The Shadow State

Imagine if at your place of work, you began to suspect that many of your coworkers were members of a secret organization. At first you notice that when one has an idea, all of them suddenly adopt it. One day one will use a turn of phrase and then all of them are using it, as if on command. They display no outward expression of membership in a secret group, but their behavior suggests they are controlled by the same source, or they are coordinated by some unknown actor.

This would have been the experience of Donald Trump when he took office. He knew, of course, that many of the people he inherited were loyalists to the Bush crime family or the Clinton crime family. That was part of his campaign, rooting out these people as bad for the American people. What he did not understand is that even the people who appeared to support him in Washington were part of an informal club. The Bush and Clinton clans were just manifestations of this secret club.

That seems farfetched, but take a look at this post in Politico about what they call “the secretive consulting firm that’s become Biden’s Cabinet in waiting”. The short version of it is that a “consulting firm” operated as a shadow administration while the Democrats were out of power. When Biden was installed, in was from this shadow government that he picked key appointees. The source of funding for what amounts to a secret society is not mentioned, but it is not hard to guess.

In many respects, Biden represents a return to a trend that began under the first George Bush and has become more obvious over time. That is, the president is a figure head representing a faction within Washington. Up to Ronald Reagan, new presidents tended to bring key people from their home state, who took up key positions and helped vet new hires in the administration. Over time they were assimilated into the Borg, but initially they offered a fresh perspective and a change in direction.

With Bush I, that started to change. His administration was from the Borg as Bush no longer had ties to normal America. The Bush family’s closest relationships were not to local elites in America, but to the Saudi royal family, Mexican drug cartels and the American intelligence agencies. Bush was the first post-American president. He was followed by Clinton, whose administration was filled with members of the semi-permanent ruling elite based in Washington.

Bush II and Obama were basically spokesmen for organization that existed in the shadows, like the one stocking the Biden administration. They were also the most shallow and unaccomplished men to reach office. Neither had done anything to that point that would warrant local attention, much less national attention. They could have been hired from a talent agency and trained to play the role. Obama famously used a teleprompter for all public utterances.

One reason the imperial capital revolted when Trump was elected is he was a break in the long evolutionary chain. By 2016, the people who actually run the government had come to see the president as window dressing to appease the masses. The real work of governance was done by the thousands of people who live, work and socialize in the world’s largest small town. From their perspective, he was a threat to their democracy, because their democracy had become one party rule.

A good current example of how things really work in American democracy is the case against former Clinton campaign lawyer Michael Sussmann. The judge in the case is Christopher Cooper, who is married to attorney Amy Jefress. She represents key players in the FBI Russia hoax like Lisa Page. Sussman’s lawyers are long time legal insiders serving the Democratic Party. The Lawfare Group, which was deeply involved in the Russia hoax, is helpfully providing commentary to the media.

The reason that there could never be a legitimate investigation of the FBI plot to overturn the 2016 election was everyone involved is connected to everyone who would investigate or prosecute the case. Washington is a separate society that is independent of the country over whom it rules. Again, if you imagine it as a secret club, politics makes a lot of sense. The part we see, campaigns, politicians, elections, is controlled by the part we never see, the semi-permanent ruling class.

There is also reason to suspect that many of the people working in politics are just as gullible as the people voting Republican. The FBI-organized protest last weekend looks like it was more for the people inside the wire than outside the wire. They wanted the rank and file in Congress to see the storm troopers cracking skulls and flag waving barbarians screaming for the cameras. The whole thing was an amusing flop, but it kept Ocasio-Cortez up at night, which was the purpose.

Long ago, Pat Buchanan observed that local politicians are often quite sensible, which is how they get bumped up to the House of Senate. The people supporting them hope they will be a sane voice for their interests. When they get to Washington, they quickly go native and become just another voice of the ruling class. Buchanan wrote it off to social influence, which is certainly true. The newly minted Congressman is quickly socialized into the culture and is then assimilated into the Borg.

Another reason though is the shadow government. These vast global consulting firms that operate in every western capital but are based in Washington operate like a secret society. They produce the people who get appointments in every administration, and they produce the candidates for spots on the bench. They don’t write regulations and legislation, but they develop and curate the people who do. They have evolved a system that is immune to the virus of elections.

What this means is that voting has become pointless. A system that is immune to voting is not going to be fixed by more voting. In fact, voting provides a false sense of legitimacy to the system. The dynamic of liberal democracy is that voting not only strengthens the system, making it even more resistant to elections, but it also encourages more voting. The more that people participate, the less their voice matters and the more shadowy the true ruling elite pulling the strings.


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krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

does the gloom and doom of the news ever create a weird type of addiction in you? If something bad is happening – you always want to look for good news. Likewise if good news finally seems to be happening – you want to keep looking for good news to make sure it’s for real. I’m not sure you would call this doomscrolling – but it’s sort of like you want there to be good news and you need a bigger dose of it. Have any of you guys ever experienced this feeling before. Also, how do you guys stop… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

I believe that if I lived in a village 500 years ago, I would walk the perimeter of the village, or at least my property, every night before sleeping, looking for threats.

(Am I the only one who’s surprised krustykurmudgeon is only 30?)

Mike Austin
Mike Austin
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

“Does the gloom and doom of the news ever create a weird type of addiction in you?” Nope. I am 68 and have taught History in three countries for 27 years. I have also lived, as in: been kidnapped, attacked by wild animals, chased by armies and Indians in the jungles south of the border, shipwrecked, shot at, opened Mayan tombs, looked for ‘lost cities’ and gold mines…and on and on. Nothing in the news distresses me at all. I have seen it all before, as in “there is nothing new under the sun.” It makes me laugh, however. If… Read more »

Nullus Maximus
2 years ago

Show me a way to fix this which does not involve nuclear terrorism. I am not convinced that there is one.

Johnny
2 years ago

Zman say 1 election was a calamity for turnout. Hollywood celebs already bemoan USA has the lowest turnout in the industrialized world, or among it. What if say 2024 even in a presidential election 20 percent of the voting age population voted and no more? What does that cause them to do? I know 2014 as a midterm had numbers like this. The wiki here on the 2014 midterms. “The 2014 United States elections were held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, in the middle of Democratic President Barack Obama’s second term. Republicans retained control of the House of Representatives and… Read more »

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

how come your daughter didn’t try to get a fake vax card?

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

sorry I meant this as a reply to Vizzini

Hi -Ya!
Hi -Ya!
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

Where can you get one?

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Hi -Ya!
2 years ago

Google. With a couple of hours on the computer and some photoshop skills and some card stock, I produced a vac card. Most exhilarating. Not a soul I’ve shown to can tell the difference. However, I do not intent to use such. To do so is in essence to support TPTB. To admit they have the power over me to demand I obtain and carry such. It was simply an intellectual exercise.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

Because she’s going to stand up for what she believes in and not hide it.

It hass caused a lot of good conversations around the hospital, opened some eyes.

If nobody’s willing to stand up and say “I’m Spartacus” nothing ever happens.

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
Reply to  Vizzini
2 years ago

you know I really like that argument. History seems to be made by events like this. Someone standing tall when it really matters.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Vizzini
2 years ago

You really raised her well, which is very difficult. Nicely done.

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

as someone who has generalized anxiety disorder – what i’m worried about is that they are eventually going to give up on COVID but try to segue into “climate lockdowns”.

The problem is that they burned through the publics trust. But my view is that even if only five states in the u.s. try this idea – it could still be a fiasco because it could have bad effects on other states.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

At that point the best thing would be for red states to go their own way and dare others to stop them from using their fossil fuel resources.

Maniac
Maniac
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

Kava kava is a natural supplement that has helped my anxiety a great deal.

Vizzini
Member
2 years ago

So, my daughter’s religious exemption at her hospital has been given it’s final denial and she’s on her way out. However, she also related to me very shocking story. A fellow tech has a variety of medical issues that make her ineligible for the vaccine, yet she was denied a medical exemption. Wait, it gets worse. The girl felt trapped. She couldn’t afford to give up her job, so she went to get the vaccine there at the hospital. When they pulled up her medical records, they refused to give her the vax — she was clearly prohibited from it… Read more »

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Vizzini
2 years ago

People have to force the issue by refusing and dare tptb to fire them. If they do, file a blizzard of lawsuits for wrongful termination on all grounds.

The very last thing anyone should do is let them bully you into quitting.

Don’t quit make them pull the trigger.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
2 years ago

We’re not going to lawyer our way out of this any more than we’re going to vote our way out of it.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
2 years ago

Just found out that every religious exemption at her hospital was denied … except the Muslim guy’s.

Maniac
Maniac
Reply to  Vizzini
2 years ago

I saw that coming. The Leftists who run our country and culture will give a free pass to the Religion of Pieces every time.

Hudson H Luce
2 years ago

“The American system of representative government was overthrown by the Deep State—a.k.a. the police state a.k.a. the military/corporate industrial complex—a profit-driven, militaristic corporate state bent on total control and global domination through the imposition of martial law here at home and by fomenting wars abroad. The “government of the people, by the people, for the people” has perished. In its place is a shadow government, a corporatized, militarized, entrenched bureaucracy that is fully operational and staffed by unelected officials who are, in essence, running the country and calling the shots in Washington DC, no matter who sits in the White… Read more »

Xin Loi
Xin Loi
Reply to  Hudson H Luce
2 years ago

My father (1923-2018) always said, “don’t vote, it just encourages them”.

Mycale
Mycale
2 years ago

I honestly cringe whenever I see commentators on conservative websites throw out that “this [antifa group] needs to be locked up”, or “this [prominent liberal] needs to be investigated by the FBI”, or whatever. They don’t get it, even after the events of the past 5 years. The FBI is not a battle hardened national law enforcement organization filled with the best and brightest, taking on the toughest and the biggest cases, which is how it was portrayed for decades. It is the security arm for the ruling class, and just like the ruling class, it hates you. Likewise, prosecutors… Read more »

greyenlightenment
Reply to  Mycale
2 years ago

Conservative websites are cringe overall. That is why zman, unz, and taki are better.

Mainstream cons just want score points against left. no perspective about bigger picture.

trackback
2 years ago

[…] ZMan smells a rat. […]

cameron
cameron
2 years ago

That’s useful about the Bush family. I tended to think of them as benevolent, gullible, dunderhead WASPs. No, they’re actually evil too.

“Washington is a separate society that is independent of the country over whom it rules.”

If Russian nuked it the country would greatly improve.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  cameron
2 years ago

“Any letting the Saudis off the hook came from the White House,” former Agent Mark Rossini said. “I can still see that photo of Bandar and Bush enjoying cigars on the balcony of the White House two days after 9/11.”
https://tinyurl.com/yjcg2w8p
That photo still angers me. I was in a conference room that had a view of Logan and watched as the Saudis were flown off.

greyenlightenment
Reply to  cameron
2 years ago

The second Bush was a POS but I think the first one at least pushed back against an occupation of Iraq . You can be sure he was under tremendous pressure to make the war go on longer.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
2 years ago

am i the only one to notice the symmetry between getting the jab, and people who think they are voting their way out of this?

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

Consider it a test. If you are a sheep you get the jab. If you are not then you don’t get the jab. This is why the Left is freaking out over those who resist.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
2 years ago

Good for them. Or should I say “good on ’em!”

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  RoBG
2 years ago

Yeah, that’s it! I couldn’t quite remember the phrasing of that sentiment in Strine.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
2 years ago

Saw those via our former active commenter Lineman on Gab.

The key moment will be the regime issuing orders to its enforcers to use live rounds and how the enforcers respond to that order.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
2 years ago

You will never seen Americans resisting like that.
We either run and hide or just roll over. And of course the DR thought masters would immediately condemn any conservatives who do resist but resisting is bad according to them.

Sadly the Aussies are in tough spot. If the police resort to using live ammo there is nothing the ordinary Aussies can do since they gave up their guns.

Still I respect their bravery. That is something you will never see from white Americans.

Mike Austin
Mike Austin
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
2 years ago

Better to have guns and luck, rather than just luck. Those in Oz chose poorly.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
2 years ago

“When they first get to Washington, freshmen don’t even know where the bathrooms are in the Senate. We show them.” -a Senate staffer

imbroglio
imbroglio
2 years ago

“What this means is that voting has become pointless. A system that is immune to voting is not going to be fixed by more voting. In fact, voting provides a false sense of legitimacy to the system. ” This is Power Elite Studies 1010 harking back to C. Wright Mills. A lot of people who vote do so because it satisfies a need and “It’s something we should do because we’re supposed to…” the way a lot of people go to church because that’s what their family, friends and folks in their neighborhood go. Your Taki post mentioned that the… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  imbroglio
2 years ago

the left is animated by their appetite for human brains.

Whiskey
Whiskey
2 years ago

Related, Angelo Codevilla has died. Killed by a drunk driver. Likely an illegal. He thought that America was already in a Civil War, and it would turn hot sooner or later.

Perhaps not voting, a waste I agree, but things like a national trucker’s strike can put the squeeze on the Ruling Class to avert that Hot War, I certainly hope so. Nancy Pelosi’s 15K each twin Subzero fridges are useless without power. Big Shots like say, Tim Cook are useless if a commuter’s strike blocks all roads to/from the Apple Campus at the end of the day.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Whiskey
2 years ago

Parallax View 2021: My Dinner With Epstein

Andy Texan
Reply to  Whiskey
2 years ago

Probably not an alien. More likely a CIA/FBI operative. Very sad. RIP. Angelo Codevilla was a good man.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Whiskey
2 years ago

How about a trucker’s strike that involves refusing to carry supplies to any point within 100 miles of LA, SF, NY, DC, and any other shitlib hellhole?

Carl B.
Carl B.
Reply to  KGB
2 years ago

Today’s truckers are not your father’s truckers. Stop in at a Mid-West I-70 truck stop and see for yourself.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Carl B.
2 years ago

Yup.

Sikhs have taken over large swathes of the trucking industry.

FeinGul
FeinGul
Reply to  KGB
2 years ago

Risible.

And Mexican truckers can step up to replace.

btp
Member
Reply to  Whiskey
2 years ago

Codevilla is a great loss.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Whiskey
2 years ago

It either goes hot or we get genocided. Forget about the truckers, ever since NAFTA they let Mexican truckers drive all over the U.S. and if all white truckers stayed home, the beaners would just take their place. A commuters strike would be devastating especially if they can clog the main trucking arteries for at least 5 days straight. That means no fuel or food deliveries, etc. You want to see panic, watch what happens when the grocery store shelves go empty and gas is $10 a gallon. BTW we are not being told the truth about the massive backlog… Read more »

ronehjr
ronehjr
2 years ago

“That was part of his campaign, rooting out these people as bad for the American people.”

Trump did a good job selling that was his intention, but there is very little evidence that was his desire. More likely he just wanted to be allowed in the club.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  ronehjr
2 years ago

Indictments, 0.

The artist formerly known as Judge Smails
The artist formerly known as Judge Smails
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

For some strange reason I can’t get the phrase “lock her up” out of my mind and I don’t know why?

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  ronehjr
2 years ago

Trump was “in the club” until he ran against Hillary. In his younger days he partied at Studio 54 (with their private rooms that were no doubt as wired for sound and video as Epstein’s or Spence’s homes.) He had no foundation other than appeals to his vanity.

greyenlightenment
Reply to  ronehjr
2 years ago

That is what people observed in 2017-2019 but it was dismised as ‘blackpilling’.

Tom K
Tom K
2 years ago

I haven’t watched this yet but I read about it last night so I’m going to. Very apropos to this discussion.

Tucker Carlson interviews Curtis Yarvin:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zsGbRNmu4NQ

Never heard the guy before but I have read some of his substack stuff.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Tom K
2 years ago

Tom K: Already reviewed at Counter Currents. Yarvin considers himself a clever boy and he’s not a White nationalist.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Yes, that must be where I found it. I’m watching it now. Some of it is very interesting. He speaks as an insider to the people in power.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Friends, don’t silo yourselves. Learn from those who are not just like us. Yarvin sounds more like a gateway than a gatekeeper.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Tom K
2 years ago

I think inevitably some who start to question the status quo because of Yarvin will find that he offers no solutions and will end up at the DR.

Hi -Ya!
Hi -Ya!
Reply to  Tom K
2 years ago

Its excellent. Of course , nothing on race, but I have listened to it twice. Tucker says like 30 words in 1:15 mintues.

Guy basically says we are living. lie

Karen not a Karen
Karen not a Karen
Reply to  Tom K
2 years ago

Yarvin blogged for years as “Mencius Moldbug,” writing lengthy pieces that explicated much of what was later called Neo-Reaction.

He’s a tribesman but I suspect his parents may be atypical, for it is very unusual for a tribesman to have “Curtis” as a first name.

Oswald Spengler
Oswald Spengler
2 years ago

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXhZyAOuyhE

“It’s a big club and you ain’t in it! You and I are not in the big club.”

Drew
Drew
2 years ago

“In many respects, Biden represents a return to a trend that began under the first George Bush and has become more obvious over time. That is, the president is a figure head representing a faction within Washington. Up to Ronald Reagan, new presidents tended to bring key people from their home state, who took up key positions and helped vet new hires in the administration.” It used to be prior to Cleveland’s reform of the civil service, that a new president would bring in hundreds, even thousands of new hires as part of a spoils system, and those guys would… Read more »

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  Drew
2 years ago

You have a replaceable competent bureaucracy where there is a genetically sufficient talent pool and a sufficiently narrow scope of responsibility for the bureaucracy. Getting the mail delivered, issuing visas, and collecting customs excises is something a person with iq over room temperature can learn in a few days. Controlling the levers of international finance, not so much. Also, this assumes you dont have a working federalist system, where your team has a bench of state level bureaucrats who have been doing the minor league version and have the KSE from that to do the federal work. Civil service reform… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Drew
2 years ago

I think I saw something a while ago to the effect that about 3,000 positions are held at the will of the President. Only insiders could fill that field from scratch (And the important ones require Senate Confirmation) .

If I were less lazy I’d look up to see if Congress is in session on Inauguration day. If not, you could end run the bastards by making recess appointments to all posts requiring confirmation in the afternoon of day 1.

Might be worth it just for fun.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Bilejones
2 years ago

The positions (relatively few) to be filled by the President are not all appointments that must be confirmed by the Congress. Those are usually cabinet and director type stuff. There are thousands that are appointed at will. But really not enough to make significant change as we’ve discussed. With Trump, the day after election there was a call for key individuals in his election effort, e.g., state Trump election officials, to send in their resumes for positions to be filled—if interested. I know this because I was friends with one of Trumps State organizers and followed their appointment and move… Read more »

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
Reply to  Drew
2 years ago

The president is a jew puppet, they have been since the termites shot Kennedy in the head. Nothing changes, nothing gets better. The whores dance for the sheckles, we pay the tab. Now they’re killing you with vaccines…when will people wake the fuck up? It’s all at stake, right here , right now.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
2 years ago

I find all of this to be true. Voting does keep the optical illusion going. But I find liberal democracy to not work even at a cognitive level. Plato nailed it in 400BC with his cave allegory, or why democracy doesn’t work. It was the most elegant way of saying that 1). The average person with the average intellect is a sheep, wholly incapable of basic abilities to conceptualize how he is being manipulated. and 2) The wealthy mercantile class has no loyalties except to their own bank accounts. They’re a bottomless pit of avarice who would strip mine all… Read more »

Neon_Bluebeard
Neon_Bluebeard
2 years ago

George Carlin had it right.

“If voting could change anything they wouldn’t let you do it.”

Severian
2 years ago

If I were writing a history of The Decline and Fall of the American Empire, I’d start with the Pendleton Act (1883). Prior to the Pendleton Act, all politics in America was essentially machine politics — when the other party takes over, they immediately turf out ALL the old party’s loyalists, everywhere, from the highest to the lowest. Since these jobs were the only real sinecures available in Gilded Age America — which had basically been in one long depression since 1873 — the competition was fierce. Being postmaster of your little town out in the boonies didn’t have much… Read more »

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

100%.

The experiment of replacing the “spoils system” with a set of insulated, over educated elite Mandarins has been run to it’s conclusion, and the results are less than idea.

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

“Repealing the Pendleton Act is about #5 on my list of things to do when I’m dictator.”

Severian, what are 1 through 4 on the list?

Gunner Q
Reply to  Federalist
2 years ago

#1 Should be ending public education. The situation cannot improve until the government stops teaching the children.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Gunner Q
2 years ago

Just make education a competitive good. Let education money follow the student.

Gunner Q
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

Government must not handle the money. No school vouchers. No taxpayer money or public infrastructure anywhere. Nothing less will make a drop of difference.

Red Bull
Red Bull
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

“Government must not handle the money. No school vouchers. No taxpayer money or public infrastructure anywhere.” And that’s exactly why conservatives are born losers. They cede the battlefield to the enemy based on their antiquated dogmas of “no gubmint.” Well, there is going to be a government, despite whatever you what, so it would seem to me that the best option would be to take it over and use it to our benefit. The left is simply better at organizing. Any free market will eventually be dominated by progressives unless we use the power of the state to prevent them… Read more »

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Gunner Q
2 years ago

Red Bull is right. You can’t just throw away the State, otherwise Leftist “private” concerns will just take over. If you doubt that, the government isn’t censoring you. Private companies are . Most are on the same side. Same with illegal aliens . Most of them work for private concerns. What has to happen is your guys become the New State, you set the rules and you enforce them. Family degradation? Caused by removal of boots from necks in case of divorce. Impoverishment of American workers? Private concerns outsourcing and removal of trade regulation. Education? Yes this is government but… Read more »

Severian
Reply to  Federalist
2 years ago

I can’t tell you, for obvious reasons, but I’ll give you a hint: They involve fire, rope, lamp posts, and salt.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

That’s fine and good. Its the after that matters. You cannot allow a power vacuum or you’ll have a counter revolution.

Be worthy of power, take power, and use it or else.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  A.B Prosper
2 years ago

Quite true. We knew the Left was nuts even in the 70’s. I saw it with their soft on criminal sentencing and gun confiscation laws imposed on law abiding whites. It was clear back they hated normie whites with a red hot passion. Then there was their was against the family and traditional culture the Left began to push hard during that time as well. Along with forced busings to break the back of whites in the cities. We can never ever allow these evil SOB”s to hold power of any kind. A lot of them need to go to… Read more »

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

Before, everyone knew you got your job because you were a party loyalist… but they also knew that you’d be out with the next regime change, so since you still had to live there, you actually did your job and kept your high-handed impulses in check. That’s not true at all, which is why the Pendleton Act was passed. First, not every appointee stayed in the community where they held their appointment. Second, most of the problems were related to no-shows, not abuse. You, like many other armchair politicos, think that corruption is systemic instead of personal. It’s like a… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Drew
2 years ago

That would entail a non-corrupt enforcement bureaucracy. Can you name one?

The artist formerly known as Judge Smails
The artist formerly known as Judge Smails
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

Andy and Barney at the Mayberry PD.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus

Aunt Bee was running a brothel in Mt Pilot.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

Typically, rooting out corruption has been the provence of dictators, kings, tyrants and popes,and happens at their personal prerogative. Elected officials are generally less effective at it, particularly under spoils systems, since it’s the corruption that gets you elected. That said, Grover Cleveland did a credible job at reforming the bureaucracy, thanks in large part to the Pendleton act, and also to vetoing a lot of civil war veteran pork bills, which were used to expand the spoils system. It’s true, though, that bureaucrats don’t reform themselves. A motivated leader reforms them.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Drew
2 years ago

I’ve heard that hundreds of judges and bureaucrats were jailed for for abuse of office in the 19th century.

Severian
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

The spoils system was pretty strictly policed. The no shows etc. he’s referring to are to be found in other places, of course, but largely in the Tammany Machine in NYC. I may be an “armchair politico,” but I’m not an armchair historian, making the typical armchair historian’s mistake of “happened in NYC” for “the rule in the rest of the USA.”

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

But you are making the armchair historian’s mistake of not grasping the differences between that time and now. The Tammany machine was extensively corrupt and had a ton of clout because it was fairly large. It wasn’t a PTA in small-town Indiana Indeed, the reason why Grover Cleveland was the only president to serve two non-consecutive terms was because the Tammany machine undermined his first reelection bid because they hated him for trying to end the spoils system. Why would these innocent, industrious, hard-working servants of the people be opposed to earning their jobs by their own merit instead of… Read more »

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

That tends to happen when you appoint corrupt people to positions for which they aren’t qualified. In general, it’s a really good idea to appoint competent people to positions for which they are qualified, and the Pendleton Act was pretty much a reflection of that.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Drew
2 years ago

Given that it is next to impossible to fire either a state or CC employee short of them of committing murder or cannibalism. Your approach would not work. Besides they are protected by unions that everyone is afraid of. Also the county, state and federal employment have had for decades served as a jobs program for hundreds of thousands if not millions of unqualified blacks, Mexicans, Asians and other minorities. Heck even community colleges cannot hire qualified whites over a incompetent black instructor today. Say you do devise a series of tests to weed out the corrupt and incompetent. Most… Read more »

Steve W
Steve W
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

I don’t agree. My view is that the Leviathan should be situated in one region, much as a dangerous cancer, the more easily to be treated or excised by radiation or surgery. I am not against a 5-megaton airburst over Tubman DF, as it would provide a more or less ‘complete solution’ to that particular problem, but what you suggest is metastatic; further cleansing actions would be necessary against the good people of Toad Suck, Nowhere, Pumpkin Center, East Dogtown, etc. It’s like the university branch campuses and community colleges. They are not decentralizers but new lesions that have broken… Read more »

Allen
Allen
2 years ago

The members of the collective are unaware of how divergent they are from the people they are supposedly meant to serve. I would bet that almost no government employee behind the wire has even had a conversation with a single non-government person in quite some time. Remember the government shutdown? Almost no one outside DC gave a fig about it. Inside the wire? Calamity. All of those people thought the end was near, including their spouses, their friends and their neighbors. Because they are all a separate culture, and it’s government. There is nothing on earth that can bridge that… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Allen
2 years ago

Allen: Pauline Kael syndrome writ large. It’s not merely the government. Whatever you read, in whatever format or genre, the writer depends on his social cohort. Womyn’s issues writersalways quote womyn from NY and Cali, usually of the same race and religion as the writer. Journalists, reporters, politicians, civil servants – they are all part of the ruling class and everyone they know is as well. As for the ordinary ‘murrican? Learn to code, move, compete harder at school and then grovel more at work. Whites have been deemed expendable. Secede from the system and deny them your mind and… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

AINO is a vast latifundia of helots controlled by a Power Structure. The Power Structure is a unitary congeries of Silicon Valley, Wall Street and Washington, with a substructure composed of Harvard, Hollywood and the NY Times. Naturally, the Power Structure embraces one ideology (poststructural subversion) and advances a single agenda–the destruction of white civilization. Something very similar to this has developed in most other white nations, and all of them together compose a globalist empire, led, of course, by AINO.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

Read latifundium for latifundia. My Latin slips.

Mow Noname
Mow Noname
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

“Romans go home.”

Steve W
Steve W
Reply to  Allen
2 years ago

Somehow, driving through my old haunts in Virginia and Maryland decades after living there, terrify me more than the old and understood marble halls of power in the District itself. Legends are told, by people still alive (and I have seen photos confirming this) that cows grazed in Arlington, that Tyson’s Corners was a four-way stop with a produce stand, that Loudoun County was a rural idyll; heck, I was there in the 1970s when there was an amateur baseball league: Lovettsville, Purcellville, Round Hill, and so on. It’s all very sad to me. Like a blast-wave, all the surrounding… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
2 years ago

The good news is the increasing use of force is a sign of the End Times for this system and these people. We see protesters starting to overwhelm impotent authorities overseas. Intimidation is no longer working. That’s coming here.

The bad news is, in their desperation, they’re hoovering up resources and terraforming the rest of the country like never before. The money machine seems to be running away like a diesel engine instead of grinding to a halt.

The game now is to outlast, because it won’t be long before we’re onto the next thing.

B125
B125
Reply to  Paintersforms
2 years ago

I’ve been surprised at the level of thuggery and tyranny that the system has been using. To me it seems like a typical woman’s response. No understanding of negotiation or compromise, no nuance. Just demanding that you do something over and over until you either do it, or tell her to f off. It does not seem like the kind of thing a strong system would resort to. Especially not when they’ve been doing it for almost 2 years and people still aren’t following the rules. China had a crackdown and actually welded doors shut to keep people inside. We… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  B125
2 years ago

The welding was crazy. Then again, China is demolishing entire blocks of vacant high rises. They have their own real estate bubble and potential financial crisis.

Maybe they’re in worse shape yet.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Paintersforms
2 years ago

maybe? they can’t fuel or feed themselves, other than that, they are fine.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

Right. Others have said, and I agree, that the Chinese Century was propaganda to mask the plan to sell out America and move to China.

Not that the Chinese aren’t talented enough to do well, but minus American investment and criminal trade deals by tptb, they’d still be a second rate power at this point. And, frankly, built on a better foundation.

Al in Georgia
Al in Georgia
2 years ago

Zman hits it out of the park again. This post reminds me of the movie “They Live”. Roddie puts on the glasses and sees the world as it really is. The readers of this blog have metaphorically put on the glasses. What is the next step after putting on the glasses?

Doug
Doug
Reply to  Al in Georgia
2 years ago

Finding others who also have a pair of glasses. Not an easy task in a sea of mass psychosis.

(((They))) Live
(((They))) Live
Reply to  Doug
2 years ago

Need to start chewing bubble gum and kicking ass

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  (((They))) Live
2 years ago

“and I’m all out of bubble gum”

Melissa
Melissa
Reply to  Doug
2 years ago

Particularly now that many of us have been placed in an indefinite state of isolation/time-out. Our overlords resemble first time preteen girl babysitters who enjoy wielding tyrannical power at every turn.

Not My Usual Pen Name
Not My Usual Pen Name
Reply to  Al in Georgia
2 years ago

What is the next step after putting on the glasses?

Research, research, research, and moar research.

Instead of memorizing the career statistics of Ty Cobb & Babe Ruth & Lou Gehrig & Ted Williams & the gang, start memorizing the names of the attendees at Brookings Institute retreats, CFR conferences, Bohemian Grove encampments, and of course ADL & SPLC & AIPAC fundraisers.

Learn a neural networks software package, and start making your own diagrams of the most powerful nodes in the DC/NYC-Fed/Silicon-Valley anti-civilizational gliomae.

Doug
Doug
2 years ago

Zman, I feel I need to share a link to a video with you. It’s of Matthias Desmet, clinical psychologist at the University of Ghent who talks about crowd psychosis. He has a very interesting perspective on the current wave of madness ruling over all of us. It’s almost an hour but well worth the time.

https://youtu.be/LLhCdU4WXh4

Astralturf
Astralturf
Reply to  Doug
2 years ago

I second this recommendation. This video gives valuable insight and changes one’s approach to the covidians and general hysteria. That 40% of non-believers going along to get along could be key to breaking the mass hypnosis.

Lineman
Reply to  Doug
2 years ago

Another good one is this one… https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=09maaUaRT4M

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

If we can’t vote the scoundrels out, we can’t send responsible people to Washington. If we can’t send responsible people to Washington, we’re stuck with a permanent bureaucracy that is hostile to the people over whom they rule. And in turn, we are also stuck with an oligarchy that greases the wheels for incoming apparatchiks. It would seem to thinking people that there are few ways to rectify the situation. One involves economic collapse. The other involves grim men with guns. Neither of these is appealing.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

Gotterdamn-it-all: While you may have used the term ‘scoundrels’ tongue-in-cheek, it is inaccurate and far too kind These are evil, psychopathic anti-White grifters who all need to be hanged from lamp posts. Economic collapse is beyond your control; what matters is how you prepare your family to face it. If you’re not prepared to be a grim man with a gun, then be prepared to either actively or passively assist them, or be counted as a supporter of the status quo with all attendant consequences.

Not My Usual Pen Name
Not My Usual Pen Name
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

These are evil, psychopathic anti-White grifters who all need to be hanged from lamp posts.

Careful there, honey, it didn’t end well for Joan of Arc, and it was half a millennium before she got her canonization.

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

No, not hung from lampposts, arrested, tried and sent to a hard labor concentration camp for life by the state.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
2 years ago

Tars: You want to try them in a court? Made up of whom? Who will be their guards? Who will feed them? They’d be of more utility as pig feed.

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

I don’t want to fed post.

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

The revolutionary tribubals of Republican Spain are a great example. You do need a wheat from chaff process, there are literally too many to do as 3g4m3 says. Pour encourge les autres is a good idea for rank and file. But I agree w 3g4me, the sentence is carried out behind the justice court once judgement is pronounced.

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Oh, I’m prepared. I just don’t find it appealing. I’ve had to put animals down, and it isn’t pleasant. Once the dogs of war are unleashed, they’re hard to control.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

“Once the dogs of war are unleashed, they’re hard to control.” The historical evidence supporting your assertion is overwhelming. The greatest sin of our ruling class is that they are so ignorant about the art of ruling. Enoch Powell said “The supreme function of statesmanship is to provide against preventable evils.” The dyscivilizational ruling elites of the Globalist American Empire seem hellbent on embracing every preventable evil they can. They could have profitably sheared the white sheep for millennia, but instead they chose to slaughter them for meat and replace them with goats, hyenas, and jackals. They deserve everything they… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

War is a messy business. Time and resources are of the essence. Both sides will/can not afford the nicety of taking prisoners. One thinks of our forces in WWII as being different, not even close. We shot surrendering prisoners without second thought during assaults, least the effort slow and fail.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

“We shot surrendering prisoners without second thought during assaults”

I know this to be true from first-hand account of someone who did the shooting.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

“Gotterdamn-it-all” Is that yours? Asking because I’m stealing it. 😉

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
Reply to  RoBG
2 years ago

Mine-all-mine. Steal away.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

We may get both. Not necessarily at the same time, but not within months, perhaps a few years, of each other. History provides numerous examples. Including a few from right here in North America.

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

That’s my feeling. One shoe drops, then the other. A few of us are prepared. Most are not.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

Economic collapse will probably not be so bad, at least for working people. Most of the economy, as currently understood, is simply fiction (i.e. stocks, bonds, derivatives, most forms of debt). If everything were liquidated and all debts settled, the net effect would be a streamlining of market choices (eg. a lot of zombie brands, and niche/luxury products would be scuttled, like we’ve already seen so far) and a dramatic drop in prices. Stockbrokers, bankers and corporate financiers would take in the rear but to be honest I view that as a feature, not a bug.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Drew
2 years ago

Interesting take, Drew. I have spoken to the following trades people during the shamdemic: scaffolders, electricians, garage door fitters, handymen, glaziers and the like. All do actual work required by actual people they see who pay them to do a job. All have said business has boomed for them.

Seems like a large brunt of the economic concerns come from the make-work office jobs… Like mine!

Drew
Drew
Reply to  OrangeFrog
2 years ago

I’m a contractor, and I own a farm. The last 18 months have been the busiest and most lucrative of my life. My general belief has always been that there is always job security in food, housing and clothes, so if you’re willing to get your hands cut or dirty in the production or maintenance of those things, you’ll always have a job. Especially when people cut back on luxuries.

Kesselfieber
2 years ago

Only fire can break the shackles of the totalitarian bug hive we exist in.

But first we must free our thoughts and escape the mind gulag!

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

It is interesting to see people’s reaction when you say that you’re not voting out of choice and as a protest. For some reason, this is an election year for governor in Virginia so the ads and street signs are never-ending. The topic has popped up a couple of times with friends and family. Anyway, I generally answer saying that 1) the election is pointless because the GOP can’t win in Virginia due to demographics and 2) that I wouldn’t vote anyway because voting doesn’t matter. The demographics answer truly seems to baffle both liberal and conservative whites who believe… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

I always thought South Park did a great job summarizing the situation with, “Vote or Die:”

https://youtu.be/0BqxArM3Vwk

Astralturf
Astralturf
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

I once had a conversation with my limousine liberal aunt about voting. It wasn’t even about demographics or fraud, it was purely philosophical. Why should I vote when there is pretty much zero chance my vote will influence the outcome? When was there an election that was decided by one vote? Probably never. As far as voting serving as a public opinion poll does one vote have any impact? Not at all. Why should I take the time to do something that has zero impact on the world? My liberal aunt was aghast at this attitude and even though she… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Astralturf
2 years ago

It’s a good question, and I have had this attitude thrown at me before. You know, “It’s a duty”, “People fought and died for your right to vote” &c. In a healthy system, perhaps they’d have a point. But I must echo another commenter’s sentiment from above who simply reasons that not only is there nothing in it for him, the two ‘sides’ pretty much hate/don’t care about him. You know, both Smith and Jones have a policy on the length of bicycle tire inner tubes. But you’ve no bicycle, so you don’t care. There’s nothing in it for you.… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Astralturf
2 years ago

Astralturf: If voting is “a key factor in maintaining our liberal democracy,” all the more reason not to participate. I would hope, by now, that everyone reading here understands how dysfunctional and unworkable ‘liberal democracy’ is and how it is not the system of government we desire. If you still talk with your liberal aunt (why bother?) tell her it may be a ‘duty’ for a citizen, but you have been declared inherently unequal to citizenship by virtue of your skin tone. Or that citizenship is meaningless when anyone wading across the Rio Grande can and does vote. Or that… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

I volunteer at a local charity that has had four, count ’em four, employees test positive for COVID-19 (about half total staff). The facility is closed for about two weeks. I am on speaking terms, at least for time being, with all of them. As they’re all 20-30s age range, I’m going to ask after their health. Did they recover OK? Great. By the way, had you had the shot? Depending upon their answer, I will say, as appropriate: If you had it, why didn’t it prevent your recent illness? I hope you are cautious about getting a booster, because… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Astralturf
2 years ago

What matters is being behind the scenes. To get representation, we need lobbies and to be part of the club.

Whatever flunky holds the office this week is irrelevant, it’s the machinery behind them. There is a senile man in the WH, yet, somehow the system is not just moving on its own momentum.

The problem for us is we really seem to not believe our own rhetoric. We act SHOCKED when they do the exact things you would think they would do if what we said about them was actually true.

Banana Boat
Banana Boat
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

“The demographics answer truly seems to baffle both liberal and conservative whites who believe that ideas matter, not a person’s skin.” This is the single biggest blind spot plaguing the Aut-Right (autistic right). Take Carl Benjamin (aka Sargon) for example. In one of his recent videos, he complains about a foreigner with shaky loyalty to his country, “Schrodinger’s Brit” as he labeled the person IIRC. But this is also the same guy who “doesn’t see color. Only ideas matter.” He’s mystified at the concept that someone can literally be from another group, live in his country and not be loyal… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

Indeed. This roundabout of philosophies and quoting of Greeks and Romans and the like can get tiresome.

It is simply true that whether a man be a chink, gook, wog, spic or whatever; he can – and at some point will – be strongly incentivized to pummel whitey good and hard. Because race.

And he will.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

Banana Boat: Solid comment, and thus a serious question. Given those you mention refuse to recognize racial reality, why do you follow them? Give them clicks or money or what have you? How do they help White people or White civilization if they refuse to recognize White people as an irreplaceable source for the same? In a normal or sane world we could share interests and hobbies with people who don’t share our political views. But clownworld is not normal or sane, and demographic replacement is not merely a political question. This is a time when the future of the… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

Yeah, don’t overthink it.

Guy looks different than you? Not part of your tribe. Keep him to the periphery and regard with extreme suspicious. Guy gives you a bad gut feeling? Treat with extreme suspicion. See a dangerous wolf? Stay away, or grab a tool to fight it off.

The reason you’re alive today is because things like unconscious bias gave you the discriminatory tools to determine what hurts you and what helps you.

A yellow face with slanty eyes will never be on your team.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

Banana, you have shown a spotlight on the most fundamental question that divides r@cialists from civic nationalists: What bond is stronger, values or race?

I think the answer is obvious.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

Well, every person is motivated by ideas. A lot of people, for example, are motivated by the idea of running a grift that makes a lot of money. It’s a shallow, simplistic idea, to be sure, but it appeals to a lot of people.

Now, as to why the autists haven’t figured out that some people’s ideas are really that simple, your guess is as good as mine…

(((They))) Live
(((They))) Live
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

If Trump runs again and loses to someone like Kamala, then the not voting because its pointless answer can not be refuted

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  (((They))) Live
2 years ago

I agree, but must add that whether my candidate wins or loses is not the essential aspect of why I vote or don’t vote. Even in a 100% fair election, the aspect of loss is real—otherwise the election would have little meaning. What is essential is that the process is seen to be fair and bullet proof wrt fraud. That of course currently is so far from reality that only the willfully blind fail to see it. I never fall into the Leftist and “good-White” trap of arguing/defending “…how many illegal votes were cast and by whom and whether this… Read more »

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

“Voting” is the normie-civnat “vaccine” against the socialisms. Hey fellow Citizen, have you voted yet? Oh no? Well we are all in this together! Its your Civic duty! If you don’t vote, the socialists will win! I know our vote only works half the time and has to be re-voted every two years forever, but think of how terrible things would be if you didn’t get your vaccine. I mean vote. Think of the children! Also, go Broncos!

B125
B125
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Interesting you mention that. In Canada we had an election last night. Basically the “Conservatives” won everywhere with Canadians – white people (except whites in a few urban areas). And they won the popular vote. Trudeau Liberals won strongly with the magic paper Canadians. Which means everything in Toronto, Vancouver, Montreal. He won more seats so he won the election. The election was rigged against us before it started, simply by demographics and the importation of hostile non white aliens. The second point is that even if the Conservatives won, it wouldn’t change anything. More lockdowns, more immigration, more gun… Read more »

George 1
George 1
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

The neocons and their supporters understand demographics. People like Ben Shapiro and his ilk have been selling the magic dirt scenario to the rube Republican voters for quite sometime.

They know exactly what they are doing. Completing the destruction of America.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Very good post, Citizen. However, I don’t thing the swamp cares if we abstain from voting. They are fine with low participation and a bigger electoral mandate.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  DLS
2 years ago

DLS: I can’t speak for Citizen or anyone else, but I don’t think I’m sending the swamp a message by not voting; nor am I trying to. I am not voting because that’s best for me – I would feel like a whore or slave by participating in a fraudulent, debased, perverted system that wants me dead. I personally can’t change the swamp, and I certainly can’t destroy it, so I will do all I can to exist in a parallel society that does not even acknowledge the swamp’s existence, let alone its legitimacy.

manc
manc
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Ahh, good ole Virginia. I’m a native and remember telling my dad around 2003 that Va would eventually be reliably blue because of the growth of Northern Virginia. He thought I was nuts.

Va’s statewide election results are hilarious in “Lucy with the football” kind of way…”With 87% of precincts reporting, Republican Wyatt Q. Dingleberry leads with…” then the NOVA counties finish reporting, ie., complete their electoral alchemy.

usNthem
usNthem
2 years ago

Z has been advocating the no vote strategy for a while now, but this missive really puts the DC/BIG government corruption into full perspective – what kind of sleaze does someone have to be to get a gig at westexec? It’s incredible how insular they’ve become and how much more obvious it is these days – and how they’re not even really trying to hide it anymore. One keeps waiting for some of these dirt bags (like fauci or clinton for example) to be cuffed and perp walked for their crimes, but nothing ever happens or will happen. It’ll likely… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  usNthem
2 years ago

Each year, the Borg gets fresh recruits, which are then groomed to become a part of the machine. So, yes, the Borg is insular, and it definitely has its fair share of legacy members, but it also gets new blood. When I used to live in the DC and interact with these people, I was always amazed as how these young people from around the country were so similar. Whether from Iowa or Oregon or New York, they were the same person. Raised in upper-middle class to wealthy neighborhoods, went to private high schools or very good public schools, debate… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

The Borg also pay better than anyone outside of Wall Street, Hollywood, or pro sports.

I bet empty suit, Circle Back Psaki is worth mid-7 figures all by her lonesome.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Yeah, the money is important, but the people that I knew had something else, a feeling that they should influence the country. Even though they had accomplished nothing in their lives outside of being good at non-STEM school, they truly felt that they should be a part of influencing the lives of millions.

It was strange.

To live normal lives, doing normal, helpful stuff, would literally be hell for these people.

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Then we should send them to hell via tossing their asses in prison or better yet a good old fashion lynching.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

This is an astute observation. I’ve know more than one youngster who—when asked what the want to be when they grow up—told me of their planned “path to public office”. In other words, politics was a career, not necessarily a duty or a reward for competence in the private sector. These people are dangerous.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Change your diaper, Hoagie, you ain’t doing a revolution today.

Not My Usual Pen Name
Not My Usual Pen Name
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

I guess I don’t grok “Circle Back” as a meme.

I tried searching for it, hoping to see something along the lines of “Baby Got Back”, but, sadly, no such luck.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
2 years ago

The accompanying metaphor to this “Borg” class is the “street gang” metaphor: all these insider people are guilty of crimes – lobbying for foreign governments on the DL without registering as a lobbyist, graft, tax evasion, corruption, campaign finance violations etc. – because this is part of the “gang initiation”. So those who dare to get out of line get prosecuted – selectively of course, like Gen. Flynn or Giuliani and probably also this Sussmann guy – to enforce the group solidarity. This is doubly useful because the rubes and grillers watching from the flyover states think that there are… Read more »

Liberty Mike
Member
Reply to  Captain Willard
2 years ago

“[P]retty girls of Brazil?”

If you like them brown with big buttocks and hips that can circumnavigate the equator.

I’ll pass, thank you.

Not My Usual Pen Name
Not My Usual Pen Name
Reply to  Liberty Mike
2 years ago

In the gated cummunititties [with 24×7 armed guards], there are said to be myriad beautiful blond-haired blue-eyed germanic & nordic chicks in Brazil.

But in the favela slums & shanty towns, not so much.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Not My Usual Pen Name
2 years ago

The ones I met were stunning. White, statuesque, long blonde or auburn hair, blue and green eyes- but the best part was that they loved being women. Not afraid or angry of it, they reveled in their femininity.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Liberty Mike
2 years ago

Not my cup of tea either, but really big in the Hispanic community (and Black as well). Just today wife was commenting on the young women she saw in the gym. Those with tight abs and “big bootie”. She could not understand such (she’s very naive). I tried to discuss a bit of the Black heritage and how this has an origin in genetics and was quite an adaptive feature back in the dark continent. But then tailed off quickly. Too much lecture is (I am told) my major fault.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Liberty Mike
2 years ago

Maybe I’m a minority here, but I like some junk in the trunk. Bigger the cushion, the better the pushin’. Though the current abs fad going on with women gym rats is befuddling. That doesn’t look good to me at all.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Liberty Mike
2 years ago

you say that now…

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

I must agree, although I allow for “different strokes”. My feeling is that “junk in the trunk” becomes “lard ass” in old age. Again, it’s as much culture as anything—just not my culture.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Liberty Mike
2 years ago

One of the first signs of blacks taking over the popular culture is the promotion of fat asses as sexually exiciting. With all due respect to “Forever Templar,” this is not a typical white boy outlook.

I was still asleep in the oughts when this cultural shift happened but I can remember thinking, “Are you kidding me? Those fat asses are gross.”

(Of course, the blacks did not take over the popular culture by themselves.)

Mike Austin
Mike Austin
Reply to  Liberty Mike
2 years ago

I lived in South America for twelve years. I traveled to every country save for Suriname and French Guiana. Brazil I have been to many times, traveling there from Paraguay, Venezuela and Argentina, and exploring the Amazon. I have had many Brazilian girlfriends. Not one had “big buttocks and hips that can circumnavigate the equator.” I would describe them in more detail but this is not a porn site.

Perhaps you need to get out more.

Lucius Sulla
Lucius Sulla
Reply to  Captain Willard
2 years ago

Note that in the twilight of the Roman Republic, it was typical for political opponents to be brought on corruption charges or something as soon as they left office.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
2 years ago

In twenty years we will see the barricading of Washington D.C. as the best thing that has ever happened for us. When, within a year, jokes about glowies and FedFests go from talking points of hard-right dissident channels to common knowledge in the average Joe, we’re talking about complete collapse of faith in the System.

D.C. may well turn into that Pink Floyd song “The Fletcher Memorial Home”

Take all your overgrown infants away somewhere
And build them a home, a little place of their own.
The Fletcher Memorial
Home for Incurable Tyrants and Kings.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Chet Rollins
2 years ago

This week’s FBI rally seems to have mainstreamed “glow.” (And the sight of so many fat, weak cops in dystopia-comedy riot gear has inspired a new disgust.) Only a schizophrenic could come up with something so weird yet memetically strong. Giving normies a lighthearted-seeming way to talk about spotting the fed was a great gift. If we make it, Terry will be a saint. Has the ADL pointed out where “glow” comes from yet? I assume a press release is going out soon. That’ll be an amusing day—and an important one. We know who’ll *say* to stop using the term,… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Chet Rollins
2 years ago

“The Final Cut” was quite good, the last “real” Floyd album (with Waters), sort of a sequel to “The Wall.” Both these, obviously, have much WW II imagery taken (I assume) from Roger Waters’ childhood. (I’ve never read his biography, so guessing…)

As pessimistic as “Final Cut” is, I do hope we can avoid “Two Suns in the Sunset.” 🙁

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

“could be that the human race is run…”

Banana Boat
Banana Boat
2 years ago

Ironically, normie Whites voting in elections only to continually lose may end up delegitimizing the system in the end. For elections to have any meaning, there has to be a chance your guy can win. If he can’t, then you’re really nothing but a captive of a tyrannical system where you’re oppressed with no recourse. For generations normie conservatives have been quelled by occasional — ultimately hollow — election victories by mainstream republicans, expecting each time to get their way but always being denied. “Oh well, maybe next time.” That’s how the nation went woke. Republican normies, the Joe Six… Read more »

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

The fly in the ointment is voter integrity. Until we get that, half the people in the country are going to believe elections are rigged. And they will not vote in such a system. Count me among them.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

The whining from the left about Russian voting irregularities was just delicious.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Götterdamn-it-all
2 years ago

Voter integrity? So if Ah-So and Julio and Vikander have fully documented proof that they have magic American papers and are ‘legally’ registered to vote, you have no problem with such a system? Ideas are not identity. The ‘system’ was made by and for a White, Christian people. Anyone who still values it in a multiracial empire is nothing more than civnat rube.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Exactly. In my State, voter “ID” must be shown at the polls. Great, we’re preventing fraud. Nonsense! Registration to vote requires only a “sworn” declaration of American citizenship. No checks beyond that. The whole system is absolute BS. Now is there fraud? Well, a small number of votes (about 10K, out of several million) gave Biden the win. So even if less than 5% of the votes came from illegals, it’s more than enough to swing the last election. And it doesn’t even have to be intentional as we have voter registration by drivers license application and the check box… Read more »

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

They are hoping the normie Republican voters drift leftward and end up adopting positions they opposed even 10 years earlier and making that the new standard. They have had some success doing this, but you can argue they are moving too fast right now and will wreck the system in the process. The election rigging for Biden being so brazen was a big hit.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

Banana Boat: Immigration is a civnat’s folly. Stopping it 25 years ago might have made a slight difference, but now it’s utterly irrelevant. More than 50% of ‘American’ school children are non- White and different birth rates and average age means that Whites of European, Christian extraction are now perhaps 54% of the population. That will drop rapidly as the Boomers die off. You have more and more Han and Pajeet’s running for school boards and city councils – and they win – because all their co-ethnics and the GoodWhites vote for them. Barring massive deportation of millions of paper… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

Unfortunately, what happens next when demographics shut out any hope of electoral wins, will be that Joe Normie will not change, nor take to the streets, nor understand that he will not be treated as he had treated others when in power. He’ll pray harder, and vote harder. Our hope lies with the new generations of Whites who have not grown up in times of majority and know no gains via the voting process.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

Assuming there’s some discernible form of national cohesion. To be blunt, I don’t think the country will maintain it’s territorial integrity after the whites become a distinct minority. I’m also not seeing that as a bad thing in the long run.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Forever Templar
2 years ago

That is not an unreasonable conclusion.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Banana Boat
2 years ago

Banana asks, “But what happens when the republican base cannot win due to demographics?”

I watch my normie conservative brother struggle with this. Every time a black says something non-leftist he celebrates. Every time Ben Shapiro says that we’ve got to not see race he beams.

He seems to believe that our salvation lies in the non-leftist blacks and hispanics saving us and he believes that this is more realistic bet than the bet that I have made.

TomA
TomA
2 years ago

Once again, I’m shocked that you can get away with publishing this kind of bald-faced truth, even in a blog of limited reach. Yes, the problem really is that bad, and that should scare even the brain-dead Normies to death. But it doesn’t, and it won’t. Until the environment changes. As pointed out in the blog post, the vast majority of Americans are never going to divorce themselves from the voting harder canard as long as their high standard of living locks them into the Comfort First Imperative. In order for real change to occur, the faux affluence of money… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

TomA: Not merely the Comfort First Imperative, but also the Normalcy Bias. Every new batch of commenters seems to need to reinvent the wheel, and they bring the same, tired old arguments about ‘the system’ and voting and citizenship. When all those ships sailed long ago and the only thing that matters is racial demographics. I’d like to believe economic collapse might get them off the couch. The current status of their own White offspring as a despised minority has had no effect, but perhaps an impending shortage of their cheetos might wean them from sportsball and voting harder.

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

I would qualify Tom’s position with a bit of the generational dynamic. I do not perceive that us millenials are so much “glued to the couch by complacency” as “tied to the oar in the slave galley, hoping the ship doesnt sink.” No millenial white couple I know had under $100,000 in student debt. Most are twice that. Downpayments on a comfortable home not in the ghetto are another 100k cash in hand. What 20-year old can save up 1/4 million bucks? All the white collar starting jobs pay peanuts for years, and are viciously antiwhite in hiring. We live… Read more »

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Good ol' Rebel
2 years ago

The fiercest fighters are those with nothing to lose.

Firewire
Firewire
2 years ago

Approaching the event horizon of the Black Hole. Hang on … It’s gonna get bumpy

JohnWayne
JohnWayne
Reply to  Firewire
2 years ago

“Approaching the event horizon…” Not so sure. To vote or not to vote? Sure, heads you win, tails i lose, but what good would it do to dispel the illusion? What if too many ppl realize we don’t live in a democracy? Then what? Whataya gonna do about it? Then the tyrants can stop pretending and go full steam ahead – full totalitarian. You don’t tug on Superman’s cape, don’t spit into the wind, and you don’t pull the mask of the old lone ranger, and you don’t mess around with Jim or uncle Sam unless you have a Plan… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  JohnWayne
2 years ago

I’m not sure about the rest of the country but the sports stadiums in Ohio are completely dependent on bonds that are paid back with local “sin” taxes. For example, if people in Hamilton county (Cincinnati) didn’t like something they could buy their liquor and smokes outside of the county and bring the government to heel. A big reason why they don’t is that they believe the government under which they live is operating under the consent of the governed, take that away, and, well like ‘Z’ says, all white people have to lose is their chains. (And yes, I’ll… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
2 years ago

“A big reason why they don’t is that they believe the government under which they live is operating under the consent of the governed…”

They don’t because leaving the county is too much trouble. Just go up the street and pay the tax, be back home in fifteen. Or get an Uber Eats monkey to get it for you. Take away the comfort, make the normy suffer and make them know they are suffering and only then will change occur.

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  Forever Templar
2 years ago

That collapse idea is a really hard goal to achieve, the system is actually quite resilient to acute issues. Plus you dont want to be the cause. That kind of problem results in bodies in the streets, and whoever is blamed will likely join those bodies. The hope is TPTB own-goal on collapse as we wait and see, and do everything we collectively can to make sure TPTB are holding the bag when the music stops. If they can credibly blame WT for the deprivations of collapse, itll only get worse for our people, not better.

Chiron
Chiron
2 years ago

“These vast global consulting firms that operate in every western capital but are based in Washington operate like a secret society. They produce the people who get appointments in every administration, and they produce the candidates for spots on the bench. They don’t write regulations and legislation, but they develop and curate the people who do. ” For a long time I had the impression that politicians in the Anglosphere all sounded the same and from almost nowhere start using the same new terms when a new “crisis” arrives, did anyone notice how “Indo-Pacific” become the new favorite term of… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Chiron
2 years ago

I reckon this observation is pretty much true in all sectors, really. The commonality is the existence of a managerial class that spends it’s time dick-measuring, shrewing, in meetings, and networking with others in the hive. IT is a classic example where new terms, fads, or whatever are thrown around and then adopted… because new fad. That’s literally all there seems to be to it: it has become fashionable to have/say ‘X’; thus, let us do ‘X’. I suspect it has got worse because many businesses – both private and public – have a management class bloat, although I could… Read more »

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
2 years ago

Trying to reform it all is pointless.

Creating parallel informal/semi-formal institutions are our only hope.

The Church is pozzed, and private sector unions have been more demonized than pedophile rings.

Not sure what that leaves.

3 Pipe Problem
3 Pipe Problem
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

Keep your friends close and your friends closer. Trust few, speak little. Patience is a virtue.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

Like you, I live in Tubby Tyrants fiefdom. I keep silent for the most part because, as you know, most of the local serfs are brainwashed and compliant. If you have any suggestions for some network in which I can tap into to find the like-minded would be welcome. A beer tasting club, perhaps?

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

Here’s an apt cartoon on how realpolitik works. Don’t be alarmed by the disclaimer; this one is R-rated but only for violence. Browse the rest of the site at your own risk 😀
https://www.oglaf.com/kingshaped/

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

Yeah, that whole site is pretty smutty.

Click if you want the 1 cartoon, do NOT continue if you don’t want to see a bunch of cartoon porn.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  ProZNoV
2 years ago

Powerful informal structures exist, even under supposedly heavily hierarchal Church structures. The key is to refrain from directly attacking the visible Church leadership unless it’s a complete slam-dunk, and instead create societies and networks that deem them irrelevant.

It’s the same strategy that should be employed regarding government. Make the enemy realize he’s losing power and influence, but make it impossible to tell where the threat is coming from.

It’s a lot less sexy than 1776 bravado, but it’s the new method of war.

Barnard
Barnard
2 years ago

As members of the Borg would say, Amen and Awoman.

I don’t know how long ago that Pat Buchanan made that observation about local politicians being sensible, but it is no longer true today. There are some, but many enter this level hoping to ascend into the Borg. Decent people looking out for the public interest are getting weeded out before they can do any damage.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Barnard
2 years ago

It’s like the propagandists: even the guy who writes for the high school newspaper dreams of getting a pat on the head from the New York Times.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Barnard
2 years ago

Back in the 90’s when Ross Perot ran for president, he used to say something similar to what Buchanan said. “It’s not the people, it’s the system.”

Now we have the World Economic Forum grooming leaders like Merkel, Trudeau, Macron, and that weirdo leader of New Zealand, and others.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Wolf Barney
2 years ago

John Kerry threw a grenade in the water in Vietnam so he could get some superficial wounds and come back as a war hero who was wounded in action to help his political career. The craven power seekers of subsequent generations haven’t had to take risks like that as they are groomed for the role at even younger ages and never put in even slightly dangerous situations. As their lives get easier and easier they have become less capable of doing even the simplest work. I keep thinking this arrangement has to collapse, but I don’t know how long it… Read more »

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Barnard
2 years ago

My understanding is he wrote all the paper work for his own citations. Can only compare that to a great uncle who picked up a Bronze Star (V) in both WWII and Korea. Both were surprises.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Wolf Barney
2 years ago

The WEF is literally a real-life implementation of SPECTRE.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Starring Klaus Schwab, straight out of central casting as a Bond villain.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Barnard
2 years ago

Barnard: Good point. Voting ‘locally’ is an utter waste of time – most decent, legitimately pro-White people don’t have any interest in running, and the few decent but deluded rubes who do will never get the funding or party support to win. But normies persist in participating in a rigged game. Because ‘citizenship.’ Because ‘muh patriotism.’ Because it’s too scary to consider the fate to which they’ve consigned their grandchildren.

3 Pipe Problem
3 Pipe Problem
2 years ago

Again, this was foreseen by those old white guys a couple of centuries ago. The idea was that the wealthy, having means of their own, would take up the onerous duty of publick service, call it noblesse oblige, whatever, and after a short period of time, return to the private life. As Strelnikov famously informed Zhivago, the private life is dead; the ‘publick’ life is the path to power. Apparatchiks R us.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
2 years ago

DC is more inbred than the most isolated WV “holler”. And now for generations. Number of years ago was doing regular runs to DC working on some industry regulatory issues. So had to meet with the normal coterie of lobbyists, lawyers and consulting firms. Always felt like that scene from “John Adams” when he makes his first venture into the Versailles court of Louis XVI wearing his plain New Englander clothes. And gazing in wonderment at the vacuity of the spectacle.