Petty Tyranny

One of the stranger things about the current age is that very few people talk about the Cold War or the events that drove it. For people living from the 1950’s through the 1980’s, it was the central topic of politics. When the Soviet Empire collapsed, it was if everyone decided to forget about the whole thing. If it is mentioned at all it is usually a conservative trying to remind people that socialism does not produce high quality consumer goods or not enough choices in the cereal aisle.

The great ideological battle between socialism and liberalism has been reduced to a battle between market economics versus command economics. The winner was the one that made better home electronics. Yet, right up to the end of the Cold War, the battle was not about economics. Sure, the lack of blue jeans and rock music was a popular way to mock the Soviet system, but even there it was not about the products, but the reason why they existed in the West and not the East.

The West opposed communism not because of GDP numbers or cheap consumer goods, but because communism was not just immoral, but evil. Controlling the granular details of people’s lives was monstrous. Communist countries did not allow their people to voice their opinions or choose how they lived. They could not even choose where they lived, as the government assigned apartments. The image of the “iron curtain” was to compare the Soviet system to a penal colony.

On the other side, the Soviets were fond of pointing out how blacks in America were treated poorly. There was also the urban squalor and poverty. Some Americans might enjoy blue jeans and rock music, but millions lived in squalor. Of course, the existence of super rich living in mansions was immoral on its face, given that so many people were living in poverty. The communist could privately concede that their system was not making equal consumer goods, but it was still morally superior.

It’s strange how the great ideological struggle of the last century is largely forgotten or reduced to a contest over breakfast cereal selections at the market, while the short fight between liberalism and fascism is cast entirely in moral terms. The West won the fight with fascism on material grounds. America could make more planes, guns and tanks than the fascists. There was the normal wartime propaganda about the evilness of the fascist, but it was never an ideological struggle.

The battle with communism, on the other hand, was always a about the basic moral difference between the two systems. There was never any doubt that the communist could match the west militarily. In fact, a frequent theme of American politics in the Cold War was how we had to rededicate ourselves to liberty in order to keep pace with the Soviets in missiles, the space race and technology. Again, the material aspect was just a part of the much larger moral argument against communism.

Higher morality has largely disappeared from modern political discourse. There is the superficial and often nonsensical moralizing about individual dignity and inclusiveness, but that is just crude factionalism. The relationship between the citizen and the state or the relations between different groups of citizens no longer a topic. In the Cold War, this was a central topic, as it highlighted the difference between the systems. Even hack politicians could wax poetic about liberty or freedom.

Notice how the debate about the virus has been reduced to economics. One camp is minimizing the health risk because they want the economy open. The other side is wildly exaggerating the health risk to keep the economy closed, not because they care about public health, but because they hate modern economics. Amusingly, they don’t even understand what it is they hate about global capitalism. It’s often just a crude jealousy of those who enjoy the fruits of modernity.

If anyone cared to notice, this pandemic has proven that there is no hint of republicanism left in modern America. There are no protests against the impositions on our liberty, just protests about restaurants being closed. No politician is giving speeches against the tyranny of these restrictions. Instead it is either about the most primitive sense of safety or about the right to consume product. To speak of personal liberty is as anachronistic as speaking in favor of free silver.

The great conservative polemicist Joe Sobran pointed out decades ago that the colonists revolted against a king, who was a very mild tyrant compared to the American government at the time. The founders would have been horrified to see what their creation became in the 20th century. Something similar can be said about the men who set out to oppose communism. If they could see what has become of the West, they would probably rethink their opposition to communism.

In the decades since the end of the Cold War, the West has lost any sense of a higher morality. There was a time when religion would fill that role. It provided a transcendent purpose to life. In other times, the secular rulers would provide the purpose. Maybe it was modernization or public works projects. In the case of the 20th century, the fight against communism was the higher purpose. Today that is all gone and we’re left to squabble over the crudest of desires like safety and food.

Perhaps the reason for all of this is that liberal democracy was never a rational and complete political philosophy. Rather, like libertarian, it was always an ad hoc reaction to and critique of socialism. It first replaced republicanism in the economic crisis of the early 20th century, then it blossomed in the fight against fascism. Finally, it evolved into a containment vessel in the Cold War. Once that purpose was lost, what was a left was a massive economic and cultural machine with no reason to exist.

As a result, liberal democracy is devolving into petty authoritarianism. The people, stripped of their republican virtue, no longer have the means to resist. The ruling class, armed with a monopoly of force and need to legitimize themselves, is taking on the habits of the deranged tyrant. They push people around not because they want to, but because they need to in order to feel their own existence. What defines them is pushing people around, so they seek out reasons to push people around.


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Walt
Walt
6 months ago

If you are 40 years or under, the Soviet Union and the Cold War mean squat. This is about 35% of the population. It’s no wonder why young people don’t understand that there once were 2 Germanies or why there were. Or that Germany even exists. Excerpts fir the Hitler nonsense…

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Walt
6 months ago

Walt, I would say you are being generous with your 35% number by just limiting it to age. You add in most of the groups from our ridiculously massive immigration wave and the number of our population that it doesn’t “mean squat” goes much higher. Many of the Latin American, Carribean, and African immigrants still view heavy socialism as legitimate alternative. For them, the U.S. supported oligarchies, strongmen, and anti-communist forces were merely “American Imperialism” and they do not contextualize it as a existential fight between Western Ideology and Communism. Add in a healthy dose of SJW race-baiting and that… Read more »

d.deacon
d.deacon
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

most of those immigrants use socialism as a cover for antiwhite action. which is what Lenin wanted, ever since he set up the minorities in the Russian Empire against the czar, he knew to use them as bludgeons to throw down the system and enthrone himself. (((Trostsky))) was even more adamant in this regard, he legit wanted to dissolve all nationhood. that said, neither browns nor whites do well with liberalism either. which is why both are rudderless right now, both are presented with false dichotomies that mislead them: browns-and-friends into asking for increasingly counterproductive gibs, whites-and-friends into asking for… Read more »

UFO
UFO
Reply to  d.deacon
6 months ago

Yeah, it’s weird to see tax-paying yellows and browns shrug off ridiculous gibs programs for blacks and refugees here in Canada. Like they half-heartedly complain that their money is going to that… but at the same time they still see it as whitey’s problem, not theirs. I want to say “are you nuts? Your money is going to them just as much”.

But anti-white is the greatest animus. They do truly hate us and want us dead. They want the comforts of the West without Western people (not possible).

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

Latin America is an odd duck politically. To me, in most of their history, they have faithfully followed the Spanish (and I guess, earlier Roman) economic systems. Even in a “Democracy,” you still basically have a huge peasant class and few, huge landholders. Yes, some industrialization, but the feudal system is still in their bones. English ideals of freedom are late arrivals even in Spain, and seem to be on the way out in USA and even England 🙁

John Smith
John Smith
Member
Reply to  Walt
6 months ago

I dunno if it means squat to the older crowd either.

We force the Germans to live in the shadow of You Know Who to this day and never let them forget it.

But the last black baboon you guys had for a president was bowing to the Japanese and apologizing to them.

This is where I get paranoid: was it because the Japs murdered entire cities of Chinamen and not Jews?

Or is it because the POTUS at the time was a jogger with an IQ barely north of 85….?

Mike_C
Mike_C
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

Well, then I guess we are all Germans.

As to the Japanese, Unit 731 is not spoken of, nor are any of their other massive atrocities, because there cannot be any competition for the greatest victimhood narrative ever told.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Mike_C
6 months ago

The Chinese haven’t forgotten which keeps smarter Japanese up at night.

When not if the US goes tits up, Japan and Taiwan will be scorched from the Earth which is why no doubt both nations along with South Korea are thinking of joining the nuclear club.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  abprosper
6 months ago

Pretty sure all three of those nations have the technical know-how and national will to have prototype nukes in 6 months and operational capability in less than a year.

Heck, I bet they all have archives with the designs, simulations, and specs already. They’ve probably already prototyped half the parts save the physics package.

Diversity Heretic
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

When I worked on Capitol Hill in the 1990s, the Department of Energy estimated that Japan could have a serviceable nuclear weapon in 6 weeks. They have a lot of experience working with plutonium in their breeder reactor program and the explosives technology necessary to achieve a controlled implosion of fissile material is well within commercial blasting technology.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
6 months ago

If you have the enriched uranium, the weapon is trivial. The first weapon dropped was u235 type and we just shot two sub reactive masses together in a tube. Plutonium needs to be held together a bit longer for a good fission, hence implosion is used. That’s a bit more complex, but I would not be surprised if the Japanese already have that figured out and parts sitting on the table. I would if I were a nation as rich and smart as Japan sitting across from China and North Korea.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  abprosper
6 months ago

They should, if they haven’t quietly already.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

Your complaint with Obama was he was too polite. Kay. A pushover. Diplomatically, sure.

Nah, you’ll recall the Japs committing all that genocide generations ago under an imperial banner but forget what a bloody bastard Obama was. Drone strikes and collateral damage and renditions were things casually signed off on before lunch time under his reign.

Antisemites are woefully myopic as it is, but irritatingly banal in regards to recent history.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

Half Jogger, Half AWFL.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  BadThinker
6 months ago

This wins this comment board; Obama the half breed AWFL
Lol

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  BadThinker
6 months ago

Jogger: sadly, word bought at a high price. But we have 4 of the 6 letters back 🙉

Xman
Xman
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

“We force the Germans to live in the shadow of You Know Who to this day and never let them forget it.”

Not “we”… (((they))).

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Walt
6 months ago

I’m just on the wrong side of 40 and I was quite the grade school Cold Warrior back in the day.

That said, I was also quite the outlier back in the day.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

I remember the ‘91 coup and the subsequent collapse of the USSR. That, 9/11, and now this coronavirus nonsense are probably the 3 most world-shaking events of my life. The coup removed the last check on American global hegemony, which turned out to be a terrible thing. I think Putin said as much, once. There was no longer a reason for Americans to cling to ‘superstitions’ like Christian morality, because we were now masters of the universe, free to pursue reckless fantasies without consequences. I’m glad I was just a kid then, or I would’ve been pretty bummed out suspecting… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

Also, for the numerology folks, what’s up with all the 1s and 9s? August 19 1991, 9/11, covid 19.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

Pretty sure 9/11 was chosen as the op date for the specific purpose of creating a psychological tie with the US’ 911 emergency number.

Who chose the op date is the really interesting question.

H I
H I
6 months ago

One small whitepill is the decision in Wisconsin striking down the SIP order. But yeah, our side should embrace freedom as our rallying cry. Freedom requires a moral population, and it’s something very different from libertarianism or libertinism.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  H I
6 months ago

Interesting to note that of the seven on their Supreme Court bench, five are female. What’s wrong with that state?

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

This whole state of affairs is due in very large part to women and their urge to cocoon, which is wonderful when put to good use for a husband and children, but is otherwise a societal death sentence.. I’m not traditionally religious, but there were valuable lessons to be learned from the goings-on in the Garden of Eden. Women are getting us cast out of the paradise we once knew. Apparently, Adam never learns. Women now think they are in charge because they are getting their neurotic way, but they are only being programmed and used by globalist men. Their… Read more »

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Exactly, we can see the outlines of our current crisis in both the Bible and the runaway progressive eglatarian interpretation of religion which has become a perverted religion itself called modern progressivism. Eve should be loved and become our partner not our leader. She does not have the inner build for proper leadership. On top of that if you are a Christian it does not take much reading of the New Testament to see that a certain tribe constantly stirred up shit following the apostles around in the New Testament written accounts. Combine the woman out of her proper Biblical… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
6 months ago

Not currently a believer, but I wonder if the Whore of Babylon (what does she symbolize?) won’t have a real-world parallel in the future? Maybe it’s happened, but Islam isn’t known for female leaders…

Member
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

Even noticing that is a hate crime! (And that’s what’s wrong with that state.)

Tax Slave
Tax Slave
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

Welcome to the Matriarchy.

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  H I
6 months ago

What should be sought is not “freedom” but “liberty”. Is not “protests about restaurants being closed” or protests about “the right to consume product” evidence of a fundamental desire for liberty? A couple of weeks ago my wife had a birthday. I would have liked to have had the liberty to take her out to a nice dinner to celebrate. My hair is much longer than I prefer to wear it. I would like to have the liberty to get my hair cut without having to wear a mask. The founders’ goal was not freedom but liberty.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

What should be sought is not “freedom” but “liberty”
No what should be sought is Power so that we can implement our liberty…

Member
Reply to  Lineman
6 months ago

A week or so ago there was a post saying that we in the DR needed something akin to Tom Paine’s Common Sense, a pithy statement of what we believe that ordinary people will understand and can be the rally point of a movement. A major part of such a pamphlet would need to be a reassertion of the American Founder’s concept of liberty and an explanation of the fact that liberty does not exist so we can have 90 inch TVs but that the TVs are a product of free minds thinking of things to offer to free people.… Read more »

Tax Slave
Tax Slave
Reply to  pozymandias
6 months ago

Well said. The largest obstacle I see today is that we no longer have amongst us men who can stir men’s hearts with bold words AND a willingness to take bold action. It’s usually one or the other but never both skills in one individual.

3g4m
3g4m
Reply to  pozymandias
6 months ago

Pozymandias – Now rewrite that in current 3rd grade language and add lots of colorful pictures, and perhaps 10% will be able to comprehend what you’re getting at. Good luck.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  3g4m
6 months ago

Yes !!!!!! Do exactly that — books, novels, or comic books if necessary, and video presentations. Entertainment, with a message. Just like the “LEFT” did to us.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  pozymandias
6 months ago

Pozymandias, being that politics reflects lifestyle/economics, and being that there’s a growing movement to flee the cities (and even suburbs now) for exurbs and rural areas, maybe (accurately btw) tying the bad stuff to urban life would drive the point home in a normie-friendly way. It might even convince the refugees to go native and stop the spread. One can hope anyway 🙂

tashtego
Member
Reply to  pozymandias
6 months ago

This is the best articulation of the fundamentals of what a new, better constitution for our people should look like that I’ve ever seen. I nominate you pozymandias to write Common Sense for the 21st Century. I’d be proud to help in any way I could.

Member
Reply to  tashtego
6 months ago

I’m glad to see this was well received. I’ve thought of taking my own advice and writing the thing myself of course. This is basically the outline. The actual thing might be maybe 15 or 20 pages. That might be pushing the limits of modern attention spans but we’re not targeting the serious smartphone addicts or the stupid. After I wrote this I recalled that Paine’s essay itself was in four parts too. So I think I have the basic structure mostly correct. It’s not 5 thick volumes nor is it a couple paragraphs.

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  pozymandias
6 months ago

pozymandias, I greatly/sadly fear that even 5 pages would be too long for contemporary audiences. Too often I have seen cogent, tightly written posts of over 2 paragraphs labeled TLDR.

H I
H I
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

Freedom and liberty are in the end both fine, just let the autists argue over the distinction. Semantic nitpicking is bad optics and focus. And “They may take our lives, but they may never take our liberty” doesn’t have the same ring to it. So yes, you’re technically correct but rhetorically focused on something peripheral. Freedom and liberty will work together just fine against the other side.

james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
Member
Reply to  H I
6 months ago

The distinction between freedom and liberty is crucial, not fine.
Liberty requires responsibility. With every civil right there comes a corresponding civil obligation. On the other hand a successful criminal has perfect freedom. He rises when he wishes and takes what he wants. Will Durant- “In my youth I stressed freedom, and in my old age I stress order. I have made the great discovery that liberty is a product of order.”

WhereAreTheVikings
Member

Edmund Burke would agree.

Bill_Mullins
Member

Thank you.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

Freedom and liberty are not the same things, but today they have been conflated until the average person thinks they are the same. Look back at the Founders’ writings and discussions and you’ll see they were used distinctly. If at that same time they were defined the same, they’d not have used two different words—the Founders being well educated in language arts.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

Most people don’t really even understand liberty. Instead, therefore, our rallying cry should be opposition to tyranny. Even the most obtuse blockheads have some inkling of what tyranny is all about and they understand it is not a good thing.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

The problem is that the Boomers of the 1960s have redefined “liberty” to mean “anal, abortion, miscegenation and weed, guaranteed by the State.”

thisisme
thisisme
Reply to  H I
6 months ago

“We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion… Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other.”
John Adams
Agreed.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  thisisme
6 months ago

So how do we get a religious and moral population? I mean we can hope and pray for another bout of revivalism , wait for the religious to outbreed the secular (take a century and change) assuming we don’t get an immigration flood in the meantime or what? Secularism as religions needs to go but once religions lose standing usually if not destroyed they shrink though rarely die entirely. Hellenic Pagans still sacrifice to gods of the Dodeca even now but there aren’t many nor are many Lithuanian Pagans still out there. Christianity is there in Europe and no Islam… Read more »

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  abprosper
6 months ago

So how do we get a religious and moral population?

Sadly, I fear that ship has long since sailed – AND SUNK! I am convinced that the Republic to which I gave a decade of my life and for which my son sacrificed his health is well and truly FUBAR The only remedy now is metaphorically wiping the hard drive and reloading the operating system from scratch. At a minimum we need to revert to a pre-Marbury V Madison state of jurisprudence and delete any/all amendments ratified since then.

thisisme
thisisme
Reply to  abprosper
6 months ago

I think you missed the point. I was just stating the obvious, as a reason not a solution, with a long standing quote. My way of saying I told you so. It’s ok to mock me as well, I get it. What was your solution again?

Alzaebo
Reply to  thisisme
6 months ago

The difficulty is that we are being smothered by the modern ‘morality and religion’.

That surfeit is pretty much the point of all of the Zman’s writings.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

The US is arguably the most Christian developed nation out there and even with our leaders loathing it to some degree, knowledge of and practice of is common place.

And its not an immigrant issue either, most of our immigrants are from Latin America and are nominally Christian.

For all that, it simply doesn’t take as a social order.

The real option is for Christians to nut up, be strong enough to fight temptation and to take power and use it to make a state where the social assumptions are actually Bible Based.

Got Deus Vult?

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  abprosper
6 months ago

Are Americans truly Christian in the hard, doctrinal sense? Or are they superficial Christians who see Christianity as a form of nice-guy liberalism with pretty music and the opportunity to flaunt their wealth in front of fellow parishioners? I would argue that there is a major quantitative difference between Christians in 2020 and Christians in 1980, and the difference hardly constitutes improvement.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
6 months ago

That Christianity is both part of the problem and part of the solution is obvious. The church was once more doctrinal oriented and I remember that time. Now it’s more soft and a rock concert type feeling.
This contributes to a shallow public expression of the Christian faith. If doctrines are not worth fighting for what do we fight for?
A better experience?
Christianity is no longer about doctrines it’s about like everything else in modernism, it’s about emotions and feelings.
And we will pay a price for this degradation.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
6 months ago

Very possibly. If true religious adherence is no longer a thing than it behooves dissidents to find another way.

Any solution that requires a component like high compliance to Christianity than can no longer be acquired or created needs to be dispensed with.

Find another solution or do without.

Otto vonB
Otto vonB
Reply to  abprosper
6 months ago

High compliance to Christianity is not a necessary prerequisite, but Christianity is one path to a moral self-discipline that made the West great. There is great wisdom and temperance that can be learned from the New Testament. (The Old Testament doesn’t have much use to me besides highlighting jooish folly and immorality). We need to not only be moral men in our own hearts, but have the strength to lead others by example starting with our family, then our friends, then our communities. We need to reject the “freedom” of hedonism. We don’t have to take it to the opposite… Read more »

james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
6 months ago

The English were luke warm Christians for centuries. They tended to emmigrate their radicals. Then the Frankfort School caught up to them.

eusebius
eusebius

You read all that on Wikipedia?

Try reading some history books, maybe focus on European observations of England as a Catholic country. The Spanish had a lot of observations.Then read about the rise of Protestantism, the Civil war and the subsequent struggles between the Catholic establishment and Protestant people.Maybe also consider the Victorians and their muscular Christianity.

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
6 months ago

I agree, but the bad music people have taken over the Christian Churches. So we don’t even have pretty music.

3g4m
3g4m
Reply to  abprosper
6 months ago

Sigh. Race>Culture>Religion. Race>Culture>Religion. Race>Culture>Religion.

David_Wright
Member
6 months ago

Hey, it was nice while it lasted. Now we enter those hard times that make strong men. What comes out of that I probably won’t see, but I do pray for my progeny.

Where does the losing of Christian faith fit into all of this. I get that the formal religious sects have also failed us. I get that being fat and still having some economic security hampers the fight in us. The good whites have to dig deep and find again some of our lost virtues and start to kick ass.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

There is not enough appreciation on our side of the divide for our Christian heritage which was so recklessly abandoned in the last 50 years. Part of that is the affect liberal democracy has had on us as a people and our institutions.
For all of the well deserved grief the Boomers get, they could not have so radically changed society if it wasn’t already rotten to the core when they showed up. Many of the churches were already well converged by the 1960s. Vatican II’s roots go back to at least the 20s.

Juri
Juri
Reply to  tarstarkas
6 months ago

I agree. Many people bashing 1968 in the West or !917 in the East but those people can`t understand that those years were consequences, not causes. Healthy society would have fought off both events. Communism in whatever form is like corona. It can destroy only old sick organisms.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Juri
6 months ago

Listen, if you really want to you can trace our woes all the way back to Edenic times, but that gets us nowhere. The fact of the matter is that what is plaguing and destroying us, New Leftism, began its destructive course in the 60s. The intellectual roots of New Leftism lie with the Frankfurt School.

james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
6 months ago

Melville moves your dates up. He described Christianity as an American asset already weakened by the third generation of this country. WILL MORRISEY, Ahab’s Democratic Despotism, City Journal 2020 Melville places Ishmael’s self-portrait as a passive demi-citizen near the beginning of Moby-Dick. He reveals Starbuck’s weakness near the end, shortly before the shipwreck that will kill all but self-caring Ishmael. Ishmael exemplifies what Tocqueville considered the individualism of democrats. Under conditions of social equality, individualism is anything but rugged. Pressured no longer from above, or “vertically,” by kings and aristocrats, democratic man succumbs to “horizontal” pressures from the opinions of… Read more »

John Smith
John Smith
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Hmmmmmm. Dunno if I would measure spirituality by church attendance. A lot of Christians are going underground as their churches fall. Carefully not noticed by the mass media is that as the queers and wahmen take over, people start leaving. The church is not the faith.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

Exactly John. I’ve seen here in my town any number of “home” churches. Literally a congregation so small it meets and worships together in a member’s home. We are heading back to a time of ancient Christianity in Rome, where congregations met in catacombs. The faith can not be destroyed.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

“Wherever two or more are gathered in my name, there I am”

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

John,

As I’ve noted before, a few years of traveling through the Ozarks and I’ve watched the “Baptist” name dropped from most of the monikers on the multitude of small churches. Much more creative names now and the small churches still seem well maintained. Not too many megachurches. It is a hopeful sign you are correct, Sir.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

The historians call this “Particularism”. Without it, there would be no modern democracy as we know it. Is that a good thing? I have my doubts.

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

… or at least the building, or denomination, or hierarchy is not the church.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
6 months ago

Up here in Canada our faggot PM still has the churches closed down because he hates us with the heat of a thousand suns. We won’t put up with his queers, his militant atheism or his current year politics or views on abortion, etc.

So everyone is on Zoom now. The faith has a growing presence on line and it will be most interesting to see where that goes….

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Glenfilthie
6 months ago

I think that’s great, but on the other hand, I can see Zoom being used for meetings of governmental bodies to discourage citizen participation.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Glenfilthie
6 months ago

The internet isn’t bad but fellowship is personal. As in in person. That can’t be lost.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

The same can be said for teaching.

ExNativeSon
ExNativeSon
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

As a PK with a number of uncles as preachers and missionaries I certainly attest to the church of any denomination as not being the faith. Without coming out for or against Christianity as a religion it is certainly along with our European genetics and the scientific method the 3 pillars of our heritage. And all 3 pillars are under siege. While the Chuch of England is probably the biggest joke of all in the current age I have spent hours in churches in England that had the bones of centuries-old warriors and leaders buried directly under the floor of… Read more »

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  ExNativeSon
6 months ago

I’ve visited both Westminster Abbey, and St Paul’s – I know the feeling. Still get a cold chill thinking about it.

ExNativeSon
ExNativeSon
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
6 months ago

For those interested check out Malsbury Abbey https://malmesburyabbey.com/?page_id=488. I spent hours in the Abby, the village, the streams, the pub, etc. talking to whomever would talk to me. America is not like this and American churches are not like this. The sheer magic is breathtaking in the English churches that have not been torn down, turned into restaurants, or mosques. Literally walking on your people, your ancestors, from hundreds and even thousands of years ago. Walking around the graveyards nearby which held my people completely shut me up. For me, the history, architecture, gravestones, and literally the ground itself took… Read more »

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  ExNativeSon
6 months ago

Thanks Brother…There is something about those places that get down deep in your being…

estuarine
estuarine
Reply to  ExNativeSon
6 months ago

Isn’t the Anglican church less progressive than the Episcopal church? You familiar with Swedish church-going?

The UK is less strategically broken than the US.

The C of E represents elite opinion and is culturally unreliable as a guide for England or the villages contained within.

ExNativeSon
ExNativeSon
Reply to  estuarine
6 months ago

est, I am not familiar with the Swedish church and I certainly agree that the C of E is not the villages and that the leaders of the C of E do not represent large numbers of the people who attend their religious ceremonies. I got that by walking around the villages and talking to people. However they are still the face.

I hope you are right about England. Each year I went it seemed more broken but that experience primarily occurred in the urban areas.

Otto vonB
Otto vonB
Reply to  estuarine
6 months ago

There is a breakaway sect of the Anglican Church here in America that is very traditional and conservative. Their aim is pushing back to the basics of scripture. It’s a very strange situation as the Episcopal church and Anglicans in England have gone off the rails to the left . They had to go to Africa of all places to get a Bishopric started here in Texas – this can be done because the Anglican/Episcopal church is decentralized unlike the Catholic Church I was raised in. It’s definitely not perfect , especially with the African connection – how bizarre that… Read more »

MostlyCivil(mostly)
MostlyCivil(mostly)
Reply to  ExNativeSon
6 months ago

I was raised Episcopal, the US version of the CofE mother. My former church now sports a permanent rainbow flag in front and a sign “*all* are welcome.” 100% of the dozen congregants are queer, including the priest and deacon who cohabit with one another in a two mommies living situation, although some hungry vibrants will stop by after service for the free food. The priest resembles Rachel Maddow, and other, perhaps more traditional, churches are clearly subsidizing the operation. I converted to an orthodox church. The head priest is a burly guy married to a beautiful wife who still… Read more »

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  MostlyCivil(mostly)
6 months ago

ExNative, and MostlyCivil,

“…churches in England that had the bones of centuries-old warriors and leaders buried directly under the floor…” Good reminder and your imagery makes me want to weep for what was lost. Weep and then crusade.

MostlyCivil, the same applies for your imagery as well. Powerful and hopeful.

Thank you gentlemen. Outrage and hope should be our daily diet. Thank you, truly.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

Amen my Brothers…

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Thought better of it

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
6 months ago

The Cold War was really two wars.

The West won the Real Estate and Structural War (control by corporate conglomerates and their subservient parliaments). And (((Inner))) Bolshevism won the moral landscape of Blank Slate Leveling with an all knowing self-righteous elite ruling from on high. It is the end of history because all the right people agree. Since they have no moral disagreements none exist. Any vestige of any old order is “Whitism” and it is the last anachronism and thus the final evil. Once gelded the Garden of Eden will once again bloom.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Yves Vannes
6 months ago

Excellent analysis and exactly what happened.

usNthem
usNthem
6 months ago

This country has totally devolved into a steaming pile of dog squat which this Kung fru and the feminine hysterical overreaction to it has laid bare. It’s been known basically forever that the vast majority of politicians are worthless, but man oh man it has never been clearer than now. One really has to wonder if there’s truly any hope for this place at all.

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  usNthem
6 months ago

One really has to wonder if there’s truly any hope for this place at all. IM(NS)HO the republic is well and truly FUBAR. I’m glad I’m old so I don’t have to watch it fall and try to live through the interregnum. Perhaps my generation is responsible for the situation, perhaps not. In any case we were smart/canny enough to hold things together until we got old enough not to live through the fall of western civilization. Hate me and my generation all you wish, younger folks. Hatred is a highly corrosive emotion which only harms the hater; not the… Read more »

John Smith
John Smith
Member
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

Well I gave you an upvote, Bill. You’re right, as far as it goes.

But I stand smack dab between the boomers and Gen X (got there by a couple months)… and I hate you both! 🙂

I hate the millennials most of all! LOL!

Errrrr… how do ya give yourself an up vote? I am sure to be hated back by everyone now too! Oh well, can’t blame them for having good taste…

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

I’m a late Boomer, and I’m giving you an upvote. Just be sure to give the Greatest Generation its due. It was in charge in the ’50s and ’60s, when the military-industrial complex was allowed to take over (thanks, Ike, for implementing it to the hilt and only then warning us), constitutional freedoms were ceded, and the welfare state fertilized. And yes, you can take that last literally, thanks for asking.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Yes … I grew up admiring the WWII generation. Still have some friends who represent (and lived) all the best we imagined of them. But there was something about those from that cohort who lived through the war, watched the reality of complete govt control of society, and then realized how it offered some really good opportunities for getting the things they wanted — whether personal or ideological. I see WWII as a “slingshot” event in our culture: it allowed rapid acceleration of the events being pushed in the culture. And yes, the idea that they were the “greatest generation”… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

Me, too, PP. I am a later Boomer. I never identified with most of my peers, and I damn sure don’t want to be grouped in with the older ones. As for the Greatest Generation, either exhaustion or entitlement, or a combination of both, was the result of going through the Depression and World War II, and their good times in the corporate world were not going to be held up by such things as liberty. Their mindset was government got us through the Depression (so not, but that’s for another post) and World War II, so as far as… Read more »

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

I’ e thought the same. They just came home tired, many of them, and thought they’d done their bit, now bring on the GI Bill and ‘57 Chevy. But I have known some notable exceptions. One was on a liberty ship sunk in arctic waters above Norway. Too young to actually enlist in the Navy in early ‘42, but Merchant Marine took him. Sailed the world during the war, from New Guinea to Murmansk to Iran. Then joined USMC with start of Korean conflict and did 2+ turns there, ten yrs total as a Marine. To this day he personally… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

Yes, it was not all of them. My father-in-law, a pilot, was a Goldwater supporter. But it was many of them. Enough to allow all the chaos to be ushered in.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  usNthem
6 months ago

usN,

There isn’t hope for this place as a whole but within that framework hope abounds for us. We just have to awaken, grow resilience, and not lie down to die. Steadfast.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Penitent Man
6 months ago

Hope lies in secessionary states. We rally together and we hack lands of our own from the rancid hide of the USSA.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
6 months ago

The average person — working or middle class, well-intended, smart or clever (but not one who thinks too far beyond what’s directly in front of himself), the good citizen along with the indifferent, the “sturdy yeoman” type — these don’t seem able or interested in conceptualizing those things that lead to the cultural mythos and ethic needed to sustain things like republicanism — perhaps they never did, nor were supposed to. That was an activity that was left to the cognitive and creative classes from among our folk. But those classes have long since stampeded over the line to full… Read more »

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

I can remember when we at least had the illusion that this was not so.

{sigh} Was it ever more than an illusion, PrimiPilus? I’m not so sure any more.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

In our lifetimes, alas, there was probably a large element of illusion.

CPK
CPK
Member
6 months ago

Disagree that “There are no protests against the impositions on our liberty, just protests about restaurants being closed.” I’ve been involved in some, including the one in Annapolis, and the imposition on liberty was a dominant theme. There’s certainly an economic dimension to that — the liberty to one’s livelihood and freely engage in commerce with others is not unimportant. The economic consequences are also a way to drive the point home to people who don’t care about liberty qua liberty. But the objections haven’t just been frustrated consumerism. Certainly, the other side prefers to characterize the objections that way… Read more »

Trojan House
Trojan House
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

And, unfortunately, we would accept those state governors with open arms. There have been some protests up here as well to “open up the economy” but they have been really small and don’t get much media attention. Maybe it takes a tyrannical government for people to understand what it actually means, and even still, I think Canadians would accept it! I’ve had many a discussion with a colleague about our freedoms being eroded and her main argument is “I have nothing to hide” so it doesn’t matter to me.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I think it’s there still, this sense of and desire for what formerly animated us. Perhaps not as widely disseminated throughout the people, but there still in good measure. Yes, they do own the urban area populace, and they have and are the “elite” classes. But out here there is still something struggling to stay alive. It seems to me that a major part of the ruler’s project is erecting the illusion that that old American independence and cantankerousness is finally, at last and thankfully gone. I believe this is and must be one of the major objectives of their… Read more »

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

To flesh this out a bit — yesterday I made pilgrimage into the depths of the Dallas megalopolis. Made a side trip to the new Scheels there (billed as the nations largest sporting goods store). The place is huge, located in a huge shopping complex, and surrounded by a similarly Texas-sized parking area. Hundreds of vehicles in parking; row upon row of giant pickup trucks; families and groups of men streaming in and out; place packed inside; few wearing masks. Hunting and firearms areas full of people buying, looking and socializing. They have a line to control the number of… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

What a magnificent post. Thank you.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

Northeastern Yankees used to be the epitome of cantankerousness. Remember New Hampshire’s license plate, “Live Free Or Die”? All that is now a distant memory.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Yep. My father was a NH native. Left in ’39 to join the Navy. All family roots that side are there. Town halls; selectmen; group meetings on how to fix the roads; suspicion of “outsid’as”. They were a hard, independent lot. I remember in ’71 when there was a big stink because some nut put white tape over the “Live Free or Die” motto on his license plate. I imagine all that’s pretty much gone, now.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

God, we’ve lost so much …..

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  PrimiPilus
6 months ago

Shelter in Place or Die – and logo depicting a face covered by a mask. Think it might catch on?

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
6 months ago

I think you could make a mint, and use it to fund candidates who represent our point of view.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

The longer this damn lockdown lasts, the greater the possibility that may happen. Not due to virtue of course, but an attempt to escape the hangman’s noose.

T. Morris
T. Morris
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

If there was any republican virtue left in America, these state governors would all be hiding in Canada right now.

If there were any republican virtue left in Ameria, there wouldn’t be a single woman among the state governors, and half the rest would be hanging from a tree.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  T. Morris
6 months ago

Well that is the 600 lb. gorilla in the room. We have a huge problem with our women; and at least half of them aren’t qualified to vote, never mind holding positions of authority…

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Glenfilthie
6 months ago

I can see allowing married women 21 and up with property and children the vote and by inclusion widows the same. These are women who have opted in.

Otherwise, a Dissident Republic will need to limit the franchise to worthwhile voters.

Andy Texan
Reply to  Glenfilthie
6 months ago

I think the evidence is in, Western Civ peaked just before female suffrage (1913 here in the US). Female psyche is geared to security and a security State is what they are building. Looks like a prison camp from here.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Glenfilthie
6 months ago

My wife always asks me who/what to vote for, on the rare occasion she doesn’t just have me fill out her absentee ballot instead.

It they’ve a strong man in their life, women could care less about politics.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I’ve been involved with NormieCon protest groups and what I’ve seen is actually quite encouraging.

People know damn well their constitutional rights are being stripped from them. They may not be ready to embrace the JQ just yet, but these protests are about a hell of a lot more than the right to drive a rascal scooter into Fudrucker’s.

Otto vonB
Otto vonB
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I agree, Z. There is far too much inaction, but some of us are getting busy sharpening our blades.

Bill_Mullins
Member
6 months ago

What defines [the ruling class] is pushing people around, so they seek out reasons to push people around.

DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! DING! PAY the man!

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

Forget about Orwell’s quip about a jack boot on the face of man forever. Think about a government of “Karen’s”! Now that’s scary. 😉

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Karens being manipulated, and only allowed to flourish in the public square, by the jackboots.

Hugo Silva
Hugo Silva
6 months ago

The debate has been reduced to economic questions because it’s the only thing that matters. The West opposed Communism because the Western ruling class stood to lose from the triumph of Communism, the babble about Higher morality was just propaganda to motivate their proles. Since it was clearly shown that the Communist system could not fulfill the material expectations of its subjects it collapsed and since then there hasn’t been need to bullshit people with talk about morality unless when the government want people to sacrifice themselves to achieve government goals. The americans rebelled against a mild tyrant because that… Read more »

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
Reply to  Hugo Silva
6 months ago

“the talk about personal Liberty was just propaganda to justify their uprising and motivate the public”

Pretty strong propaganda campaign since they wrote hundreds of documents about it before the Declaration & Constitution and its basic ethos is enshrined in nearly everything since. (up until recently). So even if you are correct (you aren’t), the effect was that the economic imperative became the moral imperative anyways.

And BTW, nice cuck on the ‘muh public health’ >> ALL. You are 100% part of the problem Karen.

Hugo Silva
Hugo Silva
Reply to  Apex Predator
6 months ago

Yes the economic imperative became the moral imperative, morals are the justifications you come up to pursue your interests, even if you believe them. After the Second World War world domination became a plausible goal for the American ruling class but that required them to sacrifice the Old America which had become to small for them and become cosmopolitans, so they discarded the old principles and got some new ones. And there is no right to endanger the public health as anyone of the Founding Fathers would haver told you, you and the muh rights crowd are just spoiled individuals… Read more »

Juri
Juri
6 months ago

Sorry for insult but you never won the Cold War. You won the Cold Battle. Cold War is still out there and now it seems that Russians are winning…:D Stalin and KGB evil plan to destroy US via mass immigration, deindustrialization and other cultmarx weapons works fine. McCarthy was last line of defense. The guy understood what the problems are and fought back but lost. Anybody believes that US is capable to do what Russia did in 1991, gave up their territories, threw hostile ethnic groups over the board and reformed itself 100 million strong ethnostate. Is it possible in… Read more »

AntiDem
AntiDem
Reply to  Juri
6 months ago

The Cold War was really a fight over which subspecies of Enlightenment Liberalism would be dominant in the battle for its evolutionary niche, like the battle between our ancestors and Neanderthals to see which would be the strain of early human that carried on the species. In every such battle, one wins and the other goes extinct. In 1991, the Marxist strain of Enlightenment Liberalism went extinct (de jure in the former Soviet Empire, though it has continued in name only in parts of Asia and in Cuba), and the strain of Gramscian/Frankfurt School Enlightenment Liberalism that had infected American… Read more »

james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
Member
Reply to  AntiDem
6 months ago

FDR never at any point considered Stalin to be anything but a friend to his beliefs, merely opposite sides of the same coin. FDR was Huxley’s Brave New World version rather than Stalin’s Orwellian one. The one is far more clever than the other.

PrimiPilus
PrimiPilus
Reply to  Juri
6 months ago

YES to the McCarthy observation …. HUAC was onto something real. Hollywood and the bureaucracy were fully infiltrated. As much as the hosts on Turner Classic Movies may struggle daily to obscure the reality of this and paint anyone pointing this out as beyond the pale, much of their content (Film) was intended to push forward their ideology. Our leaders failed to stop it them.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Juri
6 months ago

Juri, obviously the answer to your rhetorical question is “no”. Can’t see getting a 100M strong ethno State at this time. In Russia it was possible, because communism as they practice it, never dissembled the people’s belief in themselves and their unity as a people. Yes, communism was a heavy boot, but the people and their unity (for communistic goals and motherland of course) was always front and center and promoted.

3g4m
3g4m
Reply to  Juri
6 months ago

Juri – not to minimize the evil of Stalin or the secret police, but the same people behind the takeover of Russia are behind the collapse of America. Yes, the special people. The ignorant and naive attitude of “They’re just like us” still lies at the heart of it all. That obtuseness about human nature – in contrast to what used to be common knowledge and common sense – is so utterly resistant to reality and so massively reinforced by mass media, technology, armed government enforcers, and most insidiously by Karens that I often despair.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Juri
6 months ago

John Brennan formerly of the CIA is Communist through and through. He got caught spying on the US Senate, for crying out loud….and ZERO consequences.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
6 months ago

The whole cereal thing is a pretty good example of how the system creates the illusion of choice. Capitalists found a way, in cereal, to package what are essentially the same thing in 50 different ways. Kind of like the press with endless websites, papers and magazines all owned by the same people pushing the same nonsense. Or the political parties and politicians who all believe in liberal democracy and the same basic things again, giving us the illusion of choice.

Mark Stoval
Mark Stoval
6 months ago

“Perhaps the reason for all of this is that liberal democracy was never a rational and complete political philosophy. Rather, like libertarian, it was always an ad hoc reaction to and critique of socialism.” I think Rothbard did present a fully coherent and complete political philosophy. Perhaps you should read him. The classic “The Ethics of Liberty” stands as one of the “most rigorous and philosophically sophisticated expositions of the libertarian political position.” I also think that the founders (called liberals in those days) presented a coherent philosophy even if not totally complete. However, the problem is that a society… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  Mark Stoval
6 months ago

“We are without moral foundation.”

Strongly disagree.
The Karens and the Cucks, the Scheels and Pro Bass Shops, the libertarians and churchists prove that inner morality is the highest imperative of white nations, of the Spirit that lives in the white race.

We are moral by instinct.
Even Meth Lab Nation has no drive-bys.

It is the expression of that spirit of a People that has been sundered, we indeed have nothing to latch onto. We search, but it has been taken from us, hidden from our view.

Oliver
Oliver
6 months ago

Another on point post- one thing from 1950s to 1980s is, America was super majority white. People understood what liberty and the Constitution meant. I have yet to hear any conservative or alt-right talking head point out the loss of liberty except the Z man. I have yet to hear any radio/TV talking head bring up the monstrosity of two men arrested for self defense in Georgia. All we are waiting for is the return of the mulatto QB to throw for 300 yards and NASCAR. My response when people start to argue with me about not wearing a mask… Read more »

Whitney
Member
6 months ago

I watched Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy a while back and at the end of the movie the good spy asked the traitor spy why he did it and the traitor spy says something like “it’s all just so ugly here now, there’s nothing worth saving anymore.”

james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
Member
Reply to  Whitney
6 months ago

Carre’s early books were astounding in their precision. How could he have understood, and explained, so clearly the truths about English traitors, an understanding which otherwise repelled the normie mind? His father was one.
It seems we are in similar or greater difficulties making normies understand our ruling class. The normal mind does not easily understand the abnormal mind.

Alzaebo
Reply to  Whitney
6 months ago

Exactly so. My Trump-hating liberal friends, as frustrated by the dysfunction and corruption as the ‘Under God’ crowd, want it all to burn-

metaphorically, that is, as long as the lights stay on, Disney Channel is available, and there’s meat on the shelves.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

Can you blame them? I’ve gone hungry and its not pleasant.

In the end to fix a mess like this you have to want something enough to pay a very high price for it and there are a lot of people who have or had most of what they need.

If your side can develop a taste for power and vengeance with a side order of a new social model, maybe you can have it.

Know what is best in life

To crush your enemies
See them driven before you
And to hear the lamentation
Of their women.

AntiDem
AntiDem
6 months ago

I couldn’t possibly see it more differently. The modern American left are nothing if not dedicated moralizers, applying the same endless hectoring and showy pearl-clutching that their Protestant ancestors did to new causes, like the sacred rights of men to pretend to be female, of Guatemalans to break into our country and collect welfare checks, and of women to never get hit on by betas who make under $50k a year. As for the right protesting over Fuddruckers or Applebees, that’s the Colbert spin on it, and we shouldn’t take that seriously at all. Between the anti-lockdown protests and the… Read more »

AntiDem
AntiDem
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

The left doesn’t lack a moral system, they lack principles. There’s a very important difference. And saying that the anti-lockdown protests are about reopening Applebees is like saying that the American Revolution was about being able to buy tea for cheap. No it wasn’t.

This is why blackpilling is poison. It always leads to acceptance of the left’s premises. At that point, us losing becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. If we believe that we’re losers, then that’s what we will always be.

Alzaebo
Reply to  AntiDem
6 months ago

“applying the same endless hectoring and showy pearl-clutching that their Protestant ancestors did to new causes”

Boy, if that isn’t the American right as well.
The incessant ‘war on the dangerous dangers of dangerous Marijuana!!’ was nought but pure virtue signaling to the masters.

“Pick me, pick me!” they cry. “I’ll show ’em who’s tough!”

It turns out we did have something to latch onto, after all. Always the wrong enemies.

Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

Weed massively exaggerates paranoia in people. Just look to Trayvon Martin for an example. My friend’s son is an walking testament to the very real dangers of marijuana use.

Most people don’t want their children turning into weed induced paranoids.

OldStock
OldStock
6 months ago

Old stock white Americans are a people beaten down. With the Soviet Union imploded and the entire world ripe for the financial taking, the sociopaths and narcissists every society produces went on a wild rampage “all or nothing.” Legacy Americans were to be erased under the hive mind of the ruthless and the pretext of public safety. First, we needed to destroy Saddam because he threatened access to oil. Next, we needed to bring justice to those who attacked us on 9-11. Then, it was the Soviet Union again in the form of Russia daring to challenge our global edicts… Read more »

Drake
Drake
6 months ago

“There was never any doubt that the communist could match the west militarily.”

There was a lot of doubt about it in the 80s when we decided to invest a bit more of GDP into the military. One of the causes of the Soviet collapse was their attempts to keep up. I got to participate in a war against one of their biggest military customers and it was a slaughter.

ChrisZ
ChrisZ
6 months ago

This very week I watched the 1965 film “The Spy Who Came In From the Cold,” starring Richard Burton: one of the signature cultural works of the Cold War. It was wonderfully nostaligic for me to see Checkpoint Charlie; the “benevolent charity” that’s really a Commie recruitment front; the naive CP girl who believes in free love. I appreciated the sight of a London and Europe that were still spiritually and visually connected to pre-20th century times; where the few “alien” inhabitants were only recognizable by their Jewish surnames, and not by their varieties of complexion or dress. But it… Read more »

joey junger
joey junger
6 months ago

Jared Taylor takes a lot of stick every time he brings up the Eastern Bloc, but that doesn’t stop him from pointing out that former socialist/communist countries have much stronger nationalist and religious sentiments now than the supposedly free countries. Maybe he goes too far in insinuating that something about those systems defended the people from the decadence that our freedom engendered (or maybe not). The thing to do if you’re curious about how it was to live under those systems is to ask the people who lived there, country by country; don’t ask some little weasels hired by think… Read more »

Hugo Silva
Hugo Silva
Reply to  joey junger
6 months ago

The Stalinists gave up on the Eastern Bloc but the post-Trotskists took over the West, so now the New Cold War is going to be post-Trotskists vs post-Stalinists, políticians like Trump are just controlled opposition tasked with coopt recalcitrant conservatives and lead them to a political dead end.

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  Hugo Silva
6 months ago

I do not believe that either Stalin or Trotsky would have ever fallen in the madness that has descended on this country, a few examples: “life-affirming” abortions until 9 months of gestation (why only 9, why not 29?), normalizing gender dysphoria, letting common criminals out on the street because of seasonal “grippe”, special commando forces on TV arresting 65+ years old citizen (they would have been more discrete), etc.

Juri
Juri
Reply to  tonaludatus
6 months ago

This madness is exactly Trotsky at his best. Stalinist wing was revolt against Trotsky madness. Stalin was very clever man but he got power with very simple method. Trotsky madness freaked out lot of more “normal” communist party members who were afraid that this madness get them all killed and united behind Stalin who was only adult in the room.

Alzaebo
Reply to  tonaludatus
6 months ago

One of the first things the special Bolshevik people did was to legalize unlimited abortion and homosexuality, and to make antisemitism a death penalty crime- until Stalin’s purge.

Raslip Mugfrud
Reply to  tonaludatus
6 months ago

Trotsky fused with Percy Shelley fused with the Poz of the last 60 years
https://ozconservative.blogspot.com/2018/12/shelleys-detestable-distinctions.html

Member
Reply to  tonaludatus
6 months ago

Stalin’s Doctor’s War was the nationalists re-establishing themselves (post czars) after the bloodletting of WW2. Which was the beginning of the end for Usual Suspects/Internationalists/propositional nation types running things. May explain why the propositional nation crowd doubled down in the US.

iron curtain
iron curtain
Reply to  joey junger
6 months ago

The movie Good Bye Lenin captures that Ostalgie perfectly. Movies are always fantasy, but the gray, dour East Germany depicted in that movie is paradise compared to the current state of the US. One thing I’m still trying to figure out: Why wasn’t the eastern bloc ever into open borders or into refugee-based population replacement? They had all the same ideological bullshit about workers around the world uniting, but they never opened their countries up to refugees fleeing the proxy wars they fought with the west, which is always how the west responded in its proxy wars with the east.… Read more »

The Blank Slate
The Blank Slate
Reply to  iron curtain
6 months ago

Tying this back to Z’s post, notice that while the USSR was fond of moralizing and criticizing the US for its black-white friction, the USSR never offered to import American blacks on any massive scale. Imagine if that had been the case and repatriation (but to the USSR rather than to Africa) had been completed roughly a century after Lincoln had first proposed it. This American Life has been nothing but the crappiest AWFL navel gazing after 2008, but every now and then useful historical nuggets can be gleaned from our loyal cloud people opposition. The Prologue and Act 1… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  The Blank Slate
6 months ago

“American blacks can only define themselves in opposition to white people, otherwise they’d have no identity at all. They are deracinated and therefore doomed to failure” Since my mind is on weed today, you’ve just answered a question that has vexed me for decades. How did conservatives fall for it? A minor grift by rich industrialists, the war on weed, became a global octopus that inverted all of the principles- moral, legal, and Constitutional- that once defined the white West. Rather than defining themselves by what they were, the conservatives, fearing a “loss of faith”, latched onto a government-defined religion,… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

“ How did conservatives fall for it?”

1) weed really is destructive; and 2) it became an effective honeypot to easily prosecute bad guys following the ‘reforms’ of the Warren Court.

Juri
Juri
Reply to  iron curtain
6 months ago

“”….Why wasn’t the eastern bloc ever into open borders…””” We had 3 wars and 2 revolutions within 100 years. Genetic white liberals got killed and took their genes to the grave. Madness ceased to exist. We do not have enough Karens and Antifa to force us into submission. Comrade Stalin also assisted. He lured liberals into communist party and slaughtered them. Can you imagine US where 4 million most mad open borders supporters, Antifas Karens and other progressives will be slaughtered ? Bad genes go extinct and madness disappears. In my home country there is fierce fight about Stalin. Some… Read more »

3g4m
3g4m
Reply to  Juri
6 months ago

Juri – There’s no question that Stalin was evil, but he was also a clever man. Fascinating to consider the East’s resistance to open borders in such stark terms (i.e. mass repression versus Sweden). Fwiw, I remember being startled and angry when I was ticketed by the East German vopos (military police) in Berlin 1981 for not crossing at the designated street corner. Yesterday here in DFW, I was pulled over by an agent of the state. He merely gave me a warning but said I did have to have a front license plate (husband said it was not required).… Read more »

joey junger
joey junger
Reply to  Juri
6 months ago

The stupid generally stops in the Visegrad Nations, and the antipathy toward outsiders (really just common sense and instinct) exists partly because that was where Christendom/Europe had to defend itself from the threats from the East. Fences not only make good neighbors, but fortifications keep you from being tortured and your female citizens from being raped. More locally and recently, though, you can’t b.s. people in these areas about diversity being a strength because they’ve slaughtered the hell out of each other for differences that seem pretty granular from the outside. “Two school rooms with one roof is better than… Read more »

joey junger
joey junger
Reply to  iron curtain
6 months ago

The epitome of an “Ossie” stronghold is Chemnitz. There’s literally a giant Olmec-esque head of Karl Marx in the city square, and yet that’s where the anti-Invasion sentiment has been strongest, where the resistance to the multicult project has been strongest in Deutschland.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
6 months ago

In an odd way, the lock downs have highlighted what has been lost and what the bleak future holds. People under 40 didn’t live through the Cold War or remember it but have gotten a taste of what was opposed. Given most people are indeed idiots it is unlikely they will learn from the last few months, but they certainly have been warned. While most of what little resistance there has been has come from a minority of Boomers, teens and Twenty-somethings also have defied the tyrannical state and ventured to the beaches and parks. So perhaps there is some… Read more »

Hugo Silva
Hugo Silva
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

.

Slackmac
Slackmac
6 months ago

I’m just curious why zman stopped posting at gab.

james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
Member
Reply to  Slackmac
6 months ago

He said he was taking a break from things that consumed too much space in his mind as opposed for things he intended to accomplish. Or he’s building a bunker.

Slackmac
Slackmac

Thanks! I missed that

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Ironically, the great goal of Western liberal democracies has become Equality Uber Alles, which isn’t too far from the workers’ paradise the communists peddled.

Hugo Silva
Hugo Silva
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
6 months ago

Equality Uber Alles to achieve a World where there are no fixed roles in society is the Prime Directive of the Left wether in the Communist version or in the modern Western version, the original goal was supposed to be economic equality but after the collapse of the Eastern Bloc showed that wasn’t a viable goal the modern Western Left gave up that goal and decided to focus instead in the social equality of all individuals, that is the complete abolition of differences of sex, ethnicity or Culture, basically they replaced Leninism by Lennonism.

John Smith
John Smith
Member
6 months ago

There are more than a few idiots on our side of the divide – or at least, they lean this way… who are wholly invested in the Chinkypox Panic:

http://thezman.com/wordpress/?p=20521

This guy is supposedly a healthcare worker and theoretically should see the panic for the nonsense it is. But… I think he gets a charge out of virtue signalling and being a moral authority. I think it plays well to the neurotic geriatrics and hypochondriacs that tend to hang out over there

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

One of my regular customers is a doctor specializing in geriatric care. He did some time as a doctor in the JSDF, and he’s done some work deployed overseas in Afghanistan. Pretty level-headed guy. He was telling me there was a genuine fear Covid could ravage the elderly population if not contained. Here in Japan, there’s a lot of old people. Elder worship, as exasperating and counterproductive as it can be, is still a thing here and nobody wants to see a big chunk of the geezers wiped out. Problem is the usual cultural example to follow is the United… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  Forever Templar
6 months ago

Whether they were correct about the geopolitical implications or not, young American men in the 20th century were willing to offer up their lives for their country and future generations. Now, you have Boomers who, true to form, have lived full prosperous lives but are now totally unwilling to take a risk for the sake of their grandchildren’s having the same liberties and opportunities they had, and cower and whine accordingly. I despise them. Good for Ken Paxton, Texas attorney general, who spoke up for those of us who would die tomorrow of this stuff to preserve the Republic for… Read more »

3g4m
3g4m
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

WhereAreTheVikings: Paxton is actually a total political opportunist and cuck, and he and his cronies got his damned wife elected last year. He mouths the right platitudes but won’t do squat for you when it really matters.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  John Smith
6 months ago

People who longed to virtue signal but couldn’t quite get there have embraced all this nonsense because it finally allows them a personally acceptable way to be one of the In Crowd.

Edgar
Edgar
6 months ago

“On the other side, the Soviets were fond of pointing out how blacks in America were treated poorly.”

[*Smacks forehead*] We should have just sent all the blacks to Russia! So many problems solved.

(But, joking aside, that’s basically what the ***s are doing to us now.)

Alzaebo
Reply to  Edgar
6 months ago

Haha! Instead, the Russians sent their J***s… here!

The Babe
The Babe
6 months ago

In the decades since the end of the Cold War, the West has lost any sense of a higher morality. Well, I think you could say that the “higher morality” now can be summed up in the term anti-racism. But of course this is not exactly a morality at all, but a method of psychological warfare that the Special People are using to genocide their nearest comepetitor. Namely, us. The special people having that special ability to transform what is in their interest at the moment into Universal Principle (which means that the Universal Principle will change as their interests… Read more »

jwm
jwm
6 months ago

Last Saturday I was in Huntington Beach, CA. My bicycle gang held our monthly ride despite the masked moroners, and virtue nazi’s. We rode right into the middle of a 12:00 noon protest at the pier. There were hundreds, maybe in the low thousands in attendance. Many were carrying signs reminding us of constitutionally guaranteed rights, 1st & 2nd amendment freedoms. There were tons of “freedom” signs, pro-Trump signs, and even some “Q” signs in the mix. Lots and lots of American flags. There was a heavy police presence there with mounted cops on horses guarding the pier entrance. In… Read more »

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
6 months ago

Socialism is this country generally came aboard as a free rider. It was the product of prosperity, especially after the war. Over time we became a country of consultants, adjunct-professors, administrators, ambulance chasers, civil servants, “non-profit” employees, welfare types “working on their beats”….just about everything other than making an honest fucking living. Now they’re jamming through trillions just to keep this thing from going up in smoke. In the smoldering ruins, we’ll have to learn as a country to once again make a living, even if that means just selling beads on the beach like some Jamaican. We’ll have socialism… Read more »

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  JR Wirth
6 months ago

Automation breeds socialism. Now you can certainly slow the process by restricting imports and trade but its a stop gap measure. Modern factories require less workers and less workers means less wages and less people making an honest living. Modernity in some form requires decent wages and consumption. It can get by with a steady state economy but any kind of stable system requires inputs. Wage arbitrage has been bad enough that we haven’t had replacement fertility in the US for nearly 50 years! Instead of correcting the situation we’ve relied on debt, welfare and opened the flood gates for… Read more »

Sperg Adjacent
Sperg Adjacent
6 months ago

“There was the normal wartime propaganda about the evilness of the fascist, but it was never an ideological struggle.” One interesting thing is that the ideological struggle of World War II took place after the war. Reading histories with a lot of contemporary quotes, you can see that the British at the time of their declaration of war considered it as an “ordinary” balance-of-power war. Basically, “the Germans are grabbing too much, and we have to stop that.” But a huge weight of interepretation was loaded onto the war after it ended, especially with the appearance of Holocaust movies and… Read more »

TheLastStand
Reply to  Sperg Adjacent
6 months ago

Any suggestions for those history books?

One of Many Georges
One of Many Georges
6 months ago

liberal democracy is devolving into petty authoritarianism

I see a few columnists and Twitterers taking the “freedom on principle!” line, but not as many as I’d thought there would be.

It shows the importance of metapolitics–instilling your values in the general populace’s mind.

And it’s not just that the left often attacks old fashioned notions of liberty directly–they also just kind of crowd them out in the public discourse and education with all their globohomo stuff.

Paul
Paul
6 months ago

Dude, Gab totally sucks without you.

Jeff Albertson
Jeff Albertson
Reply to  Paul
6 months ago

Pretty much. I see notifications are broken again, (they had the mechanics pretty much nailed down, but then they “improved” it again), but heartiste is quite active and that is my main reason for continuing to use it.

Exile
Exile
Member
6 months ago

Mark Steyn has restated Sobran’s observation quite a bit since the ‘aughts, noting for instance that American cheeses suck because of food regulations that the allegedly cowardly French would not stand for. Both myth and history suggest that low practicalities have ignited more revolutions than high morality. The rapes of Lucretia and Scottish Mx Wallace*, taxes (the English Civil War & American revo) and bread lines in Paris, St. Petersburg and Berlin. We’ve often observed here that high principles are usually painted into the picture post-hoc by court historians. “All men are created equal” haunts us today more than it… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

To your point about French cheese, I have found that food in the EU generally uses much higher quality basic ingredients than we do in the US.

This is because one of the few things the EU actually got right was banning a huge list of strange food additives, fillers, and preservatives that are 100% A-OK for use in the US.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

Yes, they’re on to the Frankfood. Good for them. They’re much healthier for it. I wish this country could get 1/100th as motivated about celiac disease and the drugging of our young boys as it is about this glorified pneumonia.

WhereAreTheVikings
Member
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
6 months ago

Frankenfood

Juri
Juri
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

About regulations When you need to fight with conservative, bring in Russian aviation. In the 1990 Russia was paradise of small government low taxes conservative. Nobody followed regulations and nobody paid taxes. Did Russia got world best airlines or did they got lot of air crashes. ?

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

Our common cheese in America was invented for WW2, retasked as 70s welfare cheese, rebranded as Cheese is what makes it taste so good (Velvetta melted over everything) and like our post Prohibition watery beer mass marketed for adjusted taste buds. In food the commons buys quantity not quality. However looking a little harder you’ll find more cheese, and pay more of course. In general we value consumer machines higher than consumer foods. Our consumer machines and tools reflect this, along with the taste buds of women – who do the shopping. Men like tools, toys, cars, guns. Women like… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

“When the American Empire finally falls, it will more likely be through a series of local and practical outrages than some grand “positive” stand for liberty, justice and the Imperial way – ala “V for Vendetta,”

It is happening now at an intrastate level. It isn’t about principles but power, with the non-urban areas chafing against their domination by metropolitan centers. This will grow more intense each year.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Jack Dobson
6 months ago

Marvelous white pill from Mr Dobson. COVID has accelerated the power struggles between the layers of power. Fortune now favors the Bold, Politics is power. Incumbency and tenancy of power (what else can we call Urban Democrats but Landlords, indeed Lord Lords) but it also carries many burdens. The free agent non incumbent can ala Afghanistan and Iraq use their burdens to RUIN THEM. Turkomen Proverb; A muslim warrior is convincing a farmer to submit and pay jizrya (tax): Warrior; “ You have a farm and a house. I have a horse and a whip. I will kill you and… Read more »

Severian
6 months ago

“If they could see what has become of the West, they would probably rethink their opposition to communism.” I know I have! I taught a lot of History to a lot of undergrads for a lot of years, so I really should’ve known better, but… damn it, when the chips were down I thought most people really did value their personal autonomy. The kids I saw every day on campus were herd animals, sure, but weren’t we all when we were their age? Facebook, smartphone addiction, those stupid Ugg boots… all those are just fads, I thought, no different from… Read more »

james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
james wilson WebSite URL Mpg2J wpdiscuz_captcharef
Member
Reply to  Severian
6 months ago

Mouse. Mouse Utopia. We are indeed mice. A rat colony may have taken a bolder course.

Member
6 months ago

The West won the fight with fascism on material grounds. Oh, I dunno about that. The American system in place since FDR is pretty well described as fascism, if you can get over peoples’ feelings about the word “fascism” and stick with actual definitions. The ACA is a classic fascist policy, as were social security and medicare/medicaid. Remember the “liberals” of the post-war period were all the commies and fascists of the pre-war period — Mussolini was a huge hero to “progressives.” There wasn’t a lot of light between communism and fascism in terms of on-the-ground policies, except fascism, such… Read more »

Mark Taylor
Mark Taylor
Reply to  Vizzini
6 months ago

The NAZIs wouldn’t tolerate tranny story hour. The difference in the two philosophies wasn’t economic, it was cultural. Communism rejected that people had a nature, and that nature was the creator of culture.

Member
Reply to  Mark Taylor
6 months ago

To be fair, Americans in the 1940s wouldn’t tolerate tranny story hour, either. Now both nations are subjugated by globohomo.

Mark Taylor
Mark Taylor
Reply to  Vizzini
6 months ago

Right, I think it’s fair to say Americans thought they were fighting for nationalist reasons. But our leaders decided the defeat of the Germans was a victory over nationalism, people and culture. The Marxian frame that economics was the driver of humanity was the winner of the war. Now it’s all we talk about with regards to what a government is. The Germans opposed communism because it intended to erase their culture, and any idea that Germans were a people, and Germany a country. That is why they wouldn’t put up with Trannyism. Trannyism wasn’t who they were as a… Read more »

Hugo Silva
Hugo Silva
Reply to  Mark Taylor
6 months ago

The winner of the War was the leftist idea that fundamental differences of status among individuals were illegitimate versus the racial hierarchy promoted by the Nazis. The difference between the West and the USSR being about the legitimacy or not of economic differences among individuals. Since the Nazis were beaten fundamental differences of status were deemed illegitimate and the West started by outlawing racial discrimination, Special People of course were allowed to discriminate against outsiders because it’s a part of their religion. Having outlawed racial discrimination they are now attempting to erase the most fundamental difference of status among individuals,… Read more »

Member
6 months ago

If anyone cared to notice, this pandemic has proven that there is no hint of republicanism left in modern America. There are no protests against the impositions on our liberty, just protests about restaurants being closed.

I disagree. A lot of the Columbus, OH protesters are talking about liberty.

Din C. Nuttin
Din C. Nuttin
6 months ago

Gotta ask…does anyone on this site think giving away our money to illegal immigrants is a good idea? How about turning criminals loose? How about putting contagious people into nursing home environments? Where do these brilliant policies originate?

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  Din C. Nuttin
6 months ago

Satan

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
6 months ago

Not to be redundant, Democrat party by and large (since Satan is not omnipresent)

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
6 months ago

I was being a smart ass but never the less somewhat true

Mark Taylor
Mark Taylor
Reply to  Din C. Nuttin
6 months ago

One of life’s mysteries. I’ve often wondered how speeding fines go up annually when I’ve never heard a single politician mention increasing them.

Member
Reply to  Mark Taylor
6 months ago

Politicians don’t want to mention them. There isn’t an organized opposition group. Fee increases generally are incorporated into the budget and ‘need’ to be increased to keep the budget whole.

Alzaebo
Reply to  Din C. Nuttin
6 months ago

“putting contagious people into nursing home environments”

Outright, deliberate murder.
They knew exactly what they were doing.
Happened not just in NY, but all over.

Death by attrition from Obamacare wasn’t working fast enough, so they upped the timetable.

Opioid ‘epidemic’? A pharmacist told me he has guys eating a bottle of Tylenol a day, just so they can can deal with the pain.

The mules must keep working!
The old mules to the glue factory!
Public employee pensions are at stake!

TomA
TomA
6 months ago

“The people, stripped of their republican virtue, no longer have the means to resist.”

Not so. It’s just that the old way of resisting is doomed to failure. The Deep State is well prepared to suppress and eliminate the old-school militia based forms of resistance. And the new and improved version of tyranny that we will likely see here is guaranteed to be far more ruthless than anything in the past. A new paradigm is needed. And that is what evolution demands.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  TomA
6 months ago

Yes.

Despite Officer Greg Anderson’s impassioned YouTube video, I imagine that there are plenty of well-trained and programmed special operators that would be turned loose to hunt down any militia foolish enough to think they were secure in their Kentucky hollers.

Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

The future of the Army is indeed urban and counter-insurgency warfare.

lurking_in_hope
lurking_in_hope
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
6 months ago

No, not American military in any number. Not in our current or past armed forces, aka Veterans. Of which there are 14 million or so that can still go to war. The problem for the few American armed forces or PMCs that might be willing to hunt Americans is they’d be hunted down by their buddies and most of the..ah..er… “community” of Veterans and those serving. The hollers you refer to happen to be a prime feeder into the military especially combat arms. The Left eschews combat as it eschews all hard work. This just isn’t a card they can… Read more »

Dave
Dave
6 months ago

The Cold War was a battle between two social models, the Communist Prison State and the Democratic Social Welfare State. The CPS was a rock-solid, seemingly permanent feature of the political landscape until November 9, 1989. When thousands poured through the Berlin Wall to marvel at the material abundance of the DSWS, the CPS instantly lost all legitimacy and collapsed. So too approaches a day of reckoning for the DSWS, which presently survives only by printing trillions of dollars and “lending” them to itself. Not sure what will follow except that it will be extremely undemocratic — probably starting with… Read more »

Whiskey
Whiskey
6 months ago

Sorry, ZMan I disagree. The core of the issue is the emergence of a ruling class in a bubble. The HYPS “Super Zips” of Charles Murray’s Coming Apart. Or Burnham’s Managerial elite. They don’t have special titles, distinguishing dress, castles, and servants, so they must preen their moral superiority and also degrade ordinary people at the same time to make themselves worshiped and feared. Locking down beaches is all about rich people in Newport who live on the sand making sure come Dirt Person from Riverside does not come out to the beach. Or worse, Cerritos. Its why Newsome locked… Read more »

Alzaebo
Reply to  Whiskey
6 months ago

Proof of Zman’s long-ago dictum, “women go to college to learn what the rules are, and how to enforce them.”

That’s also why women watch the nightly news, to get their updates.

Betcha the salon owner wasn’t a college graduate. She couldn’t afford to take four years off to learn the rules.

Allen
Allen
6 months ago

Most people don’t want liberty, they’re after freedom from want. The former takes work while the latter only requires a thief to move the goods.

Pete
Pete
6 months ago

I’m old. I know I am old not because my body hurts in ways I never imagined. I know I am old because instead of fantasizing about shapely young women in short skirts, I dream instead of living a a society run by the Z man.

Member
Reply to  Pete
6 months ago

I’m old, but a society run by the Zman better provide me with shapely young women in short skirts, or I’m pulling my support!

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
6 months ago

What Western Guys Do For Fun– While most of us are fretting, analyzing, and moping about Steamroller Fascism, we play with earthquakes to blow off steam. I sent Basic Husband off on a T-Renewal walkabout last week. He met a geologist friend (BH is a pedigreed Mining Engineer and geology minor) and they drove into the Monte Cristo range in south central Nevada to explore mines-ghost towns and rocks. Check your atlas. At 4 a.m. yesterday, the earth blew off a 6.5 right below them…they were 3 miles from the epicenter. I have a USGS app that gives me an… Read more »

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
6 months ago

Not a good argument AFAIK we never really had a voice in government. Every time the people voted for change the courts would shoot down our efforts and the politicians we supported would betray us. The few times we won it was on issues that didn’t matter to TPTB. Every war since the Spanish American war we were goaded into by the elites. Every trade agreement was done as a back room deal and no public input allowed. BTW this even extends to the local level where meetings are held at times the public can’t really attend. And there is… Read more »

d.deacon
d.deacon
6 months ago

loved the conclusion. would qualify the “communist are superior morally because more equal” argument. the soviet system was just as unequal, just not always expressed materially like in the west. most housing was crappy, unless there was an oil bonanza, and the elites of the party of course made the best of it since they controlled all foreign trade – why do you think Russians are so prevalent at the black market of anything? related to this, the monopoly on rights and freedoms was a different kind of inequality, enforcing mentally rather than physically. what use is it that you… Read more »

dad29
6 months ago

Perhaps the reason for all of this is that liberal democracy was never a rational and complete political philosophy.

Patrick Deneen would agree. But THE “higher purpose” is religious–the salvation of souls–and fitting that into ‘liberal democracy’ is……..ahhh……..challenging.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
6 months ago

Z Man said: “If anyone cared to notice, this pandemic has proven that there is no hint of republicanism left in modern America. There are no protests against the impositions on our liberty, just protests about restaurants being closed.”

There are actually a lot of people who are crying out for liberty, just mostly people without any real power or influence. But there are a few names you would recognize. I won’t leave links to all that I’ve found, but here’s one I’m sure you’ve heard of. His name is Charlie Daniels.
https://cnsnews.com/commentary/charlie-daniels/charlie-daniels-judicial-media-and-agency-activism-scourge-21st-century

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
6 months ago

The media is as usual lying. There are sizable protests everywhere even in California. On top of that there is more than a little Irish Rebellion to the stupid orders even in NYC. Ultimately what’s lacking is leaders with integrity, a spine and any ability to check the greed and to make sure that the US has a strong domestic economy. There are a lot of reasons for this but the main one is our society screws everyone not in top 10% (or so) and there is no incentive to do the right thing. Most of us do by habit… Read more »

CitizenK9
CitizenK9
6 months ago

Before CV-19, there was nicotine. Millions will be killed by second-hand smoke if we don’t act now! The banning of smoking in private establishments was an outrageous violation of the right to be left the hell alone. But now it’s accepted by everyone save for solitary cranks. The road to hell is paved with bullshit medical studies

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  CitizenK9
6 months ago

The road to Hell is always mapped by experts.

UFO
UFO
6 months ago

About Karens – at first I thought it was just an anti-white movement. But I’ve been dealing with more Karens lately. A large percentage of middle aged and older white women are indeed massive bitches. Passive aggressive, ugly, impatient, rude, bitter, and apparently devoid of any happiness or charm.

Is this what happens to post-wall “liberated” women?

Lorenzo
Lorenzo
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

Womens’ liberation freed a huge number of inner bitches.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Lorenzo
6 months ago

We are all prisoners of our biological inheritance. Most men are violent with a roving eye and most women are hypergamous malcontents. Their hindbrains evolved bitchiness in the time before civilization when the advent of sapience gave rise to culture (systematized behavior), in the same way that men evolved to be cooperative killers.

Human civilizations have developed cultures to remediate the shortcomings of both men and women to optimize civilizational perpetuation, but in the West those aspects to remediate female dyscivilization have been completely removed at the same time that those aspects directed at men have been intensified.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

Can you tell us why you’ve “been dealing with more Karens lately?” It sounds interesting.

UFO
UFO
Reply to  LineInTheSand
6 months ago

It’s not that interesting, and I don’t wanna dox myself.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

Horace is spot on. Modern women were sold a bill of goods. For people with commonplace expectations longevity, the optimum situation is long term stable marriage and large families so that by the time Karen is middle aged, she isn’t that far off from being Grandma, Great Aunt and having a host of other predefined rolls that grant status. In essence she is too busy and to pressured by society to bother the rest of society with excess bitchiness. Now she is lucky if she has two kids and most of then have neither resources nor interest in having kids.… Read more »

tz1
Member
6 months ago

I think you oversimplify if not get it wrong. Being deprived of work is the ultimate tyranny. It isn’t merely economic, it is human dignity, from Genesis 3. But I think that is something you have lost as you don’t believe in God or Christ. Even Stefan Molyneux who is also trying to reinvent Christianity badly admits it was the cornerstone. You can’t even understand the “Cold War” properly if you don’t see it as a battle between Christianity and Atheism. One example si Bishop Fulton Sheen. We became decadent, but that is a fall from SOMETHING. Capitalist nihilism might… Read more »

Member
6 months ago

Freedom is a male concept. Females want security. We have shifted our culture to being a female centric one because that is better for our rulers. Women want mommy and daddy government to take care of them. That gives more power to our rulers and is a lot easier than running a highly functioning system. However, the right of the divide has some remnants of masculinity and that is why they are the ones doing the protesting. They aren’t articulating their anger as centering on freedom but freedom to most Americans, when I was growing up in the Cold War,… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  My_Comment
6 months ago

Agree with all.
19th amendment was the death knell of freedom.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
6 months ago

“ There are no protests against the impositions on our liberty, just protests about restaurants being closed. No politician is giving speeches against the tyranny of these restrictions. ”

No. We read different news.
And there is no government monopoly of force in America, not in law and not in truth. Nor in protests, although the guns are silent they are present. And no they’re not Feds, no more than Trump is KGB (yes I know its SVR now, most don’t).

Member

“ We read different news.”

The most vocal ‘open the country’ guy I know is also one of the biggest cucks. This guy thinks Ds are the real racists, Trayvon was murdered by an racist and that we need to save the restaurants. Our host aside, I haven’t seen that much of an correlation between the realist community and the open her up gang.