently 80% of uk politicians are traitors, the definition of democracy is turning your country into a whore for foreigners to buy and s**t on, excuse my language.
democracy with a white minority will be even worse

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

Only 80%? Do you want to know what legislation has recently received uniform bi-partisan support in the US Congress? 1: Condemning “Q” and 2: Giving Israel veto power over US arms sales to countries they don’t like.

Kentucky Headhunter
Kentucky Headhunter
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

But the many are merely a collection of “one”s. Functionally, there is no difference.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Kentucky Headhunter
1 month ago

why would an absolute monarch sale his country? what does he gain from it?

what can chinese offer him? huaweis and silk?
what can some saudis offer him? instagram whores?
why can’t israelites buy putin off?

why would masons bother getting rid of kings if they were just as trashy as biden?

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

War debt to the same people bankrolling his enemies. Perpetual war and revolution are good for business. Can’t have peace and stability or the financial system would collapse. Near the end it’s obvious that’s what capitalism amounts to.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Paintersforms
1 month ago

The Romanian also said everybody had enough, Romania/Hungarian Transylvania is rich, until C was forced to accept the loan. The Byelorussian said the same. Belarus was offered a large IMF loan to impose lockdowns. Belarus said, NYET, and presto they got a color revolution. Others from communist countries say they miss the low crime, the heritage and traditions, the families, that everyone had a job and place to live. They didn’t have much, but they always had enough. What struck me, though, was the near tears in his eyes, when he stopped his car in the Caucasus, inhaled deeply of… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 month ago

I’d be happy with re-regulation and periodic debt forgiveness. Just enough to keep the money men disciplined.

Let the rich keep their mammon as long as they respect our liberty.

Last edited 1 month ago by Paintersforms
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

The Romanian told me, “we traded one Ceausescu for a thousand Ceausescus”.

Last edited 1 month ago by Alzaebo
Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
1 month ago

Sometimes the United States ruling class seems to be engaged more in a fire sale than participating in a corrupt marketplace. The attitude seems to be get yours while the gettin’s good. The amorality is bloodless. As for Charlie Trie, that sort of was the marker. Bush I began the betrayal of the United States on the altar of globalism. It is easy to forget, but the Clinton Administration did a 180 between its first and second terms. The first was hostile to offshoring, mass migration and foreign intervention. The second was full-scale globalism with the attendant deindustrialization, mass migration,… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 month ago

Sometimes the United States ruling class seems to be engaged more in a fire sale than participating in a corrupt marketplace.

Just lay back and think of it like the bust outs in Goodfellas and the Sopranos.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Heh. Whenever anyone here uses the term ‘no show job’, I think of ol’ Tony and his crew.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 month ago

I still voted for Trump but I believe Trump will do a 180 in his second term. They all throw their base under the bus in the second term.

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

I also voted for President Trump but I disagree with you for I believe that he will be different in his second term and will throw out all the scumbags that tried to sink him in his 1st term, no mercy this time.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Bilejones
1 month ago

So if he’s reelected he’s going to fire the people he appointed?

Drake
Drake
Reply to  RoBG
1 month ago
RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Drake
1 month ago

FWIW I want him to fire (mostly) everyone. Haspell was publicly never/anti Trump. Girdusky et al. pointed it out. So what made him hire her? (I know, Javanka.)

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  RoBG
1 month ago

I’d much prefer arrests.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  RoBG
1 month ago

Genuinely asking the “downvoters:” Are you arguing that he didn’t appoint them? Or that he had no choice? Or that it’s 4D chess? Just say what you believe. You might actually persuade someone. I’m persuadable. I actually welcome it, because what I’m seeing is dark.

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

My support for Trump is best summed up by the meme:
TRUMP
Because Fuck You, That’s Why!

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

He already did to an extent. The deplorable president now works hard for blacks, hispanics, and suburban women.

I think that was largely due to the Charlottesville fallout. At least that’s when I noticed a change.

Peabody
Peabody
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

If he did a 180 wouldn’t that mean he’d actually be supporting and protecting us though?

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 month ago

Valuing short term gains without considering long term costs. One of humanity’s worst sins.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Why should they, when this one short life is all we get? That whole body of consideration is what the religious collapse into a 3-letter shorthand- G.O.D.

It makes things easier to grasp without all the verbiage.

Last edited 1 month ago by Alzaebo
Ace Rimmer
Ace Rimmer
1 month ago

The moon belongs to everyone
The best things in life are free
The stars belong to everyone
They gleam there for you and for me

The flowers in spring, the robins that sing
The moonbeams that shine
They’re yours, they’re mine

And love can come to everyone
The best things in life are free

And love can come to everyone
The best things in life are free

Last edited 1 month ago by Ace Rimmer
usNthem
usNthem
1 month ago

Society can’t function in an open air market rooted in perfidious treachery ruled by knaves. Thus, the falling apart as we’re seeing in real time. Trump is seemingly the only person in that swampish hellhole (or anywhere slimy politicians thrive) who isn’t on the take and actually has the best interests of the country and people at heart – for the most part. I’ve lost any loyalty to this dog dump of a land mass. The only way it’s coming back is to see a bunch of these traitorous, seditious scabs incarcerated (at worst) or dealt with more forcefully, shall… Read more »

Barn Jollycorn
Barn Jollycorn
1 month ago

The critical questions are:

  1. Who took the video?
  2. Who had it and was using it as blackmail?
  3. Who else is being blackmailed?

Any discussion of Hunter Biden (as with Epstein-Maxwell) without addressing the question of blackmail, and the obvious threat to any conceivable notion of national security, is either distraction or calculated omission.

Sandmich
Reply to  Barn Jollycorn
1 month ago

At this point in time I’m not sure what the point of blackmail would be, there doesn’t seem to be any price paid no matter what these people do.

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
1 month ago

“At the devil’s booth are all things sold. Each ounce of dross costs its ounce of gold.” ― James Russell Lowell, The Vision of Sir Launfal.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
1 month ago

Welp – it’s obvious you can’t run a country like this. Hell – you can’t run a party run like that. Stick a fork in the Donks- they’re done like dinner. Every single point you made about the rule of knaves is true – but you left out the most important point: they eventually self correct. Eventually they are removed, or they remove themselves. To ensure a proper cleansing of the political class conscience, though – that would require real punishment for the perps as a warning to the others. It’s coming, eventually. There is no other option… and Leftie… Read more »

Joey Jünger
Joey Jünger
1 month ago

The explicit nature of this may be a new thing, but it was always implicit in the American religion of the worship of the immigrant. Russia or China or other real countries are great because of the mystic cord that connects the people who live there to the people who lived there hundreds and sometimes thousands of years before. America is great (Make America Great Again!) because you can come here and earn more money, provide for your family, start your own business, etc. Those are all good things, but they are bread alone. Hopefully the people at Trump rallies… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Joey Jünger
1 month ago

The explicit nature of this may be a new thing, but it was always implicit in the American religion of the worship of the immigrant. Yes. This was always going to be an easy sell to Normie. The US is simply too easy to present as a country of immigrants; and that’s all you need to tell people. Never mind that some immigrants built more than others. That said, it remains to be seen how England’s almost entirely white 1000 year history will save her… But people here know that to call us a land of immigrants (which really is… Read more »

Maus
Maus
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 month ago

But the reality is that blacks (Africans), browns (Spanish mestizos) and reds (so-called Indians) have always been present in the historical American project that became the United States. It’s just that America has always been like a high-stakes poker table, piled with natural resources, and open to anyone with the ante. The whites (Europeans) came, played better and the others lost their stakes. Envy has driven them to claw it back and keep a seat at the table; but ultimately that’s not in the cards.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

This is again reminiscent of late republican Rome. Where the entire senatorial class was engaged in one grift after another, frequently involving bribes from foreigners for influence.

Barnard
Barnard
1 month ago

Far be it for me defend the integrity of member of the Senate, but that story was overblown. Out of the four, the only one who did anything questionable was Richard Burr. Ron Johnson sold shares of a small company he had been planning on selling for months. Feinstein sold a small amount of stock in a company that didn’t take much of a hit and Loeffler has almost no input into how her investments are managed. She should have had it in a blind trust for appearances sake, but there was no evidence she instructed her brokerage to make… Read more »

Sandmich
Reply to  Barnard
1 month ago

Your statement rings true, though probably because when it comes to graft, clever stock market trades are not a great vehicle for large amounts of guaranteed cash (I mean, unless you’re Hillary Clinton and someone sells you some stock options to their own stock at a set strike price).

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Who else has been willing to make a deal with the Chinese?

I’d say it should be obvious the MSM is in the Chicom tank.

What reason would anyone have in remaining loyal to a system where the people at the top of it are willing to sell your loyalty?

There is none.

As Brad Pitt’s character says at the end of the film Killing Them Softly, “America is a business. That’s all it is.”

Last edited 1 month ago by The Wild Geese Howard
Rich
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

I think the MSM is in a couple of tanks.

Epaminondas
Member
1 month ago

Another question arises. Who would now want to join the military and sacrifice his life for such a system?

whitney
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 month ago

I have wondered if that isn’t part of the PTSD that some servicemen come back with. I think most of the ones that join up don’t realize they’re supporting something evil until they get there and realize that they’re fighting on the wrong side

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 month ago

aren’t there families in the south who still value the military?

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

Not just in the South.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

It’s a close tie with college football.

Rich
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 month ago

Kids that don’t see much of a job future, want food, a roof, and figure the experience might help them land a job when they’re out. American dream is dead for them.
But there are a few patriots. They have Trump signs on their trucks and risk getting beat up for it.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Rich
1 month ago

As do I.

Milestone D
Milestone D
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 month ago

That’s an interesting point. I’m at 22+ years in the Navy, and I can’t honestly say that I’d recommend it to my kids. My year in Iraq was a big eye-opener: I realized soon after I got in theater that my det was there b/c it was easier to send military members to Iraq than it was to change the peacetime-tailored contracting and fuel accounting administrative regulations. Now having worked in the Pentagon for several years, I’m inclined to think Smedley Butler’s “War is a Racket” was spot-on. Notice that among an organization that fosters a Pantheon of decorated generals,… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Milestone D
1 month ago

Smedley Butler was a great man, and is not nearly as appreciated or widely known as he ought to be.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

I think his first paragraph should be an entire discipline of real economics.

Last edited 1 month ago by Alzaebo
Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

Alternatively, the elites think they are selling access and influence, rather than their honor and virtue and patriotism. Buying and selling access and influence have a very long tradition in American governing. Indeed, they arguably enshrined in the constitution itself. Doing so is an inescapable aspect of the America political system. So it’s not much of a stretch for these people to extend that Vertically to foreigners and also horizontally to family members and the bureaucracy. It’s been a long standing thesis of mine that republican empires morph into autocracies because the evolved structures and norms that supported republican government… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

Is this why they hate us? Hatred being the only natural response to their guilty conscience? Our faces are constant reminders of who they were, how they were innocents before selling themselves out. Now they have a form of syphilis of the soul that has made them insane.

Sandmich
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
1 month ago

For as corrupt as the Chinese are, I cannot imagine a bribe big enough to have Xi import 500 million joggers to his nation.

diconez
diconez
1 month ago

More 1789 fallout.

Member
1 month ago

One consequence of globalization has been the transfer of trillions of USD to China as payment for Chinese made goods. So what do they do with it? Some gets invested in US T Bills, some gets used to buy real estate in lucrative urban markets (SF, LA, NYC, Seattle, London, Vancouver), some is used to buy resources from the ME and Africa, and some buys influence in corruptible regimes. The irony here is that the Chinese bought politicians in America with their own money. The libertarians who advocate for globalism can now be denounced as traitors, selling their fellow countrymen… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
1 month ago

As Lewis pointed out: “We make men without chests and expect of them virtue and enterprise. We laugh at honour and are shocked to find traitors in our midst. We castrate and bid the geldings be fruitful.”

We’re approaching the end result of materialism. With everything having a price, pretty soon people themselves will have a price (again). A return to the Servile State, but somehow even worse.

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  BadThinker
1 month ago

From the Aboltion of Man – it remains the most perfect metaphorical comment on the subject of honor I’ve yet to come across.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
1 month ago

I still have not read it. I think I may need to. The essays on this site as well as commenters recommendations are solid gold. Long may it continue.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 month ago

If you are audio/video inclined, this guy does a great job with many of lewis’ essays from the book.

https://www.youtube.com/user/CSLewisDoodle

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 month ago

All of Lewis’ writing take considerable concentration (at least it does for me)

whitney
Member
Reply to  BadThinker
1 month ago

Orwell pointed that out also. How all progress moves towards safety and the Virtues of the past won’t be applicable in a completely safe world and new virtues will arise. He called that one. It’s a good essay. Chapter 12 in the road to Wigan Pier

Mis(ter)Anthrope
1 month ago

The linked article about the Chinese buying up important parts of the American economy is interesting. But haven’t we had this problem for much longer in the form of Jews who openly confess to being Israel firsters?

Sheldon Adelson and Haim Saban come to mind. But they are just two examples of many.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
1 month ago

Of course, in a healthy society, Las Vegas casinos and insipid children’s television would not be considered important parts of the economy. That Adelson and Saban were able to make that kind of money in those industries is a sign as to how sick and rotten our society already was when they started.

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  Barnard
1 month ago

Good point. Perhaps Adelson and Saban were bad examples. How about our national banking system?

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
1 month ago

How many people know about BCCI, GS, JPM, CITI, HBSC, and their myriad convictions? They’re too busy trying to keep their heads above water. They just want a living wage and a reasonable commute.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
1 month ago

Haim Saban. Power Rangers money. WTF.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
1 month ago

Speculation: Jews are traditionally the people without a country to call their own. I’m aware that Israel has existed since 1948 yet this doesn’t change my argument. A large percentage of Jews have and will continue to remain in their Host Country (e.g. USA) for various reasons. Not the least of these would be, if they’re rich, they probably own large chunks of America, just as does any wealthy American. So yes, the USA’s Jews may feel an allegiance to Israel to varying degrees, even hold dual citizenship, but if they are rich they aren’t stupid. Whatever its strengths, Israel… Read more »

Bruno the Arrogant
Bruno the Arrogant
1 month ago

Loyalty, honor, virtue, patriotism are just a few examples of things that have value, but you can’t put a price on them. You cannot put a price in your good name, for example, but you defend your good name, because it has value so dear that it cannot be purchased. Oh, dear. Actually, those things very much have an economic value, and we have all kinds of civil and legal procedures to affix a price to them. It’s why we have libel laws, and civil judgements awarding damages to your good name. We even used to have criminal statutes covering… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Bruno the Arrogant
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
1 month ago

Very good point, but it all also results in bizarre distortions, which begets an extreme sense of entitlement.

Say Levontavius Brown loses his hand while on the construction job site (suspend your disbelief for a moment). He sues. Judge says the employer owes him $50 million.

“Dayum” thinks his girlfriend. “Sheet. That some REAL money.”

Now everyone in the hood acts like they are worth literally $50 million. And when they don’t get it?

Reparations of some $10 trillion for all blacks.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

I don’t even oppose reparations for blacks, at least not in principle. The problem is, it will never end. Any black kid born the day after will want his gibs. And the rim and jewlery companies will become reliant on the income and lobby life-long reparations. As it is, we have had reparations for at least 50 years. Whites are the only net tax payers. Fifty plus years of gibs has produced dysfunction and calls for even more gibs. This was just in direct payments. How much is the loss of places like Baltimore, Detroit, Camden etc etc etc? A… Read more »

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

Tarstarkas, all points well taken. There is however in my mind, one point that overrides your practicality. The payment of reparations implicitly admits that the descendants of slavery and the Jim Crow era (all now eliminated for generations) are in some way, legitimate victims, and further that monetary reparations will compensate/repair the damage.

The above would seem to fly in the face of HBD science and therefore does not address the root of the problem, which in essence is diversity itself. All men are not equal, equal men are not free.

Last edited 1 month ago by CompscI
tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  CompscI
1 month ago

Well, I agree. Blacks might be worse off it you only look at the negatives for them. But on net, they are WAY better than they would otherwise be. To be honest, I wasn’t looking at it from that point of view. I was looking at it more as a payment for white guilt that would make it go away and allow us to reassert control. A one time payment, if it were “one and done” would be money well spent. Of course, it will never be “one and done” and so it’s a moot point. It really is amazing… Read more »

Horace
Horace
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

I look at our Americanized Africans as the fattest, most spoiled Africans that ever were, are, or ever will be again after this abomination of a multicultural empire becomes an historical footnote. No one else on this Earth including ANY of their own kind, would have died to free them, then let them stay and dyscivilize the place (the French have started calling the process ensauvagement), or tried to help them as we have. No one else will, ever again. They have burned their bridges with pretty much everyone but dwindling stupid white leftists. I think that if Trump wins… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Horace
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Horace
1 month ago

…and perhaps the saddest thing, whether to the starry-eyed Egalitarian when she finally swallows that red pill, or even the jaded race realist who still feels some compassion for the worse-off: there is only so much that can be done to help the Blacks improve their status, and most of what can be done may already have been done.
While my above comment is clearly “racist,” may I note that the analysis can be applied to intractible problems far beyond America’s black underclass.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  CompscI
1 month ago

I don’t see how “Reparations for Slavery” could possibly be legally justified. We aren’t allowed to punish descendants of a criminal for an ancestor’s crime. I would think it equivalent that you couldn’t arbitrarily reward descendants of a victim for wrongs suffered. If such were ever passed, just imagine the precedent it would set. Anyone, no matter how far back in the past, who had a plausible case of victimization in his family tree could demand compensation. All that being said, it is still entirely possible, indeed likely, that a future (socialist) government would pass out the gibs, because catering… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Ben the Layabout
Bilejones
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

You need new principles,

I don’t even oppose reparations for blacks, at least not in principle

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Bilejones
1 month ago

I don’t recognize the victims or the perpetrators. In civil court you sue the actual perpetrators not the ethnic or tribal group they come from. Well at least it used to be that way.
If we are to play that game then we need to sue for trillions in damages from the blacks.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  David Wright
1 month ago

I’m afraid Bilejones is right. I need new principles! 🙂

Good luck collecting that lawsuit. Gold teef and rims.

I was watching a G-man podcast the other day and he mentioned something called Afrofuturism. This conversations reminds me of this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfBpjkgn5pY
It’s a collection of Afrofuturism shorts. This is unintentionally hilarious. Especially the third story.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

Thanks for link. I will watch it. While Parliament/Funkadelic’s normal fare was never to my taste, anyone who loves hard rock guitar must audition their timeless “Maggot Brain,” with a profound poem at the beginning.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOKn33-q4Ao

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

I agree that some compensation to them is warranted. I agree in principle. Only insofar that if “equality” is what a country lives and dies by, it cannot be a hypocrite to such a grand extent.

But we have paid them back through welfare, AA, cutting them slack, trying to hold them to a different set of standards that makes more natural sense to them and comports with their natural tendencies and so forth.

Debt’s been paid

Last edited 1 month ago by Falcone
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

The debt was paid, but not by those who brought them at 10 times the price of an Irishman- because all the Irish slaves had died clearing the land. LeRoy just picked the cotton.

Sidvic
Sidvic
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

If the reparations include a one-way ticket to Africa… well, perhaps we can negotiate.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Sidvic
1 month ago

Liberian Beef Industry Council slogan (proposed): “Immigrants. It’s what’s for dinner.” 😐

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
1 month ago

and let me add too. You are a bit mistaken on your larger point. I know of many instances where a person was wronged and all he wants is an apology. Strangest thing is that many defendants would rather settle for a few million than issue a simple apology. Tells me that that apology is worth something. In fact, more than they are willing to spend.

What does that say? It says that their honor is not for sale, or that it the person harmed isn’t worth their honor.

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

Good deductive reasoning. I would also add, in my understanding of a “true” apology—something rarely seen today with our political/business class—monetary damages, or “making things physically right”, would be naturally forthcoming and would not be a product of a court decision.

Maus
Maus
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
1 month ago

Actually, governments used the rule of law to impose an imperfect price construct on intangibles like personal honor to enforce their monopoly on violence. Prior to this legal fiction, men were all to conscious that private vengeance was the only exacting way to redress the damage to one’s honor. Most people are glad that this burden on civilization has been mitigated; so they accept the law’s ersatz substitution of a bloodless price as the measure of honor or loyalty’s worth.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Maus
1 month ago

Yes. Pretty sure America never had it, but before trial by judge or jury there was trial by battle. Just like on Game of Thrones, you or your hired man literally fought to the death with the opponent. I guess a lingering vestige of that was the concept of the Duel, but I don’t think you got the option to decline in Trial by Battle. There are good things to be said for our current justice system, imperfect though it may be.

Falcone
Falcone
1 month ago

Remember how there was a moral imperative behind abortion — the morality being, a good and responsible parent dare not bring a soul into this world without making at least $50,000 a year? That’s a simplification to make a point. The point being, that there was a morality behind it, or perhaps an ethics or civic virtue, that financial responsibility must precede parenthood. Regardless of one’s position on that point, in time that was hardly the point. What drives the issue now is simply millions of not billions of dollars raked in from the sale of baby parts. Greed drives… Read more »

Din C. Nuttin
Din C. Nuttin
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

Spencer Tracy in Hemmingway’s “Old Man and the Sea.”

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
1 month ago

The elite have given us draft dodgers, bone spur victims, computer nerds who become multi billionaires, bug eyed creeps that own the Washington Post, and a army of feminists and homosexuals that follow the elite around and play in the power games. Of course we also got a good dose of the affinity network of the usual suspects all mixed into the stew, along with the Chinese Communist Party, now a wing of the Democratic Party. And we realize everyone is bought? Or at least the majority of everyone? We in the dissident movement have seen this for some time.… Read more »

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
1 month ago

Actually the CCP is now a wing of both establishment parties. We should not be so hard on just the democrats.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
1 month ago

I strongly agree. ‘Cocaine’ Mitch is a poster hoodlum for Republican-flavored globalists.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
1 month ago

I think Joe Biden and Nancy Pelosi were ALWAYS crooks. These are the type of people attracted to politics.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

Small time crooks

If they were meant to be civilization-selling crooks, they wouldn’t be showing the signs of people broken morally and spiritually

SixxSigma
SixxSigma
1 month ago

I worry that this Hunter story has no legs. It’s being circulated in repub circles but Joe Normie has yet to be persuaded of its authenticity. As a conservative myself, the whole thing just seems a little underhanded and is one giant whataboutism. Let’s look at this through the eyes of normie.  People remember Biden’s comment in the first debate about his son struggling with drugs and his pride in watching him overcome those issues. People are emotionally affected by stories like that. Then Trump comes along with this muckraking story and I can definitely see how normies will not… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  SixxSigma
1 month ago

As bad a Joe is, I think it is hard for Americans to accept that the guy they have “known” for decades is a traitor. It’s even hard for me to accept that he is, for all intents and purposes, a Chinese asset That said, it is NOT hard for me to accept that Hunter is. There is no mental gymnastics needed for that. But then it make no sense that if the son is, that the father is innocent. That doesn’t compute. So there is some conflict going on here. But once that connection is made, that father is… Read more »

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  SixxSigma
1 month ago

As a conservative myself, the whole thing just seems a little underhanded and is one giant whataboutism.

Let’s say you’re the Vice President of the United States and you have a crackhead son who saves photos of himself screwing hookers. OK, it’s not necessarily on you that your son is a fuck up.
But now let’s say that your crackhead son who probably couldn’t hold down a job as fry cook at McDonalds is paid millions of dollars by foreign interests. Why do you think they chose your son?

Tempest meet Teapot
Tempest meet Teapot
Reply to  Federalist
1 month ago

Because they understand that a Reality TV show about the crackhead son of an American Vice President will get incredible ratings and bring laughter to the Han people.
C’mon, man!

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  SixxSigma
1 month ago

MSM doesn’t carry the story (Hunter Biden) much, and when it does they downplay. That’s to be expected. However, every organ of “news” I tend to listen to does play it up. Radio of course, Youtube, this blog, etc. You perceive possible backlash from Joe Normie coupled with incredulity. Perhaps. And of course, the Dem’s have wrote this off long ago. My reading of the importance of the Hunter story is to demonize the opposition ever more in order to drive the “Trump voters” to the polls in record numbers—not to convert anyone from Biden to Trump. It’s a “turnout”… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  CompscI
1 month ago

Every text I get from the Trump Campaign makes me want to vote for him less.

WJ0216
WJ0216
Reply to  SixxSigma
1 month ago

It’s not “whataboutism” at all. It’s about a dipshiite son of a vp who knows nothing about energy getting paid 2 mill a year by Ukraine for a do nothing job in a Ukrainian energy company. It’s about dumb old Joe bragging that he got the prosecutor looking into the issue fired. It’s about Trump being impeached for trying to bring this to light. Kinky sex and drugs and adultery don’t resonate any more thanks to Bill Clinton but abuse of family privilege does

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  SixxSigma
1 month ago

Nick Fuentes credited Michelle Malkin for pointing out Hunter in 2011.
What is amazing the the wide range of boards of directors and consultancies he was involved in.

That they are all doing this, and have done so for decades. The depth and breadth of institutionalized corruption is beyond astonishment.

Dutch
Dutch
1 month ago

Milo Minderbinder. “Catch-22”, written by Joseph Heller, was a playing out of Eisenhower’s warning about the military-industrial complex. Globoschlomo basically inhabits the things it fears, and everything is for sale. Have your bombers bomb your own side, if it pays the check. The last act is to entirely abandon the joint, in a rowboat to a far shore. The movie is a quick 2 hours.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
1 month ago

Their slogan should be “build back cheaper and gayer” That way their children will get the same opportunity when it collapses.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

2035: Make America Glam Again

TomA
TomA
1 month ago

First the good news. Their numbers are quite small. We’re not talking tens of thousands, but at most several thousand that are the core of the disease; the key power brokers and sell-outs. There are over 200,000 highly skilled hunters in Wisconsin alone, and don’t get me started on Texas (no disrespect to the rest of the country). The solution is obvious. Only Jackboots stand in the way, and even that has a solution.

Last edited 1 month ago by TomA
BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  TomA
1 month ago

So when Bob shows up at your house after a stolen election wearing a MAGA hat and asking you to drop everything, leave your job, family, and mortgage, and join the 1st Wisconsin Militiamen, you’re going along?

Normie ain’t doing that. Will require far, far more pain to get to that point.

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  BadThinker
1 month ago

No, and I would not expect you or anyone else to do so. I would ask, “What is the plan?” Explain that and I’ll consider your request.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  BadThinker
1 month ago

I have advised repeatedly that the militia model DOES NOT WORK in this modern era. Do not go there unless you want a one-way express ticket to a detention camp. The vast majority of top hunters hunt alone. Take your Red Herring elsewhere. No sale.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  TomA
1 month ago

What is a free market but millions of individuals making individual decisions?

A hunter relative explained to me hunting law, that the state wants hunters to take ‘spiked’ deer.

Deer antlers grow misformed, with a mere spike in place of one antler, due to excessive inbreeding. Herd health is restored when the defectives are removed from the breeding population.

Somehow, that seems exactly right in our current dilemma.

Last edited 1 month ago by Alzaebo
tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  TomA
1 month ago

Complete and utter fantasy. The 3%, patriots, 2nd amendment types etc are the most unreliable people there are.
Even if they weren’t total cowards, they are totally unprepared to fight the cops. They have silly fantasies of shooting at the military doing confiscation round-ups door to door, like something in their tortured fantasies.
The only thing they have ever even made any noise about is taking the guns while their daughters are turned into mudsharks and catwomen.
Hunters and the rest of them all keep their rifles safely locked up in safes unloaded. They are completely irrelevant.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

Intelligence matters (hunters check). Skill matters (hunters check). Stealth matters (hunters check). Motivation matters (when they come for your rifle, motivation check).

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  TomA
1 month ago

Motivation matters (when they come for your rifle, motivation check).

What good are weapons when the only injury sufficient to motivate you to use it is the taking of the weapon?
The founding fathers fought the revolution for far less than we tolerate on a daily basis. They would spit in our faces and call us cowards and worms. We deserve it.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

IMHO they fought the revolution because screw parliament, we’ve got a good gig here ruling these places and why the heck should those hacks get a piece of the pie?

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

Maybe but when you look at a Trump rally with, say, 20,000 people in attendance and, say, if only 3% are willing to fight back against the impending “trannytyranny” that is 600 dedicated people in one place. Now multiply that with the number of rallies he held just in the last 4 weeks and you can have a serious opposition that would be very painful to suppress, admittedly painful to both sides.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago
McCool
McCool
1 month ago

Scotlands Robbie Burns wrote of it hundreds of years ago..

What force or guile could not subdue,
Thro’ many warlike ages,
Is wrought now by a coward few,
For hireling traitor’s wages.
The English steel we could disdain,
Secure in valour’s station;
But English gold has been our bane –
Such a parcel of rogues in a nation!

Cromwell
Cromwell
Reply to  McCool
1 month ago

He was a liar.Henry VIII broke the Scots and let them keep their country if they agreed that he was their overlord. England liberated the Scots from the French during Elizabeth 1’s reign. They literally begged to be incorporated into England- she turned ’em down. Cromwell conquered ’em when they double-crossed the English near the end of the civil war they inititiated. Cromwell gave them back their country. The Scots ,again, begged to join the UK after they went bankrupt in a jealous fit trying to compete with the English colonies in the Americas. Scots claim they want independence but… Read more »

UKer
UKer
Reply to  Cromwell
1 month ago

You are right, Cromwell, about more English than Scots wanting independence for Scotland.
We English say that if the Scots really, truly wanted independence then they would allow English people to vote on the issue. The Jocks would be gone in a heartbeat.
Of course, the really funny thing about Nicola Sturgeon and the rest of the Scots wanting independence from Westminster is they are desperate to be ruled by Berlin and their vassal state, the EU in Brussels. Everybody wants independence from one thing but dependence on someone else.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Leaving aside (in the Biden case) the issues of drug abuse or pornography: it’s not even clear that Biden (or his son) did anything illegal. I’ll admit I haven’t followed the case closely, nor will I. But the core problem remains: influence is for sale, and it’s hard to even make it a scandal anymore. As someone once said, and it certainly applies to politcal influence: “The real crime is what is legal, not what is illegal.” In the broadest sense, the Biden Laptop flapadoodle is no different from business as usual in DC. For instance, the roles of lobbyists… Read more »

Last edited 1 month ago by Ben the Layabout
Tempest meet Teapot
Tempest meet Teapot
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

“I’ll admit I haven’t followed the case closely, nor will I.”

Then how about not commenting on it.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Tempest meet Teapot
1 month ago

I hardly did, but if you noticed, the rest of my post deals very closely with Z’s essay topic today.

Sidvic
Sidvic
Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

They have texts and emails where Hunter lays out the apportionment of the loot. 10% for the big guy. Also Joe gets 50% of hunters salary. Apparently Hunter also pay some expenses.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Sidvic
1 month ago

Tax evasion on Joe’s part would be easy to prove if anyone at the IRS cared to look into it.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

I have to admit that, by your logic, ridding the country of treasonous vermin is actually patriotic self-defense rather than illegal. Whew, now my conscious is clear.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
1 month ago

This is why I have the opinions I have. I’m very anti “honor the troops” and roll my eyes at “the thin blue line.” These are just enforcers of an unholy establishment. An establishment that would sell you out in a heartbeat. George Carlin used the term “the owners of this country.” They used to be smart and want the population happy, but that was decades ago when the threat of global communism loomed large. Today it’s every man woman and child for his or her self. That’s just the way it is, and the country is just a big… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 month ago

They still want the population happy. They just have believed their own bullshit about what happy entails, and thus made the population miserable.

Last edited 1 month ago by BadThinker
JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  BadThinker
1 month ago

I’m not sure they care at all about that. If they do, yes, it would be in the narrow confines of living in a cramped, overpriced condo with a cat, using public transportation and spending paychecks on overpriced sashimi.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  BadThinker
1 month ago

They don’t US happy. They want us petrified of antifa and BLM

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 month ago

One of the harder things for me is to let go of my respect for the military. Especially since my dad was a Marine and one of the most amazing men I’d ever met was an Admiral. But when my son joined the Navy and I started seeing where this all was going with all of the foreigners in the service, how blacks couldn’t even pass the swim part of basic training, how blacks were dancing on the lawns of the base like they were in the ghetto and no one said anything, that the captain of his destroyer was… Read more »

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

They’ll never win another war. Unless it’s against the Netherlands. Eventually the Chinese will make that clear when they take Taiwan in a few years.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 month ago

No argument here

And if Mattis was the best warrior we had? Yikes ! I wouldn’t follow that guy into a fight with the girl scouts

Last edited 1 month ago by Falcone
3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

My late father-in-law was a career army officer, jump wings and ranger tab and all. And my husband, like you, had a hard time of letting go of that. But he now says it was all a waste – his father’s entire career, since the country’s been turned over to Han, pajeet, and sub-Saharans. None of the work or risk or sacrifice was worth it. This iteration of America isn’t worth crap.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

Sad and true. If you love America, you have to hate what it’s become.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

Yep. And my sense of things is that our military members were used and their virtue and patriotism exploited, but every military person I know comes to a similar realization and doesn’t seem the least bit bitter about it, which I find good. Bitterness can eat away at you, and I’d hate to see the millions of decent former and current military embittered. What was interesting to me was that with the Iraq War against Hussein, every military family member, including my dad and father in law, were against it. The people pushing for it had never served. Out of… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 month ago

Mall of America, current video

Maus
Maus
1 month ago

For a culture soaked in the subjective relativism of post-modernism, the corollary of your Rule of Knaves price theory is that anyone who isn’t being cozened with bribes and honey pots is essentially worthless. The guy who has no grasp of honor or virtue as objectively valuable human traits is left with the sour taste in his gut that a shitheel like Hunter Biden is more worthwhile than he is in the world’s eyes. That’s one hell of a black pill.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Maus
1 month ago

I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they do not belong to the world, just as I do not belong to the world.”

Also hard to swallow, especially in the materialistic age.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Maus
1 month ago

That’s the feeling I was starting to feel under Obama, that if you aren’t in politics or connected to the political establishment then you’re worthless.

And my feelings weren’t unjustified. There was creeping sense the state was becoming supreme.

My entire sense of Obama was this: “I made it to the presidency, if you can’t? tough shit. I got mine. If you can’t get yours, it’s your problem.”

Last edited 1 month ago by Falcone
AnotherAnon
AnotherAnon
1 month ago

Zman says, “Climate change was build back better before there was build back better.”

The Brits were recently making noise about a “New Marshall Plan”. That’s probably straight from the WEF. Not clear if it refers to British build back better or American build back better – where it’s on US taxpayer dime. The UK got a raw deal after the war compared to the rest of Europe, afterall.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
1 month ago

Zman, your post at Taki’s is stellar.

Please do keep up that Monday thing.

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
1 month ago

Honor integrity and discipline have guided white men for centuries. Look at the Celts. That’s why the bent nosed moneychangers are so hell bound to destroy it. Chaos and degeneration fits their needs…control and slavery.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Dennis Roe
1 month ago

There’s a biological/evolutionary reason why oriental countries are slave states.

Last edited 1 month ago by BadThinker
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  BadThinker
1 month ago

Chicken and egg?

Do they all have very similar consistent features (black hair, dark irises, and slanted eye shapes) because they are conformists ? Or did their conformity beget these similarities?

Either way, doesn’t change the validity of your statement

UpYours
UpYours
28 days ago

Oh please, every retarded moron in every democracy whines about the ruling class, but who put the ruling class there? Who voted them in?
It was you, Boobus Americanus or Boobus Europa or Boobus Sapiens. The fact that sub-100 IQ Boobus Americanus, especially the “science” and “high edumacated” white collar monkeys vote for a corrupt racist crook like Biden, tells me all I want to know about “muh libruuul democracy”
Trump is against “science” shriek the pencil-necked four eyed science cucks. Don’t worry your H1B replacement that bye-done lets in is pro-“science”.