The Paradox Of The Market

An axiom of liberal democracy is that the more open the system the more choices there are within the system. A market for widgets, if it is an open market, will have the maximum number of widget makers and widget suppliers. The marketplace of ideas, if it is open to all, will have the full range of ideas. Similarly, as long as the demand side is unrestricted, the full spectrum of demand will be represented. Every widget buyer will have the chance to demand his type of widget.

This is the starting point for modern societies. It is no longer a point to be debated and certainly not questioned. This is obvious in the non-debate over tech censorship. Any effort to discuss what is going on with companies like Google and Twitter is met with a wall of sound about the sanctity of private firms operating in the market. “Build your own platform” has become the top single in the amen chorus. The marketplace is now a god that provides what the people need and deserve.

In theory, the chorus should be right. If everyone who wants to make widgets is allowed to make widgets, then there should be a widget maker for every type of widget demanded by the public, assuming the widget can be produced at a profit. Even people wanting free widgets could be supplied by charity. Outside of the extremes, if there is a way to make a profit by meeting even the most bizarre demands for a product or service, someone will find a way to meet that demand.

Something similar should happen in public discourse. If the public space is open, then everyone can present their ideas. If everyone is free to listen, or not listen, to those ideas being offered up, the marketplace should develop in the same way as it should with a product or a service. The insane ideas will have a small audience, while the sensible ideas will gain a larger audience. The marketplace of ideas will sort and stack the ideas on offer based on the preferences of the audience.

This is a bit redundant, but it is important to think about this axiom of liberal democracy while considering current reality. If the market place for goods and services functioned as believed, then we would have more than two mobile phone makers. There would be more than one search engine. We would have lots of small car makers, rather than a handful of global operators. In fact, General Motors should have gone out of business decades ago based on market principles.

In the realm of ideas, we should have a dozen political parties flourishing to one degree or another at the state and national level. For example, there is no obvious reason why there should not be political parties that operate just as the state level. According to the axioms of liberal democracy, there should be state parties that focus just on state and local issues, maybe operating as a feeder to a national party. Yet, we have just two parties that are really just two faces of a single party.

It is a paradox of markets that the internal dynamic of the market leads to fewer choices and maybe even no choice. Take the desktop computer market, for example. The only choice is the color and the label of the Chinese slave camp that produced it. Inside, the parts all come from the same source. Alternatives to the standard PC are fringe options that exist for hobbyists and weirdos. You see this everywhere you look around the marketplace. Our markets are oligopolies now.

It goes beyond market consolidation. Another aspect of this is that as some dominant players emerge, they begin to insulate themselves from demand. In fact, it is possible that the quest for market domination is actually an effort to insulate the supplier from the pressures of the marketplace. The players initially experiencing success shift from competing for clients to competing to wall off their share of demand in order to prevent others from competing for that market share.

You see this with sports. The NASCAR phenomenon is assumed to be driven by the edicts of this weird new religion that has gripped the great and good. That may be one aspect of it, maybe even the primary aspect, but there also seems to be a desire to get rid of their own audience. That is, NASCAR would be fine with not having a live crowd and depending entirely on television money. Then they no longer have to be responsive to the demands of the customers.

The temptation here is to say that the fans will not watch, but in the realm of television these days, ratings matter very little. ESPN, for example, gets the bulk of its revenue from mandatory cable fees. If you have a TV sub through the local cable monopoly or a service like Hulu, you pay ESPN eight dollars per month. It does not matter if you watch, you pay the fee. All cable channels work off this model. Once again, the glory of the market place is to result in a monopoly and no market.

This dynamic where the dominant suppliers seek to eradicate the demand side is evident in politics. Both faces of the uniparty are now onboard with vote by mail, for example, which eliminates the pesky demands of the voters. This form of voting makes for unlimited fraud, so we will end up with Stalin’s maxim. “It’s not the people who vote that count. It’s the people who count the votes.” Since picking one party or the other has no effect on policy, voting will soon be entirely ceremonial.

It is always tempting to confuse a paradox with a contradiction. Critics of modern capitalism, for example, will claim that the oligarchs are not really capitalist in the free market sense. They are corrupting the system. Similarly, people will claim that the problem with politics is that a small group of highly corrupt people are subverting the democratic system. In other words, the axioms of the market place are true, it’s just that the current systems are not adhering to them.

The trouble with this line of reasoning is it suggests that the marketplace itself selects for the sorts of people who seek to subvert the marketplace. Everywhere we look, the great experiment in open markets has had the same result. Whether it is finance, technology, ideas or politics, the result is small club that controls everything, not only to their exclusive benefit, but to the detriment of the people they allegedly serve. It is almost as if the market selects for sadists who despise their customers.


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391 Comments
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MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
4 months ago

We don’t have a free market system. We have a bizarre hybrid of Libertarianism and Socialism that gives us the worst aspects of both.

Marko
Marko
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

What we have is guilded-age global capitalism but married to a social/capital surveillance system used by cloud people who hate dirt people.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Marko
4 months ago

A Guilded-Age system indeed; and to think Trump campaigned as a new TR

Exile
Exile
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

Only to preside over TR’s statue being cancelled.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Yeah, but he was responsible for our being saddled with the Albatross of Puerto Rico. F-k him.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  3g4me
4 months ago

Who gives a dam’? He was white. Protect him.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  3g4me
4 months ago

President Grant wanted to annex Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic) as a territory, and incentivize the blacks to go there.

The Dominicans agreed, but the Democrat Senate shot down the treaty. What might have been.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

I see Slate Star Codex (Scott Alexander) blog has self-cancelled due to a threatened doxxing by the NYT. This guy was apolitical, and brilliant.
Nice to go to for a challenge and something a little less end-of-western-civ-y.
Everything, and I mean everything, is being cancelled.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Marko
4 months ago

At least Caeser can’t order you to cut your own throat. Not yet anyway.

Last edited 4 months ago by Official Bologna Tester
Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

Yes and no. Let us take our esteemed blog host and his example about computers: what, exactly, do you want of your computer that you’re not getting now? Be specific. Your cell phone? Hells bells – they already do everything. Some monopolies and oligopolies actually work… why mess with that. The market will indeed put the boots to Zuckerface, Bookface and twatter: in time. If I was running Gab, I’d LOVE to see the Whitehouse dump Twatter and use my platform instead. Trump alone would literally bring the nation with him. Speaking of Blab… I heard their numbers are exploding… Read more »

Vegetius
Vegetius
Reply to  Glenfilthie
4 months ago

>what, exactly, do you want of your computer that you’re not getting now?

The link to yesterday’s episode of Cotto-Gottfried.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Glenfilthie
4 months ago

Alt Tech is a thorn in the ass of Silicon Valley that will soon become a spear

C’mon, this is Q-tier plan trusting. You’re smarter than that.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

I ascribe to no “plan” MWV. I simply acknowledge that markets are not static, they change slowly, sometimes rapidly. Sometimes they are artificially inverted as they were during prohibition, when some self righteous harpies nagged America into thinking it wanted prohibition. Believe your eyes and history: markets always correct too. Look at our esteemed blog host. When I first started posting here, he got maybe 40-50 comments a day. Today he does three times that – on a bad day. Zuck and his harpies have convinced enough Americans that they want censorship and a managed public square. I don’t know… Read more »

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Reply to  Glenfilthie
4 months ago

If Pres. Trump dumped Twitter, Parler would be a safer and relatively more respectable home. Normies such as Candace Owen and Dan Bongino post there. Some questionable types such as neo-Nazis post on Gab.

Of course, to libs, anyone who voted for Pres. Trump is a bigoted Nazi. On Gab, some posters really are Nazis.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaedhiel
4 months ago

Do you still get a free copy of Siege when you sign up for GAB?

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

I didn’t.

I needed to look that book up because I never heard of it.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaedhiel
4 months ago

Candace …who? Dan….?
I care not for such buggardly poseurs and harlots. On Gab I interact with towering intellects like our blog host and Cornelius Rye!
Gab can get a little tangy… but compared to the neosocialists and sexual degenerates on Twitter… Gab wins hands down…

tremain
tremain
Reply to  Glenfilthie
4 months ago

I would like it not to have inbuilt backdoor management modules in the CPU that have their own remote connectivity.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Glenfilthie
4 months ago

Woke Tech is the market – that’s the point of Z’s post today. They’re wearing the boots, not getting them.

One of the best things Trump could have done was make war on Woke Tech with some sort of “internet bill of rights” – but where there’s no will, there is no way.

Twitter disrespected and laughed at Trump’s empty threats in real time and Tweeting Donny laid down for them quicker than he did for BLM as they burned down D.C. He’ll never switch to GAB because he’s never been real.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

I don’t disagree, but you are forgetting that for all of these things mentioned, we are not the customer. Being a customer involves paying someone money. Even in the ESPN example, we are not the customer, the cable provider is the customer. Like the tech example, not only are we not the customer, we are the product that is being sold. Comcast is offering our attention as a product to ESPN which in turn, uses our existence as Comcast customers for its own customers, the advertisers. Unfortunately, I think anti-social media is going to go down the road of cable… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
4 months ago

<i> For a flat monthly fee of X or as part of our ISP package, we will be able to access social media.</i> That’s how it worked thirty years ago, with AOL and the likes. A package came with a lot of services provided by the ISP, like search engines, webpage templates, talkboards, chat forums and so on. Then a lot of startup companies started no-frills, high-bandwith access for half the price and fuck you if you don’t know how to configure your own connection, because that’s not part of the service plan. A friend of mine did just that, made… Read more »

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

The early service providers were walled gardens and not on Internet. The first one I ever paid for was Q-Link for the C64 (I think it had other versions, but they were walled off from each other). AOL did the same thing. AOL for Dos was very similar to Q-Link and I think (IIRC) AOL was Q-link and the Q-Link name got tossed and they deleted all the 8-bit stuff (which was a HUGE loss IMHO) and they became AOL. In fact, when AOL started allowing you to use Internet through the AOL interface, that was basically the beginning of… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
4 months ago

<i>The Dune analogy is good, but if everything outside of the palisade enclosed cities is empty desert, it’s just a framing thing.</i> The spice is in the desert – the salt of the earth, if you will. But if you want a more apposite one, consider Mao’s revolutionary doctrine: win the countryside, and the cities will fall to you like ripe plums. Big Media is the past, they’re in a six gee inverted spin with both engines flamed out and smoke coming out of the instrument panel. As a Swedish dissident journalist noted: it’s not a law of nature, that… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

Gay, black, flying bodybuilders in space, riding rockets designed by Hutessa geniuses.

Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

The problem with the libertarian analysis has always been, not so much that it’s wrong, but that it never takes network effects and capital flows into account. The world is simplified down to a abstract marketplace where there are only producers and consumers. In the real world of course, capitalism requires capital. This is where (((banks))) can start to get involved and tilt the entire playing field in one direction. People will say: well that’s not an economic question, that’s part of the JQ. I’ve often said though that if Jews did not exist it would be necessary to invent… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  pozymandias
4 months ago

<i>network effects and capital flows </i> Capital works to our advantage in this instance because the entry cost is next to zero: old-school news networks are enormous money pits, and for every coiffed, manicured, pedicured, coke-addled, child-molesting talkhead with $250,000 worth of plastic surgery and dental work, there a million aspiring geeks taking them on with nothing but a cheap webcam, and the geeks don’t have to comply with suffocating speech codes or policy dictates from the ADL. Capitalism is not perfect, but it’s the least bad solution and it works wonderfully on an open internet. <i>If your goal is to… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

coiffed, manicured, pedicured, coke-addled, child-molesting talkhead with $250,000 worth of plastic surgery and dental work I had to chuckle at this. Soon they’ll be out of work too. There’s talk of a new humanoid robot that runs on cocaine and can molest children. Once they get the price down to around a 1/4 million… Anyway, I totally agree about the whole “pull back into your bunker, turn on Fox News and keep voting Republican” mindset. The prevalence of that probably cost us 20 years of time we could have used to organize and build our alternative economies and communities. I… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by pozymandias
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

They kept up head jabs at the 2A so they could KO the other 9.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  pozymandias
4 months ago

I think both you & Felix have a point here. You need iron to protect yourself in meatspace but you can’t use it when the feds are going to McMichael you and Charlottesville the antifa.

We have to work this problem from both sides – use alt-media to delegitimize the opposition and use self-defense to keep them from outright killing us in the streets.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Agree, but there must be water-tight bulkheads between those spheres. Build meatspace networks to strengthen your community, it’s not where you should fight your battles. In meatspace you’re are extremely vulnerable, but as long as you have a clean troll account, one without doxing info, they can’t reach you on the internet, at least not without a warrant. Don’t start warfare in your own back yard. We’re in Stalin territory now, you can’t air your true political opinions to anyone but your closest family and friends. This is also good psychological warfare: the regressives know there are Nazis everywhere around… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

I thought the meme warfare over the “OK” hand signal was especially brilliant. It got the SJWs in a panic looking for Nazis under every rock. It also motivated them to attack normies who used the symbol innocently and were now aware of just how crazy these people are.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

Good points, Felix. A genuine internet bill of rights would delegitimize globohomo in a very short exchange. Censorship is the only way that they keep the hard White Right from winning on every issue. The amount of outright fed-posting during the Floyd riots on relatively tame sites like Breitbart would have resulted in a million-man-vanning if Our Guys were involved. As much as I support IRL community, we very much need to stay engaged on the internet as well to keep Whites coming our way. In terms of cost-benefit, it’s the best way to leave the light on for Whites… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Yup, take and hold the high ground.

Member
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Totally agree. Without the internet none of us would have gotten to where we are in our understanding today. It would be awfully nice if there was a way to streamline the process of locating other haters IRL without risking doxxing though. There are of course, clubs you can join or events you can go to like the Amren thing Z went to last year in the Tennessee hills. The problem is that a lot of that is on indefinite hold now. Gee, what a coincidence.

Captain Obvious
Captain Obvious
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

<i></i><i></i><i></i><i></i><i></i><i></i><i></i><i></i>
<b></b><b></b><b></b><b></b><b></b><b></b><b></b>
<link></link><link></link><link></link><link></link><link></link>
<I am pretty sure there’s a message in here somewhere but I am continually distracted by the manually-inserted HTML tags that nearly every person here appreciates do not parse through the input box, just a clue, H-e-e-l-l-l-o-o-o-o-o Bueller?>

</I am pretty sure there’s a message in here somewhere but I am continually distracted by the manually-inserted HTML tags that nearly every person here appreciates do not parse through the input box, just a clue, H-e-e-l-l-l-o-o-o-o-o Bueller?>

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Captain Obvious
4 months ago

I’m trolling Zman to get him to fix it. Thanks for your contribution.

Tricky Dicky
Tricky Dicky
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

Have you emailed Z? Oh wait, I see the point of trolling. Z is not best known for his responsiveness to email messages.

Captain Obvious
Captain Obvious
Reply to  Captain Obvious
4 months ago

Oh c’mon! There is no sane reason to continue using non-working tags that are distracting. To fail and then subsequently maintain the failed behavior without relent is a sure sign that something is wrong with the poster.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Captain Obvious
4 months ago

I’m just fucking with you. I’m just used to typing out tags, and I only notice after I’ve clicked post.

It’s annoying as hell, so instead of editing every second post, I’ve decided to spread the misery around a bit.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

It’s clickification of the interface, Apple thinking.

It’s great with little drawings to click on, but why disable the all-keyboard functionality of HTML – the lingua franca of the internet? If I get a mouse elbow, I’ll sue.

Captain Obvious
Captain Obvious
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

Well then, provided you are just fucking with me I understand completely. I wouldn’t want to NOT spread the misery around. Not here, where I am firmly committed to the spreading of misery. Misery, for one and for all.

Member
Reply to  Captain Obvious
4 months ago

You’re now forced to use the icons for everything.

No more <tags>allowed</tags> it seems.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Felix Krull
4 months ago

14.88 do 51 (a majority)

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
BTP
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

You’re missing the point. This outcome is the one that obtains when you attempt to implement a free market system. Is the a corruption of the idealized, theoretical, unreal system we imagine might exist somewhere along with the god of the forms? Sure, but so what?

What you get is literally how capitalism works. There isn’t some other result possible.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  BTP
4 months ago

I agree. You can have markets without capitalism (an economy based on capital accumulation, growth/market expansion and usury with minimal to no constraints).

Too many people believe our economic choices are between a totally-planned economy where all goods & services are simply handed out by the State and what we call capitalism today.

There are many better choices outside that frame. Simply outlawing usury again, enforcing anti-trust principles and periodically clearing debts would do wonders to humanize the present system.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

The whole point of capitalism is to create a monopoly. That’s your goal. It’s done through coercion, taxes, bribery, regulation etc. The level playing field becomes a jagged mountain. The whole point of the FTC was to eliminate this. Instead it was the FTC that was eliminated in everything but name in the mid-80s. If you want to enrage a libertarian (I’ve seen it) tell them that capitalism is not the free market, that they’re two distinct concepts. They explode like Fem-bots.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  MemeWarVet
4 months ago

More proof that we are ruled by the axioms of an alien culture. Symbiote or parasite? Hayek and Popper both went to the same school. Our main concepts and definitions are pilpul, doubletalk, we still can’t define these shuls of thought. Gilded age economics began as a distinctly political project to direct the frame of our concepts. This is the same missionaria protectiva as our concept of religion- a narrow narrative channel built on and serving political agendas. Same kosher sandwich. We will be corralled by either internationalist Kapital or Commune, and bent towards tearing down our glorious Greco-Roman statuary.… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
4 months ago

I must give big kudos to our host.

Instead of waving flags, he points out structural paradoxes. Postmortem diagnosis before the redesign.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
4 months ago

It’s not just the uniparty, it’s the unicorporation. If you want to buy from a corporation that does not support BLM, good luck with that.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Wolf Barney
4 months ago

Psychopaths are drawn to any means for harnessing people to do their bidding and give them concealment. Businesses, political apparatuses, religious organizations and the like are such means. So we end up here: It is almost as if the market selects for sadists who despise their customers. However it is your “sadists” who manipulate the market and not the other way around.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

Yes. The psychological component gets missed. Many Cloud People enjoy sadism because they have all their material needs.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Jack Dobson
4 months ago

Psychopaths have been a permanent fixture of civilization. It’s not an epithet but an actual brain condition which possibly evolved as it did in response to socialization and crowding. The existence of the condition and those psychopaths intermingled among us explains one heckuva a lot of human history (and human misery). Because those born with psychopathy tend to be also born with superior communications skills and the talent to manipulate others, normies tend to defer to them and thus psychopaths can be difficult to contain. I believe the “science” of psychology is mostly bullshite, however, it does help classify and… Read more »

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

Psychopaths need to be exposed and then have their brains opened over a fallen tree for the sake of the village. Somewhere along the way the religious, social, and cultural immune system that performed these functions was compromised. Not only do these traits now survive but they are often solved for, rewarded, and celebrated as power and material success accrues along that behavioral axis. The traits that should have been jettisoned become part of the aspirational model for the entire village/organization. The virus spreads. In business the paradox is quaint. A really good salesman is hard to find. But extrapolated… Read more »

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Screwtape
4 months ago

A good book to read is Starving The Monkeys…

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Recommend the book to Bill Gates, I heard he really likes reading.
His vaccines were not that effective in diminishing the african birth rates, maybe “Starving the monkeys” offers a simpler solution, it’s a different perspective in how to solve his problem.

Chad Hayden
Chad Hayden
Reply to  Screwtape
4 months ago

I disagree…psycopaths are a huge benefit to a civilization in time of war. Military recruiters keep an eye out for these types as they can make ferocious and cruel warriors. I have a couple friends who are somewhat psycopathic and they’re both in our thing. They lack empathy, and so they slay with women and in their careers. As long as they can avoid being cancelled they’ll continue being hugely successful.

Last edited 4 months ago by Chad Hayden
Juri
Juri
Reply to  Chad Hayden
4 months ago

Psychos are not warriors. One reason why army basic training is so difficult, is to root out psychos. Those people like to torture others but by themselves they are such a snowflakes that even following basic discipline is too humiliating for them. Have your noticed that every last profession from army to airline pilots to ship crews, where order and discipline are demanded has almost 0 liberals.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Chad Hayden
4 months ago

Psychopaths are only useful if you can keep them pointed at the enemy – and only so long as there is an enemy. I don’t see how they are net-positive overall when normal men can perform at 90% of their Dark Triad levels when properly motivated and they don’t present the same danger of “killing the village in order to save it” – especially your own people’s village.

Chad Hayden
Chad Hayden
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Good points.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Chad Hayden
4 months ago

I would also think they’d be much more likely and willing to sacrifice those under their command, especially if it improved their chances of promotion or glory.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Screwtape
4 months ago

And to think we were told sacrifices to the corn god are a bad thing.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

If psychopaths are genetic so are sheep, I’d wager, as are sheepdogs. We need more sheepdogs, fewer wolves and sheep.

Last edited 4 months ago by Paintersforms
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Paintersforms
4 months ago

I would disagree and say we need more Wolfhounds… Sheepdogs spend most of their time keeping the sheep in line not killing the wolves…Also Sheepdogs do what their Masters tell them to do…

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Splitting hairs, but wolfhounds are the sweetest dogs. They won’t hurt a fly unless told to or defending their masters, but they make terrible guard dogs.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Paintersforms
4 months ago

I disagree. My cousin has had a succession of 5 Irish Wolfhounds and all but the first have been surly and at times aggressive.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  KGB
4 months ago

Hmmm Sounds like the DR😉

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  KGB
4 months ago

Maybe the breeder? My parents breed them, so I’ve been to several kennels and I have yet to meet an IW that’s worse than aloof.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Paintersforms
4 months ago

I think it is a combination. There are some people who are genetically susceptible to being sociopaths, but it takes the right environment to bring it out. Clownworld brings out the worst aspects of people.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  tarstarkas
4 months ago

Agreed. It’s the spirit of the age. The wolf/sheep dynamic.

Last edited 4 months ago by Paintersforms
Member
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

As another one of those “hard science” types I also tend not to respect psychology much. It doesn’t help that almost everyone in it nowadays is an obnoxious female leftist either. I do pay some attention to evolutionary psychology and neurobiological based theories. The main problem with the whole field, of course, remains the inability (for obvious ethical and practical reasons) to construct controlled experiments. The only real exception to this, ironically, is experiments done entirely using computer simulations. An example would be that famous experiment years ago that showed that all you needed to produce a segregated neighborhood was… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

Our present managerial state system rewards psychopaths, sociopaths and narcissists alike with a clearer road to power. When the entire system is based on winning at all costs, the most ruthless and unethical will inevitably rise to the top.

Shit-tier humans float in this system. It needs flushed.

Last edited 4 months ago by Exile
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Wolf Barney
4 months ago

I think most corporations are aware the republicans are a bunch of traitorous cucks who won’t protect them from leftist mobs so they donate money to BLM to safeguard their businesses, just like small business owners who thanked italian mobsters for protecting their shops & restaurants, when in fact the mafiosos were extorting them.

Last edited 4 months ago by sentry
LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Consider the possibility that most executives really do support BLM and are socially liberal. They don’t reject the GOP as impotent but rather because they see it as insufficiently progressive.

There are very few Hank Reardons in corporations these days.

Last edited 4 months ago by LineInTheSand
Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

Agreed. The execs are not concerned with not being protected by the Republicans; rather, they are dyed-in-the-wool AWRs. AWR has coopted capitalism since the collapse of the USSR. From their sulfurous abodes in Hades, Adorno, Marcuse, Foucault and Derrida are applauding.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
4 months ago

“AWR”?

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

That is Ostei’s clever little acronym he won’t stop using that nobody gets because he is a SmartBoy™, so when you ask him he gets to prove how clever he is by telling you Anti-White Racist even though it has never been a term seen anywhere outside of his attempt to also make it a ‘thing’ on the Takimag forums years ago. But he gets an A for effort and a Gold Star like all SmartBoys should get!

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Apex Predator
4 months ago

Instead of further supporting the idea that a racist, “AWR,” is a deathblow criticism, I’d rather try to make racism acceptable.

Of course, I don’t mean that people of one race should be harsh to members of a difference race, but rather that we acknowledge that race is, for most non-whites, the deepest loyalty.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

AWR is just DR3. It needlessly confuses & complicates our message and doesn’t impress the enemy at all. They do not care about hypocrisy because the antifa types are simply sociopaths seeking power and the true believers have installed Shlomo’s firmware upgrade about “only Whites can be rayciss b/c punching down.”

Nunnya Bidnez, jr
Nunnya Bidnez, jr
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

I’m not a racist, I’m a race realist.
I believe in Darwinism, don’t you? ;>)

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Nunnya Bidnez, jr
4 months ago

I understand your distinction and agree with you, but I doubt the normies ever will. It may be easier to just detoxify “racist.”

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

Well, yeah i guess i am a racist. So what? I like that formulation.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

I use the term for one simple reason–truth in advertising. Ever since the rise of the New Left, hatred of the white race has been the motive force of liberals. They should be made to own that fact. If TPTB would simply call a spade a spade viz the War against the Statues, namely calling it a manifestation of AWR, our cause would be modestly advanced.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

In a sense, pointing out the obvious, namely that AWR is America’s master narrative, does make racism acceptable by demonstrating its banality. If we are swimming in AWR, then what’s so terrible about racism against blacks?

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

try to make racism acceptable. –I’ve tried bro. But it is like pounding on brick wall with a coconut. Racist is like concervative kyptonite.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Apex Predator
4 months ago

I’d lik AWR to get traction because it’s accurate, so I ask Osteii, please, spell it out until it takes.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Member
Reply to  Apex Predator
4 months ago

I was puzzled by this acronym too. I always thought it meant “angry white retard” and was related to AWFL – angry white female liberal. I even tried consulting the Ultimate Reference on All Things, https://www.urbandictionary.com/ but just got “ass to waist ratio”.

Do I get an F# for effort?

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  pozymandias
4 months ago

Well! Now you’ve awakened the angry white retard from her torpor! You lads with your acronyms and nyms. Jeez! Thank God a couple of you piped up and squeaked ignorance of weird letter combos. I worked with a handful of mensa goofs in the water company who hated working around us normies because their casting out the weird letter combos, name dropping, theory dropping, math formulas, dates and times, programming skills, the theory of everything, all said with nose in air, was pearls to swine, the swine being me. So spell out at least once in a post what the… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Range Front Fault
Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

Anti-White Racist, i.e. “liberal.”

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  LineInTheSand
4 months ago

My perspective is from the west coast, but I’ve found that most C level types are social liberals who just want social liberalism with lower taxes.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Most corporations are like water. They follow the path of least resistance to the bottom line, cynically or not.

Last edited 4 months ago by Paintersforms
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Paintersforms
4 months ago

I agree

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Paintersforms
4 months ago

Heck, they pay people to do just that, to shave the cost by passing it on.

NJ Person
NJ Person
Reply to  Wolf Barney
4 months ago

Speaking of the market, I just got my latest issue of the Economist. On the front cover is the title “The genius of Amazon”. Have not yet read the article, but I remember the Z-Man mentioning Amazon gaming the sales tax system. Also, during the lock down it is interesting that Amazon is considered “essential” whereas its local retail competitors are “non-essential”. On top of all that is the over the top support of BLM which is insulting to any white person with any common sense. There really is a hostile club.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  NJ Person
4 months ago

Amazon also games the USPS. USPS provides shipping rates that are unprofitable based on their variable costs. They do this because it supports their workforce, with taxpayers picking up the losses. If not for the taxpayers, USPS would charge market rates and have massive layoffs, like all non-subsidized businesses must do.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  DLS
4 months ago

I always take heat for this, but the PO is one of the few things the government does that is actually mandated in the Constitution. The PO just happens to be one of the first agencies to get converged, largely because the government ordered them to hire blacks. It costs less money to mail a check across the country to your bill company’s lock box address than to pay with online banking! Aside from the blacks working there, the PO is mandated to service every postal address and for the same price. Mailing city to city is profitable, but having… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  tarstarkas
4 months ago

And the weirdness is international. Sometimes it is cheaper to pay for something to be sent in the mail from China than it is to have it sent domestically.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
4 months ago

China pays the postage for their businesses to ship to the US. It’s a multi-billion dollar subsidy. I get shit from Amazon all the time direct from China. And no, I’d buy local, but am often caught by deception as to country of origin.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  tarstarkas
4 months ago

In Mexico, you pay in person, because they’ll open the mail and steal any cash or checks. No wonder Western Union does roaring good business there.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  tarstarkas
4 months ago

Yep, and Congress has mandated that they pay the full cost of employee pensions up front, so any surplus is quickly eaten up. Where in the hell, do we find a private company that charges the same ship rate to anywhere in the US? Mail a letter across the street, same as mailing to Anchorage, Alaska.

USPS, as much as I hate them, are proof of the inability of Congress to run a business. On the other hand, as inept as they are, they have been turned into a minority jobs program, so they are never going anywhere.

Member
Reply to  DLS
4 months ago

There seem to be 2 main business models these days.

  1. Be like Amazon and figure out how to reduce your expenses for everything below what it costs to produce the stuff by buying politicians and gaming the law.
  2. Come up with a goofy idea for a startup. This breaks down into your basic underpants gnome business plan as follows:
  3. invent a technology that does not and cannot exist
  4. get funding from stupid rich people
  5. hire a bunch of hipster dipshits and buy them all a top end Mac
  6. PROFIT! – by selling your shares and leaving the country.
Last edited 4 months ago by pozymandias
Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  NJ Person
4 months ago

The end result of the Kovid Krackdown will be the elimination of large swathes of small business and much larger market share for inimical entities such as Amazon. I don’t believe this is entirely coincidental.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
4 months ago

What fries my ass is how Amazon has been touted as a *job creator* in this time of shutdown for opening up several regional distribution centers. New one here is good for a few thousand jobs. No discussion ever made of the 100’s of thousands of jobs lost in the local communities because of Amazon over the last two decades.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  NJ Person
4 months ago

I dumped Economist years ago. Too much poz, leftist. Now I would not read it for free.

NJ Person
NJ Person
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
4 months ago

I read it because it is best general knowledge publication around. Outside of racial issues and U.S. politics, it is still high quality. Yes, it is becoming more left wing and biased. But the alternatives, such as The New York Times, are far worse.  

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
4 months ago

Ya don’t read the Economist, you hold it upon the subway for status points.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  NJ Person
4 months ago

There’s a technical analysis website I follow that considers Economist front covers (as well as other business publications) to often be contrary indicators – ie., perhaps we’ve seen peak Amazon & black lies matter. Gotta love those Xmas deliveries January thru November though…

Owlman
Owlman
Reply to  Wolf Barney
4 months ago

I understand your point. However, since Burger King® endorsed hurling a “shake” at Nigel Forage, no one in my family has given them once cent of business. Same now for the chain, McDemocrat. Gave up pro sports consumption. No more tickets, etc. Got my family, former ardent sports fans, to go along with our boycott. Others I know. Sure, drops in the ocean? Perhaps. But look, to continue to support these entities feels like selling out. Like apathy, 100%. That’s USSR under the boot thinking. We, in my circle, get to say, “fuck them..” and fill in the them. Yes,… Read more »

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Owlman
4 months ago

Amen Brother all I would add is when you multiply your efforts by having a Community that does the same then real change can be accomplished…Just something to ponder…

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

It certainly works for the AWRs.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
4 months ago

Exactly and we have so many examples of it working that you would think we would do the same…I think though it’s going to take more fear and pain for us to do that…

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

The problem is that those on the right side of the political spectrum are simply not as politically motivated as those on the Left. It makes us happier than them, but it also grants them a powerful political advantage over us. If we were as fanatical as them, we could put the fear of God into the corporations.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
4 months ago

Well they have the state backing them as well so that helps just a wee little bit…If we were as fanatical as them without the state we would be rotting in a cell…

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

It could be that AWR fanatacism is what got the state on their side…

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Owlman
4 months ago

And your choice is one option he forgot to mention in his essay. That’s drop out completely. I realize this isn’t always possible or very expensive but for some cases withdrawing your consent is the best option for withdrawing your business.
,

Member
Reply to  Owlman
4 months ago

The Great Corporate Convergence has inadvertently created a new and huge potential market niche. The reason is that it’s gotten to the point where you can almost always safely bet that part of the price of anything that you or someone you know didn’t make is going to support the Poz. It used to be that if you really wanted to punish companies for poz you needed a blacklist. Now all you need is a whitelist of the few non-converged companies. If I were going to start a business I wouldn’t say anything political but just quietly advertise on places… Read more »

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  pozymandias
4 months ago

That’s the game Vox is playing. Hope his comics take off.

Member
Reply to  SidVic
4 months ago

I wish him well. Comics aren’t my thing but I’m glad to see someone doing this.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Wolf Barney
4 months ago

Another arena Zman didn’t address but falls into this paradigm is academia and accreditation. No matter what stripe of higher education you want or an employer desires, college students today are required to submit to a myriad of Prog agitprop courses in the various grievance studies. I’m sure an engineering student would gladly pay less for a stripped down education (germaine to engineering) and the country would benefit from a greater number of engineers turned out more quickly. Cucks and Progs will argue that a college educated person of any stripe must be “well rounded.” This was fine when the… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Penitent Man
NJ Person
NJ Person
Reply to  Penitent Man
4 months ago

The left talks about “de-funding” the police. But what about “de-funding” academia, one of the main sources of our current problems? The right let this problem fester for decades without any effective push back. Unfortunately it may be too late.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  NJ Person
4 months ago

Sadly, it seems that academia’s intellectual atrocities don’t move the needle for vast majority of voters, including those on the right. Many shelves of books have been written on the subject–one by yours truly–but academia continues sailing merrily along.

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  NJ Person
4 months ago

De-fund academia? Harumphh, lets not get hasty.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Wolf Barney
4 months ago

British Lives Matter?

Woops, guess not. I denounce myself and everyone involved.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
4 months ago

The Bubba Smollett hoax is about to render NASCAR irrelevant. As for the larger point, what is about to take out sports is cord-cutting. People below 45/50 simply do not watch televised sports as did the ones before them. It’s all going down.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Jack Dobson
4 months ago

That demographic tends to obtain its endorphin spikes through social media and not a bunch of beasts slobbing around with some type of ball. It was also feminized and so contact sports like boxing do not hold appeal among them.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

And their attention spans are not much longer than that of the average teacup poodle.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
4 months ago

I dated a teacup poodle once. When it was over, I sold her to a Chinese wet market and stood there as she was slowly processed.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Jack Dobson
4 months ago

Normal People are terrified to publicly question any narrative where blacks are terrorized by whites. Jussie Smollet was a year ahead of the curve…no one would doubt him now.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  ProZNoV
4 months ago

Jussie Smollet …no one would doubt him now
You would know instantly that Jussie was hoaxing if you were living through a brutal Chicago winter. The bleach would freeze solid. Nobody and I mean nobody would just stand around with a noose waiting for a victim to attack. You’d zip-tie him to a convenient lamp post and nature would do the work for you within minutes. Even the blacks here knew it was a hoax from the get-go.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

If Smollett would have given a somewhat plausible story he would have gotten away with it. Everyone with the ability to think would still doubt him now, the difference would be the Chicago PD wouldn’t dare conduct the investigation they did to prove he was lying.

NJ Person
NJ Person
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

Perhaps the blacks knew, but major Democrat politicians and the MSM did support Smollet.

Captain Obvious
Captain Obvious
Reply to  NJ Person
4 months ago

Including the State’s Attorney, Kim “so not foxy” Foxx.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  NJ Person
4 months ago

Oh heck they all know, and laugh at how stupid the “higher IQ whites” really are. We fall for the most obvious s**t.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
4 months ago

Yes. Just look at the imbeciles who awarded the Towson debate team the championship. Those gibbering Hutessas couldn’t speak an intelligible sentence of English, let alone construct plausible arguments, and yet…

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
4 months ago

Haha, you are an old crank. I’m still steamed about the Towson debate win too. But we probaly couldn’t have better advertising for our side if we payed for it. How anybody could watch that and not immediately join our thing is beyond me. Should have flipped alot of AWRs our way (see what i did there)

Last edited 4 months ago by SidVic
Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  SidVic
4 months ago

As Derbyshire often says, people just can’t stomach too much reality.

Owlman
Owlman
Reply to  Jack Dobson
4 months ago

I’ll see you and raise you ten. The Gen Z kids I know do not spend a cent on Netflicks and their ilk. They have been savvy enough for YEARS to steal the content these rotten companies pimp their stock prices by selling Boomers.

b123
b123
Reply to  Owlman
4 months ago

Depends. Alot of Gen Z women pay for Netflix. Of the Gen Z / late millenial men I know, not a single one pays for cable, or Netflix.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Jack Dobson
4 months ago

After seeing what the Denver Broncos did during the Groyd Riots, I’ve never been happier I cut the chord on rooting for them/NFL in general a few years ago.

ExNativeSon
ExNativeSon
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Sportsball people always say kneeling during the anthem had nothing to do with disrespecting the flag. And ironically they are correct. It has to do with spitting on their white fan base and watching that base pay to come back for more. It certainly must be a dopamine high to see people you hate actually pay you to spit on them.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

“Groyd”! Nice abbreviation of George Floyd, succinct.

Barnard
Barnard
4 months ago

People still have to be willing to sign up for TV services that sell ESPN as part of their bundle. There are multiple streaming services that don’t include ESPN. As interest in what ESPN offers declines, there will be a correction in both rights fees paid to leagues earnings for the participants. They can’t force people to watch the circuses. In another shocking sports development, it appears the Bubba Wallce noose incident was most likely a hoax. Given the total lack of proof it happened, speculation is turning towards the “noose” being the rope used to pull the garage door… Read more »

Liberty Mike
Member
Reply to  Barnard
4 months ago

On a related note, Richard Petty won cuck of the day yesterday.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Liberty Mike
4 months ago

Dam’ him and his mustache to hell.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Barnard
4 months ago

Yeah, when I first heard this “news” I said to myself, has there even been a noose incident that wasn’t a hoax? But that thought was depressing as well, when the reports came in on everyone virtue signaling that such bigotry could not be allowed.

The general public is indeed being conditioned to never question the narrative. We are all good little ideologues now.

Last edited 4 months ago by Compsci
Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Compsci
4 months ago

LOL!!!
I’m sorry, C… but I don’t see you or any of the dissidents making for good cannon fodder for the left…😆

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Reply to  Compsci
4 months ago

Never publicly question the narrative.

We’re living in a kind of country that we used to fight.

usNthem
usNthem
4 months ago

You can be their “customer” as long as you either keep your noxious bad thoughts to yourself (assuming they don’t find out about them anyway) or you slavishly toe their ideological line.

Btw, great show last night. Never heard Gottfried before – he’s very good. One of your comments really struck me, and I’m paraphrasing: this is not a revolution by the people wanting to overthrow their rulers, but one in which our rulers are revolting, saying they want a new people. Awesome!

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  usNthem
4 months ago

I didn’t hear the podcast but Z nailed it about this pseudo-revolution. It is terror for hire by the Cloud People. Take note that when Antifa came for Santa Monica, tear gas got deployed in short order.

But the thing about riding the tiger….

Some of the actual Marxists are splintering off Antifa and BLM and going rogue. Hmmm.

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  Jack Dobson
4 months ago

How do we listen to the podcast? Are we still waiting on a link? If it’s on their YouTube page, I can’t find it.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Reply to  Jack Dobson
4 months ago

The entire top 10% Cloud People or the top 1%? What the Soviets called the Nomenklatura.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaedhiel
4 months ago

And functionaries of the Deep State are apparatchiki.

Whitney
Member
4 months ago

“Then they no longer have to be responsive to the demands of the customers.” That’s true of more than just NASCAR. It seems to be true of everything. I am so tired of the phrase go woke go broke because it’s clear they don’t go broke. That and exhortations to vote. What world are these people living in? One thing I am enjoying about this civilization destroying moment we are living through is that there are enough people alive that called Enoch Powell a racist, called Pat Buchanan a racist, called Lawrence Auster a racist who are now faced with… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Whitney
4 months ago

Conservatism always was based on a lie about equalitarianism. Now that it is a failed ideology those who subscribed to it are coming to that realiziaton.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Jack Dobson
4 months ago

Agree it should be equalitarianism but it’s actually egalitarianism. The perversities of the English language, that sounds like it’s a philosophy for being a bird of prey. 😀

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Whitney
4 months ago

It’s satisfying that Powell, Pat, Auster et al are proven right, but at the same time society is clamping down on discussing the things they’ve said. So the lies will continue…

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
4 months ago

It is almost as if the market selects for sadists who despise their customers.

It probably partly does. Psychopaths are often ‘winners’, they dont waste time or energy brooding over morality.

sentry
sentry
4 months ago

I’m thinking a society which permits diversity of ideas is not sustainable, due to humans(& animals in general) being competitive & selfish creatures. It’s nice to think that the republican or the old christian monarchic values will take precedence over other ideas simply cause they are objectively better, but that’s not how reality functions. The more machiavellian & stubborn a group is the more chances it has to push its ideas forwards despite them being crappy in the first place. USA might have had an open market at some point, or it was less regulated & corrupt at least than… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by sentry
usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Exactly. It might start out with a plethora of various ideas, but as soon as one or maybe two get enough adherents on their side, they first won’t pay attention to the competition, and then eventually try to stamp them out one way or another.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

The US bought into the idea a century or so ago, that capitalism—in the sense of unbridled/unlimited competition—was not always a general good. This pretty much started with public utilities and assigned, but ostensibly regulated, monopolies being awarded (think: electricity, phone, gas, etc.). At that point capitalism had a major leg kicked out from underneath its premise. That thinking has since expanded to any number of businesses and we see that mergers producing oligarchies allowed all the time—only now, little regulated. The only real capitalism we see from time to time (before merger and extinguish) is when a new sea… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Compsci
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Compsci
4 months ago

I agree, whenever a technological breakthrough happens there’s competition for a short period before some oligarchs monopolize that specific market.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Compsci
4 months ago

 that is where the whole concept of a regulated public utility came from. Especially in the early days stringing telephone or Powerline wire was enormously expensive. The government granted those companies monopolies precisely for that reason. They need to adapt that to the 21st century and declare companies like Google and Amazon monopolies or common carriers and regulate them in a similar manner.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
4 months ago

Yep, at least that. But it seems too late. There is not enough political will to do such. The Left likes it just as it is turning out. Cancel culture has won, so why would they destroy one of their most valuable allies?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Compsci
4 months ago

In Mark Twain’s time, “capitalism” was almost a dirty word.

“He’s as ugly as Joey the Horse-faced Boy at the state fair!”

“No– worse. He’s as ugly as a capitalist.”

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

“Curse your new fangled ‘crop rotation’ theory! We don’t need your new ideas! This has always been a wheat field and it always will be a wheat field! If the land has gone sour, just sticking some different crop in the ground isn’t going to fix anything! Don’t you know that?”

Yeah, why would we need any diversity of ideas?

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Hopefully he is not talking about those ideas Vizzini but the ones that are the bedrock of civilization…

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Tell me how much civilization you have when people are starving.

Maybe we could have a special council to tell us which sorts of ideas we’re allowed to have and which we’re not.

Who gets to be on that council? I’m sure they’ll always be fantastic people.

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Read Leviathan (Hobbes book), it adresses many of your worries. An absolut monarch has access to the brightest counselors & the most accomplished experts in their respective fields, these people are capable of adressing any problem the country is facing, a monarchy does not offer a stagnation of ideas & solutions. A regular politician can’t do that, he’s not as well informed as a king is & he’s not groomed into how to properly rule a country from an early age. How can an absolute monarch be compared to bought politicians who must bend their knees to corrupt special interest groups,… Read more »

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Historical evidence, of which we have great amounts, does not support your faith in monarchs.

Leviathan is laughable Utopian idiocy. Only a naif or an imbecile would agree to be a subject under the system outlined.

Imagine Leviathan, but the Monarch is Hillary Clinton. You have no reason to think it wouldn’t be (or someone equally or more terrible).

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Believing absolut monarchy brings starvation is irrational, do you need me to bring examples?
Also, medieval monarchs had nothing to work with in terms of technological development, there were simply not that many books in the past as there are now.
Current scientific developments were brought forth through trial & error. Christianity is at the basis of modern science. Choosing capitalism over any other system won’t instantly lead a country to the invention of planes & modern medicine.
I actually believe war + christianity leads to scientific development, not capitalism, but that’s another story.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Absolute monarchy, or an absolute sovereign has, indeed, often brought starvation. Often intentional. The fact that examples exist on both sides means that having any particular faith in monarchy as an institution is irrational, and Leviathan is absolute government sovereignty on steroids (whether in the monarchical or other forms). I’m not talking about or defending capitalism here, either. A monarchy can be effectively capitalistic in how it functions, depending on the whim of the sovereign. Capitalism is equally as doomed to failure with or without monarchy. The fundamental error that fanatics for any political ideology or system make is the… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Most of history humanity was ruled by monarchs, u hope u do realize how imbecilic it is to claim humans were starving for most of its existence. Cherrypicking moments when commonfolk faced starvation does not mean monarchy brings starvation. U should drop this point already, it’s embarassing.
Have I said anything about recreating Kingdom of Heaven on Earth. Have I mentioned anything about utopias?
The main point of absolute monarchs is that they have the ability & authority to supress certain subversive tribes & they’re much better suited for making important decisions than u’re average politician is.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Jesus, the crop rotation thing was just a hypothetical example of an idea that might not be embraced in a society that didn’t allow diverse opinions. I never claimed that humans have been starving for most of their existence. You are the one obsessing over that as if it’s important to my argument when it is barely even tangential. The history of humans under monarchies is not covered in glory. There is not a single thing in history to recommend actual monarchies over any other system of government, as monarchies have displayed all the negative traits and outcomes other governments… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

The Perennial problem with any Monarch or authoritarian political system is that they are going to prefer the policies that benefit them and their cronies, which are not necessarily the same thing as what is best for the people or the country.

Last edited 4 months ago by Ben the Layabout
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
4 months ago

U mean nepotism? Nepotism is the lesser of all evils, I really don’t care if the monarch’s family & entourage is privileged cause I don’t give a shit about equality. I hate enlightenment values like universalism & equality, I don’t wanna be ruled by politicians, mobs of brown people & jews, fuck them all! Yes, the royals will be above me, they’ll wield power I can never hope to attain. Who cares? That’s a sacrifice I’m very willing to make. As long as they abide christian law & offer the commonfolk protection from oligarchs & the tribe then so be… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by sentry
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Not all monarchies are hereditary. If a monarch’s first born is Hillary-like he doesn’t have to be crowned, this is basic stuff.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Hobbes says the power to appoint the next sovereign should be in the hands of the current sovereign. You don’t get a say, peasant, so shut up.

Gosh, it’s like you have never read any history. Your faith in he discretion of monarchs is really not charming.

This kind of obtuseness goes all the way back to Plato’s Republic — where are you supposed to find all the damn Philosopher Kings and Virtuous Citizens to run the damn place?

There’s a reason “Utopia” means “nowhere” and More’s book was a satire.

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
sentry
sentry
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

A monarch should be able to appoint his succesor, doesn’t matter if its his son or not , what matter is for the succesor to be well suited for the task, he must be brought up to rule.
But if his progeny is Hillary-like, then the state’s christian church should be able to intervene & stop that from happening. There’s a reason why the orthodox church was represented by an eagle with two heads, the monarchy & the church.
Last part of ur comment suggests u are intending to go full troll. Lost interest in continuing this debate.

Last edited 4 months ago by sentry
Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Yeah, I’ve lost interest in this, too. You’re a naive fool.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

You both are talking past each other. Both of you have points, but your taking examples a bit too literally. I’m not trying to white knight anyone, just reading and wondering why the animosity. I understood both of you very clearly. Good points all around and a good thread to be extended another day. Hans-Hermann Hoppe writes extensively to your arguments.

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

I think we’ve identified the prince/blue blood on this thread. So there is that.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

 am I missing humor something here? If my aunt had a dick she would be my uncle? 😄

Maus
Maus
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

“Brightest counselors” and “most accomplished experts.” OK NRx fanboi. I understand that Grima Wormtongue was one of the best.
The only antidote to chaos is speaking the Truth no matter the personal cost. The wise leader knows that the only advisors worth their salt are the truth speakers, not the ass kissers.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Maus
4 months ago

Nice alt account, now GTFO of my face.

Last edited 4 months ago by sentry
Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Maus is a frequent commenter here, as am I. No alt accounts involved, but good job responding like a 13-year-old.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

I don’t think you understood what I meant…I mean having the idea of thou shalt not murder is probably an idea that you shouldn’t change to thou shalt not murder unless you call me a n*gger like what is going on now…

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

I understood exactly what you meant. Now you tell me Who gets to impose on Whom what ideas are civilizational baselines that should not be changed

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

The Community you live in I would say…Where it should be always…

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

How big is a community? What happens when the community next door disagrees? What happens to the losers of that conflict?

Simplistic tribal answers are great, until the world refuses to leave you alone.

Humanity went through all this thousands of years ago.

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

The world will never leave you alone so would you rather face it as a Community or by yourself…On your other questions it all depends on what your Community is made up of…Also why the anger Brother you are usually not this abrupt? Something going on with you that is setting you on edge?

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Sentry is setting me on edge, and idealistic, naive political theorizing is setting me on edge.

It’s not as if we don’t have thousands and thousands of years of history to observe the flaws in all the systems.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

No, a community would be great. But there’s always a bigger, meaner community.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Well I never said it would be easy now did I Brother…Also it’s not worth your health to get worked up over online sh*t😉

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Communities not only protect against outsiders, but also smooth the bumps along the road wrt internal situations that may arise from time to time.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

What happens then is either negotiation or war, Viz.

You are totally spiraling on this.

You cannot devise any human social order without these kinds of dilemmas occurring.

You’re the one who sounds utopian here.

What ideal system do you have in mind that answers any of the questions you’ve posed to any of us in this vein?

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

What I’m trying to tell you isn’t that there’s not an ideal system, that all this advocating for monarchy or tribal communities or any other system is striving after wind. The fault is not in the systems, but in ourselves. I’m trying to tell you that “You’re fucked.”

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

^ “is that there’s not an ideal system”

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Yep, no ideal system. But yet, after several hundred thousand years, here we are. We’ve lived through a lot of bad systems.

Some communities have vanished. Every other community still extent probably has changed beyond recognition—if old enough and we go back far enough. The question is why are we at this point?

Better is worth striving for, perfect is not possible as we are imperfect creatures and fall short. The discussion is well worth having however.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Nah, not f***d. Whites are the Creator’s highest mission on this earth, we were made- MADE- to face this darkness.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Alzaebo
4 months ago

We do OK, but don’t get cocky. We are still fallen. Some White tribes have created systems that are notably more livable than most.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

True, the others fell short, not their fault, we are simply blessed to be the best kludge possible at this time of a work in progress.

A higher percentage of what it takes, not a lock.

That said, we are miles, leagues, light-years beyond the poor unfortunates, and must make the best of the White Man’s Burden.

No crown comes without cost.

I thank Heaven daily for this chance.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

So is that what you tell your kids Vizzini that your fucked might as well not get a job, raise a family, buy a house cause your fucked anyways… Sorry that you’re in a dark mood right now but I’m going to keep advocating for Community because I want my kids to have a chance…

Last edited 4 months ago by Lineman
Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

No, I tell them not to be overly concerned about the form of governance, or to trust that government will treat them fairly.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

The best I hope to do is tell my children how things used to be (now for all practical purposes tossed into the “memory hole”) and how we got here. They really need to know—before they grow old (and impotent as I have)—how things have changed.

They can decide the good, or bad, of the change. But no matter what, they need to learn what the Orwellian phrase, “New Normal”, means. And it’s got little to do with a cold virus.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Which is precisely why any Community should/must be homogeneous. If sub-cons want to fill their rivers with shite and floating corpses, they’re free to do so – in their own shitehole country. If Whites want a country with a generalized Christian baseline while maintaining racial precepts, as we used to, then we could once again live comfortably. Cultural relativism for race realists.

Moss
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

V, do you subscribe to Natural Law?

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Moss
4 months ago

I subscribe to God’s law.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

“I subscribe to God’s Law” is an enormous cop-out in this context.

Let’s play your question game with this.

How big is a god?

What happens when the other tribe has a different god, or a different law for the same god?

What happens when God’s Law says something that science disagrees with?

Like “Thou shalt not rotate your crops?”

Imagine if the Pope was a negrolator who ran interefence for sodomite Cardinals…

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

There is only one God. That’s the side I’ve chosen. I’m not looking for happiness here on Earth. The Pope is just another Earthly, fallible leader.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

So are you going to stand with your Brethren then or just tell us we are fucked…Damn Brother…

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Matthew 6:19-21
“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal.
“But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys, and where thieves do not break in or steal;
“for where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

So Dark to Preaching…When have I ever advocated for storing up earthly wealth here or anywhere else…I’ve always advocated for our people and have put time, effort, and money into seeing our people have a better chance… Shaking my head…

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Time and effort into people are treasures in heaven. I’m sorry if I seem so blackpilled today.

Time and effort into political systems that are just going to fail us, I can’t get as enthusiastic about.

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

No worries Brother we all have black days if you were closer I would invite you over for a meal and we could sit by the campfire afterwords and listen to the creek rushing by and the mountain grouse drumming which sounds like an old John Deere B Tractor trying to start…

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Thanks, seriously.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

That’s why I say there is war between the gods. They’re an ecology, a reflection, a rarified shadow- we are the root reality, not they.

The God the Christians feel and refer to is the force of the Creator, and it is above the gods, just as we embodied are.

Why good? Why ‘love’?

‘Tis the only vibe that works, that fulfils the highest purpose, the Seeding.

A primate model of a heavenly Father, a Zeus, an El, is a two-edged sword.

We can use it’s innate strengths, but needs must go beyond a model suited for children.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Might be somewhat of a strawman here Exile. Nothing in my belief states God hates crop rotation. Let one state first what they believe to be Revelation, then perhaps critique from there.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

You sound like an an-cap or libertarian with this argument.

Who gets to be on the council that decides what’s legal and illegal (aka any government)? Who’s going to watch those guys?

Every form of social constraint can be pushed to an autistic extreme.

The ultimate control on that is legitimacy – once the people refuse to participate and vote with their fists and/or feet, the patrollers have been patrolled.

We saw how your nightmare scenario played out with Pol Pot, FWIW.

Get a grip.

Last edited 4 months ago by Exile
Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

No, I only sound that way because in the context I was arguing against monarchy. I keep having to repeat myself, though. The problem isn’t the system, it’s the people. I quote myself above: The fundamental flaw in all the systems is humans. You can stick humans together in a monarchy, a commune, an anarcho-capitalist blob or what-have-you, and humans will ruin it. Every. Single. Time.You came within a whisper of the truth when you mentioned Christianity.The hope given to Christians isn’t a kingdom on Earth, ruled by men. It’s a Kingdom of Heaven. Humans are too flawed to rule… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Humans are supposed to figure this out.”

Yes, yes we are, intelligence developed as an antibody to that inevitable, mindless Infection that feeds on suffering. I will stand with the greatest Healer in all history.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Chad Hayden
Chad Hayden
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Amen to that. I also engage in the quest for a better political system but, like a man who opines he has reached humility, we fall if we ever presume to have reached an infallible political system. A finished product political system assumes we can stop our self-improvement, our search for virtue, and that is when darkness falls.

Isn’t that what happened in America?

Last edited 4 months ago by Chad Hayden
KGB
KGB
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

And yet, academia’s golden rule is to contradict the prevailing wisdom. The problem is these contradictions take place at a superficial level; their assumptions never differ in fundamentals. For example, they’ll all agree that white people are the bedrock of evil, but they’ll argue over which one of them has been the more oppressed. It’s as if, instead of rotating their crops, they decide to change the alignment of their rows from north-south to east-west and then declare they’ve broken new ground.

Last edited 4 months ago by KGB
Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  KGB
4 months ago

Yet those academics — the most venal and striving among them, no less — are certainly the type who would end up as advisors to Sentry’s flawless Hobbesian sovereign. And the more power they would wield, the worse they’d be. How do I know? Every single government in history, that’s how I know. I mean, look how Sentry describes them:  An absolut monarch has access to the brightest counselors & the most accomplished experts in their respective fields, these people are capable of adressing any problem the country is facing That reads like it was lifted straight out of a… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Absolutely right. This period is a replay of 600-400 BC, when intriguing court priests overthrew the studied engineers, and gave us our ecstasy religions.

The Greeks of 300 BC fell so far, they looked at the mighty works their own ancestors built in 800 BC- and wondered if they had been built by Cyclopeans.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  KGB
4 months ago

NJ Person nailed it when he said defund uni.

We went from theological colleges figuring out the mechanics- “angels dancing on the head of a pin” is a valid engineering question- to using curse wordspells, the ‘abstract’ bullsquat of ‘soft sciences’ to sell lemon loans to confused nits.

They were offered a false promise, unmerited advancement for Monopoly scrip. They should be baking cookies or picking cotton, they and we would both be happier.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  sentry
4 months ago

Interesting back and forth. Because our age has defined the parameters as cradle to grave state governance you’ve all limited this discussion to what sort of throne we should be ruled by. Yet, for most of our existence we were ruled by a balance between throne and altar. Most people had little or no interaction with any form of state government. They were born into, educated in, had their social parameters defined by, pursued their livelihood within, had their duties and rights defined by, we married in, built a family within and were buried within a parish church. We were governed by… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Yves Vannes
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Yves Vannes
4 months ago

Amen Brother like I said you do have a way with words I wish I could convey my thoughts as well as you and some of the other commenters here…

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Yves Vannes
4 months ago

Whale in a pond, and as beneficial to both.

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
4 months ago

so cutting?

Balkan Fanatic
Balkan Fanatic
4 months ago

If I was looking for a picture or a story to illustrates this abysmal age the providence has punished me to live in, this massacred painting would be it
An intentional destruction or an incompetence of the highest order it is not really relevant
This is the story of our age where cowardly, incompetent,corrupt and ugly are new 4 horseman of apocalypse happening in of front of our eyes

https://twitter.com/reviewwales/status/1275155163762884609

Basil Ransom
Basil Ransom
4 months ago

Is this not “The Iron Law of Oligarchy” writ large? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_law_of_oligarchy Any organization, be it a corporation, church, kingdom or political party, grows until a select group within the organization takes over all the essentials and coalesces the power into their own hands. What Michels, Pareto and all those 19th century theorists realized was that the political “science” worked out by the 18th century philosophes was so much bunkum. Hierarchy happens no matter what safeguards or rules are put in place. Fighting reality gets you nowhere. What makes our age such a disaster is that we have institutions grown gargantuan… Read more »

The Booby
4 months ago

The ultimate marketplace of ideas is supposed to be the university. It completely stopped being that in the 60s and 70s when the ultra-left was allowed to assume full control of academia. No one – and the Booby means no one! – did anything or said much about it at the time, not even the people who post on here. Everyone laughed at those silly college kids and assumed the college was a self-contained loony bin that didn’t effect the rest of the world. They were wrong. The new one-party state that emerged in post-secondary seized control of all debate,… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  The Booby
4 months ago

I remember some the looniest college lefties from the 60-70s and they weren’t nearly as bad as today. The true believers went on to infiltrate and take academia, but also that movement bled off most of their deadweight. Those guys had a nominally-functioning society to return to. Today…there’s nothing for the, do except agitate and play video games. If we overcome this thing, all these non-functioning kidults will have to be dealt with. Public works? Military? Re-education camps? God forbid, but some global war?

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Forever Templar
4 months ago

Nope. The CH-47 Chinook has a large tail ramp that can be deployed at altitude. Not cheap but worth it.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

Are you offering to purchase one to help the cause 😉

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Not in the budget. However I was an active parachutist for more than a dozen years and I still have two rigs and gopro. I’ll jump with them and record the videos. We can replay the vids each day at beer-thirty o’clock. I’d do it, too.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

I want an A10.

Just for crop-dusting, OFC.

Captain Obvious
Captain Obvious
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Perfect for corn weevils. Nothing living remains after a good crop-dusting with the A-10. You know what looks like corn weevils? Black protestors. Hmmm.

The Booby
Reply to  Forever Templar
4 months ago

All good points. That said, the Booby neglected to mention the most important act of defiance that all resisters need to do: Cut off your social justice warrior children. That may eve require divorcing your wives. Yes, it’s hard, but the future of your society depends on it. If your children have any sympathies whatsoever for our new political class, cut them off. No money for college, no help with that mortgage, nothing in the will, etc. Give your money to pursuits and causes that are in line with your values and traditions. If the parents of the baby boomers… Read more »

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  The Booby
4 months ago

Cut off your social justice warrior children.
By the time you realize they are social justice inclined it is too late for them, the condition is a terminal illness. They already hate you. They already despise the fact you were enabled to acquire assets. Oddly, they feel entitled to those assets as soon as possible, which means you should change the locks first and then let them have it with metaphoric both barrels.

The Booby
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
4 months ago

Exactly. They need to find out for themselves that the nanny state – the matriarchy – is a sorry replacement for a real loving family. But as you said, by the time they’ve adopted the ideology they already hate you. Those of you who want to believe otherwise are deluded.

Cut them off.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  The Booby
4 months ago

Good to see you again Booby and I agree quit playing in their rigged game and start living where you are part of a Community that cares about and thinks like you…I wonder how bad it will have to get before people realize that it’s their only option…I still get the feeling that people are still waiting for the other shoe to drop before they make that decision…

Last edited 4 months ago by Lineman
The Booby
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Glad to be back, Lineman.

The Booby’s had a hectic six months. Family matters, getting a book out, and getting back from Nicaragua mere days before the lockdown hysteria shut the world down. The blog’s been on hiatus, too.

Hope all’s well with you and yours.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  The Booby
4 months ago

Doing well Brother what’s your books title and I will purchase it?

The Booby
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

Thanks. Gotta be careful of getting doxed these days. Send an inquiry to the Booby’s email and he’ll shoot you a link:

DaBooby@protonmail.com

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  The Booby
4 months ago

Thanks Brother 👍…

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  The Booby
4 months ago

I am a little dissappionted that the book isn’t written using the booby nom de plume. It’s clever cause it makes the largest red pill easier to consider. Who raises thier mental barricades against a booby?

TomA
TomA
4 months ago

Once upon a time, most Americans were hard-working, decent human beings. The environment of the North American continent demanded this as a condition of survival. That was then, this is now. Our current environment is dominated by affluence and the extinction of hardship. As a result, Americans are becoming increasingly soft and stupid. That is the root of all the problems mentioned in this post. A hard people would shed itself of parasites, both at the top and bottom of the social pyramid.

Last edited 4 months ago by TomA
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  TomA
4 months ago

A hard people that are a tribe together can do that otherwise they will get squished like a bug by those employed by the state…

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Lineman
4 months ago

The Jackboot State typically uses CIs that are run into closed communities in order to identify targets. Betrayal is the weakness that does you in. Conduct yourself solely within your own skull and that cannot happen. Smarter is better.

Last edited 4 months ago by TomA
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  TomA
4 months ago

So be the last one eaten then… Sorry I have a family that I want to see grow up to a life worth living and your way is not an option for me…I will continue to build Community even though the risk is there…

Exile
Exile
Reply to  TomA
4 months ago

You can’t accomplish anything against the kind of opposition we face alone.

CI’s are not godlike – in fact they’re usually pretty easy to spot.

If we have dozens or hundreds of communities of determined White people, I don’t see how it’s possible for TPTB to play whack-a-mole with every one & not go broke.

They can’t even police D.C. effectively as things stand now.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  TomA
4 months ago

CI=?

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
4 months ago

Confidential Informant, i.e., spy.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
4 months ago

Confidential informant.

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  TomA
4 months ago

A defensive crouch doesn’t work. Practice discretion, but the fact is with the electronic surveillance we were all doxxed years ago. It is is sitting in a large facility in nevada awaiting a query stroke by one of our masters.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  TomA
4 months ago

TomA, will you ever acknowledge that the very people in the USA have changed significantly and that may largely explain the shortcomings that you note? You don’t really believe all races of people are interchangeable do you?

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  TomA
4 months ago

Hardship waits patiently 😈

Screwtape
Screwtape
4 months ago

”Almost”? Like everything else in the grand inversion, market demand – call it the will of the people, has been flipped and now resides at the bottom. What the market solves for instead is the means to control, to increase the level of captivity. It is no longer joyful competition for the opportunity to serve the needs of the people, but rather competition to ply their particular brand of coercion to the captives. Choice and preferences are not opportunities to create new ways to serve or new customers but are threats to the level of captivity. The saying “if you… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Screwtape
4 months ago

“the grand inversion”- perfect.

An entire sociological discipline in 3 words, you know Who I’m talking about, and the allies they attract like maggots to carrion.

Last edited 4 months ago by Alzaebo
Bill Mullins
Member
4 months ago

I suspect that the axioms are correct and that the system is not truly open. I do know that the market place for ideas is anything but “open”. And it makes sense that someone who is successful would seek to stack the deck in an attempt to ensure their continued success. I see your examples as being more proof that the system is faulty rather than that the axioms are wrong.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Bill Mullins
4 months ago

Perhaps the axioms are internally self-consistent but don’t describe this world? You can create a logically self-consistent system, but that system doesn’t necessary apply to the world in which we live.

Last edited 4 months ago by LineInTheSand
Vizzini
Vizzini
4 months ago

The “free market” theory suffers from the same defect as the “theory of evolution.” In each case, there are two or three required mechanisms, but we only actually see one functioning as described. Ironically, in both cases the functioning mechanism is the same one: “natural selection” or “survival of the fittest.” Survival of the Fittest is a winnowing function: it removes diversity. If you start with 100 companies or 100 species, and the fittest survive, soon you end up with maybe 50 companies or 50 species. Of course, those 50 companies and 50 species are *still* competing and still pushing… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
Exile
Exile
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Viz, if you lived in a socialist Scandi country for a month you would hopefully have a more realistic outlook on how it compares with what we live in here.

You’re black-pilling because you want a perfect system where competition doesn’t lead to monopoly or socialism isn’t subject to government overreach or corruption.

We’re never going to have a perfect system that doesn’t require good faith effort by good people to run ethically and well.

If that’s what you want, you’re never going to be happy with any human social order.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Exile
4 months ago

Not disagreeing with you, as long as you don’t send me to live in Malmo, Sweden. But see, the reason Scandi socialism is reasonably successful isn’t the socialism. It’s the Scandi. I won’t even bother to go into Scandi Socialism’s defects, because it was “good enough” for the time, if not perfect, and a trustworthy population made adjustments to account for defects possible. That’s what I’m trying to get at. The systems don’t particularly matter. The people do. When Minnesota was mostly Scandi immigrants, it was fantastic. They could afford to believe in leftist policies, because they could trust the… Read more »

Last edited 4 months ago by Vizzini
1UnknownSubject
1UnknownSubject
Reply to  Vizzini
4 months ago

Spot on. Lived in and traveled to Scandi for years, grew up in Scandi town in Midwest. Wholeheartedly agree with you.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout