The Emotive State

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If you look back at the government propaganda of the Second World War, you will see that it was rather generic in how it framed the enemy. The propaganda about the Germans was not much different from what was used in the prior war, except this time the Nazis were often portrayed as stupid. The Japanese were portrayed as absurdly Asian looking and monstrously cruel. Both were described as villainous aggressors who had no reason to launch their war on the world.

In other words, there was nothing special about the bad guys relative to prior bad guys, other than some superficial differences. There has always been a circular logic to wartime propaganda, going back to the Greeks. The bad guys are bad because they are the enemy, and they are the enemy because they are bad. What makes them bad, of course, is they do things we would never do, and they never do the things that we know good people are supposed to do.

Fast forward to the present and villains are either Hitler or Bull Connor, who have morphed into a Janus like creature that haunts every conflict. The foreign villains are always going to be Hitler, while domestic villains are the generic racist. Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden were Hitler, despite the obvious differences, while every white conservative is a fledgling Bull Connor. Donald Trump managed to be both, despite his Zionism and love of black people.

The language of public discourse now sounds like wartime propaganda because we now live in the age of emotivism. The term “emotivism” comes from an early 20th century school of ethics that claimed all ethical sentences are actually expressions of emotional attitude, as in positive or negative. When a speaker says something is good or bad, he is not stating an objective fact, but merely expressing his own emotional attitude toward the object in question.

Like a lot of 19th and early 20th century ideas around ethics and philosophy, this one fell out of favor due to its lack of utility. You cannot build a grand moral theory if morality is a subjective construct that arises from tradition or superstition, so there must be some universal and objective morality. Similarly, you cannot make a career in ethics if ethics are nothing more than conditioned responses. There must be some universal ethical code buried in the desert that must be found.

That does not mean the emotivists were correct when they made their sweeping claim about ethical statements. Just because the war propagandists say the bad guys are bad as a way to generate support for the cause, does not mean everyone who says the bad guys are bad is merely acting on their conditioning. Nor does it mean that everyone saying the bad guys are bad is a propagandist. It is possible to think the bad guys are objectively bad and do so without emotion.

Even so, it is a useful concept when thinking about how modern humans interact with one another in the public space. America is an empire built by war, so it is built for war, and therefore it is always on the hunt for war. As a result, generations of Americans have grown up in a wartime culture, which means the public square has been flooded with what amounts to wartime propaganda. There is always a war, which means there is always an enemy that demands you jeer at it.

Public discourse in this age is not about presenting facts or contesting various claims, but about displaying your allegiance to a perceived moral divide. The white people installing the “Hate has no place here” signs on their lawn would never live within a bus ride of black people, but they feel they must show the world that they are on one side of the racism line, the good side. The yawning gap between their emotive gestures and their lived experience does not register with them.

This is why the people we call the Left love the word extremism. The word is meaningless but in the mouth of a Cloud Person it is ridiculous. They accuse normal people living normal lives of extremism, because those normal people do not want to dress their son as a girl. Logically, it is nonsense, but emotively it is highly appealing as it not only expresses the users state of mind toward the bad people, it amplifies the distance between the speaker and object.

Of course, this is why everyone is Hitler now. It is not that Hitler is the evilest person in history or that he is an outlier in political villainy. Stalin, Pol Pot, Mao, and many others were much bloodier and villainous. Unlike those other baddies from history, Hitler lets the speaker express a clear emotional state. That emotional state, of course, indicates your emotional commitment to a collection of people and ideas. Calling someone Hitler is like violently crying at a North Korean state funeral.

That is the way to think about public discourse in the emotive state. The ambitious and self-conscious are always looking around for a way express their “boo/hooray” instincts to the crowd. When the pro-Israel people rushed to their nearest platform to claim Hamas is Hitler, they were letting the world know their emotional state on this issue, not expressing an ethical or moral position. That is why the language spiraled into the absurd as they competed with one another.

That last part also helps explain the weirdness of public discourse. Since every issue is instinctively understood to be an opportunity to express an emotion, there is a natural competition to see who can be the most emotional. Piety in the emotive state is no longer about adherence to a set of ethical rules, but a consistency in showing the popular emotional response to issues. Instead of sacrificing a bull to the gods, the great and the good have a good cry at a candlelight vigil.

A biproduct of this emotionalism is that politics are purely performative. There is no practical point to any of it, as the primary motivation is to be seen expressing the best emotions at the time. While the mob sorts through their own emotional response to the emotive performances, the people with real power go about exercising that power to maintain and enhance their power. Politics has become the feelies from the novel Brave New World, rather than a marketplace of ideas.

While this is useful to the people with power, it may be short lived. There is a limit to how much raw emotion one can tolerate. Every day there is some new thing that everyone must emote about in public. Just as drug takers find they need increasingly powerful doses to get the desired effect, the emotive need increasingly stronger emotional responses. Like the drug taker, the end of this road is the inability to feel anything other than the lack of agony.

All human societies are moral societies. The rules governing virtue provide meaning and purpose to individual lives. The emotive state, in contrast, channels the natural desire to do the right thing, however society defines it, into the onanistic act of crying in public over violation of the right thing. As a result, the good life has no point, other than an endless crying jag. There is no point to this way of living, which may explain the catastrophic social measures of modernity.


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csj
csj
7 months ago

This essay is an excellent common sense explication of A.J. Ayer’s “Language, Truth and Logic” – specifically Chapter VI. If you can get past Ayer’s jewy Rothschild and MI6 connections (yes, I know that is a lot to ask) the dude was brilliant and is a gateway to our understanding of how effed up our current situation really is. He wrote this in ’36. It tore a hole in moral philosophy and was all the rage for about 20 years. Then, like that, the attention to his thesis ended. Interesting story. It smacks of a “revelation of the method”. A… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  csj
7 months ago

I wasn’t expecting a reference to Ayer, who affected my thinking quite a bit back in the day.

I remember LT&L being about dismissing most metaphysical discussions with the assertion that all meaningful statements must be tautological or scientific, which is itself a metaphysical statement.

How does LT&L apply Z Man’s post? (I don’t want to find my copy in the basement to remember what’s in chapter 6.)

Sgt Pedantry
Sgt Pedantry
7 months ago

Hitler did nothing wrong.

houska
houska
Reply to  Sgt Pedantry
7 months ago

He started a 2 front war which was stupid.

abla
abla
Reply to  houska
7 months ago

Uh… a two-front war was started against him.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  houska
7 months ago

Why invade Poland after recovering lost territory, and then some, without firing a shot? If the belief was that war would come, and it certainly threatened, why double down on what didn’t work in WWI?— regardless of whatever treaty with Stalin, or a sense of British weakness. Diplomacy was the German Empire’s (or maybe only Bismarck’s) genius, war its ruin. Same for the Third Reich, except that they really didn’t give diplomacy a chance.

David Davenport
David Davenport
7 months ago

House spaker Mike Johnson turns out to be surprisingly disturbing to the Left, and not as much of a Managerial “yes man” as expected.

Dutch Boy
Dutch Boy
Reply to  David Davenport
7 months ago

Nope, he’s one of the usual DC gang – he appointed a Pharma lobbyist as his policy director.

MysteriousOrca
MysteriousOrca
7 months ago

Most peoples/governments demonize and dehumanize enemies during times of war, and then, ideally, let it go after the war is over. One of the worst things about the modern West is that, eighty years later, the Jews have not only held on to expired adversarial cartoon propaganda wartime hatred, but have used their dominance to force it as one of our society’s central organizing principles. As many of you have probably seen, they’ve even recently been using it to justify modern unconscionable genocide – “We’ve used Schindler’s List and hundreds of other movies, not to mention school curriculums, to convince… Read more »

MysteriousOrca
MysteriousOrca
Reply to  MysteriousOrca
7 months ago

Also – in before tomorrow’s post – that Audrey Hale Nashville “manifesto” seems to me awkward and like a forgery, and I am not sure I trust its purported authenticity: “And then I will drive my grey 2009 Toyota over to the Covenant Christian School, 33 Burton Hills Blvd, Nashville, TN 37215, and kill Christian kids just because they are Christian, and white people just because they are white, the same hate the school system taught me to do.” Its style doesn’t seem like the way real people actually write in journals. But, if it is actually real, obviously, she… Read more »

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
Reply to  MysteriousOrca
7 months ago

Maybe I stand alone, but I’ve never been interested in reading this thing. I just don’t have interest in what people like this have to say. We can all guess and be right with 90% certainty. If we’re wrong…so what?

The howling for it to be released just seemed like Con Inc. looking for a dead horse to beat for a news cycle.

MysteriousOrca
MysteriousOrca
Reply to  Nicholas Name
7 months ago

I hear you, but the left has gotten laws passed and gotten important people deplatformed based on outrage after right-wing mass shooting manifestos have been released. We can’t make change on demand as easily as they can, but still useful to make use of this tool as we can.

Pozymandias
7 months ago

I’ve been enjoying the cognitive dissonance (dissidence?) that’s festering among the Lefty scum on this whole Israeli-Palestine thing. It’s like watching the monsters in the old Doom game slaughter each other while you run around taking potshots at them with that lame little revolver to keep them angry. This morning on NextDoor, always a reliable indicator of what the estrogen-addled masses think, someone posted one of those large “poster” images about the “Israeli Apartheid” in Palestine. It’s good to see this kind of thing but it doesn’t really mean the poster is having any kind of red pill epiphany. If… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Pozymandias
7 months ago

I too find myself in the position of respecting Ms. Tlaib for supporting her people, wishing there were more pols who would, while simultaneously knowing that if I were in Bibi’s chair, I’d have already spent the last several years carpet bombing the Gaza strip.

Greg Nikolic
7 months ago

Hitler is the standard villain because he is the centerpiece of the last “Good” war. Why was it good? It unified the U.S. armed forces, which dropped the segregation demands of previous years, and de facto unified America under one banner. We can look at 1933-45 as the period in which the New Deal progressivism combined with pre-Wokeism Wokeism to cement a period in which the Left now rules everything. It was the television in the Fifties which really accelerated the processes unleashed in the Thirties. Now we have almost one hundred years of the din of unending propaganda from… Read more »

David Davenport
David Davenport
Reply to  Greg Nikolic
7 months ago

” It unified the U.S. armed forces, which dropped the segregation demands of previous years, and de facto unified America under one banner.”

Not in WWII. US Army desegregation was a Korean War innovation.

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
Reply to  David Davenport
7 months ago

Partially true. Maintaining segregation in combat units was a giant unecessary pain in the ass in WW2; units with combat loses couldn’t replenish or reconsolidate efficiently. Desegregation afterwards was seen as progressive by America, but the military generally saw it as being pragmatic.

Filthie
Filthie
Member
7 months ago

There is an equal and opposite blowback on this phenomenon too. I no longer believe or trust a thing I read. When the Usual Suspects announce a Current Thing – the first thing out of my face is “bull chit”. It’s a conditioned reflex and not a good one; one day Hitler or the Big Bad Wolf WILL come calling and nobody’s going to see him for all the hyperventilating, clucking and squawking. So bad is it now, that there’s bona fide Flat Earthers on Blab. At first I thought it was a running gag devised by the Z Man… Read more »

Fakeemail
Fakeemail
7 months ago

Morality is really a product of temperament, intelligence, and aesthetics. Believing in and protecting the self interest of those inborn traits and preferences.

R and K selected have very different world views, both of which have credence to certain extents.

RealityRules
RealityRules
7 months ago

Great essay. I had dinner in the clouds the other night. Very, every high in the clouds at a private dinner. People who made unfathomable sums looting the country they, “fled”, as children. They are besides themselves about Ukraine and now Israel and how, though some of the woke stuff is okay, it has now gone way too far. Of course, that is because this tiger they didn’t recognize as a tiger, that they don’t know that they have by the tail, is now snapping directly at them. What Z’s post is getting at in part is the ability to… Read more »

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
Reply to  RealityRules
7 months ago

You said a great deal here, but I will comment on your question about what is to be done about the U.S. military. I spent 20yrs as a legionare for the GAE, so I have some insight. I was happy to see you use the term “warrior caste” because it is an accurate description of what emerged from the post-draft military. It is overwhelmingly white, male, and comes from flyover country. This institutionalized a culture of pragmatism and meritocracy (at least compared to the rest of the government). These things are sacrilege to leftists, so they acted. The Woke Purge… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Nicholas Name
7 months ago

They must be working overtime on the drone swarms that will impose domestic control

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

I won’t disagree, but the effectiveness of swarms in a counterinsurgency is yet to be known. To the MIC, the first and last solution to every problem is technology. Firing $100k Hellfire missiles at $5k pickup trucks for decades is perfectly reasonable to them. This discards the Rube-Goldburg process of these weapons’ distributed production, assembly, transport, employment, and operation. All of that is further reliant on dozens of supporting systems (maintenance, communications, feeding the operator, etc) functioning as designed. Only a small amount of chaos renders it useless. The GAE is not run by geniuses; Anti-Islamiphobia Task Forces are the… Read more »

Mike
Mike
Reply to  Nicholas Name
7 months ago

One thing to keep in mind is that all the legionnaires have families and homes.

Carrie
Carrie
Reply to  Nicholas Name
7 months ago

I know this is a dumb question, but I’m just tuning back in after a few months away from Z Man’s blog.

What is the GAE? What does the acronym mean?
I can guess mostly from context, but am asking for help.
Thanks!

Winter
Winter
Reply to  Carrie
7 months ago

I believe it stands for Global American Empire, but it could also be the “Gay American Empire” or “Globohomo American Empire.”

I welcome any corrections.

Too bad it’s not the FGAE…the Fake and Gay American Empire.

Bloated Boomer
Bloated Boomer
Reply to  Winter
7 months ago

It might have been Darren Beattie than popularised it as Globalist American Empire, but I think Greatest Ally Empire could work, too.

The Real Bill
The Real Bill
7 months ago

As I understand it, the Japanese *were* far more brutal, fanatical, and unrelenting in World War II than were the Germans. The war in the Pacific was much worse than the war in Europe. So there was some truth to the stereotypical characterization of the Japanese. The Japanese are indeed different in significant ways than Europeans. Calling someone an “extremist” is the form this sort of demonization takes in our woke modern world: another way of saying “they’re not like us“. Re: emotions: one way of looking at it is that emotions provide value to thoughts. They alert us to… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  The Real Bill
7 months ago

Hitler didn’t commit his atrocities in the name of liberating humanity as most of the other archvillains of the 20th century did. Had he done so, the general attitude toward him would be mildly offended ambivalence rather than unreconstructed condemnation.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

Hitler also had the ranting, the only other one doing that was Mussolini but no one was going to take seriously the idea of an Italian as the embodiment of all evil. Japanmen and Ching Chongs don’t work either because they’re too alien to use, while a German is culturally similar enough to implant the fear of the little Adolf hiding inside your neighbor when he carps about too many Mexicans coming into the country. Stalin was a worse butcher, but he was ultimately a product of a golem created by the folks who cry out in pain, so they… Read more »

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Ploppy
7 months ago

“Hitler also had the ranting,” which are curiously never subtitled on mainstream TV and film.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Wolf Barney
7 months ago

Yeah, actually when you translate it the whole time he was talking about how he loved cuddling his dog Blondi.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Ploppy
7 months ago

Stalin was a Jew.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  james wilson
7 months ago

He was not.

Josef Dzughashvili was a Georgian who attended a Russian Orthodox seminary in his youth.

Your Jewdar needs to be recalibrated.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  james wilson
7 months ago

Yep. So were Martin Luther King, Idi Amin, the emperor Hirohito and the Ayotollah Khomeini.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

Hitler didn’t commit his atrocities in the name of liberating humanity

Are you sure about that?

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  KGB
7 months ago

Ostei Kozelskii: “Hitler didn’t commit his atrocities in the name of liberating humanity as most of the other archvillains of the 20th century did.”

Can anyone point to a fully documented atrocity of Hitler’s which isn’t yet another ex-post-facto Frankfurt School Psyop?

[Obviously no holohoaxing is to be permitted.]

PS: Hitler’s agenda was not “liberating humanity” per se, but rather simply liberating German-ity.

Hitler was especially concerned about myriad Germanic populations, trapped in Western Russia, who were at risk of being annihilated by the Bolsheviks.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Bourbon
7 months ago

There were documented atrocities beyond a doubt, in particular mass shootings and non- judicial executions of Jews and suspected communist partisans on the Eastern Front. Although the camp lore is wildly exaggerated and there is no way they gassed six million Jews, being deprived of one’s home and property and being sent to a forced labor camp where malnutrition and typhus were rampant was not exactly a picnic at the beach. I also suspect that they had some kind of euthanasia program in the camps for inmates unable to work. They had a euthanasia program for defective Aryans and were… Read more »

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Bourbon
7 months ago

Xman, can you give some specific examples of documentation which is NOT j00-tainted in any fashion?

URLs would be awesome.

Thanks.

PS: The following was an extremely instructive screenshot at Gab the other day.

https://tinyurl.com/2dpxttub

I don’t know if you can find any ackshual published research ostensibly concerning the nature of the 3rd Reich which is NOT j00-tainted.

The j00z have written [and published and hold the copyrights to] all the history books.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  KGB
7 months ago

I get the photo, KGB, but the answer is yes. Hitler was interested in “liberating” the Aryan peoples, not humanity. He expressly preferred his own people to the Other, and that is one of the chief reasons he is so intensely reviled. Whites are not allowed to prefer their own.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

Bourbon, you’re absolutely right that it is very difficult to find any neutral and objective analyses of German atrocities that are not written by Jews and not part of the Holocaust lore. That being said the NSDAP did in fact regard Jews and Jewish communists in particular as enemies treated them harshly. Probably the most well-known examples of non-camp atrocities include the shootings of allegedly some 30,000 Jews at Babi Yar in Ukraine, the reprisals against the Czech resistance for the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich, in which a couple of hundred non-Jews were shot, and the reprisals against the Yugoslavian… Read more »

Carrie
Carrie
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

There are reports out there which are not tainted.
The Leuchter Reports.
A Polish (I think) scientist went back to the gas chambers and asked legit scientific questions about the viability of gassing massive numbers of people: tre seals on the doors & windows, the amounts of gas needed, the shower heads needed and how it was down.
In short, he was prosecuted for asking uncomfortable questions. BUT, his evidence shows that six million is a total lie in the sky number.

https://educate-yourself.org/cn/The-Leuchter-Reports-2nd-corrected-edition-2005-234pages.pdf

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  KGB
7 months ago

You had it right after the first five words.

Quit while you’re ahead.

Guest
Guest
7 months ago

Let’s just call a spade a spade. Our politics are emotive due to the nineteenth amendment. Repeal it and some sense of logic and reason will return to politics in America.

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Guest
7 months ago

I seriously doubt it. You can’t just repeal the 19th and think this will do much of anything without repealing everything else around women which naturally flowed from the sentiment which enabled the 19th . We would need to remove them from the workplace and the academy along with politics. Women’s negative influence is not just via the ballot box or even primarily via the ballot box. Plus, women have changed since the 19th. Just think of the “cult of safety” we now have around children. Most of us would agree this is driven by women. But look at how… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
7 months ago

I suspect Guest’s proposal to repeal the 19th is a stand-in for dramatically reducing female influence in the public sphere, in general.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

Most women would be much happier running a household and raising a brood of children, or babysitting the grandchildren, even if most don’t think so.

“Wine, pills, cats, boyfriends, and career. Why am I so unhappy?”

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Paintersforms
7 months ago

I think most do know it, if only instinctively. That’s why they immiserate everybody else— to let them know something’s wrong. But, being women, they can’t just say it and say what’s wrong. You’re supposed to read minds lol.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Paintersforms
7 months ago

*make miserable* I guess. Oh well, I like immiserate!

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

My thinking as well since it seems the issue is less “women voting” than a society that allows “women voting”. There doesn’t seem to be a way around it as once “voting” is allowed at all then it becomes a disease as a system validated by “voting” is validated even further by even more “voting”.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
7 months ago

There are no “strong women,” there are only weak men

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
7 months ago

Tars Tarkas: ‘Just think of the “cult of safety” we now have around children.’ I live in an house which is more than a century old, and when it was built there were: A) No vehicles flying down the road at 75MPH [like we have today] B) No v@xxines [’nuff said] C) No pediatricians [’nuff said] C) No s0d0mites nor s@pphistes E) No kneegr0wz in the skrewls F) No j00z G) The ability to spontaneously lynch [with impunity] uppity kneegr0wz & j00z & s0d0mites & s@pphistes when necessary. Etc etc etc. If you can get rid of automobiles & trucks… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Bourbon
7 months ago

My childhood was far more recent and where all those things existed. There was no cult of safety when I was a kid. Same for boomers. Kids born around 1970 were the last of kids who grew up before the cult of safety. Anyone obsessing on their child’s safety is probably doing more harm than good. Most of them are NOT obsessing with the problems you point out. Do you REALLY believe they are obsessing on reducing their screen time? Obsessing on teaching them not to relax around blax? Keeping them away from vaccines and pediatricians? Guarding what they read… Read more »

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
7 months ago

Okay, I don’t know where we go from here, in terms of continuing the conversation. The children of the 21st Century are at EXTREME RISK of every manner of psychological & pharmaceutical poisonings, and they sure as hell can’t walk up or down the road, nor ride a bicycle at 75MPH. [Hello obesity epidemic.] Some parents are paying attention to that reality, by e.g. homeschooling their children, getting their children involved in extracurricular sports, and removing their children from the purview of the Pediatrician Industrial Complex. Whereas other parents are throwing their children to the wolves of the Gender Dysphoria… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
7 months ago

@Bourbon I grew up in the 70s. In the early part of the 70s, the speed limits were generally higher than they are today. But by the mid 70s, the national speed limit was lowered to 55. But neither applied to city streets or suburban neighborhoods. The speed limit was 25mph on my street and during rush hour, traffic was at a dead stop because there was a light at the bottom of my street. There are no city streets or suburban streets with a 75mph speed limit. Once you leave your particular suburb, I agree that most of the… Read more »

Carrie
Carrie
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
7 months ago

This all sounds great to me!

Xman
Xman
7 months ago

The “emotive state” is the hysterical state… and “hysteria” is derived from the Greek word for “uterus.” Almost all the hysteria and emotiveness in the past 30 years has come from the feminization of the West and from females gaining power. After 9/11, the most common view of government is that it is supposed to “keep us safe.” I don’t recall that phrase being used after Pear Harbor — then, it was more like “Kill the yellow bastards.” The feminization/hysteria/safety/herd mentality was on full display during the COVID hoax, but it infects everything else, too, from gun control in New… Read more »

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  Xman
7 months ago

I think it’s more like high heel on your balls forever. I have really become quite sick with all the distaff crap on TV and other entertainment.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Hoagie
7 months ago

It is a rainbow-colored combat boot, but that’s a slight quibble.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Xman
7 months ago

If it was high heels I might not complain so much. What we get is more like schoolmarm flats and bulldyke work boots.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Xman
7 months ago

Are you old enough to remember the claim that women in higher offices would mean the end of war? My sides…

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Jack Dodson
7 months ago

People who thought that must have skipped high school

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

Absolutely. Even grade school.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Jack Dodson
7 months ago

Our first woman president is guaranteed to start a war. She has to, to prove she’s “tough” like the guys.

Ostei Kozelskii
Ostei Kozelskii
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

I predict she’ll rename it the Ovum Office…

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

That brings to mind Nimarata’s cringeworthy line from earlier this year, “I don’t put up with bullies. And when you kick back, it hurts them more if you’re wearing heels.”

She’s spoiling for a chance to start a fight.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  KGB
7 months ago

Uh huh. She’s a real tuffie alright. Bet she was cowering under her desk and rubbing Vishnu’s bangles when that horrid host of white Mongols came to rape, burn and pillage on J6.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

And as Mrs Clinton said:
Women have always been the primary victims of war. Women lose their husbands, their fathers, their sons in combat. Women often have to flee from the only homes they have ever known. Women are often the refugees from conflict and sometimes, more frequently in today’s warfare, victims. Women are often left with the responsibility, alone, of raising the children.

Conference on domestic violence in San Salvador, El Salvador (17 November 1998).

Eloi
Eloi
Reply to  Xman
7 months ago

The hysteria also comes from the general ennui men and women experience. Flooded with so much dopamine from drugs and extreme entertainment, their bodies only respond to increasingly extreme stimuli that produces a heightened, hysterical response. Coupled with the lack of ambition, a claim of emotional virtue helps rationalize the deep self loathing they experience. A moral cause, where they are the vanguard of righteousness, simultaneously stimulates the overactive adrenal system, justifies their empty existence with assumed purpose, and requires no effort beyond the virtual (both meanings intended).

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Xman
7 months ago

Now that’s a classic post. One for the ages.

B125
B125
7 months ago

We live in a world where everyone is fighting against the Moustache Man. Russia is fighting for the “de-Nazification” of Ukraine. Ukraine (and the West) are fighting Russia because Putin is the second coming of the painter. Both Putin and the painter were the leader of a country, so Putin is literally the Bad Painter Man. Now, Hamas attacking Israel makes them N*zis. After all, the painter also attacked the Jewish people. From the Hamas perspective, the Israelis are the really N*zis, taking a page out of the painter’s book on ethnic cleansing. Of course, the Freedom Convoy truckers fighting… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  B125
7 months ago

I’m tellin’ ya’ it’s anuddah Shoah right down da’ line! Oy, oy, oy…

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  B125
7 months ago

With this level of demand we should start a Hitler factory

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

I think that’s what they call social media. Every day they find a new one to single out for two minutes hate.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

Why just the other day I saw Hitler and Elvis enjoying a banana cream pie and coffee in a little cafe in Yazoo City.

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

Hitler Factory = Best Comment

Totally stealing this

Bob Alou
Bob Alou
Reply to  B125
7 months ago

Painter? I thought he hung wallpaper. Don’t you remember Patton’s line about “we’re gonna get that paper hangin’ son of a bitch”

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Bob Alou
7 months ago

Word has it he was a pretty fair hand with the sheet rock, too.

TomA
TomA
7 months ago

Please indulge one more Bongino rant, as is applies to today’s post. Bongino reveals and espouses many rational and useful things about modern society and clearly has some inside sources feeding information not normally available to the public. This is the good Bongino. But he is also the Chief Propagandist for the vote-harder mantra because he genuinely believes it can still work to fix DC. I can excuse this as idiocy but not the harm it does in keeping normie on the couch. The Israeli-Hamas conflict has now revealed the True Bongino. If given the opportunity, he would travel to… Read more »

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  TomA
7 months ago

God himself was a genocidal monster in the Bible. Therefore, I have no problem with genocide only with who it’s being used against. If you wanna talk morality then I have to say that Christian morality is what I believe in and Christians have slaughtered people. Sometimes in the name of God. Onward Christian soldiers was not written for the Salvation Army. On the flip side of that coin I believe that Muslims are the most immoral people on the face of the earth. And anytime that Christians or anyone else has the opportunity to slaughter as many of them… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Hoagie
7 months ago

Muslims have always been nice to me. Give you the shirt off their back, they will. Certainly nicer to me than jews. As well as smellier. The problems seem to start when they congregate in large enough groups to be politically viable. Which is fine in their own countries, it’s their deployment in the Great Replacement that is dangerous.

miforest
miforest
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

spend some time in any muslim majority country….

KGB
KGB
Reply to  miforest
7 months ago

Even there, culture and institutions remain downstream from biology. Malaysia and Indonesia aren’t nearly the same as Pakistan, Iran, or the Arabian countries.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  miforest
7 months ago

I don’t begrudge them what they do in their sand box. Not my circus not my monkeys. In my (brief) visits to those regions they were nice to me then too. Although I didn’t wander around with an open container of booze dressed like RuPaul.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Hoagie
7 months ago

If you truly believe what you say, why are you not out there right now attempting to kill the people you hate? Actions speak louder than words. But your comment does speak to something that I was trying to convey in my post above. And that is that talking trash is cheap bravado compared to actually putting your life on the line in defense of your beliefs. In others words, Dan Bongino’s national audience rhetoric would be a lot more convincing if gave those sermons with actual blood on his hands after returning from the Middle East and slaughtering a… Read more »

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
7 months ago

Why Hitler though? Why is he being used now daily as the regime’s bad guy sock puppet in their moral play? I think the answers may be found in “Mein Kampf.”

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  JR Wirth
7 months ago

Worldwide Jewry led by American Jewry has spent since World War II making Adolf Hitler the boogeyman. We all know that there are a lot of worse people in history even more recently than Adolf but he was killing Jews and Jewry runs the newspapers and the airwaves so it stands to reason they’re not gonna moon about the innocent chinks murdered by Mao.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Hoagie
7 months ago

Just a side rant about John Derbyshire who one minute will pat himself on the head with lines like:
People who obsess about Jews have issues
But then two minutes later:
What is up with Hitler being singled out as The Most Evil Man Ever?”
He has contributed (and continues to contribute) so much the cause that all I can muster is an eyeroll, but still.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
7 months ago

No matter how good they might be on any- or everything else, boomercons (and their non-rebellious descendants) are hopelessly mired in the contradiction you’ve noted—because the content of anglosphere conservatism is very little *but* that contradiction. I haven’t read Gottfried’s book about it yet, but it fits his thesis (as I understand it) that the West’s religion/cause/worldview is “antifascism,” where fascism is anything that might remind anybody of Hitler (a protean supernatural entity that doesn’t meaningfully exist in living memory). There are left- and right-inflected lists of those things, mostly overlapping, and having any Qs about the Js is very… Read more »

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  JR Wirth
7 months ago

One of the richer ironies from the most recent unpleasantness in the Middle East has been hearing speakers refer to a certain Bronze Age Death Cult as “Nazis.” Talk about what goes around, comes around.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
7 months ago

Very good essay, explains the constant calls for hysteria and for why the system wants normal people to choose up sides on every issue.
But as someone has said before they keep promising me Hitler but I never get him.

mmack
mmack
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
7 months ago

But as someone has said before they keep promising me Hitler but I never get him.

To quote Michael Keaton from Multiplicity:

“You know how when you make a copy of a copy, it’s not as sharp as… well… the original.”

It’s kinda like that.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

I was a child of the MIC. I grew up surrounded by it, in a town that wouldn’t exist if not for it. My whole world was steeped in it, everyone I knew, worked for, was educated by, was a part of or a product of that same MIC stew. I myself worked for it directly for some time, in varying capacities, and indirectly in others. It’s fair to say that it was inseparable from me as a person. Yet when I turned away from it and finally saw it for what it was, the way a dissident would see… Read more »

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

Vietnam was the last time an excuse even was offered, or a war was framed in a traditional win/lose situation. There were attempts to do so with Iraq but everyone noticed the borders were wide open while the politicians bellowed “we have to fight them over there so we don’t have to fight them over here!” Since no one will degrade and debase themselves any longer in such mindless slaughter voluntarily, we will see either a return of the draft or use of blatant mercenaries in the next and likely last GAE war.

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
Reply to  Jack Dodson
7 months ago

Don’t forget that they kept changing the reasons for the war. “Kill the bad guys” turned into “Girls have to go to school” and “Democracy” for people with no concept of civil government or compromise.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
7 months ago

THIS–>”Every day there is some new thing that everyone must emote about in public. Just as drug takers find they need increasingly powerful doses to get the desired effect, the emotive need increasingly stronger emotional responses. Like the drug taker, the end of this road is the inability to feel anything other than the lack of agony”. One can see this everywhere. It takes ever increasing voltage to gin up the desired emotional response. In cinema & art (or what passes for art) for example. Recall the ‘p*ss Christ’ exhibit which was so was so shocking several years back. ‘The… Read more »

Krustykurmudgeon
Krustykurmudgeon
7 months ago

It won’t let me post the link but did anyone see the video of people taking an IQ test and it turns out that a biotech researcher with a PhD only has a 112 IQ.

Meanwhile there was a us marine guy who had 130 iq

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Krustykurmudgeon
7 months ago

BS = Bullshit
MS = More shit
PhD = Piled Higher n’ Deeper

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
7 months ago

I learned that last one from my dad, who not coincidentally had a PhD. But he was an honest man, and not one of those who would insist on being called “Doctor”, or wanted to ride on the prestige supposedly bestowed by the piece of paper. He EARNED it by dint of hard work, though; he was a talented guy from Arkansas who was the first in his family to even go to college, first at a local community college, then on to finish his BS at a branch of the University of NC, then enlisting in the Marines (following… Read more »

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
7 months ago

how old is/was your dad. I’ m guessing a younger silent (i.e. mid 80s age wise)?

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
7 months ago

You are correct in that surmise. I am an early 50s boomer.

Both of my parents grew up in the grip of the Great Depression.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
7 months ago

My dad passed 8 years ago at the age of 91. My mother dies a bit more than a decade earlier, succumbing to the ravages of a dementia, care for by my dad for 8 years of decline with whatever aid my wife and I could offer around our full time careers.

Zaphod
Zaphod
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
7 months ago

Your Dad’s starting out story is similar to that of the late great Jerry Pournelle’s.

Tree grow
Tree grow
Reply to  Krustykurmudgeon
7 months ago

Problem is,

Who is really the smart one?

The obnoxious midwit who takes unapologetically what is offered to her by a dying society.

Or

130 IQ Marine guy who is fighting and sacrificing for a system that allows a lower IQ brown affirmative action case to lord over him.

Probably a kid with gullible normiecon parents.

Hope he grows out of it.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Krustykurmudgeon
7 months ago

I did see that video, and the part I noticed was that the lowest IQ “Ph.D” was also extremely domineering and took over the conversation constantly. This fits with another study that was done where they put people in random groups and had them perform tasks only to find that the person put in charge invariably wasn’t the smartest person nor the person with the most applicable experience at the task, but the person who talked the most. America in particular is an extrovert biased culture where introverts are regarded as creeps, its only natural that every part of our… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ploppy
7 months ago

Loudmouthed bullshitters hellbent on getting filthy rich by any means possible.

miforest
miforest
7 months ago

We also venerate those doing the will of the cabol beyoud all reason , there is propaganda that way too.
look at what our ukrainian hero is up to. now we know how he amassed a personal fortune estimated at $600m . and bought the nice $41m estate in florida .
https://dcweekly.org/2023/11/04/olena-zelenskas-organization-accused-of-child-trafficking-scandal-insider-confesses/

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

I can’t think of any source of morality besides religion. Majority decision is clearly no guide to morality. Nature would lead you to darwinism which is purebred genetic utilitarianism and this seems equivalent saying exactly the opposite, that there is no morality, only survival. While I suspect that there may be a kernel of truth in that I don’t think humans are designed to live in such a mental state. Which leaves me with religion. And as it happens, most surviving religions tend to be moderately eugenic, meaning that they are not at odds with biological imperitive. What I personally… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

“Nature would lead you to darwinism…I don’t think humans are designed to live in such a mental state. ”

Precisely why I suspect a “higher being” involved in the affairs of man—at least in creation. We devolve from strict Darwinian selection way too much for our behavior to be explained otherwise (so far at least). That man was created in the “image and likeness of God” becomes more of an attractive explanation for me.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Compsci
7 months ago

Whether or not I believe that I increasingly believe it is better to believe it. I would also prefer it to be true

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

Perhaps a more honest expression of belief than many. I can accept such.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Compsci
7 months ago

Thanks. Maybe the truth is beyond a mere “it is so or it isn’t”. It is not a human prerogative to decide if ultimate truth yields to such a binary verdict

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Compsci
7 months ago

I mean we really don’t deviate that much from other social animals. All the moralfagging we do is clearly intended for status within the group, not much different than a cow taking its turn standing on the outside edge of the herd to show the other cows what a moral paragon of cowness she is. Watch a cart narc video to see just how people act when they think no one is paying attention to their inherent vile nature, and the degree to which they panic and throw a fit when they find out their wickedness is being filmed and… Read more »

Fred the Gator
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

While I think that our morality is a transcendent intuition given us by God (along with truth and beauty), I think there is another source of morality that one might argue is not completely incoherent. It is Nietzsche’s view of will to power, and can be summarized (by me at least) by saying “If the universe doesn’t slap you down, what you are doing is right.” The fact that this doesn’t accord with our usual views of morality is of no account. There’s an amusing version of this view in a poem by C. S. Lewis called “Evolutionary Hymn”. The… Read more »

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Fred the Gator
7 months ago

Isn’t the Nietzsche principle a different way of saying “if you get away with it, it’s fine”? It seems to be equivalent, or close to it, to darwinism; it’s about survival, there is no morality.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

Nietzsche made a point of being anti-Darwin, regardless of whether he thought “evolution” in that sense was true, to preemptively shield his ideas against biological (modern) interpretations. Of course that didn’t work out at all. “What’s good is what cultivates superior types” (not an actual quote but a point he sometimes made) reminds almost everybody of speciation/etc.—especially when the guy who says it is himself biologically unfit, because our actual post-death-of-God morality is about going “YEAH RIGHT LOSER” at superior types.

Bob Alou
Bob Alou
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

I said “Praise the Lord!”

imbroglio
imbroglio
7 months ago

“The white people installing the “Hate has no place here” signs on their lawn would never live within a bus ride of black people, but they feel they must show the world that they are on one side of the racism line, the good side. The yawning gap between their emotive gestures and their lived experience does not register with them.” This goes on in the affluent neighborhoods in my town where “From The River To The Sea” signs now flap beside the BLM signs. These are also the folks who keep their masks on in the ongoing war against… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
7 months ago

All quite true, but the emotional state – particularly its ever-changing definitions of good and bad – is more aimed at the managerial class. The lower classes are having a harder time keeping up with the who’s good and bad, but they’re still emotional. The college-educated woman or man knows to keep an eye out for hints about who to boo and who to cheer. The lower classes and/or most emotional of the emotional state aren’t as cagey. We’re seeing that with Gaza. The media immediately let the managerial class know that the Israelis were the good guys and the… Read more »

Pozymandias
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
7 months ago

I’ve been enjoying the cognitive dissonance (dissidence?) that’s festering among the Lefty scum on this whole Israeli-Palestine thing. It’s like watching the monsters in the old Doom game slaughter each other while you run around taking potshots at them with that lame little revolver to keep them angry. This morning on NextDoor, always a reliable indicator of what the estrogen-addled masses think, someone posted one of those large “poster” images about the “Israeli Apartheid” in Palestine. It’s good to see this kind of thing but it doesn’t really mean the poster is having any kind of red pill epiphany. If… Read more »

ChrisZ
ChrisZ
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
7 months ago

Citizen, this observation about the high-low difference in “emotivism” is a valuable (and timely) addition to Zman’s post. Thanks.

Gespenst
Gespenst
7 months ago

“The Japanese were portrayed as absurdly Asian looking and monstrously cruel.”

To be fair, Allied POWs and millions of Chinese would have agreed with the “monstrously cruel” part of that sentence.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Gespenst
7 months ago

I don’t know if cruelty is the right word. To surrender was to be subhuman, and to agree to be treated as such. Virtually none of those Japs would have ever suffered the indignity of surrender, until their emperor commanded it. From a western frame it looks like cruelty, but from their frame, more like…. sanitation?

Tokyo Inferno
Tokyo Inferno
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

Why did they demand people surrender to them? Did they explain, as they are so bound by honor, the terms of the surrender?
Why did they rape women on an industrial scale?
Some honor.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Tokyo Inferno
7 months ago

The civilian populations who had no say in the surrender weren’t treated very well, to say the least. Hands down, the Japanese Imperial Army was the most brutal occupiers of the war.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

The better explanation might be the difference between
“In group” and “out group”. The Japanese were exceedingly indifferent—as in cruel—to the nationals they opposed, or opposed them, but within their own group had a perfectly acceptable—even admirable—manner of behavior. This manner of behavior is, even today, much remarked upon by foreigners visiting Japan. Whether Japan will revert to former out group behavior if another conflict occurs is untested, since after the devastation of WWII Japan has avoid all physical conflicts with “others”.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Compsci
7 months ago

My money is on reversion. I forget the guy’s name, but a French academic in Ye Good Ole Days described the Japanese as the “ant people.” That is perfect, and I’m a great admirer of their culture. Their wartime behavior was kind of a warped specie of Bushido, but their contemporary day to day lives are as well. Hierarchy and an in-group honor code manifests in everything from the boardroom to the whorehouse, to the degree those two can be disentangled.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

If Unit 731, Nanking and Bataan are too grand a scale to digest then I suggest reading about the American B-29 bomber crew sent to Kyushu University. It’s more… personable.

I can comprehend “raising the black flag” on a battlefield. I can see the mental detachment of industrial scale bombing raids. The story and photos of that young crew of airmen made me never again question Fat Man or Little Boy.

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Gespenst
7 months ago

“absurdly Asian looking” This is why I say we hate diversity. Cartoons always accentuate something about a character. That’s where you tend to see the ‘absurdly ethnic looking’ characters, in cartoons (both still and animated), which we now denounce as racist. It is telling that we feel much more shame about “racist” depictions of Asians in cartoons than dropping nuclear nuclear weapons on actual real life Asians. I’ve even seen White people freak out about depictions of Asians done by Asians. The people who freak out about the depictions forget what the purpose of those depictions were. Instead of getting… Read more »

jrod
jrod
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
7 months ago

Ah, for the days of MAD magazine

KGB
KGB
Reply to  jrod
7 months ago
Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  KGB
7 months ago

Send-up of racism, my ass. O’Rourke noticed things.

wendy forward
wendy forward
Reply to  KGB
7 months ago

I still have my original copy of this NL issue – best satirical piece ever.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Gespenst
7 months ago

I wrestle with this as, post Midway, GAE turned Japan into a bombed out husk of tree-bark eating orphans all because they…were extra nasty to the Chinese and Koreans?

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
7 months ago

American “nationals” in the Philippines and Guam were slaughtered after being raped, tortured and murdered for three years, pilots were subjected to vivisection, and so forth. There was more than a little reason to be pissed.

Al in Georgia
Al in Georgia
Reply to  Gespenst
7 months ago

An American, British or Australia soldier who was a POW of the Japanese had a 1 in 3 probability of dying in captivity. An America or British soldier who was a POW of the Germans had a 1 in 100 probability of dying in captivity.

With the Japanese, soldiers in large surrenders, had the better chance of being made prisoners of war. Examples of this are Singapore, Philippines, and Wake Island. Small units and air crew didn’t fare too well.

Russian POWs of the Germans had a very bad time as a POW.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Al in Georgia
7 months ago

German POWs of the Russians also had a very bad time. You probably know the numbers better than I do, but I believe they had a higher chance of dying than did western POWs of the Japs.

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
7 months ago

“The yawning gap between their emotive gestures and their lived experience does not register with them.” An example of this from downtown Houston: Google took me on a tour of Da Hood and it was typically overrun with black drug users. A dealer had barricaded himself on the porch of an abandoned house and had an orderly line of customers on the sidewalk. After getting their fix, the junkies wandered into a shelter to watch TV. About a quarter mile later, in the Museum District, I saw someone addressing this problem in their own way. He was a boomer in… Read more »

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
7 months ago

The opposite of the Emotive State is the concept of Reasons of State, which Machiavelli made famous and Richelieu championed (Raison D’Etat). This sorta means: “the State requires it, so screw your emotions”. Now granted, the State needs some moral authority. But in the end, the future DR State will also operate along the lines of Raison D’Etat. A perfectly reasonable argument-closer for the the ME crap is: 1) We won WWII 2) For whatever reason, we wanted a place to put all the Jewish folks 3) Millions upon millions of people were displaced in the aftermath of WWII (including… Read more »

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Captain Willard
7 months ago

“The rest is just post-hoc moralizing, which from my cynical point of view, has become a US specialty.”

That’s totally factual, cynical or not. I really have come to loathe the nation of my birth in no small part for this reason. “Reasons of state” is how all governments survive and operate. Some, like the US, just cloak it in morality to a nauseating degree.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Jack Dodson
7 months ago

Jack Dodson: One could argue that “Reasons of State” are today emotive reasons, because women have taken charge alongside ethnic/religious groups which have an historical penchant for excess emoting. I can agree that historically many ‘statesmen’ could consider an issue or conflict with a certain degree of rational detachment – I endeavored to do this myself when I was, in a small way, a representative of ‘the state.’ But today all sorts of emotive ‘reasons’ come into play. I am sick and tired of everyone demanding that I CARE. I don’t particularly care who kills whom or how many in… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  3g4me
7 months ago

I don’t give a shit about apathy…

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  3g4me
7 months ago

I’m actually enjoying the show, to be honest. The funniest part is the affirmative action hire Harvard president telling its uber wealthy Tribal donors to stuff it. How can they deplatform Harvard? You couldn’t make that up.

I suppose emotional reasons can be Reasons of State…for a limited time.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  3g4me
7 months ago

Great post 3g.
I think it’s pretty clear that what is in our best interest is letting these ME knuckleheads slug it out while leaving us out of it.
That said, I’m not exactly sure letting Iran get nukes is in our long-term best interest. This is the part I cannot figure out.
I hope Zman does an essay on it, because I would love to hear everyone’s opinion here on Iran.

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
Reply to  Captain Willard
7 months ago

I don’t think we can “stop” any semi-industrialized country from building nuclear weapons because the technology is almost 80yrs old. I think “delay” is a better word.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Captain Willard
7 months ago

Raisons d’Etat are a much more reliable guide to national behavior than emotions…If a government had to have a legitimate logical reason for war, 90% of wars wouldn’t have happened..e.g Britain, Italy, Russia, and the US had no rational reason for joining WW1.Nothing important was at stake for them…yet they did, to utterly ruinous effect…

Angarrack
Angarrack
Reply to  pyrrhus
7 months ago

The war aim of Germany was the annihilation of Russia as a potential rival or functioning country so Russia had good reason.

Most of Mustache’s policies were WW1 Ludendorff or 19th century Von Moltke policies jazzed up with jargon to frame it within his ideology.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Angarrack
7 months ago

No dog in this fight, but Germany in WWII simply beat Russia to the punch wrt invasion in 1941. That was why Russia got so beat up and lost so many men early on. Russia was caught positioning for their invasion of Germany.

Angarrack
Angarrack
Reply to  Compsci
7 months ago

I’m talking about WW1.

WW2 polices of Germany are considered heinous but they are a retread of WW1 policies.

Russia was the primary enemy of Germany before WW1.

Pozymandias
Reply to  Captain Willard
7 months ago

As with Lincoln (where nobody talks about his plan to send the slaves back where they belonged) no one today seems to get that Israel was supposed to be a place for the Ferengi to go so they could leave the rest of us alone. That was one of the ways it was supposed to be “never again” for all concerned. Of course, in hindsight, everyone should have expected that Israel would become a nice bolthole for the dual citizens and a place to jet off to and get a tan when it was snowing in NY. Florida is just… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
7 months ago

> As a result, generations of Americans have grown up in a wartime culture, which means the public square has been flooded with what amounts to wartime propaganda.

You still hear the propaganda about how democracies are inherently more peaceful, and how no two countries with a McDonald’s have ever been in a war. One of the oddest contradictions of high school education is your social studies teacher expressing the inherent peacefulness of rule by the people while at the same time every other chapter is about a war these peaceful democracies got themselves into.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Chet Rollins
7 months ago

Even when there’s not a nice little war on the boil, America had to pretend there was. The Cold War, the War on Poverty, the War on Crime, and the War on Terror (permanent and not always hot), etc. At any rate, “America,” the Great Democracy and “defender of the free world,” has made it quite clear that it will either impose liberal democracy on every corner of the globe or incinerate it one missile wave at a time. Where is the great virtue in that?

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

“Virtue” is an hilarious word to use about US foreign policy…Both the Civil War and WW1 were fought exclusively for the benefit of the Banking cabal and the big manufacturers…Everyone else got clobbered, and critics got jailed…

Boris
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

“Even when there’s not a nice little war on the boil, America had to pretend there was”.

Agreed, but you missed a couple: the War on Drugs and our government’s current war, The War on Whites (though they dare not call it that…yet). But look on the bright side: the government LOST every one of those wars. I would even include the Cold War in that. As I’ve argued here before, socialism/communism has been proven the winner of that war, not the US. Yes, the Soviets lost their empire, but their ideology won the West.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Boris
7 months ago

“I would even include the Cold War in that. As I’ve argued here before, socialism/communism has been proven the winner of that war, not the US. Yes, the Soviets lost their empire, but their ideology won the West.”

Truer words, sir…

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jack Dodson
7 months ago

Socialism/communism did not prevail, but Leftism of a postmodern stripe certainly did. In a very real sense AINO of 2023 is to the left of the USSR in 1923.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Boris
7 months ago

If the War on White Supremacy (or Whiteness) hasn’t yet been formally enunciated, it will be soon.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Boris
7 months ago

Remember there were 2 ‘Russian’ revolutions in 1917/1918. The first was an indigenous Russian revolution centered about agrarian socialism and land reform (freeing the serfs without land reform was never going to bring stability) and had genuine widespread support among the population. The second Bolshevik revolution was a mostly Jewish (most of the Bolshevik goyim were ethnic Russians who despised their own people and saw them as cattle who needed to be socially engineered). The Bolsheviks never had more than 5% electoral support; they won the battle of the bullet box, not the battle of the ballot box. Re-Russification of… Read more »

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Horace
7 months ago

Very sharp but I differ a slight bit. The Russian revolution has to be viewed in a pre-Lenin and a post-Lenin context as well. With the former, you see what eventually became Globohomo due to the Jewish and Jewish-adjacent elements–sexual perversions, feminism and so forth were glorified by Lenin. When Stalin came to power in ’24 that mostly went away until it re-emerged in the West almost a century later. Much of Stalin’s cruelty stemmed from his hostility to the original Globohomo and his realization that it would destroy society. No doubt there is a lesson to be learned from… Read more »

Pozymandias
Reply to  Boris
7 months ago

I think a lot of the confusion is that people associate the word Communism with the Soviet Union and it’s impossible for many people to hear the word without images of Russian posters and heroic workers and peasants appearing in their heads. When you meet a modern Leftist these images don’t seem to fit at all so liberals will often scoff when you call Trigglypuff the trisexual a “communist”. The problem is that “communism” is a sort of primordial atavism rather than a specific political movement or party. Russian communism evolved among highly intellectual people steeped in 19th century Marxism… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Pozymandias
7 months ago

Modern Leftists wouldn’t even know what the hell you were talking about if you spoke of a future communal society and the withering away of the state. And that, not tribalism, is the essence of communism.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Chet Rollins
7 months ago

Don’t they have to retire the one about McDonald’s re: the Russia/Ukraine war? Maybe it can be replaced by no two countries with homo marriage have been in a war. You’d think they’d get right on that one.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

I imagine the golden arches could be spied in Belgrade and Zagreb back in the mid-90s, not to mention virtually every postcolonial African scheissloch, many of which have been embroiled in some war or another over the decades.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

I might bet against that re: Zagreb/Belgrade. By the 2000s I’m sure it was true, but not so sure about the 90s. I was in eastern Europe a little bit in the early/mid 90s and don’t remember any golden arches. Re: Africa, was there any state on state war to speak of? Lots of civil war surely. Regardless, it was a ridiculous aphorism built on maybe 30 years of “history” that was disproven almost as soon as it had the opportunity to be. McD’s didn’t even start franchising until the late 50s. It wouldn’t be noteworthy except that these are… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

Jeffrey Zoar: Not certain about Zagreb but there was most definitely a Micky D’s in Belgrade in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It became almost a ritual to stop there whenever I was driving back from western to eastern Europe. Of course you couldn’t pay me to eat at one today, but at the time it was, in its own twisted way, a taste of ‘home.’

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

Or no two countries with trannies in grade schools have ever fought…

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  pyrrhus
7 months ago

Possibly true but I know that no country with tranny troops ever won nor probably ever will win, a war

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

@Ostei:

’24, post-Lenin, agreed, but the USSR under him looked very much like a precursor to today’s PoMo. Lenin and the pre-Stalin crew were all about the homo and strong vagina. From memory, the original Soviet constitution legalized a wide range of perversions. There was other madness during the ’17-24 period that was a precursor to the present-day horrors, too.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jack Dodson
7 months ago

You are absolutely right about that. An interesting question is whether the cultural derangement of the early USSR was somehow inherent to Marxism or some form of deviation from it. Were I to write another diss in Russian history (not a chance in Hell), that might be the topic.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

@Ostei: The Russian element, to spitball, was the prevalence of Jews among the revolutionaries, who were even more hostile to Orthodoxy (if that were possible) and reveled in spitting in the face of the church and standing in opposition to its morality. The perversions obviously were the antithesis of church doctrine. The question I have is whether Stalin actually shared the abject hatred or just went along for the ride until the time was ripe for an armistice. He certainly coopted the Orthodox Church during the war in a cynical maneuver to attain more widespread ethnic Russian cooperation, but it… Read more »

Lucius Sulla
Lucius Sulla
7 months ago

On the topic of war propaganda…

I watched the movie “The Great Escape” (1963) this past weekend, and noticed how the Germans/Nazis were certainly depicted as enemies, but not as monstrous cartoon villains. I pointed this out to my son, comparing to how Spielberg depicts Germans/Nazis in the Indiana Jones films as well as in Saving Private Ryan. Trying to subtly open his eyes on these topics.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Lucius Sulla
7 months ago

My Dad quipped after the movie, “you know, I probably would have shot them too.”

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Lucius Sulla
7 months ago

The German regular army was at least as well behaved as the US military, as those who fought over there knew…As Saving Private Ryan accidentally brought to light, the US shot loads of prisoners, especially in the Pacific, but also in Normandy…

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  pyrrhus
7 months ago

As I’ve mentioned before, there are YT videos of WWII vets discussing their service in combat. This is part of an organized effort to collect their recollections before they pass. One European theater vet (now in his 90’s) recounted shooting German prisoners during his unit’s advance. This account referred to his unit accepting 3 surrendering Germans and then taking a break to reorganize before advancing again. He recounts his Sargent instructing him to take the prisoners “down the road” and return in 5 minutes when the unit would again restart their advance. Of course, no rear echelon to turn over… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  pyrrhus
7 months ago

Band of Brothers also pointed out that US troops shot surrendered Germans.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  pyrrhus
7 months ago

pyrrhus: My husband’s German-American godfather, when he surrendered to US troops somewhere in Germany, had his jaw smashed by one soldier’s 45, and then they drove about for a bit repeatedly seating him on and then knocking him off the hood of their jeep. For various reasons, he later joined the US armed forces. Strange times.

Clayton Barnett
7 months ago

>>Supporting the people on our side, especially in the arts is the best political thing you can do.

Truely.
https://www.amazon.com/stores/author/B01LZZBEQ2/allbooks?ingress=0&visitId=faf956b2-aa96-4616-b85b-585e4d5f3178&store_ref=ap_rdr&ref_=ap_rdr

Dan Doffs
Dan Doffs
Reply to  Clayton Barnett
7 months ago

Here’s a terrific song from our side — “World War Me” — it’s on Soundcloud —

https://soundcloud.com/user-341777589/world-war-me

trackback
7 months ago

[…] ZMan sums it up. […]

Vizzini
Member
7 months ago

I was thinking about this the other day when I read some hyperventilating post with a meme about how Israel and Hamas are not morally equivalent. One of the items for Hamas was

“Historically aligned with Hitler’s Third Reich.”

That’s quite a trick, since Hamas didn’t exist until 1987, 42 years after Hitler’s ignominious suicide in the bunker.

Hamas’ founder was 9 years old when Hitler shot himself.

But they have an instinctive need to Hitlerize any enemy.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

My personal favorite version of this go-to slur was when the fake Indian college professor Ward Churchill, not to be confused with the faken Indian senator, referred to those who died in the WTC fire as “little Eichmans.” The faux outrage from those who call their political opponents “Hitler” at the drop of a hat was hilarious.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

Hitler is, to the Jews and the Jew-adjacent, the archetypal Haman/Amalek. Since the Jews mobilize around the feelings that this archetype unfailingly elicits, continually reinforced by so many of their “religious” holidays being centered on this archetype’s expression through one or another representative figure or group, the professional enforcers of the Chosenite Identity like the ADL tap into this sedulously sustained artesian well of angst very, very consciously. This serves to divert their target audience from even beginning to reflect on the role that their tribalist actions may have played in the latest pushback by others.

Boarwild
Boarwild
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

They can’t go a day without bringing up their favorite Austrian Corporal.

With apologies to Godwin.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

A friend and I recently discussed WW2 fatigue. No other war since antiquity has been so thoroughly abused to build propaganda narratives. It’s like it’s the only war that ever happened. Does anyone think people obsessed over the thirty years war, the seven years war, the Napoleonic wars, the first world war nearly 80 years later? The historical pattern, and sensible thing, is to dust yourself off after a war and move on. That does not mean forgetting. But this idea that western, and especially European, culture must feel like a funeral home 80 years later, has clearly crossed into… Read more »

wendy forward
wendy forward
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

Same, except I do love my May 9th Victory Day celebrations in Red Square.

Melissa
Melissa
7 months ago

“They accuse normal people living normal lives of extremism, because those normal people do not want to dress their son as a girl.”

We need to refer to those who do as “transvestites”. That’s what they are. That term drives them even madder, too.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Melissa
7 months ago

“Telling the truth is a revolutionary act,” to paraphrase someone who may be banned soon.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Jack Dodson
7 months ago

He might not be banned since his book is now valuable to our rulers as an instruction guide and not as a warning.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Melissa
7 months ago

I just lump all of those deviants under the heading “pervs.” The varieties of their perversion are of no interest to me, and I can’t be bothered calling them by the technically correct term any more than I can be bothered calling rap, hip hop.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

Words like “Perv”, “freak” and “kink” no longer elicit any sense of revulsion in our society. Maybe a giggle or an exasperated exhale for an older gentleman talking out of time.

Now “degenerates”… that hits all the appropriate responses. Uncomfortable silence and averted eyes. It is too true, too on point, too unimpeachable for folks to misunderstand or charm into a cutesy phrase.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 months ago

Pansexual genderqueers hardest hit.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Melissa
7 months ago

The degenerate perversions of the woke crowd is one other things I absolutely loathe the most. Thinking too much about it borderline unhinges me tbh

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Melissa
7 months ago

I prefer “deluded lunatics.”

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

ETA: Depending on the strength of their advocacy and their adjacency to children I’ve no objection to “evil monsters” either.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

Spiteful mutants has been my go to description of late.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
7 months ago

If you look back at the government propaganda of the Second World War… It’s true it was often comical in it’s display, but there was a whole “New World Order” side of propaganda as well. I’m sure I’ve posted this before but I didn’t see it until last year so forgive me, but this Song of Freedom from the movie Holiday Inn is a great cringe example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-40BEqVv-OQ When my buddy saw it (for the first time as well) he said that the government more than likely played a hand in crafting it and indeed I later noticed comics and… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
7 months ago

You’d think they would have thought to put some makeup on FDR to hide those dark circles. I’ll bet if he hadn’t smoked he’d have been president for another 10 or 20 years.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

If they’d just recognized his true gender identity he wouldn’t have had to compensate with smoking!

“A young, unbreeched Roosevelt in 1884, 2 years old”

comment image

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

Vizzini: Little Lord Fauntleroy was gay.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  3g4me
7 months ago

If the skirt fits…!

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
7 months ago

Yeah, that would make Lil’ Kim blush. Thanks for the reminder about things being bad a long, long time.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
7 months ago

So the emotive state is feminism, in a word. It is hard to find fault with that description of contemporary life. Masculinity is hated even more than whiteness. Who will slap this bitch around when she gets too crazy? No one can? We are screwed, then, not that this isn’t patently obvious. Hamas is right about women or it is a victim of the colonizer. It’s wet hankies either way.

“Calling someone Hitler is like violently crying at a North Korean state funeral.”

Brilliant, and a keeper.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Jack Dodson
7 months ago

As this tweet states, the collective West has largely been conquered by its enemies without a shot fired:

https://twitter.com/flatpepsi2/status/1721408628773830844

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
7 months ago

Man, if that ain’t the truth.

370H55V I/me/mine
370H55V I/me/mine
7 months ago

All true, but the glaring omission here is that the rise of “emotivism” has paralleled the rise of cunt in positions of power. Remove the cunts, and you get rid of the emotivism.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  370H55V I/me/mine
7 months ago

Women should not vote and should not be in positions of authority. But there is no reason to talk about them that way. They bring bucket loads of meaning to life, not to mention that they bring life itself. Understanding that women not men and are not supposed to be men, is not the same as not loving them

370H55V I/me/mine
370H55V I/me/mine
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

The ones in charge are cunts. All the rest are women.

mikebravo
mikebravo
Reply to  370H55V I/me/mine
7 months ago

Men allowed and continue to allow women into positions of power.
The slithering creep of liberalism is the true enemy.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  370H55V I/me/mine
7 months ago

[I]test[/I]

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
7 months ago

test