We Need A New Elite

Probably the worst thing Buckley conservatives did to their middle-class white supporters is instill in them an unconditional love of rich people. Conservatism accomplished very little, but one thing it did amazingly well is hypnotize middle-class whites into instinctively and ferociously defending the rights and privileges of the rich and powerful. Even today, the most racially aware white still gets a little angry when they hear an Ocasio-Cortez or Liz Warren rail against the rich.

This conditioning, of course, was deliberate. The super-rich donors that made Buckley conservatism possible saw the movement as a vehicle to protect their interests from the Left during the Cold War. It’s not that the American Left was ever a real threat to the rich and powerful, as most of them came from rich and powerful families. Progressivism has always been a rich man’s religion in America. It’s that the Left put a lot of conditions on the rich, something we see today with the Left-Corporate alliance.

With Buckley conservatism, the middle-class could be turned into an army of defenders that put no conditions on the rich. By the 1980’s, the anti-communism of Buckley conservatism was turning into the worship of rich people. The movie Wall Street or the popular TV show Family Ties are good examples. There you have heroic figures, who are pure materialists, with no sense of duty to their fellow man. Getting rich, by any means necessary, was a social good in itself.

This conception of conservatism is thoroughly at odds with any past conceptions of conservatism. In fact, there was never anything conservative about Buckley conservatism. From Joseph de Maistre to Russel Kirk, conservatism accepted that every society has a ruling elite. In order for a society to function, that elite must be explicit and indebted to the welfare of the society over which they rule. Conservatism always started with an understanding of duties and obligations.

Whatever Buckley may have said or written in his younger days, by the time the conservative movement reached it maturity, it was something that would have been unrecognizable to a historic conservative. It was a celebration of materialism and individualism that placed no obligations on the elite. Instead, it divorced the rich and powerful from their duties, turning their indifference into a virtue. That virtue has now curdled into a contempt not seen since the French Revolution.

To this day, the few intellectual hobos shuffling around the ruins of Buckley conservatism still try to peddle this lie. They wave around the Medusa head, painted up as Ocasio-Cortez, in an effort to scare their dwindling ranks into thinking socialism is their great enemy. That only a suicidal defense of those terribly vulnerable billionaires will prevent the Left from raising their taxes. It is a revolting display of toadyism that makes a decent man ball his fist and have dark thoughts.

Much of what ails the American Empire today is rooted in this terrible trick played upon the white middle-class of America. Once the Cold War ended, vast resources used to fight the communists could have been turned toward addressing long ignored problems in the homeland. Instead, the white middle-class went on a long orgy of pointless consumption, while a new class of super-rich oligarchs rose up, unconstrained by any obligation to the society that spawned them.

The truth is, if America had better rich people, rich people who felt a sense of duty to their fellow citizens, there would be no dissident right. Even putting aside race realism, if the rich just embraced an immigration and economic policy that was explicitly good for Americans, there would be no Donald Trump. The political center of America would be to the Right of the current GOP. The debates would be about how best to manage trade with the world and how best to guard the border.

Instead, we have political parties that despise their own voters, financed by billionaires, who despise the American people. Of course, this culture of contempt is not just an American phenomenon. It has spread throughout the empire, infecting the rich and powerful of the West. This story about the billionaires of France reneging on their commitment to rebuild Notre Dame is a perfect example. These people carry on like spoiled brats, living in the moment, indifferent to everyone.

In a business, bankruptcy is when the current arrangements are no longer sustainable, so the enterprise is either liquidated or reconstructed. That requires terminating current management, either to be replaced with better people, who will bring the firm back to solvency or so the firm can be dissolved. In a nation, revolution is similar, in that current elites need to be eliminated so a new set of elites can retool the country and bring it back to health. Bankruptcy and revolution are about new beginnings.

That’s where things are in the West, but America in particular. The current elites are rotten to the core. They are irredeemable. There’s no talking them out of their corruption or appealing to their humanity, at least not until they are on the gallows. These are people who now define themselves in opposition to that which makes nations possible and makes a people possible. For the people of the West to regain their sense of self, to make countries into homelands again, it means replacing the current elites.

The people can not be all, & always, well informed. the part which is wrong will be discontented in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. if they remain quiet under such misconceptions it is a lethargy, the forerunner of death to the public liberty. we have had 13. states independant 11. years. there has been one rebellion. that comes to one rebellion in a century & a half for each state. what country before ever existed a century & half without a rebellion? & what country can preserve it’s liberties if their rulers are not warned from time to time that their people preserve the spirit of resistance? let them take arms. the remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon & pacify them. what signify a few lives lost in a century or two? the tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots & tyrants. it is it’s natural manure.

–Thomas Jefferson, Paris 1787


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Federalist
Federalist
1 year ago

That they are hated by the very wealthy is probably one of the biggest things that normies (who aren’t lunatic SJWs but haven’t come over to our side) don’t get. For all of his faults, Trump seems to actually have some concern for the common man. As a billionaire, he is an extreme outlier. This fact may confuse some people.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Trump exposed the underlying hatred that the media and the elite feel toward whites – except, of course, Goodwhites like themselves. This has been useful and likely would not have been so clear if Hillary had won. But Trump’s utility is waning. He’s not going to fight immigration in any real way, but his presence anesthetizes many on our side (or those who would move to our side) who believe they have someone fighting for them. We may need a President Harris to make them understand that there is no hope under the present system, indeed, that the system –… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Everything is downstream from power; and power flows from Force.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

@vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉. Power is desire realized. Force is merely a means to an end. Desire better things.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 year ago

Sir- politics is power.
That’s all.
View it through any other lens and you’ll go astray.

Yes in the political realm which is my purpose here Sir its about taking power from madmen.

Then we’ll be free to desire better things.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉. “Yes in the political realm which is my purpose here Sir its about taking power from madmen. Then we’ll be free to desire better things.” First of all. I was born free and nothing can change that. Not even solitary confinement. Second of all. If you think you can take power from ” madmen” then you have been infected with their disease. Your putting the cart before the horse. Free your mind and your ass will follow comrade. Nicolás Gómez Dávila said: ” A man is truly mature when he understands that politics won’t save him. Seek wisdom and… Read more »

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

In the context of the current discussion – power is flowing from deceit and manipulation. Not thru any application of force BY THOSE WHO HAVE GAINED THOSE LEVERS OF POWER. I can’t think of any individuals who make up the current power structure who have gotten there thru application of force. They have manipulated and connived and used their connections and standing amongst the elite to get where they are. They then use the power of force given to the Federal government to enforce their agendas. This is exactly why I keep arguing for minimal power invested in the Federal… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Force and elections to the Executive offices that legitimate force (but do not monopolize) are what’s left to us.

There were distinct and frequent shows of force by the right in 2016. Militias, bikers, open carry, Cincinnati convention.

And we won.

The enemy responded with Antifa. We with Proud Boys. Based Stick Man.
MAGA chasing flag burners.

Force is a card we’re learning to play.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

Proud Boys…Stick Man…Moldlylocks…each of these happened prior to James Fields.

Ask the folks in Portland arrested for self-defense how Right Wing Street Violence is going.

vxxc
vxxc
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 year ago

You want risk free?
Doesn’t exist.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

@Calsdad. Here’s the link to an essay at city journal on Alexis de Tocqueville and his book “Democracy in America” 1835. It discribes da Tocquevilles fear that America would turn into a soft despotism. https://www.city-journal.org/html/end-democracy-america-14332.html

Bob
Bob
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

Kicked out of Jim’s blog, so you’ve picked up another haunt?

Xopher Halftongue
Xopher Halftongue
Reply to  Bob
1 year ago

@Bob

vxxc failed the RedPill test. He picked the whiteknight answer on a multiple choice question on Jim’s Blog.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Xopher Halftongue
1 year ago

Xopher Halftongue said: “vxxc failed the RedPill test. He picked the whiteknight answer on a multiple choice question on Jim’s Blog.” A women on this site told me the other day that she thinks vxxc is also female. I have no idea.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 year ago

Passing the Jim White Knight Test requires you agree with Jim that all age of consent laws regarding females be banned.

He flat admitted it when pressed.

Ahem. Proud to fail that test. Glad they pressed the question, I had been ignoring the weird and doing so missed the evil.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Xopher Halftongue
1 year ago

Proud to fail that test.

You are free to explain what the passing score was.
Do you pass?

I did miss the evil by seeing the good. A mistake sometimes made. Jim finally admitted his “policy” so I left.

Also I tend to skim over comments made by freaks.

Bob
Bob
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

Why do you care so much about taking his test?

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I’ve questioned whether or not it was good for us that Trump won….I am still undecided.

I do think that it’s a very positive thing that persuadable Whites will now see that there is no hope of working within the existing system. If cankles had won, many would still believe that an electoral solution remained a possibility.

99 Year Blues
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 year ago

If Trump had been a serious, clear-eyed man, he would have known on November 9, 2016 that all of DC was going to lock arms to oppose him, that all the knives would be out, that they would use the federal judiciary nationwide to blockade him at every turn, that every nook and cranny of the media and academia would train their guns on him non-stop… and he would have looked for countermeasures to all of this, which, though difficult, were available. His lack of imagination on this score was and is simply mind-numbing. I was never able to figure… Read more »

Tars_Tarkusz
Member
Reply to  99 Year Blues
1 year ago

There are quite a few defeated people cursing the day they underestimated Trump. It was always a mistake to think Trump is dumb or lazy. The big problem for Trump was that he never thought he was going to win and he did not have good experienced people on his team and he ended up having to draw from the swamp.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Tars_Tarkusz
1 year ago

No sir.
The swamp is a constraint of his office.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Tars_Tarkusz
1 year ago

Funny thing is you wouldn’t have needed to watch him that closely to know he was neither. But most of the pundits have never made a payroll or signed personally for business loans. Trump was beyond their comprehension.

hokkoda
Member
Reply to  99 Year Blues
1 year ago

I think he had people around him giving terrible advice. Trump was the only one who actually read his inauguration speech.

He should have fired every appointed bureaucrat in every agency on Day 1. But he didn’t, and now here we are.

Walt
Walt
Reply to  hokkoda
1 year ago

As Ann Coulter suggested, he should have taken the oath of office in San Diego before closing the border permanently with the Army carrying out his orders. I lost complete faith in the Orange faggot when he fired Steve Bannon instead of having his son in-law publicly beheaded.

Tars_Tarkusz
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

As bad as Trump has been on some of our issues, we are not at war with Russia or Syria and there aren’t hundreds of thousands of Africans and Syrians and Pakis etc all walking into Europe. I don’t think this would have stopped under Clinton. In fact, it might be a lot worse.

Crud Bonemeal
Crud Bonemeal
Reply to  Tars_Tarkusz
1 year ago

Illegal immigration is worse than ever

He had a huge mandate to deal with that, he’s completely neglecting it, he’s failing to take opportunities that are well within his power

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Crud Bonemeal
1 year ago

But the Dow just hit another high and there is RECORD LOW BLACK UNEMPLOYMENT!!! Plus an embassy got moved a half hour down the road! MIGA!!!

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Crud Bonemeal
1 year ago

Except he’s revealing a constraint of every President since FDR – the bureaucracy disobeys orders it doesn’t like. Rectification may well mean Civil War.

IFrank
IFrank
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

Time is not on our side.

The enemy adds re-enforcements faster than we convert the stagnant number of persuadables.

After we see the whites of their 👀 it will be too late. Another Trump term just delays the day of reckoning to our disadvantage.

Walt
Walt
Reply to  Tars_Tarkusz
1 year ago

Hey, Clinton would have won those wars. Trump would have shit the bed.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

We’ll be getting another Hillary even more woke than the last one. Just you wait and see. Her name will sound exotic, like “Kamala”, and she’ll get all gun-grabby.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 year ago

Epiminondas,

Dont worry about President Harris and the gun grab. She hasn’t the smartiosity to pull anything like that off and while she may scree and kvetch about it, her (((husband))) will palaver with all the other fortuitously married (((family))) of our various pols and billionaires and wave off any serious attempts. They figure we great unwashed goyam masses will never get the gumption to actually use them so why poke too hard that particular bugbear.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 year ago

The gun grab will happen slowly. Here’s how:

1) Make family transfers difficult. As Boomers die off, local law enforcement scoops up their leftover arsenals.

2) Normalize gun grabs for mental illness.

3) Normalize whiteness as a form of mental illness.

4) Allow lawsuits against gunmakers. This will Jack the price through the ceiling, as seen with cigarettes.

5) Allow 15-20 years of demographic change.

That should pretty well do it for the whole “law abiding citizenry” thing within a generation or so.

Lorenzo
Lorenzo
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Bourgeois whites didn’t notice Obama’s contempt for 8 years. Why would they catch on to Hillary’s?

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

The problem with women like Hillary is that men will at times give her what she wants just to shut her up.

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  Lorenzo
1 year ago

Obama is more likable than Hillary. He did a pretty good job of hiding his contempt. Hillary can’t hide it to save her life. I think that most people who are relatively apolitical would say that Obama seemed like an O.K. guy. (Before everyone gets their pitchforks and torches, I’m not saying this). These same people really dislike Hillary.

Chris_Lutz
Member
Reply to  Lorenzo
1 year ago

What everyone else said plus a lot of whites’ belief that if they elected a black president, that would put the racism charge to bed one and for all.

Reply to  Chris_Lutz
1 year ago

What suckers they were. The Dems use the race card to get an affirmative action bum elected, so naturally they’ll drop the very tool they used to leverage that mediocrity into the most powerful position on the planet. :rolleyes:

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

This has always been a concern I’ve had with right wing gatekeeping pols who do just enough to dampen the discontent without really mocing the ball forward. Moot point soon. 2020 will either be the last time we have to worry about that or the beginning of the overt one party state.

Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

And culture is downstream from race.

Walt
Walt
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Modern white people have been taught to avoid spilling blood. Fix things with the pen and the ballot box. Let justice reign. Yet the Rule of Law only goes so far until push comes to shove. Justice is a white concept that occasionally needs putting aside. Electing Trump was the modern white way of saying enough is enough. It doesn’t seem to be working too well and the predators on both sides have started baying for blood. I didn’t buy into Z’s black pill position 48 hours ago that the technofags will have their way over us. Nature is going… Read more »

Mcleod
Mcleod
Reply to  Federalist
1 year ago

One of Trump’s most appealing aspects for me, and I suspect for others, is that he has always been unapologetically crass. Marrying and divorcing models, gold gilt everywhere, a plane and helicopter with his name on the side in huge letters, steak well done, and for god’s sake he eats taco salads and brags about it. The Manhattan elite never accepted him as one of their own and, for his part, he always claimed Queens as his home town. It’s as though someone took a redneck with a bunch of money and dumped him in the middle of New York… Read more »

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

There is a great story from he first went to work for his dad. One of the guys told him “when you knock on the door of an overdue tenant, always stand to the side”. Donald asks “why?” “Trust me just do it”. Sure as shit a couple months later he’s doing a collection, knocks on the door and the tenant shoots through it. But he took the advice, that’s why he’s still here.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Federalist
1 year ago

Trump is a historical norm.
He’s just an outlier among these freaks.

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  Federalist
1 year ago

No he has no concern for the ordinary whites in this country. If he did he wouldn’t keep the Southern border open. He wouldn’t be taking advice from the Koch Brothers. The man has broken every promise he made to us and pushed a agenda that is hostile to us and the country. All most whites see is his theatrics and they confuse that with him caring about them. No he doesn’t care about whites. Go look at his response to what happened at his San Jose rally. He didn’t say a word about his white supporters being beaten to… Read more »

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

He seems conflicted. He probably does have some empathy for legacy Americans…but with whom has he done business with? Built his real estate empire with? Who have his children married? Who are his grandchildren?

What’s that cliche…the personal is the political.

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  Yves Vannes
1 year ago

Well that is a big piece of it. That’s a bad crowd he’s hanging with.

Still Look at the San Jose rally, his supporters were beaten to a bloody pulp and he just fled the state and said nothing. Even his fan base went into overdrive to excuse his cowardice.

And he let anti-fa and Big Tech bully his supporters while barely saying a word for the last 3 years. He’s either gutless or a sociopath. Maybe both.

Yet whites are still giving him a pass. They would have never done this with Hillary or Jeb.

miforest
miforest
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

Rod, do not forget that ted cruz blamed the trump supporters for the “violence” . I think Kasich did too. Not a single GOP executive called out the police for their inaction and tacit support of the thugs.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

He is a modern President.
Meaning he gives orders and the bureaucracy defies them.

A characteristic of our government since FDR.
Yes him too.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

This is a characteristic of modernity. You can’t run a nation with near instant communication (available to a degree since the telegraph) and blazing fast transit (since the train) with a constitution built for the middle ages This complexity and the inability of the reasonably smart but never brilliant elected and appointed to even understand complex problems leads to bureaucracies running things They almost have to since I can promise you most Congressweasels could not tell you what dihydrogen monoxide is much less understand say water rights or how to handle nuclear waste. Modernity is too damned complex for our… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

A.B., recent study discussed at Unz by Dr Thompson. Basically an extension to Dunning-Kruger effect. Seems that stupid people not only don’t know they are stupid, they wildly overestimate the intelligence of others. So in short, there are a lot of stupid people out there voting for stupid Congressmen. And of course, there is little hope for those room temperature IQ types in leadership to grasp the concepts/understanding in forming policy/law needed in a modern technological society.

Great news for our pundits on the radio, not so much for the rest of us.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

@Compsci.So basically what your saying is that universal suffrage was a bad idea. I’m not sure but, I think most of us have been on that page for a while. Or a least I have.

Xopher Halftongue
Xopher Halftongue
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

@AB Prosper

Oh look, anti-tech entryist is at it again.

If you want to stop the eeeevil White Man’s technology, just flood Europe and North America with niggers!

But you better be quick, because StarProphet Elon Musk’s Starship/Superheavy is developing really really fast… And it’s going to be too late for your anti tech dreams.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Xopher Halftongue
1 year ago

It should be Xopher Halfwit or Xopher Wormtongue methinks So you do understand,the Dissident Right isn’t a Liberty Movement (that’s over at WRSA) nor is it a Libertarian one (go back to Reason magazine for that) It is a bit amorphous but if it anything is an Authoritarian Right Wing one and regulation that serves the greater public good is perfectly OK with a lot of us Frankly if you Libertarian carpetbaggers and entryists would just pack your shit up, leave and not come back it would be better for all of us. You are as obnoxious as Tiny Duck… Read more »

miforest
miforest
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

VXXC how about you give us even one example of an order given by Obama or bill Clinton that was ignored. that is a ludicrous statement . the bureaucracy is only too eager to enact any democratic whim.

miforest
miforest
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

you are correct Rod . why didn’t he end DACA the day after he took office? he still hasn’t. He said he would. I think that trump’s greatest weakness is that he doesn’t give a shit about those who have supported him . He let the GOP establishment freeze out the Deplorables for any administrative positions in the new white house. why let the Obama holdovers at justice and DOJ stay . ALL presidential appointments should have been vacated upon taking office. Bill Clinton fired every us attorney in the country in 1 day. https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2017/03/flashback-bill-clinton-93-u-s-attorneys-fired-one-day-video/ . only a fool, like… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  miforest
1 year ago

Miforest, Trump threatened to end the DACA program and that was overruled in the courts. To me, that’s a ridiculous overstep of the court’s authority. However, ignoring the courts authority is not easy when the majority of the legislature threatens to impeach—and convict you, if given a reasonable public pretext for the action taken. Seems most of the complaints wrt Trump fall under that frustration. To wit, why doesn’t Trump just tell everyone to “fuck off” and “order” that it be done! Well, had such occurred we’d now be bitching about President Pence and his inability to get things done.… Read more »

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
1 year ago

In order for a society to function, that elite must be explicit and indebted to the welfare of the society over which they rule. Conservatism always started with an understanding of duties and obligations. A nation will thrive when the elite wins when the nation wins. A nation will fall when the elite is isolated from the nation’s failures. I think Trump tries to be the kind of elite requested here. I believe he actually loves America. I just dont believe he’s smart, charismatic or sophisticated enough to do it. And also, while he may be rich, real estate is… Read more »

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
1 year ago

real estate is not where the smart money is these days

Real wealth will always be in the land.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Vizzini
1 year ago

In a way yes. But since the industrial revolution 200 years ago, power has rested with urban, not rural, elites. And that matters.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
1 year ago

Bingo!

CAPT S
CAPT S
1 year ago

Great follow-up to the “What Comes Next” essay. Biggest problem I see, though, is that no matter how much we now disagree with Buckley conservatism, most of us remain stuff-oriented, “American Dream” materialists. My sense is that we’re far too soft a people – far too comfortable – for rebellion. We’re faced with two options: 1) Proactive revolt, for which we’re mentally/physically/spiritually unprepared, or 2) Post-collapse, reactive survival, after which a “new elite” of leadership is possible.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

YES.
THIS

CAPT S
CAPT S
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I’m still the pessimist Z-man. Back in those good ol’ days people knew how to extract hardy independence from a 5 acres piece of rough land. Not so today. I checked out of the mainstream long ago in order to have land, cattle, garden, root cellar … i.e. independence. And I’m only independent as long as me and my neighbors have the knowledge and wherewithal to defend it, i.e. rifleman skills. But we’re minority outliers. Changing hearts/minds at this point is still doable, but folks need to simultaneously make rapid lifestyle changes and develop some life skills that haven’t been… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  CAPT S
1 year ago

We will not need nor do we want as fellow riflemen those who need more convincing. They have ready only an inexhaustible list of conditions to be met for their threshold of action.
Action they are determined at their core never to personally take.

Events may force the hand of some but those events come from men of action.

Men never can and never could, never will be able to wait on such creatures. Our species would not exist if our ancestors were still waiting on them.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  CAPT S
1 year ago

Rural and /small town values don’t work in modern cities and suburbs as they aren’t fit for them A city that say has regular use for a cadre of rifleman other than ceremonial purposes will not be a functional city for long . It’s a war zone The bulk of Rightists such as they live in cities and thus think differently, act differently and operate differently by necessity They may have to learn rural skills but it won’t be easy. That said cities are imploding at an alarming rate and this will shift thing fast. I mean there was a… Read more »

Custodia Sepulchrum
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

What you’re saying boils down to the Underpants Gnome strategy of 1) Topple the current system 2) ??? 3) achieve a better society. Most normies won’t go for this. True, you can change some hearts and minds by convincing them the current system sucks and will work against them but most normies will still want to know what we have in mind afterwards. Even if it’s is only a vague idea most people won’t want to blindly jump off the cliff preferring instead the devil they know to the unknown, wild blue yonder. We don’t need to get bogged down… Read more »

Hun
Hun
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I disagree. You need a vision. Something to aim for. Not just “down with the system”. A high level vision at least is necessary.

george
george
Reply to  Hun
1 year ago

The vision now just includes not having your throat slit if you are white.

Prussian
Prussian
Reply to  Hun
1 year ago

I’m not understanding Zman on this one either, I’m afraid. Why take the always risky step of rebelling against the elite if there is not an alluring alternative to motivate? It seems to me that past revolutions had vanguards armed with, and united around, sophisticated critiques of the reigning order, and outlines of an alternative order to improve matters. Lenin and his gang were united around a body of theory, the revolutionaries of the French Revolution we’re steeped in Enlightenment thought, the German Conservative Revolution fed into 1933. Bernard Bailyn’s ‘The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution’ would seem to… Read more »

Walt
Walt
Reply to  Prussian
1 year ago

A cornered tiger doesn’t worry who is the menu tomorrow.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Hun
1 year ago

Those who start revolutions don’t finish them. Being prominent now is a recipe to end up like Georges Danton.

An army of silently pro-white Talleyrands will have the opportunity to forge a new destiny when the Reign of Terror ends. One can only rebel against reality for so long.

Anon
Anon
Reply to  Hun
1 year ago

Vision is indirectly important. People aren’t willing to jump ship and step into the unknown unless they feel confident, capable men are ready to take the helm. They must be satisfied a shadow elite has assembled in the bleachers, ready to replace the old, otherwise they’ll keep throwing in with the devil they know. It’s not that people won’t bestir themselves to action absent a coherently laid out plan, it’s that without the brainstorming, networking and congregating that accompany the will to devise, refine and promulgate an alternative political cosmology, the replacement elite cannot be born. Intellectual spergery, though pitiful… Read more »

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

The problem with having a specific plan for society is that no one really knows what’s going to happen next. Will there be a dramatic event like a revolution or another Civil War? If so, we really don’t know what form it will take, when it will happen, or what will precipitate it. Or will things change much more gradually? America in say 1980 was very different than America in 1880, but there was no civil war or revolution during that time. If, as Z Man says, we “work normie to both lose faith in the current system and start… Read more »

IFrank
IFrank
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Yes. We should have general realistic goals, but only loosely defined. The evolution of events will reveal options as we go along. There will be surprises.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

It is like travelling an unknown road at night with Freddy Krueger chasing you. You may not see the road ahead more than a few steps, but you sure as hell know what’s coming behind you. In short – your choices are move forward or die immediately. I would choose move forward and work out the details later. Problem is, there is not a sufficient critical mass that feels they are in that dire of a situation. But my guess it will creep up slowly and then pounce, which is not good. That’s why it is critical to get normie… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  CAPT S
1 year ago

True, but your personal path to both is basically the same: start building networks in the real world.

These groups will be useful whatever the future holds.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  CAPT S
1 year ago

In both cases of proactive revolt and waiting for collapse – the revolt is underway. As for collapse- None of you will enjoy collapse.
Nor likely profit from it.

David_Wright
Member
1 year ago

You explained quite clearly the present problem (crisis?) on what is seriously wrong with America. I await tomorrow’s essay on your plan of action for a remedy for all of this.
Cultivating our own gardens will help for us to manage and survive sanely in an insane world but it will not be a form of revolution, soft or otherwise.

Voting is not an option.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  David_Wright
1 year ago

Voting is a useful tool for less harmful or even helpful people having legitimacy of force. Its not a solution – probably. But the enemy should certainly not be granted elected legitimacy of the organs of law and force. That in our current situation is effectively 90% disarmament. With legitimacy some of the 100 million rifles may march – probably enough. Without legitimacy even the Brave will falter – at this very moment that is why our guns are silent. If the Dems have legitimacy through elections they’ll remain silent. Silent to their grave. Historians will marvel a people so… Read more »

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
1 year ago

Elite.

You keep using that word.

I do not think it means what you think it means…

roo_ster
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

SNARK DELENDA EST I have come to despise snark. It used to amuse me a bit, but now I see some wag snarking on about this or that and think that snark is the lowest form of criticism or commentary. It is too easy and a sign of intellectual laziness. The worst snark-offenders are women and the Inverse Scots-Irish. Many of the snarky women are generally repulsive, whether physically, intellectually, or morally. But what sort of man desires to spend time with an attractive woman if much of her prattle is snark? They are pleasing to the eye, but not… Read more »

Alex
Alex
Reply to  roo_ster
1 year ago

“Inverse Scots-Irish” is a great term and I’m stealing it.

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  Alex
1 year ago

I’m trying to be quiet, but isn’t “Inverse Scots-Irish” snarky?

Alex
Alex
Reply to  Bunny
1 year ago

I like it cause its open ended in its meaning, not deterministic, and forces people to think about what the opposite of individualistic hard working pioneers is.

roo_ster
Member
Reply to  Bunny
1 year ago

Bunny:

I was thinking about characteristics of various folks and their inverse and discarded several:

* Inverse German / Scandinavian? Nope, both have a communitarian streak similar to HWMNBN.
* Inverse Puritan / East Anglian / Yankee? Nope, even more similarities to HWMNBN.

And a few others. I could be enlightened, but I see no euro tribe with behavioral characteristics as inverse to HWMNBN as the Scots-Irish. And it has to be a euro tribe used in this fashion.

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  roo_ster
1 year ago

Thank you for trying to explain, but now I am more confused. What is HWMNBN? He who must not be named? Just taking a wild guess, but do you mean Jews?

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  roo_ster
1 year ago

The problem with snark—as I’ve come to notice—is that it all too often becomes an end in itself and some authors (Ann Coulter comes immediately to mind) go out of their way in writings to develop some way to introduce it into the narrative, almost always in detriment to the major points to be made.

In that manner, I guess intellectual laziness is as good a description as any. In any event, I too simply stop reading folks who come to depend upon such in their writings.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  roo_ster
1 year ago

Chicken-egg question: Was (((Jon Stewart))) the father of nihilistic irony-bro snark or the son? Either way, social media, particularly Twitter, has served as the step-parent during this cultural hellspawn’s teen years. Time this delinquent grew up in either case. We’re facing adult problems by the score and this thumb-sucking smartass worldview is nothing but noisy useless baggage at this point.

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  Exile
1 year ago

Letterman preceded him by about eleven years. The first Letterman nightly show was 1982, The Jon Stewart Show premiered in 1993. Discussion of the general topic below.
https://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/2013/03/13/the-irrational-exuberance-of-the-snark-market/ideas/nexus/
“Stewart’s snark soon transcended entertainment, becoming a worthy source of news and commentary.” Ha ha ha.
Maybe Letterman was just mean.
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-cher-was-right-about-letterman-2015-05-20

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I have to admit, I have a predictable nostalgic fondness for that joke.

Reply to  Vizzini
1 year ago

Well, it’s from a charming, funny and pretty great flick.

Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Perhaps he was implying that our “elite” are not elite in any substantive sense? If so, he’s fully echoing your thesis.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 year ago

Thank you.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Guys;
Agree about snark. But *ridicule* is very effective against political enemies, especially the current elite. It delegitimizes them.

Having the elite lose legitimacy is a critical, necessary condition to replacing them.

So how to tell the difference between useful ridicule and useless snark_? I’d say if a pity comment (and either one must be pithy) has the potential to, or better yet, does move the ball on delegitimization, then it it is useful ridicule and should be cultivated. Otherwise it’s just useless, preening snark for a personal dopamine hit.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Member
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

Snarky quips have become the defacto reasoned entreaty of our age. They fit into a soundbite, a tweet, a highlight reel, etc. and don’t overly take up the precious literal seconds you have before the modern mind loses interest or taxes its gnat-like attention span.

Rod1963
Rod1963
Reply to  Al from da Nort
1 year ago

As the old saying goes “talk is cheap” snark doesn’t fix anything. It just identifies you as another Jon Stewart wannabe. You want to remove the elites? Well that takes hard work and sacrifice – something the snark masters want no part of. And really what good is snark as political violence gets more and more mainstreamed? So when you’re snarking some Lefty in meats pace, he decides to use you face for a speed bag what are you going to do? Go snarky as you spit out teeth and blood and ask for more like Charlie Kirk does? Snark… Read more »

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  Rod1963
1 year ago

Here is an example of some pretty snarky and comedically effective political commentary.
http://thezman.com/wordpress/?p=17257

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Holy crap!

It was a joke Z.

Let me know what I can do for my penance.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
1 year ago

The wealthy, tucked away inside their gated communities, have increasingly pulled away from social and civic commitments to their towns and cities. Now we’ve added a growing and massive number of Third Worlders to communities who lack civicmindedness and a sense of duty. Steve Sailer writes about schools running out of white kids, who keep test scores up. Communities are running out of regular white folks who make places nice and pleasant.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Wolf Barney
1 year ago

The wealthy—ah yes, but who are the wealthy, or “rich”. This is not a trivial question. Ask the average Lefty, and the rich is anyone who has more money than him. Not just Bill Gates or that clown Zuckerberg. In regards to such oligarchs, I tend to agree with Z-man, but need to advise caution with the label and whom we apply that to. If one looks at the breakdown of national wealth, we have an upper 10% of the population that “own” 80% of the nation’s wealthy, the gazillionaires are aproximately 1/10% and they have 20%. The remaining 60%… Read more »

Yak-15
Yak-15
1 year ago

“Diversity is a strength!”

Yes, that’s why the British were able to conquer all of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal with a few thousand men.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Yak-15
1 year ago

And they weren’t really trying all that hard.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Yak-15
1 year ago

Same example—in spades—can be used with the conquering of the North (and South) American Indian tribes.

Guest
Guest
1 year ago

We won’t change our elite without changing the monetary system. All this “funny money” created, managed and given value by our despicable elite and its institutions – it controls us and undermines us. Money isn’t a facet of society, it’s the skeleton of society. We will know the dissident right is serious when it starts talking economics and currencies. Too bad our laws don’t allow the states to experiment with different types of currencies – commodity-based, private, debt-free sovereign, etc. I thought Initiative Q was kind of a bold attempt to slip a private currency under the wire. Unfortunately it… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Guest
1 year ago

Disagree. Economic systems are relatively unimportant, so long as they aren’t blatantly corrupt. White people can make almost every economic system prosper. Socialist Scandinavia was a great place to live before massive immigration. Let’s focus on economics after we get the demographics right.

Johnny55
Johnny55
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

THIS THIS THIS THIS!!! There is a reason Jesus whipped the usurers out of the temple. What I want to know is what changed in the 1770s. I have studied this very intently, the usurers were always around, ripping everyone off for thousands of years. But suddenly, around the advent of the Rothschilds and the illuminati they started to sweep into power in all major European countries and here as well, although this was in the late 1800s. These groups were behind the French revolution, the commies, central banks, etc. In roughly 250 years they have reached heights they never… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Johnny55
1 year ago

Johnny55, simplistically, I’d say the industrial revolution happened. Capital is needed to organize and create the means of production. Heretofore, usurers supplied funds to the elite for their vanity projects—like endless petty wars. Now there were new—and bigger, horizons to begger.

Carrie
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Don’t forget about the Freemasons’ role in all of this. They’re in there, too. ANd have done a pretty decent job of infiltrating the Catholic Church, as well. They had a hand in the revolutions. I read somewhere once (would need further research) that a revolution takes people AWAY from God/ Christianity. (ie Commies) And counter-revolution goes back toward God/Christianity, right/wrong, justice, rule of law, etc. Look at France during the Revolution: the Vendee genocide killed off the last of the Catholics who held out. And look what the country has had to show for it since then: increasing levels… Read more »

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  Guest
1 year ago

I absolutely don’t want to discourage you from contributing to this conversation but I must offer a word of advice here: if you have the time and resources take a tour around some former Warsaw Pact countries in Central and Eastern Europe. Spend some time in cities such as Prague, Krakow, Budapest or Minsk. There are many others I could list. Sure, there is some residual dysfunction and ugliness but that’s only to be expected after the devastation of WWII and then 50 years of communism. Still, those scars grow fainter with each passing year. Then, when you’ve done that,… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  King Tut
1 year ago

Tut, what’s your point—free market vs something else? If so, there is a conflation here wrt to population within country examples. Any country with a population averaging room temperature, such as Haiti, will always be a basket case.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Compsci, yes. Economic systems alone to make good societies if the raw material is not there to begin with.

Max
Member
1 year ago

Cultural Marxism is the moral philosophy (religion?) of the educated classes, and especially the elite. It’s been completely institutionalized. Somehow, that has to change if we want a functional ruling class.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Reply to  Max
1 year ago

Sure.
We topple them and the victor picks the new religion.

Everything is downstream from power, power flows from force.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

@vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉. Power is desire realized. Force is merely a means to an end. Desire better things.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Max
1 year ago

We live under an increasingly militant theocracy.
Diversa Vult!

Max
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

I don’t think theocracy is too strong of a word. It certainly seems that we are heading there fast.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Max
1 year ago

.The French Revolution began in 1789. 230 years later, the flowers on the poisonous plant have finally started to bloom. Mix that with the Soft Despotic manigerial state and industrialized, Consumerist, buccaneer Capitalism, and you have America the not so beautiful.

Vegetius
Vegetius
1 year ago

Not to defend Buckley, but I wonder if the elites would or could have reached their present state of sociopathy without Ayn Rand.

roo_ster
Member
Reply to  Vegetius
1 year ago

Rand was but one side of the kosher sandwich. Sociopathy is to be found on either end and would have migrated to the elites without her.

Johnny55
Johnny55
Reply to  roo_ster
1 year ago

Now you see the game. The old Hegelian dialectic in practice…

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Vegetius
1 year ago

@Vegetius. Buckley pitched Ayn Rand under a bus.They wouldn’t even stand in the same room with each other. Her ideas where accepted and put into practice by Wall Street.

Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 year ago

Thanks to the welfare state, there has been a general loss of a sense of personal obligation to others. Socialism replaces the idea of a personal obligation to people in particular with an impersonal obligation to people in general. In most places and times, relationships are horizontal — between you, your family, friends, co-workers, employer-employee, neighbors, community, country, etc. Socialism replaces this with a verticle relationship — solitary you and the all-providing State. Under socialism, society atomizes. The strongest way to hold a family, a community together is not love or even morality, but need. Globohomo would certainly like to… Read more »

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaehdiel
1 year ago

Don’t want a welfare state? Stop automating jobs away and stop outsourcing and importing goods and people.

If you can’t stomach the automation controls and unionization than let wages rise , prices stay decently static and cut the damned work week

We’ll have plenty of work and much less need for a welfare state.

If you want an exercise, nest time you get fast food and see a kiosk there, realize that the people replaced by that machine are probably going to voting socialist in the near future .

They can’t get ahead through work, might as well take dole.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

A.B., pay me now or pay me later. Yep, we just love Dollar Store trinkets and Walmart “specials”—but my next door neighbor losing his job of 20 years—not so much.

My son busts his balls attempting to buy USA, and it is often impossible unless one simply does without, such is the sorry state of affairs today.

Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Compsci and A.B.: You are both correct.

Plato observed in The Republic that one of the characteristics of a tyrant is that he would deliberately impoverish the people in order to make them more dependent on him. That seems to be the modus operandi of the modern-day rotten elite that rules over us – keep us fed and keep us entertained and we won’t bite the hand that feeds us.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaehdiel
1 year ago

Economies of scale are a tyranny or at least function as one, This kind of thing makes landowners and small businessmen into renters and employees so that a small elite can profit No doubt Xopher will come along screaming any moment I’m a Communist entryist or some nonsense but most of problems are caused by “big” both government and state The Left for all their flaws is far better at observing the problem space the the Right is. They get it, problem is most of them favor “big” as a solution and you don’t solve complexity and efficiency traps with… Read more »

Rogeru
Rogeru
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaehdiel
1 year ago

” strongest way to hold a family, a community together is not love or even morality, but need.” I’ve thought about this too. I wonder if the increase in divorce and decrease in fertility might be attributed , among the various other reasons we discuss, to the lack of need for family. For the first time in human history its actually possible to live as an individual without starving or being enslaved by the neighboring tribe. There does not seem to be an answer to this as long as the economy functions. Women can earn their own money and children… Read more »

Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Reply to  Rogeru
1 year ago

I recall a comment made by a family therapist in a magazine. He observed that people nowadays are quick to cut themselves off from family and blamed Social Security. At one time, if they cut themselves off from their family, they might have no one to care for them. A century ago, if you walked out on your spouse and kids, you walked out on your old-age pension. The family is no longer a unit of economic consumption, but a unit of economic production. Kids go to school and are frequently raised by third-parties. Affluence, too. We don’t need each… Read more »

Wjkathman
1 year ago

It should be noted that Gordon Gecko was supposed to be the villain of Oliver Stone’s “Wall Street.” However, Michael Douglas played the character with such scumbag charm that many mistook him for the hero. Douglas has stated that numerous people have told him that his portrayal of Gecko is what inspired them to become stockbrokers. Doesn’t get much more American than that.

Max
Member
Reply to  Wjkathman
1 year ago

If only our corporate elite were concerned with profits….seems we’ve entered an age where they care more about SJW causes than profits. Banks refusing to do business with you because you don’t support open borders? It’s insanity.

Reply to  Max
1 year ago

Max, the fact that AWRs are willing to put ideology before profits is one of their greatest strengths. If the “conservative” elites Z describes had channeled their money and energy into supporting conservative causes, America would still actually be America.

Max
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 year ago

I dunno. Stuff like that seems to be a hallmark of a dysfunctional society. If Dems and Rs need separate banks, it’s long past time for separate countries. If all politics has to be a morality play that is bad enough. Extending that to business relationships seems insane.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Max
1 year ago

It’s not separate banks, I’m ok with that. It is that they don’t want us to have a bank at all.

Rich
Member
Reply to  Dutch
1 year ago

Beware the cashless society with nowhere to go.

Reply to  Max
1 year ago

I was talking about the AWRs, not society.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

You see the same movie I did? Charming yes, heroic, how? The basis of the story, made clear quickly, was that Gordon Gecko was not playing by the rules. He traded on insider information. In short he was an “anti-hero” which I admit was the trend in movies and society during those years (and now as well). Gecko was a grifter presenting himself to the masses as a noble/successful competitor in the “free” market. But a successful criminal is still a criminal and those who emulate such behavior have simply lost their moral compass. They should present no role model… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

The movie was released in 1987, not 1989. Oliver Stone was honest enough to depict corporate bureaucracy as it was in the very scene in which Gekko uttered “greed is good.” In that scene, Gekko is speaking at the annual stockholders’ meeting of Teldar Paper. He said: “Teldar Paper has 33 vice-presidents each earning over 200 thousand dollars a year. Now, I have spent the last two months analyzing what all these guys do, and I still can’t figure it out. One thing I do know is that our paper company lost 110 million dollars last year, and I’ll bet… Read more »

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Nothing is more American than grifting . I mean the founding fathers fought a civil war, committed treason and murder for lower taxes every bit as much as freedom The USA these days is nothing but the remains of a long con with the shoe scrapings of Europe and low trust swine from all over the earth decamped here to be free to loot For a while there was a kind of Christian check to this but that is long gone and the Christian strain, hell heresies that plague us, Universalism and Prosperity Gospel are poison. If we want a… Read more »

Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

Stand straight or be forced to stand straight until it becomes second nature.

Ursula
Ursula
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

We need to raise our children away from indoctrination centers (public schools) and away from degenerate black ghetto culture. These ruin our kids.

Sean Detente
Sean Detente
Member
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

“You see the same movie I did? Charming yes, heroic, how? The basis of the story, made clear quickly, was that Gordon Gecko was not playing by the rules.”

Check your testosterone levels. Characters like Tony Montana and Gordon Gecko hold a special appeal that’s not logically explained through fussy moral frameworks.

Ursula
Ursula
Reply to  Sean Detente
1 year ago

“Tony Montana and Gordon Gecko hold a special appeal”

Hollywood-made anti-heroes. Good for white people? No.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Ursula
1 year ago

A revolution that ended up with most of the degenerates in a ditch would be a very good thing for all if it could be contained.

Walt
Walt
Reply to  Sean Detente
1 year ago

It’s porno plain and simple.Pornography is showing regular people what they will never have – living in a fantasy make-believe world. Quick rush before return to reality. Self-aware people can deal with it but trash cannot. Tony Montana was a lottery winner as was Gordon Gecko. Every day thousands of working-class slobs play the lottery. And lose.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I think that the key to going forward may lie somewhere in here. In my experience, most white people are still repelled by rhetoric about white ethno-states and shipping out immigrants all of which carries more baggage than Samsonite. It may be unfair but it is what it is and it has always been perceptions that matter. However, I think many white people would be highly receptive to messages about building and maintaining family and community bonds and the inestimable value of decency and amity. That’s a far easier sell in my opinion. Everyone wants to feel that they matter… Read more »

Nathan
Nathan
Reply to  Wjkathman
1 year ago

How many young men watched Full Metal Jacket and said “cool, man! I’m joining the Marines!”

It’s a funny thing how people often get the wrong messages from movies . Or maybe it’s a mindfuck from the start?

Wkathman
Wkathman
Reply to  Nathan
1 year ago

The takeaway from people not understanding the messages of movies: folks just ain’t that bright. There is a notion that no such thing as an anti-war film exists. Just showing war at all glorifies it, even if the intent was to disparage war. That’s plausible considering how much of the audience is comprised of damn fools. Perspicacity is an anomaly.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  Wkathman
1 year ago

Or maybe it’s because we’re chimpanzees and we like war.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  King Tut
1 year ago

The most effective anti war film I’ve seen is All Quiet on the Western Front since simply no one had anything positive to say about trench warfare

Prussian
Prussian
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

“…no one had anything positive to say about trench warfare” I think the image of WW1 that has come down to us has been skewed by the Left. “It is important to recognize, however, that the anti-war myth has not always enjoyed such hegemony. In the 1920s and 1930s, it vied with a powerful “pro-war” position for interpretive rights to the conflict. For German writers (and veterans) like Ernst Jünger, Franz Schauwecker, Werner Beumelberg, and Edwin Dwinger, the war’s violence was less victimizing than empowering. Life in the trenches had meant an experience of comradeship and newly awakened feelings of… Read more »

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Prussian
1 year ago

Must appreciated post. I have kin in what was Prussia and I suspect like many in that region have a warlike nature . These are the kind of men who slaughter a legion in the Teutoburg forest and love it Were we more like them, our problems would have been resolved long ago but easy access to stuff made us soft The thing is while the plurality of White Americans are German, they aren’t Prussian and neither are our Poles When it came to wartime experience, neither my stepfather or my great uncle had anything to say positive about the… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  King Tut
1 year ago

We’re not chimps though. Human social groups operate *very* differently from chimp dominance hierarchies (a place were a guy like Jordan Peterson gets things really wrong). Anthropologist C.R. Hallpike in “Do We Need God to be Good” puts it like this: “Positions of power and leadership in human societies are produced by situations in which some people control what other people want or need, like food, land, personal security, political skills, status, wealth, the favour of the gods, professional expertise, knowledge, and so on. In other words, power requires dependency, and among hunter-gatherers there is precious little of that, because… Read more »

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  BadThinker
1 year ago

I’m sorry but none of that disproves what I said. I may be wrong and I happy to accept being wrong but not one word of that gives me cause to review my opinion.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
1 year ago

Oh good. We agree.

Here’s the top 10 military apps to help with this problem.

I’m all about solutions.

https://blog.refactortactical.com/blog/top-militarytactical-apps/

I particularly like Theodolite.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
1 year ago

400,000 employees.
78,000 companies.
200 universities.

With but one goal in mind:
Reach the Moon.

That was an America-centric policy, when elites, government, and the middle class worked together.
Back when we were one nation.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

What we’ve lost: a unified sense of purpose, a drive to attemp great feats, an appetite to discover new wonders…and a willingness to sacrifice to achieve those ends…

Kill a civilizations great dreams, give them lesser ones. Replace striving and sacrifice with gorging on trinkets.

Corral a people’s spirit, curb its appetite and they will no longer be a great people.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Yves Vannes
1 year ago

From moon landings to “polish my female balls” in 50 years. That’s a hell of a regression.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

And it was an nearly useless goal that was for national vanity vanity projects are for decadent nations

You want good things that required a great nation to accomplish?

Hoover Dam, REA , CCC, Interstate Highway , that is what a great nation accomplishes not once off useless bullshit sending men to a dead rock

Dr. Mabuse
Dr. Mabuse
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

Nonsense. Apollo 11 was not the product of a “decadent” nation. It was a grand adventure, by people who still understood the concept of glory. Conservatives have been doing the green eyeshade act for 40 years, and it hasn’t helped to ward off decadence one bit. By now, I’d be grateful for some project that was truly original and daring. The problem isn’t that we spend money on frivolous luxuries, but that we fling it into a welfare state sewer, getting nothing for it but a lazy, useless underclass. It was a “practical” man who fussed over wasting a jar… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Dr. Mabuse
1 year ago

For those that don’t get the reference: John 12:4+ But Judas Iscariot, one of his disciples (the one who was about to betray him), said, “Why was this perfume not sold for three hundred denarii and the money given to the poor?” (He said this not because he cared about the poor, but because he was a thief; he kept the common purse and used to steal what was put into it.) Jesus said, “Leave her alone. She bought it so that she might keep it for the day of my burial. You always have the poor with you, but… Read more »

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

@ A.B Prosper said: “And it was an nearly useless goal that was for national vanity vanity projects are for decadent nations.” Mr. ABP. In my humble opinion, You have the soul of a bourgeoisie turnip.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 year ago

Perhaps I do but I’m still correct. The Hoover Dam makes power every day for 8 million people. The Space program got us some rocks, a now bleached white flag all the while the nation was burning In any case humanity is not going to the stars no matter what, the vast bulk , 6.5 billion of us are too low trust , too short an attention span and/or too stupid We might get a moon base if we make it but it’s useless and a waste of money 1969 USA will in a few decades be as dead as… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

We did the impossible- as a nation.

The Space Race was not another damned war. You want useless?

Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

The entire space race was a competition with the Soviets.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

Once the last of Gen X is gone in a few decades that nation is dead never to return. Its irrelevant as we speak. Your new nation if you can claw back a fertile land from the oceans of blood and filth required to make it., can if you really wish try such folly again in some decades. Perhaps if your Interregnum government is wise and lucky you’ll succeed Its not impossible but a minority White USA will be Brazil at best. With our tensions, likely much worse China will carry the space torch for a bit, might get a… Read more »

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

A.B Prosper said: “Your new nation if you can claw back a fertile land from the oceans of blood and filth required to make it…” My heavens, “oceans of blood and filth”. I can see that apocalyptic rhetoric is definitely your forte. My advice is: BACK AWAY FROM THE COMPUTER, AND KEEP YOUR HANDS WHERE I CAN SEE THEM! 😀

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 year ago

I’m not sure if this a compliment or an insult. I’ve been in L.A. quite recently it is a pest hole with break outs of typhus and very soon possibly plague . This is in good times . It will get worse As for blood, do you really think you can vote your way out of clown world . If things go hot enough to threaten the union , millions will die, very possible tens or hundreds of disease, starvation and violence This is why our side has trouble doing anything. We see the cost of the future but have… Read more »

Da Booby
1 year ago

The Booby agrees 100%. Our ruling class is a post-Cold War marriage. Once the “threat” of Soviet Communism ended, the rich no longer had any reason to continue pretending they had any affinity for the people. It was back to paying $100 000 000 for degenerate abstract artworks by left-wing artists, falling over themselves to be seen at fashionable events hosted by left-wing intellectuals, and embracing enthusiastically the political correctness reign of terror imposed by left-wing academia and the new establishment. The left, for its part, gets to fatten itself on the fruits of corporate largess. Gov’t jobs, academic jobs,… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

Hmmm. Jefferson says that 150 years is plenty long between revolutions. Let’s see, it’s been 154 years since the end of the Civil War. I’d say that we’re right about on track.

In fact, I might argue that a revolution/insurgency started ~1965 and is finally about to gain total control. So far, that revolution has been fairly bloodless, outside of increased crime. That may change when its leaders start to openly and oppressively wield power against the defeated whites.

Carl B.
Carl B.
1 year ago

Wall Street Globalist (((elites))) have gone full-Prog/Marxist and they intend to remove Trump and open/keep open the borders wide by any means necessary. The Great Population Replacement Project has been an unqualified success.

If anyone has a plan to rid the country – indeed the world – of these (((elites))) please enlighten us. As it stands right now it looks like victory for the elites – again – and catastrophe for everyone else.

Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Reply to  Carl B.
1 year ago

A now-retired hedge fund manager friend once remarked to me in disgust that it really was all about money with the Jews. She married a Jew (now deceased) and converted, but said that she would take back her maiden name if she didn’t have children.

karl Mchungus
karl Mchungus
1 year ago

Anon conservative had a few posts detailing what a sadistic psychopathic bastard Buckley really was. My sense is that he was also a closeted homo.

Institute a wealth tax and confiscate everything after $1m. Sorry charlie 😛

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  karl Mchungus
1 year ago

Karl, that’s plain silly. There will never be anyone willing to exert effort above 1M compensatio/wealth accumulation—assuming that such requirement is not worked around, like the 50’s 90% tax rate. Next time you want a top notch doctor to operate on you, think about it.

karl Mchungus
karl Mchungus
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Then live under the heel of a billionaire, you seem to enjoy it. Zman, this is the type of person you are trying to build a revolutionary movement out of 😛

Member
Reply to  karl Mchungus
1 year ago

Brokeback Buckley. He was good friends with the late David Brudnoy, long-time WBZ talk radio legend, who was an open homosexual.

The Fair Deal, the New Deal, Socialism, taxation, and the like have all worked to weaken the white man.

Whites flourish in an accountability society, not a soak the rich, reward the bureaucrat, reward the postal worker, reward the public employee union society.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  karl Mchungus
1 year ago

Karl, I would hope so. Can’t make a movement out of folk that can’t think past their envy and bitterness. Perhaps you come from a Leftist perspective?

Member
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Those who want to impose taxes and take what others have are the bitter and the envious.

If you insist upon taxes, how about taxing the takers, and giving to the creators?

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Libertymike
1 year ago

Most of today’s so called creators are worse parasites than any welfare mom In any case , the way money is generated today is murdering our societies and if regulating the hell out of them means our people have a future and America becomes a good place to raise a family, that’s fine with me we could lose half the GDP so long as the distribution is somewhat flat and be well set. The Economic Liberals and Libertarians ought to go carpetbag and grift to africa or somewhere else and let us run a society without you America doesn’t need… Read more »

Member
Reply to  A.B Prosper
1 year ago

A.B., why distort what I wrote?

Did I endorse carpetbagging and grifting?

Perhaps you should acquire a better grip on what makes carpetbagging possible. To wit, see Reconstruction.

America does not need any redistributionist gimmie dats. The dissident right is doomed to failure if it insists upon socialism.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Libertymike
1 year ago

Wealth redistribution is one the primary functions of the state outside of war Its has been since Haumarabbi at least In any case making things worse does not involve government owning everything which is stupid However if your cognitive dissonance can handle it, the government in ultra capitalist Singapore owns and sells or leases 80% of property They do this so that people can afford to have somewhere to live at a reasonable price. This is not super effective, its too busy and crowded for kids but its improved that nations quality of life without making goods from there unaffordable… Read more »

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Libertymike
1 year ago

hahaha did you even read Zman’s post?!

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

yah, you are a true warrior; it shows in your words.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

The graveyards are filled with indispensable men Almost no one in the real world would ever see such a surgeon anyway , For most of the nation it’s utterly moot . Under any system they will mostly see a P.A and the results if we train smart people, will work fine What they will see are less people who own everything and have the resources to opt out of bad policy choices with ease That alone is worth the loss And yes I’m aware it won’t raise a thin dime, that’s not the point. Too much wealth in too few… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  karl Mchungus
1 year ago

I would put the limit much higher than that but I agree with the idea. If a person feels oppressed by such a system, where they can still be very wealthy relative to the average person, we are probably better off without them.

This idea also inhibits the creation of a small class of plutocrats who can purchase the legislators for schemes like open borders.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 year ago

Line, correct. But how to do that is the question. As has been pointed out here, schemes that are sold as “only” affecting the rich have a way of working their way down to the middle classes as the government tirelessly attempts to secure more and more funding to transfer to the unproductive in exchange for their votes.

Ursula
Ursula
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

I guess that’s where the desire to keep government small and our representatives as people we know and trust is validated. It seems we really need to balkanize into smaller regions/republics so as to re-store power to rule to the workers and normal folk. Sometimes I fantasize that, since so many Central American and Mexican citizens are already living in the U.S., the U.S. should simply gather the leaders of Canada, Central America and South America and say, Look, we’re already mixed, let’s combine to create more prosperity to our people and let’s create a new Federation of American Republics… Read more »

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  karl Mchungus
1 year ago

one mil might be a bit low even with regulation though a 5-1 or 10-1 remonitization would make it work It should be inflation adjusted though and I don’t know maybe 2-4 depending on remon If you are going that route, large corporations have to go bye bye though. If anyone wanted to try this they’s need overwhelming force The last time a very lite version was tried under F.D. Roosevelt we nearly got a coup Many Americans would rebel if they weren’t allowed to steal , grift, swindle and chisel and as I’ve noted before , after many people… Read more »

Nathan
Nathan
1 year ago

America is a country based on greed. Mammon is our God. It’s even printed on our dollar. All conservatives care about is conserving their own wealth.

The twin sister of our greed is that thing Rush Limbaugh won’t shut up about: individualism, which is just another word for selfishness. I got mine. Screw you if you can’t pull yourself up by your bootstraps. Screw you if you can’t compete with the entire third world. If you think the government should help the little guy you’re probably a commie!

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Nathan
1 year ago

Nathan, it may be selfishness, but it also is adequately explained by belief in blank statism. If everyone has equal ability, why not encourage them to get off their butt to succeed like “I did”. As HBD science becomes more accepted, such attitude can only come more and more into disrepute. And as far as rich only caring for protecting wealth, how does one explain such figures as Gates and Buffet assigning their fortunes to charitable institutions and spending the rest of their years giving such away (not that I support that either, but that’s another thread)

Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Charitable foundations are a form of tax evasion for the wealthy. I remarked on this before, but I once attended a barbecue and a fellow told me that he was from Tewksbury, NJ (a wealthy area), and that his family was comfortable, but not rich. The children of the self-made rich at school asked, “we’re rich, you’re not, what’s the matter with you?” He went on to say that the old money people were more down to earth: They wore old clothes, drove old trucks and would talk to him while standing in line at the supermarket checkout. It’s always… Read more »

Rogeru
Rogeru
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaehdiel
1 year ago

The British Royal family is fairly accomplished when you look into it. They wouldn’t let Prince William go into combat so he became a rescue pilot for whatever they call the coast guard over there. Many of the lesser royals served in the armed forces snd now run businesses. There’s pressure on them to perform and be respectable, i think that prevents the trust fund baby syndrome to some extent.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Rogeru
1 year ago

Rogeru, well in fairness the British royal family is one bill in parliament away from abolishment. That if nothing else keeps them on their toes so to speak. If the American people had such control of their oligarchs, I’m sure we’d not be having this discussion.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaehdiel
1 year ago

As I’ve pointed out before on D-day, TR Jr. was only general officer to land in the first wave despite crippling arthritis and a bad heart. At the same time his son was in the first wave at Omaha. Roosevelts quick thinking in redirecting the troops who missed the correct landing spot to a new axis of advance likely saved the Utah landing. They had skin in the game.

Nathan
Nathan
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

@Compsci Valid point about blank slatism as a way for the rich to preen about how they did it all themselves, as if most of them weren’t born on third base thinking they hit a triple. What I said was aimed at conservatives. Wealthy lefties love using the money they couldn’t possibly spend to virtue-signal. I got so sick of talk radio because so much hot air was devoted to talking about how tax cuts for the rich are good for Joe Sixpack. Then these rich bastards by a house in FL and import a new servant class from Latin… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Nathan
1 year ago

Nathan, point well taken. I agree, but as others have pointed out, it’s what you do to get rich and stay rich that is the “problem”. Dance with the one that brought you—or else.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
1 year ago

Thanx Zman, for the post. Alexander Fraser Tytler said: ” A pure democracy is a chimera. All government is essentially, of the nature of a monarchy.” Here’s a short YouTube vid with more of his quotes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=grVoDtwBv-U How pray tell, should we go about doing that? I thought we all understood that mass movements where not an option. Anyway, replace all of the elites you like. That’s been tried lots of times. “Out of the frying pan into the fire.” Seriously, the more I know about history, the more I realize that we simply can’t jump over our own knees.… Read more »

TomA
TomA
1 year ago

First , the disease of affluence is infecting all levels of our society (indeed the whole planet). Today, even our poorest class is literally dying of obesity. Second, the corruption and degeneracy of the elite class is a reflection of the overall decline of our entire society. We no longer choose the best among us to lead, but rather select politicians based upon skill at bribery. Every single Democrat running for president is trying to outdo each other with promises of more gravy for more votes. But as to your core point, yes, when the collapse begins, it will be… Read more »

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  TomA
1 year ago

TomA said: “First , the disease of affluence is infecting all levels of our society (indeed the whole planet). Today, even our poorest class is literally dying of obesity. Second, the corruption and degeneracy of the elite class is a reflection of the overall decline of our entire society. Excellent! Now we’re getting somewhere. If this keeps up can Armageddon be far behind? Here’s a YouTube vid called “The Age of Decadence.” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hG8OAXMbfYw

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 year ago

The rise of decadence may simply be a way to placate an unnatural social order. We evolved in a pastoral environment. Up until 150 years ago 90% of the population lived in the countryside or in small villages. Cities proved to be important in building a more complex civilization, but for only a small percentage of a population. Some of us evolved with traits that are better at constructive urban life than that of others. But under this arrangement only 10% of the people in a civilization lived in cities. Our genome’s phenotypic expression in an overgrown urban(suburbs included in… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Yves Vannes
1 year ago

Yves’ 90/10 is about as HBD as it gets, much agree.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 year ago

Glubb is on to something profound. The cycles he observed are presumably linked to something biological about humans.

Dr. Mabuse
Dr. Mabuse
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
1 year ago

‘The Fate of Empires’ is a quick read, and available online for free. It’s hard not to draw the conclusion that our civilization is rapidly drawing to a close. It’s interesting that the rise and fall cycle holds true for different races, religions, and geographic regions. As you say, it’s like it’s in our DNA, we can’t avoid it any more than the human body can avoid death.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Dr. Mabuse
1 year ago

Agree. Im curious about the explanations that try to tie in human physiology and biology here. Two attempts are called ‘r/K selection’ by ‘Anonymous Conservative’ and the other ‘biohistory’ by some Aussie guy. As far as I can tell, there are no mutual inconsistencies between Glubb and these biological conjectures. Intellectually I find this ‘bio’ approach the most interesting. Our conflict w leftists must go much deeper than mere ideology. Not merely because the views of neither side are entirely logically consistent (the left’s side especiallly not) but also b/c it is so instinctive and visceral, the mutual dislike. I… Read more »

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
1 year ago

Moran ya Simba said: ” I used to be such an easygoing guy. I really dont like leftie anymore. I believe it is biology. ” Here’s one of the big reasons we are all going quite mad. Here’s a Youtube vid of “Marshall McLuhan on tribalization and the loss of identity in the global village” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtFB_nMej20 I didn’t own a computer until about 10 years ago. I can’t imagine what it’s like for young people having lived all their lives with their faces stuck in computers and cell phones,not to mention video games. They must live in a completely different… Read more »

Hxile
Hxile
Member
1 year ago

Username glitch….

Exile
Exile
Member
1 year ago

The need for a new elite is best met by a 5th position approach. We could try to reconstruct a Rube Goldberg system of checks, balances and rational incentives for the Empire, but any system can be subverted by lawyers and sophists. The Founders’ idea that you could make bad men govern well with checks and balances was hubris, and we’re witnessing the age of nemesis. Character begins in childhood, and we need to build communities where our children can be nurtured to elevate kin, community, nation, duty, honor and noblesse oblige more than selfish, personal Enlightenment values. It’s up… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Exile
1 year ago

Exile, I too would like a new “civic” religion to replace the old Christianity we seem to have “outgrown”. But I suggest, it is easier to reduce the power of the “uncivic” among us, than to improve their behavior. To that effect, we need to change from universal suffrage to earned suffrage. One often lambasts the Founders in the creation of this nation. But how does this nation’s operation/organization now reflect the nation’s organization left to us by the Founders? The Founders for example did not implement a system of universal suffrage, nor could they imagine such. It is we,… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

In a new ethnostate, I would suggest limiting voting to a) White men who b) are fathers and c) net taxpayers, not benefit recipients and d) aren’t guilty of serious crimes or major civil malfeasance.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Exile
1 year ago

Good start for a robust discussion. I’d advance the age of suffrage as well. At the turn of the century, an 18 yo had a wife, a kid and a job. Today we have about a third of college grad’s living in their parents basements.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Compsci: “It is we, the people, who later voted the changes we now see as one of the root causes of our current predicament.” I would argue the fault was more the judicial branch with its unintended accretion of power, as well as our tolerance for poorly behaved outliers. For example, 8 of the original states had rules in place, which the Constitution did not automatically abrogate, requiring not merely property but also profession of the Christian faith to hold office. I realize that is no automatic guarantee of moral behavior, but even that attempt was subverted early on. Although… Read more »

Carrie
Reply to  Exile
1 year ago

Definitely like your new term: “Dindugeld.”

Excellent.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Carrie
1 year ago

“Once you pay the Dindugeld, you shall never be free of the Dindu”

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

Dissidents can’t afford “millions for war not a penny for tribute” principles – realistically, if you lack the strength to take on a stronger power, you buy them off and build your strength. Even Rome paid tribute when necessary. Only when a much stronger enemy can extort you and prevent your growth simultaneously are you forced into the fight. See the US from the Revolution to 1812 – we overplayed our hand in 1812 and almost died in the cradle.

Issac
Issac
1 year ago

I’ve said it before, but it is more germane than ever: There is no political right worth speaking of. Anyone with an interest in politics per se should be looking for a place at the table on the left. The progressive wing of the DNC is where you can apply pressure to the neoliberal elite.

Issac
Issac
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I would say that the weaponized progressive caucus is just as much a prop as the evangelical caucus in theory, but in practice the former has far more leeway to cause trouble on behalf of neoliberalism, historically, and therefor would be more difficult to remand if they went off script. The diaspora also has a soft spot for revolutionaries of the left. It is probably not a massively exposed flank, but the only meaningful area of neoliberal vulnerability when the GOP invariably drowns in the rising tide of color.

Prussian
Prussian
Reply to  Issac
1 year ago

I’ve wondered lately whether the last chance for the West will be the elites losing control of this globalist project of theirs, and facing a radical Left revolt from the brown masses, creating a state of chaos and an opening for a remnant of the West to squeeze through. That remnant will have to be properly constituted (militant and self sacrificial), and have a vanguard elite, intelligent, shrewd, ruthless, cohesively bound around a body of theory, to lead them.

Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Ris_Eruwaehdiel
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

“Total self-abnegation” – a secular form of Christianity?

Reply to  Issac
1 year ago

Please define the bugbear known as neoliberalism.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 year ago

Atomized consurmerist individualism, atheist materialism, entropic family formation, blank-slate Lysenkoist science, Harrison Bergeron style egalitarianism, rent-seeking multinational Woke Capital, anarcho-tyrannical who-whom law enforcement, with severe restrictions on political, legal and cultural liberties/freedom of disassociation with “liberty” almost wholly confined to the sexual sphere.

Reply to  Exile
1 year ago

That is “a” definition. I’ve heard many others, and they’re all pretty much mutually incompatible. Ultimately, neoliberal is a meaningless epithet not unlike fascist.

Issac
Issac
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 year ago

Neoliberalism is Tikun Olam.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 year ago

That definition matches pretty much everything I’ve encountered over the last few years in alt right and dissident right politics. the community seems to have a pretty good idea of what constitutes neoliberalism. Max Boot and Bill kristol used to say that neoconservative was a meaningless term without a coherent definition, but we all knew what a neocon was even when half of us were neo cons.

Reply to  Exile
1 year ago

It’s funny, because usage of the term neoliberalism in academia apparently began soon after pomo homo AWR philosopher Michel Foucault began using it as a term of disparagement toward everything and everybody to the right of Trotsky.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 year ago

The site Naked Capitalism used the term constantly, I could never figure out exactly who it was they were sneering at.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
1 year ago

It is a truism that people get the govt they want and deserve Z. The old saying goes “be careful what you wish for…”

We really, really need to be careful going forward…

Barn Jollycorn
Barn Jollycorn
1 year ago

Need to stop that Tom Jefferson guy from Fedposting.
Could lead to trouble.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Barn Jollycorn
1 year ago

Barn Jollycorn said: “Need to stop that Tom Jefferson guy from Fedposting. Could lead to trouble.” “Fedposting”, just an updated description of an agent provocateur. It’s easy to beat one of those turds. Humor is your first step just laugh in the guy’s face. Then gently but firmly tell that puss rag that violence of any kind is out of the question. No matter who on this site talks about violence or any other illegal activities, simply tell them to knock it the hell off.

James O'Meara
James O'Meara
1 year ago

To pick a nit in an otherwise fine piece: ” The movie Wall Street or the popular TV show Family Ties are good examples. There you have heroic figures, who are pure materialists, with no sense of duty to their fellow man. Getting rich, by any means necessary, was a social good in itself.” Regarding Wall Street, Oliver Stone certainly didn’t intend G. Gecko to be a hero. Remember, this is Oliver Stone. The fact that people did admire GG, even quoting his speeches (“Greed is good”) and one-liners unironically (“If you want a friend, get a dog”) dismayed him.… Read more »

Member
1 year ago

I agree with Z that the ultra-rich have become villains. And I think he is correct in diagnosing the overweening materialism and self regard of the so-called “conservatives” among this group. However, I think a second factor is that a large percentage of the ultra-rich have eschewed conservatism altogether (if they ever were conservative) and have adopted AWR as their ideology. Leftists such as Slavoj Zizek have feared that capitalism will co-opt the Left. Instead, what has happened is that that Left has co-opted capitalism. All one has to do is view corporate advertising–if you have the stomach–read corporate Statements… Read more »

Tars_Tarkusz
Member
1 year ago

The left has played their part as well. It is their job to construct a false narrative so that we will become defensive because of the falsity of the constructed narrative. For example, when the left bitches about the excesses of the militarized police in America, it is never solely about the police being jackbooted. The left (anti-whites) spin a yarn about how the militarized police are constructed to keep the good POC in their place and about how the good POC, especially blacks, are “criminalized” by “over-policing” and put in a “cradle to prison pipeline” for the corrupt capitalists… Read more »

Epaminondas
Member
1 year ago

I would make a wonderful elite. I volunteer.

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 year ago
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Bunny
1 year ago

Wicked thing! I saw what you did there.

Tykebomb
Tykebomb
1 year ago

To play devils advocate, emphasis on the devil, the Elite do have a peculiar view of our interest. They believe in an utopian vision of all of us lazing our lives away at creative, computer jobs. You can see this in the utter revulsion they have at manufacturing jobs being brought back stateside. They’d rather the government shepard us through every facet of our lives than have a vibrant middle class working manufacturing or other blue collar jobs. So the racial hierarchy of immigrants slaving on their yards is the preferred solution. And it’s cheaper to them in the now.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
1 year ago

We no longer have a functioning civilization because the estates (castes) that evolved have been so corrupted and turned on their head that chaos rules the day. In an age that worships miasma it is the slime that rises to the top. Parasites who would have been kept in check in a sane age now set the agenda and rule. Yes, they are superior at being manipulative lowlifes in a civilization that idealizes mammon and orgasm. An aristocracy of vermin. And they are well aware of what they are and that their power is knotted with flimsy propaganda and not… Read more »

SidVic
SidVic
Member
1 year ago

A new elite indeed. My worry is to what pool a new elite would be selected from. Conservative inc. seems to offer up few candidates. The rot has seemingly consumed the military. Academia is bereft of reasonable people for the most part. Perhaps we do need a period of chaos so that the decks can be cleared and new ruthless and smart leadership can arise from the states or business communities. The prep school ivy league pipeline to leadership needs to be thoroughly eradicated.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  SidVic
1 year ago

Sid; Nothing like a war to throw up a new set of elites. For the first generation or two following a big war, the surest ticket to the top was to have shown distinction in that war. I’d name names but the list is way too long. *However*, to wish for a war just to change out the feckless grifters-in-charge is perverse in the extreme, considering all the death and destruction entailed. But, no worries, knowing history and human nature, having feckless grifters in charge is a really good way of getting a war. By now we all should know… Read more »

Maus
Maus
1 year ago

A new elite born of the commitment to Aristotelian virtues, particularly with temperance habituated by thrift and self-reliance would be a wonder to behold. But the programming that began in the late 80s has sunk the mindworm pretty deep in the proles. Popular culture espousing the rich was much more ubiquitous and iniquitous, particularly on television. Whether explicit, with shows like Dallas or Dynasty, or implicit, with Fantasy Island or the Love Boat. Money was portrayed as the root of all good things. The absolute nadir was Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous; hosted by the odious Robin Leach, with… Read more »

Member
1 year ago

This is one of the best Zman posts I’ve read. I adhere to my decades old principles that the most effective corporate tax is zero, as is the best minimum wage. Yet, it’s clear that the “robber barons” of the past were better rich people than today’s billionaires. Long after Zuckerman and Bezos are dead and forgotten, folks will still benefit from the philanthropy of Carnegie and his kind.

Calsdad
Calsdad
1 year ago

Once the Cold War was over the war industrial complex went looking for another boogie man to keep those white middle class voters and TAXPAYERS marching in lockstep to the war drums. The fact is that the United States has been on a war footing since probably about 1939 or so (the US didn’t get “caught” by Pearl Harbor – they knew damn well something was coming – and war production had already been thought about , planned – and even started long before the Japs attacked). It was really the FDR administration that set us down this path. First… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Laurence Vance is right: perhaps more contempt, disdain, ridicule, and scorn should be directed at the fly-over types who want “to serve” the empire by inflicting misery upon Abdul and Ahmed only to come home miserable themselves with nothing to show for their “service” other than PTSD, amputated limbs, and a much higher chance of offing themselves.

No elite has forced Johnny to march off into war since Vietnam

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Cal, the only thing I might add to your wonderful insight is that we *are* already at war with Iran. Not sure the American public understands what the definition of war is anymore. Seems we have persistent visions of fleets leaving our shore and men and armaments storming far away beaches. Anytime you have “sanctions”, you have defacto war with the sanctioned country. The form is different, but the intent is the same and in some cases the casualty rate is no different for our “enemy”. Not coming down on one side of the issue or the other, just saying… Read more »

Cranky Scientist
Cranky Scientist
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Calsdad says: “I simply don’t remember any substantial periods of time in my entire freaking life when this country hasn’t either been at war – or being prepared for the next one. This is a wholly abnormal state of affairs.” Not so. You might want to read Fletcher Prouty’s The Secret Team, and listen to his interviews in various YouTube videos. Prouty contends that war is the primary stabilizing factor in the political structure of nation states. Leaders tell their people that there are bad guys over the hill who want to invade, kill all the men, take all the… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Calsdad
1 year ago

Cal; Can verify your statements about US WWII mobilization starting in 1939 despite domestic political opposition. I learned this researching the WWII Army Air Corps service of a couple of near relatives of my parents. Both joined the day after Pearl Harbor and stepped into a system that was well organized, though overstretched, went to training bases that were already established, though now undersized, worked on planes that had been already designed and had been put into (previously limited) production, etc. Factories went to three shifts from one, training went to 12/7 from 9/5-1/2, etc. Not easy peasy but nothing… Read more »

Member
1 year ago

Consumerism is not something that can be laid at the feet of Buckleyites. It’s an outgrowth of the 19th Amendment. At least 85% of all spending in America is done by women. Look at a mall. Any useless product is being sold exclusively to women. That’s their nature. Women cannot conceive of paying back a debt. It’s why women hold the majority of credit card debt. It’s why as soon as women became the majority of college students, billing taxpayers to cover college loans became a huge political issue. Nothing can be solved while women vote. Every problem can be… Read more »

tz1
Member
1 year ago

Before, the wealthy often got that way by doing something useful, with Adam Smith’s invisible hand. Now the Financial pillagers of wall street burn down companies to strip them of assets so they can pay themselves. I term it “Bain Capitalism” and point to Mitt Willard Romney. But the root cause is the eliminating of Christianity from the equation, and I don’t know what it could be replaced with, that would cause people to value the same things Christians would – things eternal, or objectively true, beautiful, and good. There is often great difficulty in great works, so why suffer… Read more »

Chad Bigly
Chad Bigly
1 year ago

Some of you have your heads up your asses. Better off if Trump lost?!?! Not doing anything on immigration?!? It took more than one term to get us into this situation, it’s goiing to take more than a few years under Trump to fix it. Especially when Trump has had to fight practically the entire DC establishment to get anything done. Yet some of you can’t stop WHINING like little b!tches that Daddy Trump hasn’t fixed everything yet. You’re pathetic. You’re witnessing arguably the greatest president in over a hundred years and all you idiots can do is complain. Losers.

Johnny55
Johnny55
1 year ago

So true. WFB was a known CIA asset. Also, there is a weird JFK assassination connection with that guy’s brother. The “conservatives” were infiltrated by trotskyites and special people, but I repeat myself. Stalin sure did know a few things, and one of them is that all trotskyites must be eliminated. ASAP.

Johnny55
Johnny55
1 year ago

Truly, I think the best form of government is either a strong monarchy with basic rights and/or the Florence model, where you had a ruler selected for like a 1-2 year term from a select group of men and that was it. Universal suffrage is insanity.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Johnny55
1 year ago

Johnny55 said: ” …I think the best form of government is either a strong monarchy with basic rights and/or the Florence model, where you had a ruler selected for like a 1-2 year term from a select group of men and that was it.” Actually the Lord’s Prayer described the best form of government.

Matthew 6:9-13 “Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name.Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven…” Anything short of that and ya got problems.

Lance E
Member
1 year ago

What we need is a new priesthood, not new CEOs. Woke NYT writers aren’t rich, and aren’t even motivated by money. The billionaires are mostly just playing Havel’s greengrocer.

Blaming the capitalists is Marxist bullshit. The average VP doesn’t know what his “Trust and Safety” team is actually doing and definitely doesn’t know how to fix it. If you replaced the religion, most of the managers and CEOs would immediately begin regurgitating the new shibboleths. They’re doing what the system makes them do.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
1 year ago

We do have a working model from the past.

Back in those terrible libertarian days of my grandparents, before Federal war planners had taken over the country and economy, th