A Rambling Car Shopping Post

I have been looking at new cars for a year or so. I started thinking about getting a new car a few years ago, when I realized I was getting to the age where owning a sports car might be a now or never proposition. To enjoy a sports car means driving fast in places where you’re not supposed to drive fast. That means having the reflexes and risk tolerance to take chances. There really is nothing sadder than seeing an old woman driving a Porsche or some old guy putt-putting down the road in a Corvette.

I have yet to pull the trigger on the car buy. The main reason is I hate the hassle of buying a car. The way cars are sold in America has never worked for me. I don’t want to develop a rapport with the car salesman. I don’t want him (her) to help me develop a relationship with the car that will tell the world about me. I’m not interested in having a self-actualizing experience with a car. I guess I’m a weirdo, but I don’t think the way I live my life needs to make a statement. I just want to enjoy the time I have.

There’s also the fact that I can’t seem to make up my mind. I’m not a car guy, in that I don’t get into the car culture. A part of owning a sports car is being a part of the social life around owning it. I think a car is, for the most part, a necessary item of life. I want my car to start in the morning, warm up quickly and have a cold air conditioner.  I never listen to the radio, but Bluetooth is a nice feature so I can listen to my favorite hate-thinkers on road trips.  Otherwise, a car is like the toilet. I only notice it when it does not work.

Still, I feel like I should buy a sports car before I’m too geezerly to enjoy it. I’ve looked at a number of them over the last year. The last sports car I owned was 30 years ago and it was used when I got it. It was fast and fun to drive, but compared to what is on offer today, well, there is no comparison. Modern technology has made affordable sports cars that are vastly better than the most enthusiastic drivers. A modern sports car is not a machine you control. It is a technology platform and the driver is just one part of it.

Something that I did not expect when getting into this is the class issue. I grew up country poor, but I’m not country poor now. I’ve been all over the world and I have been around very worldly people. I retain my working class sensibilities, but I’m not going to lie and say I prefer the proletariat to the bourgeoisie. Whether I like it or not, the car I buy will say something about me. Am I a man who prefers an Audi or a guy who thinks a Camaro ZL1 is the right choice? I never had a reason to think about it until now.

Having driven a number of different cars over the last year, I’ve come to believe that the professional auto journalists are just public relations flacks for the car industry. For instance, I drove a Mustang and a Camaro on the same day. I was in the muscle car mood and they are the two premier options in the category. I read the reviews of them on the popular car sites. I was expecting one model to be refined and the other more brutish, as that is what all of the reviews indicated. Both cars felt pretty much the same.

That’s probably the biggest obstacle to me pulling the trigger. There’s a weird sameness to all of the new cars. A few weeks after the muscle car testing, I did a day of driving European sports sedans. The sameness of the cars, at least in terms of driving them, is the one memory. I found I had to keep a list of the small differences between, say, an Audi and a BMW, as they were otherwise indistinguishable. There’s no quirkiness or originality to set one off from the other. It’s like the car makers are all aiming for the same goal.

This sameness is due to the fact the car makers are global companies now. Instead of the British car makers building cars mostly for Brits and the German makers building cars for Germans, car companies are rootless cosmopolitans, making cars for the world. That means they think they need to avoid the quirky, local flavor, as much as possible. It used to be that America cars were utilitarian and made for the open road. European cars were sophisticated and built for tight corners. Now, they all do the same things and look alike.

This sameness extends to how they sell cars. The last time someone tried to re-think the retail sale of cars was when Saturn was rolled out. Their pitch was the “no-haggle” price and a limited set of options. It never really worked as people have been conditioned to haggle over the price of a car. That and they rolled out the no-frills option idea just when technology was allowing everyone to have a bespoke experience buying everything. The “customized experience” is a great sales tool as everyone wants to feel special.

Look at the car dealers today and they all do exactly the same things. Even their website are cookie cutter. Other than some aesthetics, it appear that maybe one or two website companies have built every dealer’s website. That’s not unrealistic. There is one main software maker for car dealership software. I no longer recall the name of it, but one software package was used by something like 90% of all new car dealers. It’s not unrealistic to think that they or someone else is doing the same thing with the websites.

Despite the uniformity, the other thing that strikes me about the dealership websites is their uselessness as sales tools. I’ve noticed that the cars on the site, often don’t exist on the lot. At the same time, the cars on the lot are often not listed on the site. Dealers are famous for the bait and switch tactic, but this just looks like sloth. Spending time in the dealerships, the vibe I get is that the business remains hostile to technology. They just want to sell cars to the people who walk into the showroom. That’s it.

As far as the car purchase, I’m still weighing my options. I’m down to one of the muscle cars or one of the German sports sedans. I’ve always liked the look of an Audi, but I fear the repair costs. BMW’s are known for sturdiness, but I’m told that is not longer true, so maybe a Mercedes. Having driven enough of them, I’m sure I would enjoy owning any one of them. But, I still cannot get over the thrill of driving that Camaro ZL1. It was like being strapped to a rocket sled. I could get used to that in a hurry.

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148 Comments on "A Rambling Car Shopping Post"

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bob sykes
Guest

Get a Miata. Cruise country lanes. Get over the need.

Steve
Guest

Agree. I had a second generation Miata. Nobody could keep up in the corners. Nobody.

Karl McHungus
Guest

I have a Miata currently, and they are a lot of fun no doubt about it. And a real bargain, new or used. But they are tiny and get bullied by larger cars and especially trucks. Not a bad choice, but not something that will make your blood rise either 🙂

Member

I understand they ship with a funeral wreath built in.

A.T. Tapman
Member

End the misery, Corvette.

Wilbur Hassenfus
Guest

I loved my second gen Miata. Used to race BMWs on my commute on Route 128. But it’s no rocket sled.

My Ninja 636 is a rocket sled. It’s insane.

But Z isn’t looking for a sportbike.

Tax Slave
Guest

Chick car. Just sayin’.

Member

You can argue the F-150 has also become a “chick car” too. My big complaint about the current Miata is it’s lacking about 200Hp. But if you want something fun to drive and you need it to be your only car, it’s a good compromise between daily driver and sports car.

Harvey
Guest

That “sameness” is the result of technology as a computer has been placed between the driver and the wheels. Traction control, anti-lock brakes, “sport mode”, and collision-avoidance are a few examples. Steering is “by wire” rather than a direct physical connection from the steering wheel to the drive wheel.

Member

Not just computers. Regulation too. Hammer started dropping big time in the 00s, cars are more or less designed by DC bureaucrats now.

Member
Dan
Guest

Right you are jim_jones. A Kaw sports bike makes a Camaro or Corvette seem like a boat anchor.

Z, buy a fast bike and a station wagon. Best of both worlds.

Alien
Guest

Dan (below) seconded the motion, I’ll third it. You want speed and handling, get (the right) motorcycle. Yes, some compromises must be made (rain, no stereo, etc.) but “fast” doesn’t come any cheaper, and Nippon has finally discovered what the Brits knew about handling.

Ride it for three years, then sell it and buy the cage of your choice; after 36 months on a good sport bike you’ll regard cars as the droll transportation tools they are.

Member
Take a test drive in the BMW X550i with the big 445hp V8. It’s an SUV that is as fun to drive as the 650i…and just as fast. When you get ready to buy something, go to Car Gurus to buy it. I’ve bought two vehicles using this website, and I can’t say enough good things about it. You can browse among new or used cars and get a solid idea of what a vehicle is actually worth. And don’t limit your search to just your area. Look nationwide and be prepared to fly to a location to pick up… Read more »
Karl McHungus
Guest

Agreed. Cargurus is like a big toy catalog (from olde days) for car buyers. Very easy to dial in things like mileage and price and model.

Bill Campbell
Guest

A motorcycle would break you out of the spinning you are in, but unless you’ve ridden before, it will surely kill you.
There is a car that loads of fun, and practical. Try a ride in the VW Golf R – small, handles very well, great power, 4 wheel drive – a real blast. I’ve got a 911, and I find myself enjoying going out in that darn R.

cerulean
Guest

“it will surely kill you.”

My next door neighbor died last year in a cycle accident. A guy at church had a cycle accident that left him unable to continue in his job or do so much as light yard work.

Wilbur Hassenfus
Guest

I started riding in my 40s and I’m still here. Got a little dinged up on the track once, but no permanent damage. I know guys who do track days all summer in their 60s.

Wear the damn gear, respect the laws of physics, and assume everyone else on the road is a blind murderous idiot. Being young won’t protect you. Being paranoid will help, some.

Ryan T
Guest
Every car review I watch on youtube would be more aptly titled: 50 Reasons why this car isn’t a BMW 3 Series It doesnt matter what vehicle it is, pro reviewers all seem obsessed with the idea of the tires communicating about all the dimples in the pavement to the steering wheel. Most people want something affordable, reliable and fuel efficient, something German cars aren’t known for. Another thing is nobody seems to have found a way to Walmartize the sale of cars..where you simply order what you want and get it delivered or pick it up without the hassle… Read more »
Tim+Newman
Guest
Most likely because dealer networks are a protected racket. They are. In the EU they were given an exemption from the ban on reselling, i.e. Levis jeans tried (and failed) to stop Tesco from buying in bulk and reselling them, undercutting the Levis store. The practice was deemed illegal, as would be any attempt by Levis to refuse to sell to Tesco. IIRC Apple tried this initially, you had to go to an Apple store to buy an iPhone, but now you can buy them anywhere. But car dealerships got an exemption, so only BMW dealerships are allowed to sell… Read more »
Member

I sawsomething a year ago about Amazon getting into the car business.

That would be a hoot

Karl McHungus
Guest
Zman, it’s crazy to pay $50k plus for anything American, they just are not built well enough to justify that cost (which I believe the top of the line muscle cars cost). I am in the same position as you (looking for a new car) and a similar age. If you want a sedan, take a look at the Lexus line, and consider buying used (huge huge savings after only two years). Anything German will kill you once the warranty is up. Having said that, nothing will beat the poon drawing ability of the Porsche 911. Nothing. You can get… Read more »
Monty James
Guest

Go with your gut. You don’t want to commit to something and keep glancing sideways at every Camaro that pulls alongside. Get it out of your system.

Severian
Guest
Not car-related, but a quick comment on this: “I retain my working class sensibilities, but I’m not going to lie and say I prefer the proletariat to the bourgeoisie.” That’s just it. That’s 90% of the problem, for both the Alt-Right and the New New Left: Of all the identities one could pick, why would anyone pick “redneck” or “ghettopotamus”? If you’re a conservative-ish kid with anything on the ball, the temptation to go Full Kevin Williamson is very strong – if I get to pick my identity, and those are the only two on offer, then I choose the… Read more »
Karl McHungus
Guest

I bet you are a ton of fun at parties “do you know alcohol is bad for you? you aren’t really going to eat that potato chip are you?!”

Severian
Guest

No, I never get invited to parties. Did you know commenting on the internet is linked to carpal tunnel syndrome.

Tim Newman
Guest

To enjoy a sports car means driving fast in places where you’re not supposed to drive fast. That means having the reflexes and risk tolerance to take chances.

Yes, and if you’re not prepared to do that, buy something slower and more practical. The reason I didn’t buy a lightning-fast sports car is I realised I am too risk-averse to actually drive fast and it would be a complete waste of money. Sports cars aren’t for everyone.

Member

And where besides the American West can you exceed the speed limit without the certainty of getting nailed by a cop? You have to be in a wide open landscape where you can see ten miles in all directions.

Glen Filthie
Guest
Resist. It’s all ego, branding, and hype. You are being manipulated. The hotrod guys have a culture with their show n’ shines and social events, and there’s merit in that. But the manicured yuppies, their bubble headed trophy wives and the wannabees…? They’re just nobs putting on airs thinking that they’re impressing people. Screw them. They’re a dime a dozen and poseurs only impress themselves. BUILD your ride, Z. The boys at Factory 5 have some great kit cars and the sky is the limit with them. You have total control of what goes into them and more importantly –… Read more »
Member

Thanks! There’s a business idea for South America. And yes, there are guys down here that could do that if they could get the parts in without getting strip-mined by customs and the tax folks.

Doug
Guest

Not sure exactly why, but I see you in an Audi A8. Cars are like women; some are designed for comfort, and some for speed. Occasionally, you can find one equipped for both.

Shrugger
Guest

I’ve had a Z-28, a BMW M3, and a Miata. The M3 was my favorite–great acceleration, fantastic grip, perfect balance. Much better at going fast than I was. The Z made the best noise and tire smoke. The Miata was great for a roadster, but I got tired of the soft top and it didn’t accelerate fast enough. The M3 cost twice the Miata, with the Z just below that. Nowadays I can’t imagine buying a new car–just too damn much money for, well, a toilet.

Matt
Guest

The Korean’s have upped the ante dramatically and the warranties are tough to beat.

https://www.newcarslineup.com/2018-hyundai-genesis-coupe

Mcleod
Guest

Toyota 86 Manual. Horsepower poor, but balanced and, most importantly, fun.

Dutch
Guest

I second that choice. The Subaru BRZ is the same car, if you want to go Subie.

Din C. Nufin
Guest

Being relatively new to the blog, I’ve read some of the old posts recently, when perhaps 4 or 5 responses were normal. One was Dutch, 2 1/2 years ago, predicting the demise of the NFL. Good call!

Spud Boy
Guest

I picked up a low miles 2001 BMW M Roadster about four years ago for $28K. 315 HP and 2900 pounds makes for a quick package. The interior is old-school with minimal electronic do-dads. They only made ~1600 M Roadsters with the S54 engine, so this car will probably increase in value over time.

ArtHouseForOurHouse
Guest

You’re too old. Your reaction time and visual acuity suck compared to even 10 years ago. You just don’t know it yet. Get an Accord or an Outback and don’t kill anyone including yourself. You’re worried about Audi upkeep and thinking about a Mercedes?

Bartleby
Guest

IMHO American muscle cars have some personality. Modern German cars are just sedans with lots of HP. Even the Porsche is more of a daily driver than a racing car. The Italians still build cars with soul. A ten year old Ferrari 360 Spider would be well under 100K and believe me you will never mistake it for anything other than track ready. I took one on to the track at Lime Rock and it was a lot of fun and safer than driving fast on public roads.

Member

I live in the Detroit area but am not part of the car culture.
They are just transportation to me. If I wanted to make a statement, then I will do it verbally.

That said, vans are nice.

Member
Born a car nut, I spent my twenties buying Fords with big engines. Then I got into alfa-Romeos. After the humiliation of driving my last one into the side of a Maverick, I bought an MGB GT and then into more family oriented Hondas, then mid-size SUV’s. Now, with the possibility of buying what will probably be my last car, I told my wife I just didn’t care anymore. Cars are a commodity and it makes no difference. They are selling alfa’s (alfa is an acronym though they don’t capitalize it. Hence the apostrophe) again in the states but even… Read more »
Richter Rox
Guest

buy american muscle , it is way more fun and the chicks dig it.

Member
I’m pretty much in the same boat, age-wise and class-wise, and I’ll probably be doing the same kind of shopping next year, although leaning more towards “entry-level luxury” instead of “neck-snapping power”. But I was interested in your research on the car shopping experience. Like many folks (I suspect), twenty years of ordering the Exact Thing I Want on the internet has caused me to not have the patience for flesh-pressing and horse-trading. It’s also conditioned me to rely on Online Reviews (which may not be that smart). I’m wondering if you’ve found that online sites, or magazines, that review… Read more »
Dutch
Guest
Before you buy something, take a driving school, something like Bondaurant. The best car money you will ever spend. You will learn the limits of a car, and your own limits. You will also learn that what you can do with a car, and that you have no business doing any of it on the street. Too many variables, and too many ways to hurt yourself and other people. There is also the matter of having a nice car and getting it keyed in a parking lot or stolen and stripped (people are assholes). I have lots of car toys,… Read more »
Occasional Commenter
Guest

That “stealthy” remark jibes with something I read about pickups: you can drive stupid fast, and cops seem to ignore you. Presumably, the cops view them as “working class bubbas” (especially plain white pickups) and they leave them alone.

On the plus side, you can get a reasonably comfy truck nowadays, and it’ll last a long time.

Dutch
Guest

Generic white full size American pickups and SUVs are a favorite personal vehicle for law enforcement and especially firemen. I am guessing the fire hat sticker with the fire department affiliation that appears on the back of a lot of these is a code for “don’t give me a speeding ticket, bro”.

1990’s pickups from the big 3 are cheap, comfy, and not as complicated as the new ones. It’s just hard to find one that isn’t all worn out.

Member

Depending on where you live and how much you want to blend in, a pickup truck is pretty much required.

bad guest
Guest

50% of the the vehicles where I live are pickups. A guy who doesn’t drive a truck around here is quite gay, but he’s not quite a real man either.

bad guest
Guest

isn’t quite gay, but he’s not quite a real man either.

Herrman
Guest

I, like you, have been bitten by the sports car bug more than once. I’ve mostly sated it with older British sports cars, their quirks being part of their charm. Then I bought a Jeep Wrangler. Take the doors off, flip the windshield down, and you get all the wind-in-the-hair, bugs-in-the-teeth enjoyment of a motorcycle or open top roadster with the security of a tank. If you want comfort, on goes the hardtop, fire up the AC, and it’s a modern SUV. And old guys don’t look silly driving one.

abelard Lindsey
Guest

How about a Mustang GT?

FredZMan
Guest

You forgot Tesla.

Honestly, the one thing I like about Tesla is the lack of pushy salespeople and ordering on-line. If you actually go to a show, the 20 something’s that are quasi-salespersons direct you to on-line ordering. It’s a better experience than the traditional dealers.

Let the flaming begin!!!

Tax Slave
Guest

Need a new windshield wiper? It’s put on a flatbed to California. Pain in the ass to say the least.

Member

Talk to Eric Peters about Tesla

bad guest
Guest

“Let the flaming begin!!!”

You mean in the battery?

Member

My problem with Teslas, is you don’t really own them. Tesla Motor Corp can more or less take control of them at any time for any reason whatsoever. And since they are connected to the internet (or cellphone towers) they can be hacked and spoofed to a degree ordinary can’t yet.

Putting the computers that control the vehicle on the internet is a VERY BAD IDEA. Very bad. Someone will hack a Tesla at some point if they get popular enough.

Anonymous White Male
Guest
Camaro ZL1, huh? Delayed mid-life crisis, perhaps? I’m with the other geezers. From a pragmatic point of view, Toyota Camry, Nissan Altima, Honda Accord, Hyundai Elantra, are all boring but reliable. Being sedans, they are smaller and cheaper than SUV’s now that the SUV is the drug of choice for soccer Moms. Get a low mileage used one that is only one or two years old. I know this is conservative common sense, but good mileage and low maintenance costs are what I look for in a car. I hate the car buying experience. The only time I’ve had a… Read more »
Reziac
Guest

My sister loved her BMW, but soon realised there is a good reason why each one comes with its factory-assigned mechanic, and after three years of more time in the shop than out, sold it to some lesser unfortunate.

Tax Slave
Guest

A major factor of why the Germans lost the war: their extraordinary engineering could not be serviced in the field.

Member
A few years ago, while on vacation in Greece, I lucked out and got upgraded to a Mercedes C-class for a week. That’s a big step up for me, and I absolutely loved the feel of the car. You could feel the superior engineering. (I’ve since felt the same experience in a BMW 4 series – still need to get into an Audi.) About the only thing keeping me from going German with my next car is the concern over repairs and maintenance. Not necessarily the expense, although nobody enjoys burning that cash. It’s the reliability factor. I want to… Read more »
Karl McHungus
Guest

I am planning to get a used Lexus IS350 in the next month or so. Fantastic value once they are a couple of years old. German cars are like catnip to asians, but are vastly over rated unless you go for the $100l+ models.

Drake
Guest

We traded in my wife’s BMW last year. We typically keep cars for a decade and 200k miles. That thing fell to pieces as soon as it hit 100k.

A.B. Prosper
Guest

Standard operating procedure for decades, probably close to a century for some goods

It doesn’t need to be that way but reliable well built cars aren’t very profitable since they seldom need to be replaced and require less service

I’m surprised its not worse since less people can afford newer cars these days , even on credit

Member

They are good for stealing market share though. ETCG goes into it here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=81ESBO3Mchs

Dutch
Guest

My professional mechanic friend just leased a 3 series BMW. He said it is the best car in the world for the first 50k miles. Give it back by then, and run away fast.

Andy Texan
Guest

I had an ’85 BMW 3 series. Bought it used with 100k miles and put 300,000 miles it. Hardly any maintenance. Gave up the ghost in 2001. Don’t think the new cars can take that kind of beating.

Ganderson
Guest

Z- I love XM radio. Sportsball- hockey, hoops baseball, golf, college football; the whole deal, not to mention Radio Classics and the Grateful Dead channel. I like “Tales from the Golden Road” a Grateful Dead call in show. If I wished to make a case for the long-term negative effects of pot, that’s where I’d start.

BillH
Guest

You seem fairly well off. Learn to fly, then buy a light aerobatic aircraft and learn acro. From then on, your car will remain, as you say, like the toilet.

Dutch
Guest

Same thing happens when you drive cars at the race track. Driving on the street becomes just getting from here to there. You can be a bit stylish about it, but street “exhibitions of speed” tend to look very foolishly masturbatory after you drive at the track.

wakxed
Guest

I bought a car in February using Carvana.com. 100% satisfied and will never be going to a dealership again, literally. They delivered it to my driveway and even handled the government registration (BMV/DMV) shitshow as well. Plates showed up a few weeks later.

Prices seemed better than dealers anyway. Only downside is you can’t test drive, but you can just do that at a local dealer and stiff them when you go to buy online 🙂

JohnTyler
Guest
Hey ZMAN; many sporty cars have low profile tires and there is precious little distance betwixt the wheel rim and the road. The result is a greater probability of bent rims and “crunched” tires (i.e., damaged tire sidewall that result in you buying a new tire) when you hit a bump. One of my cars – a “sporty” sedan – has these wheels/tires and I have spent about $2000 over the last 3 years getting rims “re-rounded” (more than once !) and buying new tires (at about 200 bucks a pop) several times. Anyway, just something to ponder. I have… Read more »
Saml Adams
Guest

Yep. Bought a full set of low profile run flats every year on a car I used to own. Never ever again.

Name
Guest

Get the new Honda Civic Turbo and install Hondata on it.
You’ll get the comfiest and most powerful car on the market, cheap, easy to maintain and reliable.

Tax Slave
Guest

And you could buy a Prius with the money you save!

Member
BMWs are taxis in Europe. I’ll never quite get the appeal of spending that kind of money for an upgraded Ford Focus. The challenge of a sports car is not the power, it’s the ride. Don’t do car dealership rides. Keep one over a weekend, and drive it everywhere you can think of. The thing you’ll notice first is the power/handling. The thing you’ll *remember* most is the ride. They are stiff and punishing rides for the most part. Even the high end ones if they have any kind of “sport tuned” suspension bang and thunk over moderately uneven pavement.… Read more »
Worldly Wiseman
Guest

Porsche Cayman

Andrew
Guest
I guess I would be the odd man out. I’ve never been a car guy. Where I live it isn’t practical, need 4WD and ground clearance. With that said it may be worth looking at a full-size GMC pickup with a Duramax engine. The best comment a friend mine made about them is if you don’t want to buy one don’t drive one. He’s correct on that. I recently bought one and the only real problem I have found is that I keep finding myself driving too fast. And there is something to say about blending in. As has already… Read more »
Zach
Guest

Get a crotch rocket to go fast, or get a Corvette. Fuck the Mustang and Camaro. The vets shit all over the euro trash that is like 1000% more expensive. Miata is fun little go kart but c’mon! Driving that is akin to a flaccid wang rippling in the wind like a flag. Very much different indeed than the high T engineering masterpiece. heh

And no, I’m not a car guy. Ha! I prefer huge luxury boats!

BrianE
Guest
Do you need a back seat? Do you want a new car or would a low mileage year or two old car do? Will this be your primary transportation, or a weekend/fair weather cruiser? Is the styling more important than performance? Both the Camaro and Mustang are fun muscle cars, but like the muscle cars of old they go better in a straight line. Why not go full sports car with a Corvette? 600 lbs. lighter, the C7 (latest version) incorporates many of the features of the race car. But the C6 offers fantastic performance and low mileage, well cared… Read more »
Ted Bopp
Guest

First, you need to get out of the practicality box. Get something vanilla for everyday use and something totally impractical for fun. My combination is a 1993 Ford F250 and a 2002 Honda S2000 (2L 250HP), The Honda’s will out handle the Camaro and has a top end of 152 mph (so far).
Second, get of over the age thing – I didn’t go to skid school until I was 57 and never drove a formula track until I was 62.

Sobey1683
Guest

ZMAN. Don’t get the Camaro unless you have Xray Vision. Shelby Mustang GT 350. Makes death Cult Liberals and Bitter Old Spinsters scowl but Normies will want to take a picture of it. Two exhaust modes. Normal and “Wake the dead”. And don’t worry about grip. both cars suffer from “Excessive Rear Tire Spin” under determined throttle application.

joe_mama
Guest

How does it work with a nice car given your proximity to the Baltimore ghetto? Serious question. I’ve lived in dodgy spots and at the time was grateful for driving a beater car.

Larry R Kephart
Guest

I’ve been driving a 2017 Cadillac ATS-V Coupe for almost ten months now. 3.6L twin-turbo v6, 464 horse, 445 lb ft, 6-speed manual transmission. 3.8 sec 0-60, 189 mph top speed. This is one of Cadillac’s best kept secrets and will probably be phased out at the end of 2018. I love this thing and will buy it at the end of the lease if it doesn’t turn into a “Christine”.

Member

” the business remains hostile to technology. They just want to sell cars to the people who walk into the showroom. That’s it.”

If you’ve successfully done that for twenty years you would be hostile to something where a 22 year old kid has ten years more experience than you.
Try a Jag, they drive a little differently, Most people don’t like it.

Member

My ruby red Ford F-150 Super Crew FX4… with its amazing twin turbos, black leather interior, HID lights, and logical levels of dashboard manual controls (no menus to turn the heat up a little bit)…

…scoffs at your sports car dreams.

gebrauschund
Guest
Karl McHungus
Guest

hahaha that was fukking hilarious! Thanks for sharing it.

Drake
Guest
I will probably shop for a sports car in a few years. If it was today it would probably come down to the coolness of the Miata versus the power of a 370Z. With a manual of course – if the car shifts for you, it isn’t a sports car. Back in the 80’s my uncle had a Porche 911. That was a car without a trace of sameness. Air-cooled, un-assisted rack-and-pinion steering, giant un-assisted brakes, and a clutch that was like a 300lb squat. It was a beast that would spit and sputter if you drove it slow, then… Read more »
Member

Better hurry then. Everything’s going DCT, which means spastic paddle flipping. The thing about sports cars, is that there’s a certain amount of “track day bro” requirements that have to be met, even if said car will never see a “track day bro”. And part of that is DCTs shift faster than standards, even though they’re less fun and less reliable. Another thing about “track day bro” is that it only has to last until the end of “track day bro” before it needs to get rebuilt.

Drake
Guest

I haven’t negotiated with a car salesman in 20 years. TrueCar, Edmunds, and others make that obsolete. I know how much I’m paying before I walk into the dealership or I don’t walk in.

merp
Guest

Z man if you are parking off street you need to check your driveway for curb clearance on the front end of the vehicle. Also if you have to crest a rise you may have issues with low hanging exhaust components dragging. Many catalytic converters are fairly exposed and not cheap to replace.
If you park on street god help you.

Member

Toyota or Honda. Can’t go wrong.

Member

Honda isn’t exactly what they used to be. Serious build quality issues. Motors eating valves. Trannies popping out of gear. Auto trannies needing early replacement.

Toyota is still good.

Alzaebo
Guest

The closest I got to any of this was hitchiking-

A Jaguar drove by, the passenger yelled out, “Get a Jag!”

So I yelled back- “It’s in the shop!”

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