Strange Days

Way back in the time before corona, it was conventional wisdom that shutting down the economy would have dire consequences for the economy. Whether you were on the panic side or the skepticism side, you were sure that locking down the economy was going to be bad for the economy. The stock market losing a third of its value in a week seemed to confirm it. No matter the truth of the virus, the consequences was going to be an unprecedented economic depression.

Here we are four months on and the world does not look like anyone imagined it when this all started. The promised bodies in the streets never materialized. The virus has thus far been a sever flu season hyped up by mass media. The promised depression has not made an appearance. The streets are still mostly empty during the work day and many businesses are still closed. Those that are open have all sorts of restrictions and they seem to have fewer customers.

What we don’t have is people out banging their pots and pans demanding the government do something about the economy. A lifetime ago a handful of white people showed up at state capitols demanding the end of the lock downs, but that soon gave way to swarms of blacks and Antifa promising to burn the cities. Otherwise, the productive portion of society seems to have gone back to sleep. Those working from home, work from home and those not working stay home.

The weekly jobless claims say that 30 million Americans are currently unemployed, but no one seems to notice or believe it. Of course, no one should believe the official statistics from the government and other sources. The only thing true about these numbers is they are constantly revised. We do know that 30 million people are still collecting unemployment benefits at the moment, so at least that many people are not working, but would like to be working.

The virus and the economy are a good example of partisanship. The panic crowd, which overlaps considerably with the anti-Trump, Hamilton listening set, was so sure the virus was a plague sent by the gods because of Trump they are convinced the hospitals are overrun and people are dying in the streets. Similarly, the skeptics of modern economics are so sure the system cannot last, they believe we are in a grinding depression that will explode into civil unrest at any moment.

What we are living through right now is probably one of those times when the partisan framework gives way to a new partisan framework. Perhaps in liberal democracy there needs to be a regular molting of the old partisan skin so a new one can emerge and refresh the debate. After all, forty years ago, the Left was endlessly going on about free speech and the dangers of corporate media. Today, it is the Right that champions speech and opposes corporate media.

Putting that aside, what we are seeing in the economy runs counter to pretty much everything we have been told for generations. The government should not be able to manufacture trillions of dollars without causing hyperinflation. This was something everyone, Left and Right, knew was true not so long ago. Here we are with the US debt at 23 Trillion, a number so large no one can imagine it. So large, no one bothers discuss it anymore. No one cares about the debt.

Similarly, we have been told for generations that the US savings rate was so low that the typical American could not afford to skip a paycheck. Small business was so strapped it could not go a month without business. We’re four months into the lock downs and we don’t have soup lines. Instead, Americans are paying down credit card debt at a record clip. In fact, credit card debt is now the lowest it has been in over a decade and headed for unprecedented lows.

One driver of the credit card debt decline is the collapse in spending. This makes sense, given those empty streets and closed shops. Still, people worried about money tend to hoard cash, rather than pay down debt. You can always tell the credit card company to go screw, but you can’t do that with the landlord, the mortgage company or the grocery store. Contrary to conventional economic wisdom, Americans are choosing to pay down their debts right now.

The weirdness in the economy is just one item. No new movies or television have come out since the panic and no one seems to care very much. Sports entertainment has been shuttered and no one seems to care. All of the spring and summer youth sports have been cancelled. This time of year, kids into baseball, lacrosse, soccer and big-time football would normally be in summer leagues. Their parents would be toting them around the country. None of that is happening.

You can probably spend the better part of day listing the things that used to be a fixed part of daily life that are now gone. More important, they are gone and no one seems to notice or care. Talk to people with kids in the summer sports and they will tell you the kids have quickly adjusted. They are doing other things. Parents with small kids are quickly adjusting to life at home with the kids around all day. Kid sounds are the background music of Zoom sessions.

The point of all this is we are like people who have been dumped out of their canoe in the rapids and we are now being swept down river. All sorts of things are happening to us and around us, but we have no way of getting our bearings. The thought of getting back into canoe has long passed. Now it is just a matter of surviving each minute until the river calms or we bash our head into a boulder. We have no perspective and no way to gain perspective until we reach flat water.

That means we really have no idea where this will all end. Maybe that’s why there is a strange calm over daily life. Maybe that’s why people are instinctively paying down debt and hunkering down. It may not make total sense, but in uncertain times, simplifying the household finances becomes a point of stability. Again, it is hard to know, as we are all just being swept along. Still, the one thing we can know is that we are being swept along by forces outside our control.

Note: The good folks at Alaska Chaga are offering a ten percent discount to readers of this site. You just click on the this link and they take care of the rest. About a year ago they sent me some of their stuff. Up until that point, I had never heard of chaga, but I gave a try and it is very good. It is like a tea, but it has a milder flavor. It’s hot here in Lagos, so I’ve been drinking it cold. It is a great summer beverage.


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MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
1 month ago

How long can the government pay people not to work without causing hyperinflation?!?!

Indefinitely, or so it seems.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

If those people weren’t doing much productive in the first place, i.e. not much reduction in real goods and services, and the money doesn’t circulate much in the economy, you won’t get inflation.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

I think there are a lot of jobs that involved nothing more than red tape and paper-pushing that weren’t doing much to contribute to the economy in the first place, i.e. those jobs barely existed in real economic terms.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Over 1/3 of the economy is government spending. A good chunk of that is make-work. There is no way this 1/3 is not imposing additional costs in the private sector. Complying with regulation is a not insignificant portion of business spending.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

Oh for sure, tars. I believe that at least 75% of every dollar spent on the defense industry is skimmed off by myriad waste mechanisms.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

Yeah its nearly 40% of the GDP. However most of this bloat is caused by the efficiency trap. We simply don’t need at least half, maybe more of all workers and without money from jobs, we get no consumers and no future consumers except through 3rd world immigration Note within a generation, they stop having kids too. Latino TFR is where White TFR was in the 80’s (1.8 or so) Unless you basically eliminate economies of scale and tightly control automation, jobs are gone. We are right now in a position where you can work from home, order nearly everything… Read more »

Lady Dandy Doodle
Lady Dandy Doodle
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

This is what a great book, “Bullshit Jobs”, says.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Lady Dandy Doodle
1 month ago

I’d like to see Mike Rowe in charge of the labor departmentcomment image

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Lady Dandy Doodle
1 month ago

Pocket service just served me an article today that mentions that book. The article itself is bullshit 🙂 What I found amusing is that they self-censor in the text (“bulls—“) but have no problem using the full name of the book 😀
https://getpocket.com/explore/item/you-re-not-just-imagining-it-your-job-is-absolute-bs?utm_source=pocket-newtab-global-en-GB

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

Gold is back near it’s all-time high, reached in July, 2011. Just sayin’.

Crispin
Crispin
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 month ago

Not quite all time, yet…
Nominal gold all-time high was $1,917.90 an ounce Aug 22, 2011
[ $1917 in 2011 = $2185 today ]
Inflation-adjusted all-time gold price was $850 in January 1980.
$850 in January 1980 = about $2650 today

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Crispin
1 month ago

What is curious, and has been true for years, is that gold seems over-valued by at least some historical commodity prices. Far from perfect, and we’ve had this conversation here before 🙂 but just consider the cost of a gallon of gas in 1929 (Gold $20/oz) and today. You may choose any commodity you like but it must have existed back then! No satellite phone calls…

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

Sooner or later all the money printing is going to screw something up. If I had to take a wild guess as to what might be happening ….. I’d say that a lot of young people probably dumped their apartments and moved back home with their parents. If they still have a job – maybe they’re now working from home, and have plenty of extra money left over which they use to pay down their credit cards. That would explain both of the things that Zman noted. I know of at least 3 cases for 20 somethings where this exact… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

I agree that “sooner or later all the money printing is going to screw something up,” but what has been so amazing and educational is how long an economy that is untethered from reality can prosper.

It may be that as long as the USA has a relatively productive economy, the biggest military, and is the world’s reserve currency, that the USA can continue to defy economic reality past the point that we are all dead. Who knew?

Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 month ago

I’ve long marveled at the US economy’s seemingly unique ability to float its massive bulk in the sky. Ultimately it’s the question of “where does Becky her money to spend at da club?” She has a job (still). What does she do though? Well, before the Beer Flu she went to meetings a lot where she and Rachel, Jessica, and Jennifer would discuss matters of great import to the large company they worked for – things like racial justice, the environment, the need to welcome immigrants, the need for more cultural sensitivity, removing “gendered” language from the text on the… Read more »

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

I’ve accepted “Sooner or later all the money printing is going to screw something up” as gospel my entire adult life.

After the last 120 days? I’m not so sure.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

Your whole life was spent in conditions where inflation was easily possible.
LBJ’s guns and butter during a time with high monetary velocity do to population growth production and consumption allows inflation.
Right now there isn’t much for most people to spend money on other than debt reduction.
That said once the economy collapses in a few months, baring more unemployment and there are 30 million or more homeless. things will change and we will see consequences,

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  abprosper
1 month ago

I wish that were true. I’ve managed to lose quite a bit in the stock market without leaving home 🙂

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

I have hearing about the consequences of money printing being just around the corner for all of my life. While the cumulative effect of the money printing has taken a good deal of our income and wealth, the highest periods of inflation were tame and relatively short lived. The ECB and the BOJ have been printing money like it’s going out of style for a long time, especially the BOJ. Japan doesn’t have the reserve currency either. A lot of the Peter Schiff types think this all happens in a vacuum. It doesn’t. The central banks collude with each other… Read more »

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

He’s predicted 16 of the last 2 recessions!

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

That’s because the money was more evenly distributed so it found its way into rising prices of consumer goods.

now the money is heavily concentrated at the top so it finds its way into things that wealthy people spend money on, namely houses, the markets, luxury goods, etc. prices of luxury homes, goods, and things like yachts are through the roof

if the average Joe received more of that new money, you can bet the inflation would be insane, speaking of inflation in the technical academic sense of the basket of goods utilized to estimate CPI

KeepTheChange
KeepTheChange
Reply to  Falcone
1 month ago

That’s a very reasonable explanation … I guess $20 million doesn’t buy the house or yacht that it used to!

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  KeepTheChange
1 month ago

Nope. And look at the prices of luxury homes. In every mid size and large city you will find dozens over $10 million. That used to be unheard of.

Even the upper class markets you are seeing hundreds at $1 million and higher

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

“Then suddenly one morning out of the mist – a whole bunch of ships appeared……………………. and that little vacation was OVER.”

I got three words for you. ” The great reset.”
https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/gore-kerry-radical-great-reset-capitalism-justin-haskins

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 month ago

Looks like Justin Haskins is reading Martin Armstrong. Armstrong issue a pay-for report a couple of weeks back titled “The Great Reset” – which talked about the exact same things that Haskins is talking about in his article. I have the report – just haven’t had the chance to read thru more than the 1st ten pages or so. Long story short: The virus is just a mask for machinations behind the scenes – and the global warming crowd – which if you remember has been screaming about ” we only have 12 years!” for a couple of years now…….… Read more »

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

“As somebody said a long time ago: “In politics nothing happens by accident” ”

Agreed.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 month ago

Except Chappaquiddick.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

Short of a true 1984 type surveilance state, I doubt they will ever completely abolish “cash” or at least a barter black market. Inefficient yes, but there will always be a need to buy goods and services in quantities not approved of by The Planners, or unapproved by them at all. And for that there’s cash, or more likely, an obsolete form of it when it was made of a precious metal.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

The unemployment and other programs stop at the end of this month which means the US will undergo a complete collapse by the end of the year. No wonder people are paying down debts Hyperinflation requires both a currency crisis and as CSC noted money to have velocity. The currency crisis won’t happen unless the US implodes simply because there are no other options to dollars, Yen, , Euros and Rubles all fall short and while the Yuan might seem like a good idea, China is not in as good a shape as they want you to think. As for… Read more »

Toasty
Reply to  abprosper
1 month ago

Trump and congress just extended the unemployment benefits for another month. Then they’ll extend it again, no chance it gets cut off before November.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Toasty
1 month ago

Where did you read that?

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Toasty
1 month ago

I’m waiting for the rent freezes and rent forgiveness to end. Then watch out and make sure you are far from a big city

Guest
Guest
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

In a credit money economy like ours money printing is inflationary but debt destruction is deflationary. We are experiencing massive debt destruction right now through bankruptcies and debt discharge. As long as money printing does not vastly exceed debt destruction there will be no broad-based inflation, because the money supply remains approximately constant.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
1 month ago

“What comes next?” That’s what I keep thinking and I truly don’t know.

Trapped On Clown World
Trapped On Clown World
Reply to  Wolf Barney
1 month ago

It does feel like we’re in a calm before the storm phase. While most people don’t think more than a few months in the future, I’ve pressed them on the calamity of what we’ve done and they can at least agree it’s unprecedented. Whats most concerning to me is the fact that our leadership seems to be in a trance. Mindlessly issuing new restrictions on social and economic activity. The governor of NJ just mandated masks outside yesterday! Texas has closed establishments that get more than 50% of their revenue from liquor. Its like they can’t think through what will… Read more »

Trojan House
Trojan House
Reply to  Trapped On Clown World
1 month ago

Yes, they certainly can see past the end of their noses at the best of times and this will only make it worse. What I think they care about is looking like a “hero,” you know, saving millions of grandparents. That is why they are still peddling fear.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Trojan House
1 month ago

I think there are a couple factors behind that. They know that old people vote, and they know that they can only get away with so much voter fraud.

Thus, they are going to peddle anything they think that old people will like, such as mandatory masks outside.

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Seems to me they’ve been killing off the old people so they can’t vote.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Hoagie
1 month ago

Here in Chiraq the voting right persists after death. No joke.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Hoagie
1 month ago

They kill off the old to make sure the old vote the right way. Every old person who died from the Chinese flu is voting Democrat in November.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Trapped On Clown World
1 month ago

“It does feel like we’re in a calm before the storm phase.”

You summed it up perfectly, no way current affairs will lead to anything good.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

Yea but most people are acting like the calm will last a long time or the storm will never come…

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Lineman
1 month ago

I think it’s for the best. Thing is sane whites can’t fix their own societies as long as current elites aren’t removed, system crashing down is the best way for that to happen.

Moss
Member
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

…system crashing down…
A decision matrix is mandatory now to gauge how likely you are to get pulled down with that System (physically, financially, work, food, housing). Removing yourself from it, and your ongoing investment in it’s existence, as much as possible, is key.
Observing the masses paying down debt is not surprising. Most people see more clearly the noose tied to the millstone that is their indebtedness. Rejecting debt slavery, and it’s control of you, is easier when you are not distracted by the mythical modern life you’ve been fooled into living.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Moss
1 month ago

This is the point where people either cut back and prepare for real, or simply carry on and hope for the best. Both are coping strategies, and either one gets you from where we are now, to wherever it is that we are going. People are quite adaptable, to a point. After that, all bets are off, and prepping versus hoping becomes a huge factor. We aren’t to that point yet, and may actually be far off from it. The de facto UBI mentioned by Vizzini below, as well as the systemic fat that can be burned through, suggest a… Read more »

Moss
Member
Reply to  Dutch
1 month ago

Dutch, “Systemic Fat” has been proven true by virtue of the Make Work drones not working, and the lack of structural effect on the economy (for now). But what of the physical / safety aspect of our society? The Hang Fire phase makes sense to me economically and business-structure wise, but the physical danger we are all now exposed to is a new variable to me. Not that I had not considered it but it was way down the list of concerns. Proximity to the concentration of dindu’s is now a major concern. Roving mobs are one thing, but most… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Moss
1 month ago

Avoid proximity, and go as grey as possible to the outside world. You just know the “oth-oor-ities” are itching for the opportunity to make examples out of a bunch of people on our part of the spectrum. Avoid being one of them…

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Moss
1 month ago

Yeah but – I think prior to maybe 4 months ago – most people never really considered the fact that “system crashing down” would include enraged mobs of diversity coming to their own house – and burning the place down with them inside – all the while yelling “racist!” as you tried to evacuate your wife and kids thru the side door. Most of the prepper types I know – even in the most extreme cases …. might move away to a more rural location , but that’s often so they can grow a garden and stay away from “cities”… Read more »

Moss
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

Carlsdad, beyond Maslow’s basics (to paraphrase food, water, shelter, physical security) I’ve now added Community to the reason to retreat to rural areas.
Weathering implosion of the modern world is made easier with community. I’ve looked around my AO (mid-size, southern city) for my people, discreetly, for 3 years. If those men are here, they don’t want to be found. So we are withdrawing our contribution to this community for greener pastures. And even if they are not much greener community-wise, a little land far from little Africa is a win for my family.

Member
Reply to  Moss
1 month ago

I’ve already done this. Unfortunately my matrix has mostly zeros in it. Stuck in a small, overpriced apartment, shitty job and was in the middle of attempting a career change when 2020 hit, food is all from the store, my patio garden will never supply more than a few herbs, water is city water supply. We’re not as fucked as Manhattanites but close to it. The upside here is that it’s a low density suburb around here with only “good” diversity and I’ve got a good car to escape in. My wife and I are cheaper than Jews too so… Read more »

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

I beg to differ. A system crash would almost certainly lead to them having even more wealth and power over us. Things don’t get better by getting worse.

miforest
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

Oh yes , they will be the ones issuing the new money. ie they will have it ALL

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  miforest
1 month ago

Ummm… They already do. If the system crashes, the pitchforks are pointed at them.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

If by pitchforks you mean AR15’s , yes.
This is why the BS race riots were encouraged, It distracts them from aiming at the oligarchs for a while.

Moss
Member
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

I’m with you skeptic. Chaos hurts them overall. They are losing control of their pets. While I hope to have mine far from the implosion, it would be entertaining for a bit to watch.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Moss
1 month ago

“They are losing control of their pets.” This is a key point most people haven’t hoisted in. What we’re witnessing is not some evil Beethoven orchestrating a symphony of destruction. Rather, it is a swarming ensemble of hobgoblins and demons conjured by elite demiurges who have overestimated their own power.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 month ago

how have the elites lost control if the cops were told to stand down, losing control means army not being able to bring order.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  sentry
1 month ago

The point is that, while the elites do have the power to stand down, they do not have the power to control when, where and how destructively the rioters riot. If they think they can put this djinn back in the bottle whenever they like, they are mistaken.

Moss
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

Tarstarkas. I agree with your statement at face value. Since power comes from the end of the gun, how does the sheer volume of private ownership play into this strange new world we find ourselves in? I believe there will be a fight. So a crash suggests, to me anyway, that they will eat many of their own, thereby reducing their number of troops I (or my progeny) will have to deal with. That’s a good thing IMO. Allowing them to strengthen their current position while sucking life and wealth out of the productive of us seems like a terrible… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Moss
1 month ago

I hate to oversimplify things but power is basically really 2 things – arms and organization. The elite knows we have the former, this is why they try so hard to keep us from attaining the latter. People have been talking a lot about 1968 here lately. The same* scum caused the problems back in 68. Back then, though, there was no increasingly totalitarian framework of “soft power” to keep people like us from meeting openly and even discussing “self defense options”. Events like the Spanish Civil War and of course, the rise of the NSDAP were still fairly recent… Read more »

sentry
sentry
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

That’s my greatest fear. Elites coming up with a “solution” that majority embraces cause they’re scared & hungry.
At that point I’ll know the end times are coming & that nothing can be done to reverse it. I am not that black pilled yet.

MBlanc46
MBlanc46
Reply to  Trapped On Clown World
1 month ago

The federal bailout will come immediately after the inauguration of Joe Biden. Even if the Repubs manage to hold on to the Senate, they’ll be falling all over themselves to throw money at the states.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  MBlanc46
1 month ago

We have been experiencing ongoing bailouts as far as the eye can see. The Biden difference is that the future bailouts will have an additional cost, which is the demand for an overt personal celebration of government’s intrusion and takeover through the various bailout strategies. Anyone participating in any way in them, will have a feminine-style personal shit-test placed on them as an essential part of the process.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Trapped On Clown World
1 month ago

One lesson people should be taking from the events of the last 5 months is that the rules are not static, objective and unchanging natural forces. But rather they are arbitrary and can change on a dime. So far, 2020 has been the year of the unthinkable and there are 6 more months left. Whatever bad scenario you can envision, do yourself a favor and remember that the rulers make the rules and can change them or not enforce them or selectively enforce them at their pleasure. The rules are not for you. You OBEY the rules, they make them.… Read more »

Trapped On Clown World
Trapped On Clown World
Reply to  tarstarkas
1 month ago

The rulers make many rules but there are some aspects they cannot control. Namely, underlying reality itself.

Money is a store of value, how long can we continue to provide value to 30% or more of the population who is contributing nothing to the common wallet? How long can we attack those individuals who are providing the actual value for our world? The farmer, the machinist, the tradesmen?

I have a growing fear that nothing but the underlying reality of the world will stop our leadership from attempting to create utopia.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Trapped On Clown World
1 month ago

The Utopains have been a problem since the US was a colony but let me ask you this.
How do you plan to make use of those 30% or more of people who no longer have use because of your drive for efficiency?
A lot of people on the Right think they are entitled to safety, security or property rights, they need to think again.
Those are not inherent or natural but part of the social contract and if you have no agreement with those people , you are screwed.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Trapped On Clown World
1 month ago

In the meantime, the intire anglosphere is ass deep in Chines spys and collaborators. Just sayin, things are complicated. Everybody has plans for the world and America is in their way.

miforest
Member
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
1 month ago

I’ve posted this in a few places here , so I will leave it for you. the chineese actually look spooked by this and are turning inward . this is a great channel for seeing the world outside our media box.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3pCyoEFX9I&t=1002s

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  miforest
1 month ago

“…the chineese actually look spooked by this and are turning inward…”

That Video just confirms what I said above. The world is lousy with Chinese spies and collaborators. And as far as China looking to solve some of their internal problems, that won’t dissuade them from their imperialist aspirations.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Wolf Barney
1 month ago

If there is a mass wave of evictions, an American version of Mad Max, the first movie though, not the sequels. I have no idea how we will deal with this slow rolling crisis especially with many of those people having nowhere to go, being paranoid and well armed. The only way around this is to put an end to the shutdowns by fiat and to hand out another 6 months of unemployment but this will not fix anything, only stabilize it at a lower level. Late Stage Capitalism had to go for a real fix but while the Left… Read more »

Fulwar Skipwith
Member
1 month ago

A long time ago, in the 20th century– we had an idea that we could simply bomb civilian populations into submission.

After we killed a few tens of millions this way, we decided it didn’t work, because people have a remarkable ability to adapt to a “new normal”.

The “new normal”, of the virus, and the protests, has always been the left’s best weapon.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Fulwar Skipwith
1 month ago

When did “we” decide that it didn’t work? I must have missed that. Because last I checked the US was still attempting to bomb the Mideast and Afghanistan into submission – and it wasn’t working. I really don’t think there was any concious decision or recognition of reality made on that one – it was simply that the cost of the bombing got too high (for us) – so we stopped trying. If you’ve been watching – the lefties still think the bombing thing works – otherwise you wouldn’t have reps from CA threatening to use nukes on the rest… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

The wars are not intended to be won.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
1 month ago

Canada has now spent as much money on the pandemic, as it spent fighting the second world war.

Economies fail slowly to start, and then all at once. The financial hair cuts and bank holidays are on the way, make no mistake.

Jacques Lebeau
Member
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 month ago

Already creeping in. A friend at an aerospace engineering company has been told the whole department will be taking a 12 day “unpaid holiday” this year. And that is probably just the start.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Jacques Lebeau
1 month ago

Meanwhile, “educators” continue to get their full paycheck despite not having lifted a finger in 4+ months

MBlanc46
MBlanc46
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

Too important to fail.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

Harvard will only hold virtual classes. Tuition will be what it has always been. Nice gig.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Yves Vannes
1 month ago

True but given the costs and the low value on online courses a lot of people are not going to Harvard now.
They might be able to cut costs enough to avoid an immediate haircut but long term, they are humped.

Lady Dandy Doodle
Lady Dandy Doodle
Reply to  Yves Vannes
1 month ago

Literally only paying for the diploma on that piece of paper when you fork out 50K/year and don’t get to look at the beautiful ivy covering those wall.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Jacques Lebeau
1 month ago

Yep – definitely already creeping in. I have been watching online equipment and bankruptcy auctions for a while. I pickup good deals on equipment to fill out my shop that way, as well as things like milsurp generators and vehicles. Judging by the amount of auctions I see for companies that supply the oil and gas industry with pipes and processing equipment – I’d say they’re hurting …. a lot. I also see quite a few large auto parts manufacturing facilities showing up , as well as lots of smaller machine shops and so forth. LOTS of restaurants and food… Read more »

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

The board-ups vice the ‘for rent’ signs in Chicago are a major tell. Landlords here almost unanimously being of the small-hat variety. Self-gassing and I love their self-hatred and destruction.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
1 month ago

They are and will be the ones receiving the “loans”, let’s just call them what they are, bail-outs, from Uncle Sam. If any crumbs are left, small businesses will get some.

MikeCLT
MikeCLT
Reply to  Jacques Lebeau
1 month ago

Lots of businesses are giving haircuts to senior employees, at least. Law firms and accounting firms have cut partners draw 25% and associates pay 10-15%. And that was with PPP. I expect things to get worse after the election. That’s when we hit calm waters before we go over the progressive waterfalls. (Even if Trump wins).

David Wright
Member
1 month ago

For one thing, the low income earners are doing better than ever with the Feds subsidizing unemployment. That’s going to end I hope.Maybe the credit paydown was helped by stimulus checks?

As for economic effects of all this, could it be it is still coming?
Possibly we entering a new golden age or prosperity and love.

Liberty Mike
Member
Reply to  David Wright
1 month ago

How do we KNOW that consumers are actually paying down credit card balances at record rates?

Note, the source of that information, cited in the Zero Hedge article to which Z linked, is the Fed.

Note, too, that Z wrote, “no one should believe the official statistics from the government or other sources.”

Some sources are credible, but I wouldn’t include the FED or any banking or financial institution in that realm.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Liberty Mike
1 month ago

I believe it, but would need more info. For example, suppose you were like the typical low income credit card user before COVID-19–who would pay minimum on balances and always seemed to use the card as soon as there was some room to put more on the account. Now comes COVID lockdown. You’re scared and can’t go out much. You stop impulse spending, you have a little extra cash. You continue to pay the minimum due, but fail to spend any of the newly available free credit line. Voila—instant pay down! But I would not necessarily call that a sea… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  David Wright
1 month ago

My wife tried to get a piano moved a month ago, and the owners of the moving companies we talked to wanted the work, but complained most of their staff was still on unemployment, and had no incentive to go back to work.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

I had a conversation the other day with the manager of the local pizza chain – she said she is DESPERATE to hire drivers (who make $20-$25 per hour including tips), but no one is biting because of that extra $600 per month from Uncle Sam.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

per week

Dave
Dave
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

Here in the Rotten Apple, outside of “essential services” and the building trades, no one wants to dump the unemployment checks and go back to work.
Once the UI runs out, then, and only then, will people start going back to work en masse.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Dave
1 month ago

What incentive is there to ever end that unemployment gravy train?

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  MemeWarVet
1 month ago

We have effectively created a guaranteed minimum income.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Hoagie
1 month ago

It gets better. ” The great reset ” will include reparations. I have a feeling that’s going to turn into a ” be careful what you wish for ” situation.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Dave
1 month ago

No they won’t. There aren’t that many jobs to go back too. And as to Hoagie’s point about UBI, very true but I tend to see this as inevitable.
We have too many workers to make jobs pay enough for anything more than Netflix and an apartment.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

I’ve had trouble getting the usual guys I have doing farm labor to come out. They’re all collecting unemployment and while they theoretically want the work, day-to-day it’s just easier to stay at home and putter with their race cars.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

“…but complained most of their staff was still on unemployment, and had no incentive to go back to work.”

Hahahaha! Socialism triumphs again! 😀
comment image

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

Good. Half our problem is wage arbitrage (down by half since the 70’s) and wages have needed to come up for a long time.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  abprosper
1 month ago

I admit I don’t know the term. Funny, I had always heard the opposite: that by world standards, the USA’s wages are too high (which should be the same as saying the rest of the world is “too low”, it depends on your reference.)

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

No worries. I’ve learned a loot of stuff from Our Thing.
The idea that a nations wages are too high is globalist/free trade driven and therefor inimical to DR values.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

In a business we are intimately aware of, the owner was asked by employees to lay them off so they could get the $600 on top of unemployment.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Compsci
1 month ago

And, if the owner were an astute businessman, he woud have said “Yes, but not until you’ve stayed on the payroll long enough until I can turn the PPP loan into a grant.” 🙂

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  David Wright
1 month ago

The subsidized unemployment will become a permanent feature. It is part of the pacification plan that will follow the St. Floyd riots. Bank on it.

Whitney
Member
1 month ago

We are ruled over by Satanist pedophiles and the Catholic mass has been made illegal. Satan is real folks. That also means God’s real. Act accordingly

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Whitney
1 month ago

Well, you gotta admit the secret rituals in “Eyes Wide Shut” are more appealing, at the baser level, than wine and crackers at the rail 😀

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

comment image

miforest
Member
Reply to  Whitney
1 month ago

Whitney , you are absolutely correct I urge you to take a look at a couple of sites that are talking about the book of revalation feel to life now.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jm6XgPZpFfc is a good one and it explains a lot . their whole channel is worthwile .

JeepEr
JeepEr
1 month ago

I paid down some debt with mine. I’d like to be in a better position when the bottom falls out . That and ammo purchases. Always buy ammo.

Member
Reply to  JeepEr
1 month ago

Good luck, ammo is getting tough to come by. I bought some 9mm this morning and only got it because I was watching like a hawk, and most of it sold out and was unavailable within ten minutes of my order confirmation. We all need to allocate a percentage of our day to replenishing our stock of freedom seeds.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Arthur Sido
1 month ago

I’ve never seen anything like it. Even reloading supplies are sold out.

JeepEr
JeepEr
Reply to  Paintersforms
1 month ago

Wes Sage (online) has pretty good deals but sells out quick.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  JeepEr
1 month ago

Thanks I’ll check it out!

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Paintersforms
1 month ago

Even black powder stuff is selling out. It’s Obamagunnerama 2.0, only this time I have zero reliance on off the shelf stuff. Fool me twice, cant get fooled again.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Arthur Sido
1 month ago

Good advice. I don’t think it will start with outright confiscation, though. My guess is the ammunition and new firearms supply will dry up as a moratorium is placed on new production, and after a bit of attrition the move will be toward gradual seizures. Incidentally, I saw first-hand what happened in Australia after Port Arthur in 1996. Per usual, do not believe anything in the propaganda outlets. More or less the St. George strategy was used, and many teary Aussies willingly gave up their arms. The propaganda was remarkably similar to that surrounding the recent American race riots. Most… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 month ago

The tactic that California used to shut down gun stores was to require a background check for each purchase of ammo.

The only gun store/range in my county threw in the towel when that passed around 2016. The owner told me that the ammo background check was simply too onerous and was the last straw.

After that, there was nowhere to shoot or buy ammo in my county. (That’s one of the hundreds of reasons that I left CA.)

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 month ago

There is a point where the authorities respond to claims of “my rights” with “so what are you going to do about it?”, just as the gun butt is slammed into that person’s teeth. And the crowds watching via television will cheer.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Dutch
1 month ago

Dutch is back!

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Dutch
1 month ago

Absolutely. We’ve seen a lot of that recently.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Arthur Sido
1 month ago

This is very, very good news. It is white folk, not Hutus, who are buying this stuff.

miforest
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 month ago

no . absolutelly not. in the uban area I live in , the family and church community is tooling up because they don’t trust the radical defund the police crowd.

IPrank
IPrank
Reply to  JeepEr
1 month ago

I tell everyone, be prepared! ABC, ammo, bourbon and cash. They call me Cassandra, but i learned in Boy Scouts, be prepared.

miforest
Member
Reply to  IPrank
1 month ago

food and a water filter would also be helpful in a time of discontinuiety of services.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  IPrank
1 month ago

I vote ATO – ammo, tequila & cash.

BTP
Member
Reply to  JeepEr
1 month ago

Not just ammo is scarce – rifles and pistols, too. Was talking with a retail dealer the other day and he pointed out that the manufacturers are completely tapped out. Everyone is on allocation. Their pistol display case was shockingly empty. I signed up for a manufacturer email notice when the product was back in stock; I got the notice and purchased immediately. I checked back 16 hours later & they were out of stock again. I have no idea how it is that no White guy has started shooting up a demonstration. Is it that the seriousness of the… Read more »

miforest
Member
Reply to  BTP
1 month ago

nobody should shoot anybody if there is any possible way to avoid it. you most of the porotests have a theatrical quality to them with some fights but no actual killing on either side. there are a few outliers like the woman hit by the african american man’s car in seattle .
which I think is more of an accident than deliberate.

Mikep
Mikep
1 month ago

Yes, it feels like we are still in a state of shock, like a person involved in an horrendous accident, who seems to observe events dispassionately from a third party point of view. Presumably at some point the shock will start to wear off, and then what? You write that, “The government should not be able to manufacture trillions of dollars without causing hyperinflation.” and that, “The streets are still mostly empty during the work day and many businesses are still closed. Those that are open have all sorts of restrictions and they seem to have fewer customers.” I suspect… Read more »

Dave
Dave
Reply to  Mikep
1 month ago

Your initial description is excellent. We are, most of us, in a state of shock. The response to the virus, particularly in Blue states and the MSM, has been completely politicized. These psychos actually think strangling the economy and psychologically torturing Middle America, while openly encouraging the black underclass to riot, is a winning election strategy. Their hatred of Trump is so overwhelming that they have brought the country to its knees in a suicidal attempt to remove him. To any semi rational person, this all looks like most of the country, and nearly all of our elites, have lost… Read more »

Mikep
Mikep
Reply to  Dave
1 month ago

Yep Dave, no where good, but probably interesting nevertheless.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Dave
1 month ago

Or maybe the average person has watched how things have gone for the last few years, and is actually somewhat mentally prepared for where we are at today. The question is, how much worse, in what ways, and how quickly, before Joe Normie is finally overwhelmed?

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Dutch
1 month ago

When women were forced to allow trannies in their public loos, I knew America was totally lost. Coronageddon and the Great Minnesota Chimpout have slammed the door.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
1 month ago

Two possible explanations for our economic robustness are:
The Zerohedge Prophecies: Banks and the Fed are desperately trying to steer the ship in the background, but can’t dodge the iceberg they are careening towards.
The post-scarcity economy: Most jobs are pointless make-work occupations, and our economy can hum along just fine even at greatly reduced manpower.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

Most work is make busy work. When shit becomes real and bonus unemployment goes away, we may see partly where our economy is going. Then again, what do I know.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

As I pointed out in my comment, I suspect that many of the jobs not being done just aren’t that productive or necessary. There’s no way you could remove 30 million workers who were producing necessary goods and services and not have a noticeable impact on the economy and all of our lives. Dollars don’t produce necessary goods and services. Workers do.

The fact that borrowing and printing dollars has kept the economy afloat shows that those workers weren’t adding much.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

The “service economy” mostly consists of luxury services and the “knowledge economy” mostly consists of Tennessee Coates posts.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

Yes, tend to agree. People, I think vastly over-estimate the “value” or the “need” for all sorts of service jobs and industries. Pessimistically, the corollary is also true: a lot fo the workers really didn’t offer much of unique value. I’m not saying that these industries didn’t contribute something to the economy, at least wages to their workers, but the fact is a huge number of stores, goods, services and the attendant jobs are pretty frivolous and provided things that most people could easily provide for themselves. A lot of those jobs probably are not ever coming back. Better learn… Read more »

roberto
roberto
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Sounds like you think we don’t need a dozen coffee shops on every block .

Maus
Maus
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

Makes you wonder if social distancing and mask wearing have seriously cramped the Botox and vampire facial crowd at the high-end day spas? One can hope that some of the economic pruning is actually cutting out unproductive branches in the tree of life.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

The office building housing my husband’s employer is still almost totally empty. He goes to work in jeans. I was never a huge shopper but now I buy nothing but groceries. Don’t want to wear a mask and be around all the estrogen. I’ve been doing my own nails and hair. We put our gym memberships on hold (won’t work out in masks and gloves). Our ‘service economy’ was mostly make-work, and most women’s jobs consisted of being professional gossips and karens.

miforest
Member
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

..

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

Probably also tells you that most if not ALL of the immigration we’ve had into this country over last few decades – was completely unnecessary for “economic” reasons. When I was a kid – kids used to take care of most of those low end jobs that you now see immigrant types in. White kids worked at McDonalds. White kids worked on roofing crews. White kids hauled concrete forms at construction sites. White kids did unskilled labor in factories. White kids worked on the farms. If you worked even halfway hard – you could be doing “blue collar” type labor… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

Yes, even your current author, the human sloth, had his teenage jobs, although spotty 😀 The problem is not just teens. For example, I live in a maybe 5% Black area. In the service jobs, the melanin-rich are under-represented; it is mostly white folks working even in fast food.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

Joggers for the most part are ill equipped to take jobs. Seen this personally in my lifetime. Way back when, I needed a summer job as I was working myself through school. Even went to car washes. Money is money. Went to a large production factory and spoke with the plant manager (he ran the show). He said he just hired 3 “inner city youths” who were part of a city program for the disadvantaged youth—read juvi-court diversions. So he “pulled my coat” and gave me this advice, “Be at the loading dock tomorrow morning, ready for work, and tell… Read more »

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Compsci
1 month ago

Putting traditional manual labor and jogger together is a stretch, unless of course you’re talking about armed robbery, house b&e, rape, murder – the usual run of the mill jogger stuff.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

The Ma and Pa subsidy is the only ethical form of cheap labor.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

Wetbacks aren’t the only thing sucking up local employment. Kill the big box stores. Most of their garbage is made overseas or from far away. They kill local production, local business and local employment. If you’re relocating to rural areas try to pick up farm work if you’re job hunting. The more people that do this the less need they will have to use imported labor. The agribusiness sector is still large but most of the labor is now brown. Apply with 3 or 4 compatriots and see what happens. If you need to you can press the issue. Make… Read more »

KeepTheChange
KeepTheChange
Reply to  Yves Vannes
1 month ago

Amen to that and an upvote!

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

mexicans are cheaper than white kids

KeepTheChange
KeepTheChange
Reply to  Calsdad
1 month ago

Rings true with me … even I, a now highly esteemed Engineer, picked oranges and laid some sod as an energetic teen. Helps me appreciate being a desk-worker in the A/C!
Methinks that the immigrants make some decent coinage working here vis-a-vis their country’s currency and, if they work 10 or 15 years here, can retire back in their home country. They don’t want to stay here, necessarily.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

I’m convinced there are an incredible number of grey and white collar jobs that are nothing more than BS paper-pushing that add no real economic value. In fact, these jobs may be so useless that they act as an net economic drag.

There are also a huge number of jobs that are no-show positions that create the same problems.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Imagine cutting all the Human Resource departments in the country down to just one person!

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 month ago

That and all of the diversicrats. Of course, there’s plenty of overlap between the two.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 month ago

I’d start by retro-naming (New word?, or for those who put themselves through college, neologism.) them back to their last legitimate function :Payroll.

KeepTheChange
KeepTheChange
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

I work for a company that only does commercial business (no gubment stuff) with >10,000 employees. You can’t imagine the confusion when something simple, like a customer returned good (CRG) and a return to stock is required. Oh, the emails and consternation that ensues. It’s this way with apples but that way with oranges, etc!

Dave
Dave
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

It’s true that many millions of jobs are make work, and as long as essential services and the building trades are fully operational, then the larger society functions.
Unfortunately, our betters have decided that a significantly reduced, and completely demoralized, police force is a winning strategy in large urban areas, as well as a form of UBI, to keep many millions on the welfare teat for as long as possible.
The last two factors are a recipe for disaster, but I think the Bond villains behind our own Color Revolution want it that way.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Dave
1 month ago

Well, let’s get the island to explode so we can start over, and swim away with Ursula Andress or the flavour of the week 😀

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

You have conflated You Only Live Twice and Dr. No. Not that there’s anything wrong with that…

Mikep
Mikep
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

It feels like they’re aiming for the iceberg, perhaps they think it’ll make a good hiding place for the of mountain of un-repayable debt they have accumulated over the last few decades.

Marko
Marko
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

Also I have a hunch that most of that 30 million are immigrants or children of, and worked at menial jobs at low pay at large companies. When their job ended, they go on unemployment or get support from their families. This is easier for immigrants who tend to have large, supportive families. So these people can be removed en masse from the economy without much pain. Even if they lose unemployment, they do have other safety nets. Problems will occur when educated or middle-class people start losing their jobs, and can’t pay their massive debts.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Marko
1 month ago

I think we unfairly discount native American talent. The fact is, it takes a lot of odd jobs to accumulate enough capital to start a small business nowadays. Today’s budding businessman needs to save enough for the inital 9mm, some clips and ammo, inital product and packaging, pay off the local cops, etc. It’s a tough world out there 🙂

miforest
Member
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

or both

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

The biggest head scratcher is the economy. Sure, the Fed and the gov’t pumped trillions of dollars into it via money printing and borrowing. Indeed, pumped more than what the economy produces in GDP terms. So, that may explain the lack of a depression. However, you still have 30 million people not working. People on the ground not doing jobs. Presumably, you shouldn’t be able to paper that over with dollars – printed or borrowed. Dollars can’t substitute for real work. Which makes me wonder if these people were doing the equivalent of busy work. Z has noted how when… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

Perhaps many job – and thus workers – aren’t that useful or necessary.

And the number of useful jobs is going to drop precipitously in the decades to come. We’re being softened up for the Robot Age, where only 10% of the population have real jobs.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Make friends with robots. You have to network people!

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Quite possible. We may be witnessing the first unveiling of that truth. But let’s also remember how huge a portion of the U.S. economy is unecessary services. If 200 million Americans decide to go out to dinner once a week instead of twice a week, a lot of waiters, cooks, restaurant managers, food delivery drivers, etc., lose their jobs. Those losses won’t be made up for in job gains at the grocery store and cookware industry. But does the standard of living for those 200 million drop?Not really. They miss the enjoyment of going out one night a week, but… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

<i>But does the standard of living for those 200 million drop?Not really.</i>

They’ll have to pay unemployment benefits for all the fired cooks and waiters, not to mention the infrastructure of a modern society that those unemployed will still have access to but not pay for.

A tanking economy makes us all poorer, not just the ones losing their jobs.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Thank you. Finally someone gets this.
Let me ask folks here, if very few people have jobs, where are babies going to come from?
A lot of DR people claim to be pro natal but have a huge disconnect on the issue of wages and family formation.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Absolutely, Felix. And I would add a job—even when subsidized with welfare benefits, like Head of Household income tax rebates—is better than stay at home and do nothing welfare payments. Something soul sucking in that.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

There is no doubt a sense of State dread over the ramifications of automation. If this isn’t a dry run, it is a good chance to see how successful UBI can be. And as I tell White friends and families: take literally anything offered, and cheat.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

> Which makes me wonder if these people were doing the equivalent of busy work. Z has noted how when he worked in an office and there were lay-offs, you couldn’t notice any drop off in production. Maybe we’re witnessing the same thing here. Perhaps many job – and thus workers – aren’t that useful or necessary. With the first round layoffs of 10% or so of the force, barely anyone who is left blinks, as it’s mostly business as usual and they can actually be more productive without the deadwood and toxic people no longer around. It’s on round… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

I’d agree with that. Perhaps this is the first round.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

A Day Without Blacks would actually improve production and customer satisfaction.

DMV’s across America would be swamped with appointments for DWB two years in advance.

MBlanc46
MBlanc46
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

It’s far from certain that it’s the dead wood and the toxic people who will be let go.

Trojan House
Trojan House
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

I would be happy if there were less “gender studies” jobs.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Trojan House
1 month ago

So would I. But I think there is a misconception wrt such positions in academe. They are created to keep the numbers up wrt AA hiring and minority student enrollment. In that regard they will never go away, albeit they are certainly barnacles on the ship.

Severian
Reply to  Compsci
1 month ago

That’s it. Lots of departments are 100% Diverse, and not just the obvious racial grievance ones. Basically you *have* to get POC PhDs, and since they can’t even spell STEM you’ve got to put them somewhere. Basically all liberal arts departments are, or very soon will be, nothing but holding pens for angry ethnics.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

And all academic standards, or what remains of them, will be dropped swiftly in the name of “muh ekwallity.”

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

This has already happened to a large degree. For decades, diversity or equal opportunity, led to the less-qualified to gravitate towards certain type of positions, which of course meant ones where competence in a STEM field was not needed. Unfortunately for everybody, these positions tend to be adminstrative and even of decision-making, even leadership. At the extreme in terms of power, just look at whom we elect or appoint to high office…

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Compsci
1 month ago

Yes, but when did they learn how to make the entire hull out of barnacles? 😀

Mikep
Mikep
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

Douglas Adams wrote about this in his Hitchhiker’s books. A civilization somewhere in the galaxy decided to get rid of all it’s useless makeworkers, HR departments, telephone sanitizers etc. They told them that the sun was going to go supernova and that the planet was to be evacuated. They would be going ahead to prepare the new world for everyone else, ha ha. Totally impractical of course, you’d need a bloody big spaceship.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Mikep
1 month ago

The elite also all died from a telephone borne illness. Whoops.
As an aside such illnesses are common. Back when I worked in a call center, the cheap boss didn’t buy sanitizer and took the entire operation down for two weeks. Cost him a bundle too.

miforest
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 month ago

dollar can substitute for a while. but I see more and more gaps appearing in the supply chain at work and in the stores all the time. Also, china seems to be trying to isolate itself from the west. probably to avoid our predatory lenders and hedge funds . a very intresting channel to watch is english language ghineese dissident news . this is 23 well worth it minutes . https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3pCyoEFX9I&t=3s
this epesod is particularly enlightening .

Felix Krull
Member
1 month ago

Great column. Perhaps in liberal democracy there needs to be a regular molting of the old partisan skin so a new one can emerge and refresh the debate. That is called “proportional representation”. It is why nationalist parties are skyrocketing all over Europe: there’s a constant churn of new parties entering parliament and old parties disappearing, and sometimes the new ones make it to the big leagues. Even a country like Sweden (nominally) has about 20% nationalists in their legislature. The bad news is that it doesn’t work either. The globalists simply buy up any party that gets within striking… Read more »

Jacques Lebeau
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Four official languages but essentially one ethnicity.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Jacques Lebeau
1 month ago

Bingo!

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Jacques Lebeau
1 month ago

Canada manages to fuck it up with only two languages.

Crispin
Crispin
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Chinese and Pakistani? Or is that just Vancouver?

Mikep
Mikep
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

PR is a good system in a Country with a fairly homogeneous population like a European Nation State, not sure how well it copes with diversity though.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Mikep
1 month ago

Not sure how any system outside of authoritarian copses with diversity.

Mikep
Mikep
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Switzerland is not multicultural, it’s multi lingual, with the different cantons each having a super majority of one or other of the language groups.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Mikep
1 month ago

If you don’t speak the same language, you’re not of the same culture. And ethnic enclaves are not usually conductive to successful democracy.

Europe is full of ethnic, linguistic and religious conflicts between “essentially” similar people. The fact that Switzerland manages such a successful country, is due to their superior political structure, not to the fact that the constituent parts of the confederation are all white.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Swiss are the original preppers living in a mountain fortress. Might also partly explain their banking success. Your money’s in a safe place full of responsible people. Also fear of invasion or encroachment is good for social cohesion. Never been there but that’s the impression I get. Correct or not?

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Yep. I’ve heard that the Federal government is quite weak in comparison to the authority within the Cantons. Here of course, for almost 200 years we’ve had a Federal government usurping State authority not granted to it by the original agreement of the the Founders, i.e., the Constitution. And it seems decade by decade things get worse not better wrt or unity.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Compsci
1 month ago

Also, women were only allowed the vote in 1971, so they’ve had less time to poz the country.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Can’t agree with that. There is diversity and there is diversity. Switzerland’s is the former. America’s is the latter. German speakers and Italian speakers are far more likely to get along than whites and neolithic African jungle savages.

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

There’s some subtle alchemy to how the Swiss have managed so well. I’ll take a stab at some of the ingredients but I admit the whole is somehow much greater than the sum of these parts. Scale, Jews & circumstances (not necessarily in that order). 9 million people, 0.4% Jews. Macro-ethnic cohesion, robust heartfelt civic nationalism, a very functional federal system that seems more “integrated” than our “checks and balances” model, as well as affluence in a small population with great geostrategic positioning. All of these have made them remarkably resistant to the kind of subversive influences that Globoshlomo can… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

Unless it’s changed, I like to point out that all able-bodied Swiss men are members of their Army. They all have one government-issued, fully automatic rifle kept in the home. Subject to inspection at any time. Doesn’t Switzerland have gun crime? Sure. At probably the world’s lowest rates…

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

Read somewhere that in Switzerland the locals get to vote up or down on permanent resident status for immigrants when all the very strict requirements are met. This is a huge incentive for legal immigrants to assimilate 110%.

Imagine having immigrants neighbors have the final say on who gets to stay? Shocking, I know.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 month ago

Once they gave the vote to women, though, things started going down hill. There is one Swiss area I read about that voted not to take any refugees, and although the article demonized them, I don’t recall specific economic penalties the central government could impose. There was a different town that took in one African and her 10 spawn and practically bankrupted itself to pay for that one family.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  3g4me
1 month ago

There was another town where they had this Dutch animal rights type, who campaigned to outlaw cowbells. She’d lived in Switzerland for almost 30 years and her children had Swiss citizenship, but:

Tanja Suter, the president of the local Swiss People’s Party, claimed Ms Holten has a “big mouth” and residents had not wanted to give her the gift of citizenship “if she annoys us and doesn’t respect our traditions”.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/switzerland-deny-passport-dutch-vegan-anti-cowbell-nancy-holten-animal-rights-annoying-a7520991.html

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 month ago

Felix – I read that too, but then I read a comment (somewhere) later saying she had been granted citizenship the following time she applied. People need to stand strong, and in any event, women should never have the franchise.

Epaminondas
Member
1 month ago

“After all, forty years ago, the Left was endlessly going on about free speech and the dangers of corporate media. Today, it is the Right that champions speech and opposes corporate media.”

And the reason is simple: the left now controls most channels of communication. They don’t have to rant and rave about “the man” oppressing them any more. They ARE “the man”.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
1 month ago

But that doesn’t stop them from doing so, dissimulating wackjobs that they are.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
1 month ago

The economy is so shot up with Fed morphine that the pain generally isn’t being felt. it actually pays to stay at home for some people. But it’s already being felt in the price of gold. Hyperinflation doesn’t just happen one day, it takes many quarters to build and not everything goes up at the same time. The stock market is the primary outlet for the latest inflation burst. Right now it’s in asset prices not consumer prices.

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 month ago

Debt destruction in the economy is offsetting a good deal of the printing. For example, if people are using their government gravy money to retire credit card debt then basically what’s happening is the CC debt is being moved from the consumer’s ledger to the Federal Government’s ledger. Another piece is that since so much of U.S. currency is held abroad that the inflation jolt is cushioned, essentially by stealing a little bit of wealth from every foreigner holding dollars (or dollar backed assets). The last part is interesting: if foreigners get sick of Uncle Sam stealing from them, then… Read more »

miforest
Member
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 month ago

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3pCyoEFX9I&t=3s a good perspective on the global implications of the debasing of our currancy JR

Dukeboy01
Dukeboy01
1 month ago

I think we’ve got to wait and see what happens at the end of this month when the bonus Federal unemployment money ends, assuming they don’t just extend it out until the election to try to buy votes. One way or the other that will end some day and that’s when we’ll learn how bad the carnage is.

In the mean time: Prep, prep, prep, and prep some more!

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Dukeboy01
1 month ago

Oh they’ll extend it alright – pretty much guaranteed. And amen to your last sentence.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
1 month ago

i think Trump has an October surprise for the dems (and gope), involving indictments and arrests. a kind of pre-emptive offense at an unexpected time. so add the chaos that will cause into the mix 🙂

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Karl McHungus
1 month ago

Not going to happen.

There’s a better chance they run Kanye to split Biden’s Black vote than this (which is to say vanishingly small).

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

Won’t Kanye hurt Trump more than Biden since Trump has made major inroads with blacks because of the record low black unemployment and releasing the incarcerated Afrophysicists?

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

Your sarcasm sounds like my conservative brother when he’s being serious.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

Kim Kardashian husband for prezident, democrats have to hurry up & search for a diferent candidate on TMZ.

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

Could be that the Kanye ploy is designed to force Biden to pick a black female rather than a white one (e.g. Warren) for VP…which will boost Trump’s overall vote considerably. That’s the theory at least.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Jim Smith
1 month ago

Kanye just being Kanye…he likes to show up where the action is…

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Dutch
1 month ago

Under the current climate, I think Corn Pop would be the best pick for VP.

Severian
1 month ago

If enough people start drawing the obvious logical conclusions, the virus could be the best thing that ever happened to us. In my neck of the woods, there are still a lot of Karens and soyboys wearing their masks everywhere — such people are unavoidable, alas — but for every one of them, there’s another one out playing with the kids, walking the dog, doing home improvement projects… in short, getting out in the sunlight and acting like normal human beings, instead of consumer-bots and worker bees. And the no sportsball thing!! That has shocked me more than anything I’ve… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

>  If things break right, we could see the end of both pro sports and the university system here in the next decade. Thanks, corona!!!
If Universities are are short-sighted as Harvard ,who decided 50,000 a year is fine for University of Phoenix-level instruction, things may get pretty hilarious.
Yes, I know Harvard sells credentials, not education. My good Harvard friends have the most powerful raw intelligence I have ever seen but consistently have insane views due to a lackluster education.

Severian
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

I know lots of people with Ivy League degrees (they’re everywhere in academia). They are, without exception, the most over-educated idiots I’ve ever encountered. Like Orwell said, you have to be very smart indeed to believe the stupid things they do, but they’re up for the challenge. They think the Latin words on the diploma mean “Certified Sooper-Jenius.” If parents are still willing to put themselves in the poorhouse for that, after all this, then shine on you crazy diamonds. Better than spending it all on yet another Bentley like a rapper would.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

Tuition is just a large and they hope, final cost that parents pay for the privelege of getting their offspring out of the home 🙂

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 month ago

Traditional post-secondary education may be in the process of being destroyed by a form of educational “inversion.” That is, increasingly anyone will be able to get a first-rate education online, and then pass tests to become “credentialed.” Thus, credentials will attach to the person rather than to an institution’s diploma, and at prices that are miniscule compared to today’s college racket.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jim Smith
1 month ago

Online learning is fine, but it takes a particular dedication and person. It’s not for everyone. But for those who are of the sort, it is better to take the tests and obtain the certification credentials, than spend excessive resources taking crap the Universities consider essential for a well rounded education.

However, outside of technology such as computer science and support of computing, what areas have been so automated?

Mark Auld
Mark Auld
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

Town hall had an editorial about using this crisis to defund the universities. Add killing major league sportsball, and we might see a huge silver lining in this cloud that hangs over us all. The question I have is what happens to all of those folks formerly living the American dream that in reality were make work jobs? How their raft ends up once we’re through the Rapids could include a high % of the population.

Severian
Reply to  Mark Auld
1 month ago

As to the jobs, I don’t know, but the university defunding is taking care of itself. All the junior colleges in my neck of the woods are taking to the airwaves, making sure everyone knows that their online Freshman 101 classes are fully transferable to all the State U’s. Since State U is threatening to make all its classes online anyway out of fear of Kung Flu, the only difference between State U and Local JuCo is that State U will charge you $20K more for the privilege. And that comes with a special bonus realization: Since both State U… Read more »

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

Stanford is cutting 11 varsity sports due to financial pressures from the virus. Unfortunately, football and basketball are not among those that were cut.

Severian
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

Don’t worry, they soon will be. What with the Supreme Court ruling that trannies are now a fully protected class under the Civil Rights Act, all athletic scholarships will soon enough go to biological men. That will rile up the feminists, and since no one in the ivory tower has ever won an argument with a feminist — trust me on this, they will grind your ass down to powder — the only solution will be to eliminate all sports across the board. You know, the more I think about it, the more I’m loving this virus!

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

The victim hierarchy is fun to monitor because it does shift.

It looks to me like blacks beat feminists because the feminists tried to shame the blacks for misogynist rap lyrics, but the blacks won decisively.

The trannies seem be rout the TERFs (Trans Exclusive Radical Feminists).

In any case, what great entertainment.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 month ago

Yes but do trannies beat blacks? Tough call. My bet is with blacks. They have slavery and Jim Crow. Also, a lot of trannies are White.

Obviously, none of them beat Jews because all of this stuff is really just a Jewish smokescreen to destroy straight, gentile Whites.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

I don’t follow sports much, but I recall that (biological) men competing and winning in women’s sports is already an issue. Actually, I applaud the Supreme’s latest insanity. Let the feminists take the hit — they deserve it. Related: I don’t know if it was a court case or not, but years ago Spa Lady was forced to hire male staff due to equal rights laws. Tough luck ladies, equal rights work both ways… 😀 Now, if only whites could find Black groups or clubs they’d actually wish to join, just imagine the court cases we could file… 🙂

Mikep
Mikep
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

Can’t work the like button so, 🙂 🙂 🙂

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

Cause those are the only ones that make any money and keep the rest of the garbage, especially all women’s sports, afloat.

Severian
Reply to  usNthem
1 month ago

And that will be gone soon enough, too. I still have lots of acquaintances in academia, so I’m semi-wired in to what’s going on at several colleges across the spectrum (JuCo to Big State to Small Liberal Arts College). I can assure you that eggheads are the Branch Covidians to end all Branch Covidians. Since these people sincerely believe that anyone to the right of Rachel Maddow is pushing pro-Trump propaganda (and lately they’re not so sure about even her), they believe that the horror stories the MSM are pushing are just the tip of the iceberg. They’re convinced, utterly… Read more »

Infidel17766
Infidel17766
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

I often marvel that nearly 100% of public discourse is about 13% of the population. “Chronic Negro Fatigue” describes my reaction to this situation perfectly. Thank you.

Severian
Reply to  Infidel17766
1 month ago

Not original to me, alas. I have no idea where I first heard it, but it sums up the situation perfectly. They’ve spent the better part of 50 years making themselves obnoxious to everyone and everything. I think even now most people would be willing to leave them alone if they’d just leave us alone, but since they define themselves by obnoxious opposition to ambient civilization….

MBlanc46
MBlanc46
Reply to  Severian
1 month ago

Folks do seem to be slowly returning to something approaching normal life in my part of the world, too. The Left are trying to gin up enthusiasm for not opening up schools in the fall. It will be interesting to see how that plays out.

Severian
Reply to  MBlanc46
1 month ago

Please, Jeebus, make it so!! There is no bigger scam in this world — no bigger scam in the history of the human race — than “education.” High school diplomas are worthless, since they let you re-take the test until you pass now (seriously – how else can we be sure No Child is Left Behind?). Thus, college diplomas are worthless — I myself have handed out As for work that would barely rate D- back when I was in college… or in high school, for that matter, because what can you do? Asking a modern college “student” to write… Read more »

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  MBlanc46
1 month ago

Frankly, I don’t see how any school can possibly reopen with the current virus hysteria/mindset. What, have everyone including the kids wearing masks and gloves and social distancing? Never gonna happen, so something else will have to give.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  usNthem
1 month ago

Schools in Virginia are opening. But if your kid wants to go to school, they can only go two days a week. The other days, they’re on their own. They have to wear a mask and googles (I think). They will eat lunch at their desk. No group projects.

If you go the virtual route, the kid gets four days of Zoom classes with the teacher.

The fact that this is brutal to marginal students doesn’t seem to bother the Karens.

usNthem
usNthem
1 month ago

Another well written piece. I’m currently working from home, so to speak, and I often find myself wondering how f’d up everything is and how we got here. The wife and I hardly do anything anymore, other than walk around the hood and shop for groceries. I literally can’t stand to see all the idiots wearing masks and “social distancing “ – god I hate those f-ing words. Yet the stock market keep cranking higher as if there’s no goddamned care in the world. It’s all so f-ing bizarre there’s no way to make sene of it. This is going… Read more »

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  usNthem
1 month ago

I social distance. From negroes. Seriously, there is no upside with interacting with them. If one asks me a question I am just going to turn my hands palms up, wear a stupid grin, shrug my shoulders and move on.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  usNthem
1 month ago

Slightly OT but: I wonder about the long-standing popular fear of bats. They certainly do carry some nasty diseases. Most likely, including the current pandemic, probably with a stop in a Chinese lab along the way… Some bat scientists have literally gone “bat shit,” dying from virulent disease shortly after being exposed to bat feces. Also there are cases of workers dying soon after shoveling wild bat poop. With reports that COVID-19 can cause brain problems, it may lend even more weight to the term “bat shit crazy” 🙁

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 month ago

The largest repository of rabies resides in the bat population. That being said, I had a number of them living in my old house under the porch. No a big deal, but sometime later they found a small opening into the wall, then into the house, and one night we had bats flying in the dark in the bedroom. Turned the lights on and hilarity occurred. 🙁 Wife was very unhappy, but dog (Terrier) loved it. Damn quick killer.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  usNthem
1 month ago

The Fed is buying stock, hence the support of base levels. Nothing less, nothing more. Appearances must be kept up or the bubble bursts.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Compsci
1 month ago

True it is largely fed juiced, but it doesn’t take away the bizarre, surreal nature of the thing…

miforest
Member
Reply to  usNthem
1 month ago

look at how littl social distanceing or masks ar going on in the suposed hotspot for the wu flu
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3pCyoEFX9I&t=3s

Member
1 month ago

People are getting paid to stay home and watch Netflix. Why would you go back to work when you make more staying home and collecting unemployment? What seems to be becoming apparent is that an awful lot of jobs in the American economy are just not that useful or important. Our economic system is built around a whole bunch of jobs that only exist to provide employment to people with no useful skills. As long as we all pretend that made-up out of thin air “money” has value, we can keep it going but even that will end at some… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Arthur Sido
1 month ago

After I posted my comment, I noticed everyone else is saying the same thing….

Exile
Exile
1 month ago

2020 has collapsed some long-standing narratives, most of which we’ve already been questioning around here for awhile. Fiscal Conservatism: There’s a lot more ruin left in the nation’s economy than goldbugs have ever accounted for. Hardest hit – guys who’ve predicted 10 of the last 3 recessions. There is a more-than-theoretical limit to how much money you can mouse-click into existence but we don’t know where that is yet. The MMT and Soros-economy guys aren’t totally wrong. Psychology has at least as much macro-heft right now as the number of actual widgets in actual warehouses. Red-Blue Politics: 2016-2020 have been… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

Add to that list market manipulations. As I noted elsewhere in this thread, there were numerous propaganda pieces about a month ago warning against the evils of day trading and the great risk this poses to amateurs. Of course, even these small guys day trading are driving up the prices that Vulture Capitalists usually snap up for a sum after a market crash. The stories ceased once prices shot back up. Also recall that to elect Obama, a similar controlled market crash preceded his ascendancy. Apparently there wasn’t as much day trading because people were not locked in their homes… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

I’m convinced that positive psychology is the only reason that I’ve been able to continue making good money trading Tesla options.

It’s all over as soon as that positive sentiment cracks.

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

“The only way in which Trump hasn’t managed to Lean Forward is war-making.”

He’s done some other little things, but the “war” thing is no small thing considering the pressures he’s been put under to get one or two going.

Lady Dandy Doodle
Lady Dandy Doodle
Reply to  Exile
1 month ago

“War of Northern Progression”–i love it! Definitely using that one IRL.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
1 month ago

This is only possible as long as the US Dollar is tge world’s reserve currency.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

Which is only possible as long as the world fears the US military’s power projection capabilities and nuclear arsenal.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

That will end once either China or Russia lets it be known they fully intend to use nukes and the Blue coasts demand and obtain immediate surrender/de-escalation. The planned proxy war with Russia will end immediately for that reason.

THEN the idea of the U.S. as a paramount military power will end. It’s not true now but nothing will illustrate it better.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 month ago

I believe a Biden/Harris administration is in for a lot of rude surprises if they pursue conventional war with Russia and/or China.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

It will be China, and, yes, it will go south quickly.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

Remember the spate of US Naval vessel collisions a few years back? When the military was sent to the border to help the Border Patrol 2 years ago, there were soldiers bitching about having to eat MREs when there was a Jack in the Box in the nearby town.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  skeptic16
1 month ago

I do remember that! I also remember the ridiculous bases in Iraq and Afghanistan that had food courts with Taco Bells, KFCs, and car dealerships.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

In the green zones, the “barracks” were small twin bed apartments, with shower and stuff. I think it was Mad Dog Mattis (Marine Corp Adjutant) who complained about making war too comfortable and Marines soft.

miforest
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 month ago

9/1 convinced me we will never for any reason use nukes. if they didn’t use them agains the benladins group in and isolated area where there would be very littleal civilian collater dammae, then they will never use them.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
1 month ago

We’re a very wealthy society. Even the homeless gain weight from overeating. We still have a lot of social capital and tons of physical capital. Everything is still peachy because we’re still burning through the fat. We probably still have a lot of fat to burn through. USA Today is now begging the D-party to get their friends in CorpUSA to tank the economy as insurance for the upcoming election. So hardly anyone seems too worried about what happens further on down stream even if we intentionally make things worse. Most people have jobs they do to survive but don’t… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Reply to  Yves Vannes
1 month ago

Good caveats here – when paycheck issues start rubbing up against raycisms & covid, things could get spicy fast, fam. You have a window of opportunity of short but uncertain length – use it to start prepping and making plans for finding your White Zone.

The first thing good preppers tell you is that bugging out right when the SHTF is the worst time of all for obvious reasons. The sooner you start, the softer your landing.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Yves Vannes
1 month ago

So, they’ve created ridiculously huge supplies of money. One way to wipe that out is through writing off bad debt. I suppose elites planning for the crash by enriching themselves through all this fake money, then the bad debts will be written off, it won’t be them that pays the price (it will be us), and the money supply will contract to a reasonable number.

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
1 month ago

Since March 19, the dollar has declined 23% against gold. Unless that stops, you’ll have 1970s-style stagflation. It’s why you’re seeing prices rise in some areas, especially groceries.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
1 month ago

A strange slew of news items appeared about a month or so back, basically demonizing individual day trading and saying amateurs are setting themselves up for financial ruin, yadda, yadda. My guess is the Vulture Capitalists, who thrive on cratering the economy and then snapping up assets for half or so of their value, are pissed at the competition. The corporate propaganda organs stopped with those items as suddenly as they started. Perhaps the propaganda had the intended consequences and slowed down individuals who decided to try their hand at mini-Vulture Capitalism, or the prices got high enough that it… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 month ago

Possible. But reports I read said the Robin Hood and other tiny traders are just a fraction of total trading volume. I think it’s a stretch that a former barista twenty-something living in Mom’s basement buying 1/10 of a share of Tesla is going to compete with the professional traders 🙂

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson