Peaceful Separation

“Familiarity breeds contempt” is an old expression that like many others, remains true even though it is widely ignored. Proof of this is all round us, as Americans know more about one another than at any time in history. The more we know, the less we like about one another. The reason for this is we have never been one people or anything close to a nation. For most of our history, we have barely been a country. Now we get to see this reality every day on our media platforms.

From the very beginning, from the first settlement, America was a land with people, rather than a people with a land. The people who settled New England were very different from those that settled the South. In fact, those were groups of Englishmen with a long history of not liking one another. The Puritan settlers were on one side of the English Civil War, while the people of the South were on the other. To this day, that animosity shows up in a million little ways.

Even within states there is not a lot of unity. Pennsylvania is a big state with at least three distinct cultures. The people that populated the western part of the state are different from those in the east. That was true from the beginning. It turns up today in cultural habits and especially in voting habits. You could break the state into three smaller states and the people would not care. The fact is, they have never been a unified people loyal to one another.

The colonies and then the new country were a dumping ground from the very beginning for people not all that interested in nation and country. People did not leave the old world for the new because they felt a need to be part of a unified people. Either they were indifferent to it or hostile to it. The original settlers left the Old World to live in the woods with savages because they were done with the Old World. This has remained true, for the most part, to this very day.

The Founders understood this, which is why they tried to avoid creating a strong central government fit for a unified nation. Their first go at it was a loose confederation of states that were free to operate as they thought best. The next go at it was the constitutional framework we pretend to have today. The chief feature of this new structure was that the national government was sharply limited in its powers, outside of a few areas that served the needs of all of the sovereign states.

Much of what vexes modern America is rooted in the fact that the ruling class is oblivious to this reality. They endlessly blather on about the need to unify the country around this or that issue. Their propaganda is drenched in saccharine messages about the need to be unified. The defining characteristic of the modern plutocrat is the haunting fear that someone, somewhere, is thinking for himself. They are hellbent on uniting a people with no interested in being united.

The quickest way to social peace is to unplug the internet and shutter the public affairs shows on television. If all of a sudden people had to go across town to tell someone that they did not like their politics, they would not do it. In a flash, a disunited and disagreeable people would be minding their own business. The liquored-up harpies on social media would have to join the church or a local civic association if they wanted to gossip about people they barely know.

Obviously, that would not be the end of it, but there is no denying that the increasing social friction is rooted in our increasing familiarity. America has always been a land of many people, a house with many mansions. The reason most of the people are here is they did not want to be around the people over there. Even in America, that mentality has held since the beginning. The migration west was as much about getting away from the people back east as starting new on the frontier.

The great patriotic struggle in the first part of the last century convinced the American ruling class they could and must unite the country. After all, if they could unite the nation to beat the Depression and Fascism, why not poverty and inequality? Why not unite around defeating racism and being mean to people? Not only are they hell bent on uniting a disunited people, they now strive to unite the world. Their new unitarian creed has them as the one true god of us all.

What they are is a lid on a boiling pot of water. The more the water boils, the more the lid is pressed down. America is a pressure cooker right now because the ruling class keeps the lid firmly on, while cranking up the heat. They are under the delusion that if they can just keep it all locked inside, that lid firmly on the top, the whole will suddenly become one. They have been convinced that “E pluribus unum” is their calling, rather than a cheap slogan on our money.

Conservatives get grief for always saying that the solution for our troubles is to get back to our constitutional principles. They should get grief as what we need is to get back to the reason America exists at all. It is a land of people, lots of different people, not a people with a land. There can be local community and regional unity, but this is not a nation and it can never be a unified country. What will bring peace, is what always kept the peace. That is peaceful separation.

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Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
3 years ago

The only way to make a peaceful, truly tolerant society is to only allow solid social foundations to operate in the daylight and to maintain harsh social stigmas that keep degeneracy in the shadows. Contrary to popular opinion, gays had their orgies as long as they were discreet, minorities could live in peace in their crime ridden hellholes as long as they kept it in their neighborhood, and men could pay for a lady’s night services as long as they kept it in the seedy district. As can be easily discerned from reading Age of Entitlement, attempts at compromise and… Read more »

Last edited 3 years ago by Chet Rollins
OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

When freaks and degenerates try to push their crap on respectable people, the first response needs to be ruthless suppression until the freaks decide that the previous state of affairs was far superior to trying to worm their way into polite society. Exactly. Judgement is absolutely necessary, in all societies; yet we find our leaders exercising their judgement, but toward the wrong thing. For example, the case of women who have slept with many men being celebrated, this seems to encourage further bad behaviour because ’empowerment’. The judgement will be extended to the responsible female seeking a family, because ‘its… Read more »

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

The degenerates and swine are useful tools for the destruction of the middle classes. Most of these incorrigible perverts inhabit the amazingly wealthy Media Class. Never take your eye off the ball. Even the elites get caught up and foolishly begin to believe their own drivel. And when that happens, you know the endgame approaches.

Last edited 3 years ago by Epaminondas
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Even here in semi-rural* East Butt Plug™ there is the occasional panhandler, usually in store parking lots. However, manning a corner or median at an intersection is popular too. I rarely donate, in fact that is just reinforcing bad behavior. But, if your cirucmstances allow, a great gambit is when a bum asks for cash, instead offer to buy him food or whatever. Sometimes they accept, but it’s telling when they get a look of disgust and go away in search of a softer touch 🙂 *Various definitions exist. However, a luxury subdivision bordered by a hog farm, pastures and… Read more »

Last edited 3 years ago by Ben the Layabout
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

That guy in Laredo with the sign:

Won’t lie
Want beer

C’mon, I had to. Honesty should be rewarded.

lo-tech
lo-tech
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Grifters like that lady have existed always. But as you wrote, never before was society actually set up to humor them.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

My thinking has always been that sexual weirdness or some perhaps dark desires or just plain everyday lust, these things are inevitable — for better or for worse. And knowing this, a mature and reasonable society would try to accommodate these things but also do well to keep them under wraps as much as possible. Which is why I think if we are going to have vice and licentiousness, keep it contained; put all the whores and gambling and drugs in a red light district and keep it there. But putting strip bars in regular neighborhoods where kids can see… Read more »

Last edited 3 years ago by Falcone
Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

In Toronto, even way outside the gay district, couldn’t seem to walk a block without seeing adverts and stores with two half-naked men kissing alongside innocuous restaurants.
Explains the distinct lack of children in the city. Even the most clueless lib knows something is wrong about an environment like that for children.

Last edited 3 years ago by Chet Rollins
B123
B123
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

The joke is on them, lol. The “developers” flush with Chinese cash are buying up every block and putting up glass monster condos. Including on Church Street (the Gay District street).

Anyways, the city is 45% white and dropping. Peel Region next door is 30% white. These 2 areas have the lowest fertility rate in Canada (around 1.2). The lower the better in this case.

Vizzini
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Even compromising to the extent that the red light district has a “right” to exist will empower degeneracy. Uw will spread from there, as it has

No, you can’t wipe it all out because new degenerates are born every day and most of the old ones aren’t worth bothering with. But you periodically raze the red light district and roust the pimps and whores to let them know where they stand.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

“Kill a few chickens in front of the monkeys occasionally to keep them respectful.”

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Epaminondas
3 years ago

you can’t punish whores in feminist state that has feminist courts where women judge men, that’s sexist, what you can do instead is pander to them
comment image

Last edited 3 years ago by sentry
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

Leaving the legality or illegality aside, I side with the earlier poster who said (or I’ll make up he said) that the old way was better: a society tolerated, not to say approved of, troublesome minorities, the drug culture, the gays, or the whores. But you confined them to certain areas with tacit understandings they remain there, they could do their thing.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

I want to make a distinction between degeneracy and desperation. A couple of weeks ago I told you about that junkie that was pimping out her little girls to pay for her habit after her dealer boyfriend was sent away. If that woman doesn’t get it together her kids will age out of foster care with no prospects. (She should be serving life, etc. but she’s not.)

Vizzini
Reply to  RoBG
3 years ago

I’m not seeing the distinction in your story. Not every desperate person resorts to degeneracy. If you’re pimping out your girls, your kids should be taken away from you yesterday. Aging out of foster care doesn’t mean you have “no prospects.”

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Not to pile on, but your list could also include tranny story time for children.
There’s a severe dearth of shame: that painful feeling of humiliation or distress caused by the consciousness of wrong or foolish behavior.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
3 years ago

Absolutely but shame requires a moral foundation which is something we don’t have. As part of a personal project I’ve been researching religiosity in the US and its decline was astonishingly fast. In two decades from like 2000 to 2008 the number of “none” religious selection went from 10% to 35% and regular church attendance is down to less than 25% of the population. Its no wonder Chritians get ignored and Churches get shut down. Very few people are using them. Now various relgious apologists claim there is a great hunger for religion and that may be true but its… Read more »

el-porko
el-porko
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Agreed. Weirdos and degenerates have always been part of human cultures. Sane societies will either brutally stamp them out, or shuffle them off to the side and isolate them so they can harm only themselves. In neither case do you attempt to say that degeneracy is normal and acceptable.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

This is how the crotch warriors are created, or at least how they are maintained.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

When freaks and degenerates try to push their crap on respectable people,

The fact that the Internet and social media serve as a huge force multiplier for this crowd are a major downside to those technologies.

BTP
Member
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

I think you’re right, Chet. Consider the possibility that bigotry and narrow-mindedness are signs of a healthy society.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  BTP
3 years ago

None of these people are “open minded!” They simply push degeneracy. They are never “open minded” about anything we want. Open mindedness is a lie designed to neuter your objection to their degeneracy and evil.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

Exactly. Much as tolerance is no longer about live-and-let-live, but instead is an injunction to embrace what normal people find repugnant.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  BTP
3 years ago

Absolutely. The “anything goes” society/culture is circling the bowl – rapidly. Which is more or less where we are now.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

Appeasing freaks and degenerates just creates more demands. They can’t help themselves. They will never stop until sex with babies and human sacrifices are human rights.

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

Late term abortion is already human sacrifice with the obligatory magic chants of female empowerment surrounding it.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

Yes, people forget the value of clear, enforced boundaries. In the (very) old days, a black could come into the White neighborhood. But it damned well had better be Mr. Washington the milkman, or Mrs. Avery, the maid, or similar. A bunch of loafers hanging out on a street corner, or a hobo sleeping on a park bench, were subject to dispersal or arrest. Need a place to stay? Fine, thirty days in the county jail or picking your supper at the county prison farm. Nowadays public loitering, camping in parks, and such are constitutionally-protected freedoms. The vagrant’s gain in… Read more »

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

The community was destroyed and now nobody cares about the geographical zip-code that was formerly a community. Everyone is living there temporarily and are only there for work and all of this was done for the alleged economic efficiency. This is the kind of intangible Z-Man is talking about, I think, when he says they have monetized social capital. Hundreds of communities from around the country were robbed of talent so these kids could go to silicone valley. Nobody in silicone valley cares about Silicone Valley and all of the local areas these guys come from have been robbed of… Read more »

Jay
Jay
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

I must take exception to “Nobody in silicone valley cares about Silicone Valley”… I was born, raised and still live in what is now known as Silicon Valley. I still care very much, as do my wife, daughter and parents who are in their 70s and have been here since their own Junior High days. We’ve all done our share to try and make it a better place- volunteerism, coaching, mentoring, CERT participation, etc. Do I resent what its become? Hell yes, but Im not ceding the place to invaders either. People are already leaving in droves and I couldnt… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

One aspect of immorality that never gets mentioned is state involvement in gambling. If the local mafioso is able to run a numbers game in the dark, so be it. Same goes for a bingo game at the church hall. But why on earth do we allow the collective to operate and promote games of chance? The sight of the poorest amongst us dully staring at yet another scratch-off ticket they can’t really afford is enraging.

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

That question is all too easy to answer…politicians are whores who will do anything for money. Their aiders and abettors are mostly us, who buy the line that such public immorality in pursuit of tax dollars in some manner cancels such immorality.

lo-tech
lo-tech
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

Mr KGB, sometimes it really is just about the money. Casino companies have a lot of lobbying money to spread around. And states are broke, so they need to earn money by selling gaming licenses.

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

To promote gambling among the poor and have the proceeds distributed among the rich suburbs by the political class in the name of “better schools” is one of the most repulsive public policy I have ever seen; and here it is in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts home to the highest density of BLM signs per square mile…

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

I blame the Social Gospel movement. The idea (at least in America) that we can *stamp out* all vices and make people better is a defect of New England Protestantism (and now the country as a whole). And our modern woke masters come from the same stock as the Social Gospel folks, with an added injection of tribal grifters, we now have a Social Gospel to sell us on the very vices that were originally fought against.

rashomoan
rashomoan
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

Whatever happened to the concept of shame?

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  rashomoan
3 years ago

Only applicable in a type of society which we do not have.
Also guilt was as important if not more so as the West is far more guilt than shame driven
To be frank in a anxiety that eschews anything collective and celebrates industrialism, its nearly impossible to have shame.
Just do your own thing is poison in a society where many harmful things are available and worse, you can’t control supplies very easily if at all as the war on some drugs has taught is.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  abprosper
3 years ago

THis was supposed to be individualism BTW but either works I guess.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

America used to be both agrarian and constrained by geography. Prior to the railways and WWI average people didn’t stray too far from home. That would have limited numerically marginal populations from believing they were anything other than marginal.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

And with that cat out of the bag for as long as it’s been, ruthless suppression is absolutely going to be required to put those degenerates back where they belong.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
3 years ago

It’s true that the people in New England were different than the white people in the South, and that New Yorkers were different than people in California or Texas, etc, but they were all like siblings when comparing them to “New Americans”, such as the Somalis, Hondurans, and Pakistanis today.

Last edited 3 years ago by Wolf Barney
B123
B123
Reply to  Wolf Barney
3 years ago

I recognize that they’re not my people – but white liberals can be really insufferable. Hondurans are quite predictable with hbd, as are Pakistanis.

I prefer them to white libs (who are the ones causing all the problems) but they should be in Honduras and Pakistan. Let’s be honest, the liberals who control things give them everything, and why wouldn’t they take it? It’s like blaming a dog for getting fat.

3rd worlders in the community are a symptom not the root problem.

Alfred Doolittle
Alfred Doolittle
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

Exactly. I think we can all agree, even with our dusky hued neighbors, we are united in our loathing of white liberals. Their dystopia is a functioning society to us, and their utopia is a myopic slow burning dystopia for us. Liberals are or can be useful members of the human family, but they must be skillfully lorded over.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Alfred Doolittle
3 years ago

White liberals are actually not so bad…when they’re asleep.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Asleep? Like a dirt nap?

Alfred Doolittle
Alfred Doolittle
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

Pardon reposts. Technical errors

Last edited 3 years ago by Alfred Doolittle
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

Perhaps the Puritans and Southrons actually did form two countries– in every thing but name.

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

Alzaebo: Its almost like they literally formed two countries, but the satanic puritans could not stand being rejected and so genocided their “brothers” and terror-raped their “sisters” into accepting their “union.” Almost like “unification” has always meant subjugation to the puritan yankee.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

They had more in common with each other than either had with “Poem on a Statue.”

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

The Damnyankee is the enemy of Western Civilization, Christendom, and White culture, either in his new world form as lincoln and then the sjw, or their satanic predecessors the puritans and roundheads. The world cannot suffer waiting to eject the Damnyankee 109 times; fool me three times, you’re off to a camp.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

Quite right. Hondurans and Pakis didn’t create multiculti, anti-white ideology. That was a product of the Frankfurt School and postmodernism, which, in turn, were created by whites and Jews.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Wolf Barney
3 years ago

That was my quick answer to Rome’s Great Stagger: all the barbarians were still White.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

The Romans were quick to realize that the northern barbarians (Celt and Germanic) made poor slaves. It’s why Caesar formed his legions from these virile, independent-minded people.

Cameron
Cameron
Reply to  Epaminondas
3 years ago

North American Indians made poor slaves too. Northern peoples aren’t good slaves.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Cameron
3 years ago

They died en masse upon contact with Europeans. Dead people make lousy slaves.

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  Epaminondas
3 years ago

But convenient snacks on Cannibal Island.

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
Reply to  Wolf Barney
3 years ago

It’s the same here. Most Germans consider Bavarian’s to be right wing conservative hillbillies. Despite the fact they are one of the most wealthy and politically influential states. 
Most Americans associate Oktoberfest with Munich or Karneval in Köln, For us, neither is considered a cultural highlight of Germany but it is who we are like it or not.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

Well, now we associate muslim rape gangs with Koeln. Bet you guys miss the old stereotypes now, thanks to Frau Merkel.

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
Reply to  Educated.redneck
3 years ago

True. France and the UK have seen it too. But unlike Germany, their foreign flood was from the old colonial days. Merkel may have done a lot of good for Germany, but no one will forgive or forget that mistake. And you know Germans, forgive and forget is not in our DNA.

james
james
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

“The old colonial days”-UK’s migration history is not like that of France. Blair and New Labour invited in the majority of these people,and the Tories conserved this new tradition.
France was importing people into Europe before WW2.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

Well, maybe not quite up there with Beethoven, Goethe and Mainz Cathedral, but still pretty dam’ good!

Last edited 3 years ago by Ostei Kozelskii
RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Wolf Barney
3 years ago

The other day a poster (sorry, I forget who) listed all the legislation of the mid-60s: Civil Rights Act, Hart-Celler, etc. Every sponsor was a 1st-gen child of an immigrant from outside the culture and sphere of founding America (Hajnal Line.)

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  RoBG
3 years ago

As was Earl Warren, whose parents were Norwegian.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
3 years ago

They endlessly blather on about the need to unify the country around this or that issue. I see this all the time over here, the ‘need for unity’ filters down from TPTB and infects all corners of life. You’ll hear it in corporate meeting rooms, you’ll hear it from a group of acquaintances in the pub and so on and so forth. Even on the small scale, friendship groups often are flooded with people who want to be liked by everyone, and who think if we’re not best friends then something is wrong. A good question for these people (government… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Perhaps it wasn’t meant to be the focal point of your comment, but you bring up something that means a lot to me, and probably others. And that is simply manners. I know they get a bad rap. But to me they are important. People without them bug the living hell out of me, and don’t expect me to get along with them and be unified.

Last edited 3 years ago by Falcone
OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Manners are the first thing I notice about a person. You can’t not, really. I think it is entirely reasonable to infer many other characteristics from your first impression of a persons manners. Indeed it was not the focal point, but the concept of manners is a subset of the point I was trying to make. Agreement is necessary, to a large degree, in order for all of us to get along and make a functioning community. Some cultures coming over to our lands have manners that are frankly disgusting, even if it is the norm for them. You put… Read more »

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Manners are a construct of white supremacy and therefore should be taught in schools and demanded in public. Just another reason why white supremacy ain’t all bad.

Ja’Mel
Ja’Mel
Member
Reply to  Hoagie
3 years ago

I don’t see whats so wrong with WS…

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

I know they get a bad rap. But to me they are important.

Our Wise and Beloved Queen Margrethe II noted on the utility of protocol, that it relieves you social anxiety: if you always know precisely how to behave, you don’t have to worry about embarrassing yourself, and you’re free to enjoy the socializing.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Felix Krull
3 years ago

It helps people ease into a situation

So true

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Felix Krull
3 years ago

Good manners were the mutually-agreed-upon customs that allowed disparate people to live in tolerable proximity to one another without constant unpleasantness erupting.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Well of course. Manners shows respect for others. A good way to identify if the person himself is respectable.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Good manners is a minimal requirement for me as well.

To your larger point, “unity” almost always means rallying around a central tenet of the Ruling Class’s program. It never works in reverse, does it?

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Jack Dobson
3 years ago

Their very difficult compromise is allowing you to exist. Come on, we aren’t killing you… just play along…

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Beatings will continue until unity improves (slight variation on that saying)

BTP
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

They speak of unity, but they really want submission. That, after all, is a form of unity.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  BTP
3 years ago

I think you’re correct. I have always associated the word ‘unity’ with voluntary action. If group X has unity, I consider it to be something not forced upon it by a greater power. Once again, these people speak about valid ends but use the most unnatural of means to get there… i.e coercion.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  BTP
3 years ago

And is there anything that screams submission more shrilly than 98% of the population wearing a pointless and humiliating face diaper in order to ward off an illusory threat?

Ja’Mel
Ja’Mel
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

I was denied dental care yesterday because I refuse to wear one. I feel like I’m carrying more than my fair share by not wearing a mask. If more people would not wear one, opened businesses, the state could hold no power on this issue

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ja’Mel
3 years ago

Yes, the power is with the people, if they would only use it. But, alas, they’re mostly dumb cattle.

Member
Reply to  Ja’Mel
3 years ago

As soon as the mask/SD nonsense started here in Oregon I knew that the only hope we had of getting rid of it in less than a geological timeframe was if people simply “forgot” about it and kept everything open.

I’m now thinking that if the virus mandates were all ruled unconstitutional tomorrow, many of the local businesses would continue their mask policies for virtue signalling reasons.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Their definition of unity is seamlessly putting a Walmart a Chase Bank and chain fast food options on every corner with no local opposition. They will allow a local to own the spray tanning salon and the Vietnamese owned nail salon. A unity of uniform, humorless blandness.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

In principle, unity is a worthy goal. The problems arise because in practice, the “unity” is, of course, what the powerful seeks to impose upon the weak. In a more rational world, there would be the acceptance that not everybody wants to (or even possibly can) be the same. With certain exceptions perhaps, groups should be voluntary and have the right to include — or exclude — strictly as they see fit. Freedom of association, in so many words.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Why are you accepting that “unity” is a good thing per se? I”‘m sure Jaquarius D’indu would love to be unified with your bank account; would you enjoy that unity? Or maybe you and Jose the Cracker-buggerer can enjoy some unity in the local jail shower. “Unity” is not a good thing in and of itself.
Unity is only good amongst those who want to be and benefit from being unified, at which point pushing unity is carrying coal to newcastle.

Goddess
Goddess
Reply to  Educated.redneck
3 years ago

only the usury oligarchy want unity … of debt servitude …

Goddess
Goddess
Reply to  Goddess
3 years ago

Divide and rule … is the rule… same m.o. … as usuryal

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Educated.redneck
3 years ago

Egad! Next thing you might state is that diversity is not our strength. Horrors.

B123
B123
3 years ago

There will never be peaceful separation. Land and rights are earned, not given away.

The antifas are highly armed and insane. The FBI also controls MS13, and various other gangs who will come after you.

Tptb have decided that whites need to be killed, since they’ve realized they will fight back rather than submit. I can’t tell if the current insanity is a sign of them winning or a sign of them losing.

They hate us and want us dead – take it at face value – no peaceful separation will happen.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

I’ve seen very little to indicate that Whites will ever fight back

B123
B123
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

We are fighting back just by existing, by reproducing, by not giving in spiritually. We are under immense pressure and yet a good chunk of us do not bow.

Everything tptb have done to us is psychological, so far.

Fighting back in a hot war though? We will see.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

A big part of the problem is that these MAGA types think that they’re winning.

They’re going to be in for a big surprise (and it won’t be the Teddy Bear’s Picnic)

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

So true. When I am out and about laughing and bouncing, black people look at me like “didn’t he get the memo??”

I think they get bothered by it. In fact, I am sure they do by their reactions and facial expressions. A happy white person upsets them immensely.

B123
B123
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

I’ve noticed the same thing. So don’t give it to them.

Didn’t he see the commercials, where white men are weak beta cucks?

Didn’t he learn on Pornhub that all white women crave the stronger BBC?

Didn’t Netflix tell him that his daughters should be pimped out to pedophiles?

It’s spiritual and psychological warfare on whites, Christianity, and family. They hate happy, healthy, normal, white people, especially white families.

el-porko
el-porko
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

“I’ve noticed the same thing. So don’t give it to them.”
This. My reaction to the last year of chaos is to laugh at nonsense more, to stand straighter, to be actively optimistic. We are in a moral battle even more than a physical battle. Be aggressively optimistic.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Employees at my company (thousands and thousands of employees in the States, countless more around the world) got our glossy brochure in the mail yesterday that outlined our health care choices for next year. The cover had a smiling jogger with his tar baby sprog in his arms; the photos inside were an array of mystery meats. Not a single photo of a white person, which is par for the course these days. It’s not an attempt to appear balanced, it’s a full-on assault on the existence of whites. We were just given surveys to fill regarding our views on… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

I can remember getting that brochure one year. The cover featured a dark chocolate jogger leading a yoga session with two very blonde white women in a park setting. All were clad in form-fitting clothing.

Opening the brochure revealed an image of the jogger with his arms around the shoulders of both white women, beaming with an ear-to-ear smile.

Into the circular file it went.

I am certain the hand rubber responsible for the brochure was able to travel backwards through time.

Last edited 3 years ago by The Wild Geese Howard
Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

It’s true. To be hated and disenfranchised in your own country, to be made to give up a big chunk of your earnings to subsidize and advance the people who hate you— and to carry on working, voting, paying taxes, obeying the law, starting families— it’s remarkable.

I’m proud to be a (white) American. In spite of our flaws and goodwhites and endless tolerance of indignity, I’m proud. I don’t care what anyone says, we’re the best humanity has.

(When I’m not criticizing those flaws 🙂 )

Last edited 3 years ago by Paintersforms
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Paintersforms
3 years ago

to be made to give up a big chunk of your earnings to subsidize and advance the people who hate you

This is why I get super pissed off when the Cloud People start making moralizing noise about, “patronizing jogger-owned businesses.”

Having half my yearly earnings stolen and passed on by the government isn’t enough?

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

As a race, Whites are far too civil. As a group, we are too forgiving. But we (and our enemies) forget that, pushed into a corner, we are fully capable of being as savage and barbarous as is necessary to our survival. We also tend to be more competent than other races, and this will extend into brutality should it become necessary. As an old Star Trek episode said, a civilized man can pretend to be a savage (or, behave like one if necessary), but it’s impossible for the barbarian to pretend he’s civilized.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

Rittenhouse fought back. Whites in Texas, Idaho and Michigan have also fought back. The notion that all whites have lain down is a red herring, and a very rotten one, too.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

The last few months have been eye-opening. I think there will be a point where Whites do fight back, but that is based more on spidey sense than actual proof thus far.

ExPraliteMonk
ExPraliteMonk
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

We fight back right now. We just don’t do it where cameras can identify us.

BTP
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

Maybe. But think of what smart people see so far: any attempt to defend ourselves as men results in ruined lives. Consider the possibility that our guys understand the futility of getting in a fist fight with Antifa (the absurd Proud Boys) or daring to defend yourself with a mere show of force (the St. Louis couple). It’s possible we are cowed. It’s also possible we are not.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  BTP
3 years ago

Those are all good points…But I could easily counter that the Left has simply won, and that it’s over

c matt
c matt
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

That’s the thing though. Is it ever really over as long as some survive? No doubt Khrushchev thought it was over, as did many others. It ain’t over until it’s over. Then it’s over.

Victory is more likely if you can choose the time and place of your battles.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

Most of us are still reeling from the realization that we are in an existential war inside our own land, something that very few thought remotely possible. Psychologically, it is December 8, 1941. Don’t count us out. Most still hope that we can vote our way out. When (not if) it becomes clear that we cannot, then we shall see.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Horace
3 years ago

Probably the best answer I’ve seen to this question.

Its amazing how dissidents will turn into “Muh #2A” NormieCons when you embark on this line of questioning.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

Most of us are still reeling from the realization that we are in an existential war inside our own land”

Yes, it is the best. Kudos to Horace.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

Another difference is that on Dec 7th, 1941 we had a more or less unified ruling class that stepped up to the plate to lead the nation, physically too, on the front lines (ex JFK, GHWB). There was no crisis of lack of leadership to organize the people in collective self defense. We have Trump in the year 2020 with all his civnat flaws, and no deep ruling class leadership cadres behind him. We are more like the Sunni Lebanese at the beginning of the Israeli 1982 invasion and occupation of Lebanon. The Lebanese were not entirely unhappy to see… Read more »

BTP
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

We will find out soon, I think.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

They have! Won the battle, that is, but not the War. The War is never over.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

The media is gaslighting you into submission in a very clever way. What they do is not report on the things that show White fighting back to create a false sense of helplessness. Even so I have seen multi thousand man militias show up in places like Klamath and elsewhere and Antifa getting shot in Austin and of course Kenosha. Trump rallies are a push back and we have huge informal ones even here in California. What you don’t see is offensive action. Its all defense. This is frustrating but there isn’t a Right Wing movement with common goals as… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  B123
3 years ago

Isn’t that the point of war- to take territory?

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

No on on the Right is really ready for a campaign of conquest and genocide if its even possible to be ready for such a thing. The last time we took land was 75 years ago and we put down bases not conquered in the direct sense. The last true conquest was the Indian Wars and that was probably a a century and a half ago. Also it helps to have both a need and an ideology to conquer things. We don’t have an ideology, a surplus population and truth to tell don’t really need the resources. Worse if we… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
3 years ago

You used to be able to be a lone wolf in this country. You could be by yourself but knowing there were others around to keep the place safe for you to roam And it worked vice versa But of course desegregation and now mass brown immigration ruined it The America I love is the America I got to know on those moonlit walks in the south getting to know the land. And everybody was the same in that way and would go out and smell the honeysuckles in the night air. It was beautiful. Take that away from me,… Read more »

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

The Homestead Act officially ended in 1976 (1986 for Alaska). It was a fantastic “safety valve”; the cranks among us (many, esp. here!) were able to trade hard work over time for a real piece of land to live on. More importantly, any land not claimed by the states or private ownership was officially federalized. In western states (Alaska, especially), the actual amount of private land is comparatively very, very small. Governments (state/feds) are quite jealous of their privileges. Homestead Act repealed for many reasons, but mostly…the government grabbed what was left of the “good stuff”. They might regret not… Read more »

Last edited 3 years ago by ProZNoV
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  ProZNoV
3 years ago

I am looking for land back where I’m from in Florida, and anywhere really with green hills and rivers. Planning to move. But anyway, can you imagine owning your own swim hole. I wonder if any are left or if they have all been taken by the various city, county, state, etc governments. I’d pay a good amount to own my own swim hole or a small spring. I can’t think of anything better. I doubt any are left for private ownership.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

My gosh, west Wisconsin for you then. Eau Claire. Buy hunting acreage if you don’t want to stay the winter, (and you won’t).

The prop taxes are not cheap, but I was talking to guys with 100 acre parcels for hunting. Sparkling rivers and lots of ’em with the sweetest folk in the USA.

For southern humidity, south Missouri. Abandoned hay farms all over, fishing and hunting galore.

Every little town simply closes down the first week of deer season because nobody will show up for work.

Come to think- Lake of the Ozarks.

Huge. No bottom. All redneck.

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
JR Wirth
JR Wirth
3 years ago

Stephen Douglas was brilliant in pointing all of this out before the Civil War. He predicted exactly this path and advised that it was futile as we are a different people living in different regions. The place was set up for decentralization because it only works with decentralization. Today the states may as well be Federal counties. The seeds of all of this were planted by corrupt railroad lawyer (the first generation of modern corporate whore lawyers in the White House) Abraham Lincoln. He’s deified though so that’s taboo to say.

Vizzini
Reply to  JR Wirth
3 years ago

I’ve never understood how a guy that got 655k Americans killed to ostensibly achieve an objective that every other slave-owning nation in the West managed peacefully (If you buy the “War to end slavery” narrative. I don’t.) can be called a great president.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

Odd. Almost as if it were a first step to a global empire. A potential made real by railroads, a new technology.

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

Thats easy: they hate you and want you dead. Lincoln the spiteful mutant is great BECAUSE he killed so many whites, not despite it.

Sandmich
3 years ago

Of course the big issue here is: black people.
By extension, the powers-that-be need a black conclave in every square mile of the nation in an attempt to head off any break-up, while all it does is make whatever future break-up that happens extra bloody.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Sandmich
3 years ago

For our rulers blacks are the gift that keeps on giving. So useful in so many ways.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  David Wright
3 years ago

Heh. And for the ruled, they are the grift that keeps on grifting.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Sandmich
3 years ago

Blacks aren’t the only social ill (although, admittedly, they’re high on the list, here in the USA). At least twice in Twentieth Century, Europe managed to kill tens of millions of their own, with nary a Black, indeed, scarcely any non-Caucasian, involved (excluding the US military when it arrived upon the scene.)

Last edited 3 years ago by Ben the Layabout
Sandmich
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

True, but looking back on 200 years of “brother wars” it’s hard to see one that wasn’t, in retrospect, a really bad idea.
To an extent, from the American Civil War onwards it was pretty much the same white tribal warfare that had been around for thousands of years, but with none of the sides taking the industrialization of warfare into account.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Perhaps you’d consider the outre’ possibility that we’re being enticed to do it again. A 20th, and now a 21st C. replay of the Catholic-Protestant wars.

MikeCLT
MikeCLT
3 years ago

There can be no separation because neither side would agree to accept the blacks.

Wkathman
Wkathman
3 years ago

Haven’t even read this yet, but the title alone is music to my ears.

waitingForTheStorm
Member
Reply to  Wkathman
3 years ago

Great article. I have told many immigrants (I had lots of contacts thru work) that this country was populated by loners, adventurers, and malcontents. This very fact explains much of what has been referred to as American exceptionalism. We are exceptional because we are, largely, the exceptions. One of my former coworkers, after having visited my “compound”, asked me “Why do you hate?” in response to my desire to be separate and unmolested. I explained: I don’t hate; I just don’t like. Big difference. Being hive-minded east-Asian, I don’t think he ever got the concept. The last I heard, he… Read more »

Last edited 3 years ago by WaitingForTheStorm
Lanky
Lanky
Reply to  waitingForTheStorm
3 years ago

Just had a kid with a BTW. There’s something about fertility…

TomA
TomA
Reply to  waitingForTheStorm
3 years ago

I just want to be left alone by the parasites. Go somewhere else to get your free lunch.

Ja’Mel
Ja’Mel
Member
Reply to  waitingForTheStorm
3 years ago

I prefer just a handful…..Wait, what were we talking about???

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Wkathman
3 years ago

“Familiarity breeds contempt …then children” – M. Twain.

Doug
Doug
Reply to  ProZNoV
3 years ago

Does that make them children of disscontempt or malcontempt?

Last edited 3 years ago by Doug
Luna Padre Ramel
Luna Padre Ramel
Reply to  Wkathman
3 years ago

Check out this story from TAC: Professor Recants Love Of College Football“I gathered information from Eastern bloc émigrés to the US, trying to see what they meant when they said that America today was starting to remind them of life under communism. One of the things I heard over and over from academics had to do with the compulsion to confess one’s supposed sins against woke ideology, and to abase oneself for having violated ideological purity. Czechs talked about the show trials of the early 1950s, in particular.”“Today, Inside Higher Ed publishes a spectacular example of this in American academia.… Read more »

Same
Same
Reply to  Luna Padre Ramel
3 years ago

Fascism is a reaction to bolshevism. The fascists are the good guys.

Some
Some
Reply to  Same
3 years ago

Don’t be pedantic. The word was obviously used as a pejorative and was stated as such in the post. Even the reason was given.

William Wallace
William Wallace
Reply to  Same
3 years ago

Associating enemies with negative symbolism is a FED technique. They used it at Charlottesville when one of their guys took a Nazi flag and flamboyantly waved it around. Same here when this guy praises fascism (out of context with the comment). Don’t fall for it. They’re scared of the freedom option. That’s why they make comments like that one. If they’re scared of it, maybe there is something to it?

c matt
c matt
Reply to  William Wallace
3 years ago

Associating enemies with negative symbolism is a FED technique

It is a classic communist maneuver. Step three, if I recall correctly. Of course, being a communist maneuver and a FED maneuver are not mutually exclusive.

It's Here Plan Accordingly
It's Here Plan Accordingly
Reply to  Luna Padre Ramel
3 years ago

Democrats possibly plotting a coup: https://americanmind.org/post/no-coup-for-you/ https://americanmind.org/essays/the-coming-coup/ Note: The Transition Integrity Project (TIP) is a means by which the left can organize and game a coup against our government should Donald Trump win re-election. Of course, they can’t come out and say that, so they pretend they are merely responding to other parties. In reality, the left merely accuses others of what they want to do in order to justify doing it themselves. They’ve always done that. Remember when they said they were afraid of violence? Well, the radical left just caused billions in damage from months-long violent riots. The… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
3 years ago

Uncharacteristic of you to engage in such optimism, which is that removing the lid would be effective or even possible. The Ruling Class wants a boiling pot, a devil for their religion, and social unrest. I’m really not sure as to why–I have thoughts, but can’t even explain why they decided to go Khmer Rogue on the cities. I don’t know what the end game is. But peaceful unification and tolerance sure ain’t it. White genocide seems to be part of it but not all of it. We may soon learn. The divisions are welcomed, though, and exploited, and the… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Jack Dobson
3 years ago

A one world Marxist government over IQ – 1 to – 2 SD, Coudenhove-Kalergi mongrels governed by a tiny, hand-rubbing elite, enforced via a networked tyranny of social credit and vaccination hoops to jump through.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Jack Dobson
3 years ago

I think the attack on the cities is the first attack on white gentiles or libs. I saw this with white women; I remember telling them last year or maybe the year before, that the hordes were coming for them next. I could start to see the shift in advertisements where white women — in scattered commercials, not quite heavy yet — were being portrayed and mocked gently for the time being as fools or foolish. This is an attack on white people. The people who gentrify will not be spared. They have just been saved for last. The JJJs… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Jack Dobson
3 years ago

“Boiling pot” is an incomplete analogy. Instead, how about a pressure cooker filled with water, with its weight and safety release both welded shut, over a high flame? What could possibly go wrong? Google “boiler explosion” for a sobering learning experience.

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Respectfully disagree Ben. For those who accept the boiling-pot metaphor, our present condition is very similar to the last decade or two of the USSR. Gorbachev came along and recognized the problem. He tried to vent some steam, which usually causes the explosion. In that respect Trump may be our Gorbachev. Have to wait and see; it may not be long now.

Last edited 3 years ago by Jim Smith
CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Jim Smith
3 years ago

Sharp insight. I’d add what happened here, USA in the late 60’s, with the jogger riots across the nation. We had a 100 years of suppression since the CW, then came the second great “emancipation”.

All Jim Crow laws removed, voting rights act, programs galore started to uplift the “negro”. Result…almost immediate riots from said folk. Cities burned. The reaction…more groveling, apologies, AA and welfare. And it hasn’t stopped since.

Worldwide Outta
Worldwide Outta
Reply to  Jack Dobson
3 years ago

The ruling class will never allow freedom of association within this country, or at least they’ll never let you have it. The far-left’s coalition is only stabilized by pitting various fringe groups against normal whites. They must always promise to vanquish the white demon on behalf of the POC, establishing their leadership over them and preserving their wealth and status in the process. Thus, the endless humiliations our side has to endure. That’s what they mean by “unity.” They want you to sit back and take it for their sake. Allowing middle-class whites to associate among themselves would imply exclusion… Read more »

Marko
Marko
3 years ago

Separation would be great, but we’d have to deal with all the punch-holes where cities are. It would be like so many West Berlins.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Marko
3 years ago

I think there would have to be populations transfers along the lines of what happened between Greece and Turkey. It would be too complicated any other way.

BTP
Member
Reply to  Barnard
3 years ago

Codevilla talks about a period where people sort themselves along these lines.

Reality YT
Reality YT
Reply to  BTP
3 years ago

Left alone most people sort it out. We will not be left alone, nor will the others until we throw off our tormentors.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Marko
3 years ago

I’m guessing that most large urban areas would not exist at their present scale without massive influxes of federal cash. Any work done there is largely paper pushing which can be done anywhere and the services to support it. NYC might be an exception with the large financial industry but even this is mobile as New Jersey is about to find out.
Many of these large urban areas might morph into holding pens or reservations for the underclass. Even hipsters wouldn’t try to gentrify such a forbidding place

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  skeptic16
3 years ago

“Escape to New York!”

A travel adventure! Quaint, charming, with it’s own exotic thrill.

Our experienced safari guides will safely make an unforgettable tour!

(Liability waiver required)

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

That is not impossible. On my one trip to Panama, which is a pleasant country, one city I visited is Colon. I’ll spare you the details, but it has history value. Alas, it also has third-world class poverty and violence. My guide book said basically “Don’t walk down the city streets, not even in broad daylight.” On my visit, with another American, we were met at the station by our English-speaking tour guide. He showed us his concealed handgun permit (in English and Spanish), as well as his firearm. He drove us around the city. We had lunch in an… Read more »

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Panama benefited for a time from the monied interests who themselves benefited from the shell corporations, fraud, tax evasion, money laundering, etc. services provided by that particular firm exposed in the Panama Papers.

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

It’s a vision of what life is here, in many ways, now. The bulk of which we avoid daily contact with. I was once in Chicago to attend a meeting at the University. Before attending, I was faxed a map of the University and immediate surrounds. The map was literally red-lined as to where I might walk and to where such was “stupidly dangerous”. One could not walk from the University as it was surrounded by stupidly dangerous. 😉 The map was somewhat superfluous as I was picked up by a chartered bus at my hotel and escorted to the… Read more »

Mayor Lightfrog
Mayor Lightfrog
Reply to  CompscI
3 years ago

Very late 70’s I attempted to visit the Bronx as a little kid from Western Michigan just having earned a modest scholarship. Our awards bus was barred entry because a gang purportedly had a “live rocket launcher” interpreted as a “bazooka.” Ultimately, a big nothing burger. In Chicago back in your day, the Hegewisch to Bronzeville gangs would have politely given the bus driver accurate directions and no trouble unless they spied a pretty white girl, then just aggressive catcalls and bustin’ some moves. Today, they would take the bus and everything in between. Not for the cash necessarily but… Read more »

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  CompscI
3 years ago

Adventure travel – any extra charge for the bonus cultural experience?

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
3 years ago

No, but I have to admit for the first time I felt sort of ashamed. I had to go back with any number of non-citizens who (some) came from countries I had once decried—smug in my “Americanism”. The path to this group has been long.

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

I lived in Panama when I was young (as a military brat). Colon is far and away the biggest shithole in Panama.

It has been a long time since I’ve been there, but overall Panama was a pretty pleasant place in the late 70’s and early 80’s.

lo-tech
lo-tech
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

I always regarded those Kurt Russell movies as entertaining satire. Turns out they were documentaries!

Ja’Mel
Ja’Mel
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

So many different varieties!

Ja’Mel
Ja’Mel
Member
Reply to  Marko
3 years ago

The technology is there….

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
3 years ago

I agree with most of what Z says here, and he says it very well. (The pressure cooker metaphor is especially well executed.) However, while it is undeniably true that “America” is not an organic, unitary nation, it is equally true that America worked until roughly 1964, at which point fissiparous forces, generated in no small measure by multiculti, began to throw the entire system wildly out of kilter. And in this connexion, note that all peoples are not equally antipathetic to one another. The Pennsylvania Dutch are far more compatible with Slavs than Icelanders are with the Matabele. Diversity… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

The thing is, we got along well enough, and this is evident in the fact that so many people from one part of the country moved to another and there was never a big deal or friction. I travelled the country for a few years because of work, along with many others like me, and America was just a big playpen for white people, and you never had to worry about much of anything. Except black neighborhoods — of course. Even if I ended up in a biker bar, there was never a big problem. We all got along well… Read more »

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Fissiparous – admit I had to look it up. In light of current events – a word which may find its’ way increasingly into the lexicon.

Sandmich
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

The ruiner here again is the Supreme Court who steps in with their High Dictates and plowing over whatever long-evolved compromises had been put in place.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
3 years ago

They talk about unifying the country. Then they bring up issues particular to very small minorities, constantly harangue us about it in their media and rub our noses in it.

Higgs Boson
Higgs Boson
3 years ago

Peaceful separation starts with canceling the grievance culture, their never-ending litany of blame and demands for our money, property, and peace of mind.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Higgs Boson
3 years ago

Why would the Left give up something that’s obviously working very well for them?

Higgs Boson
Higgs Boson
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

The left is running out of options faster than they think.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  MemeWarVet
3 years ago

Boy howdy

David Wright
Member
3 years ago

Reminds me, from yesterday, of commenter Karl Horst (Germany) that America is a dumping ground for eurotrash. Foolish and inaccurate indeed. You say they were indifferent or hostile with the old world. More accurate and I understand more than ever their motivation. Social media and the other ways we are exposed to constantly the inane opinions and lifestyles of others is our undoing for sure. Covid sure didn’t help with all the docile compliant members of my extended family. Really has driven a wedge and I find withdrawal the only choice. I wish there was a workable way for many… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  David Wright
3 years ago

Maybe that’s why Freedom of Association (which is derived from Freedom of Assembly) was such a big deal in the document formerly known as The Constitution. To bad they did not list Freedom of Association expressly.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  David Wright
3 years ago

Horst’s criticisms were not entirely invalid. A large fraction of the early immigrants to America were hardly the cream of European society. Let’s see, we have oddball religions, on our side of the Atlantic we called it “freedom of religion,” but in Europe it was more a case of “You can leave, or we can kill you.” Now just having unconventional faith should not be a crime, nor should it necessarily be an impediment to building a civlization (although sometimes it is — witness Islam). But we also got a large supply of indentured servants, little better than slaves. Also… Read more »

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Sorry, but Germany can’t take credit for concentration camps. British concentration camps were operated in South Africa during the Second Anglo-Boer War which lasted from 1900–1902.
We just took a good idea and made it more efficient. It’s what we do.

Last edited 3 years ago by Karl Horst (Germany)
james
james
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

You can take all the credit, Horst. Concentration camps were first used in the Spanish-Cuban war-the Prussian military adviser came up with the idea. To be fair he claimed he was inspired by the treatment of native Americans in reservations by the US government. The German death camps were not concentration camps: they were designed to exterminate the people in them, the Boers survived the war even though they lost, the unlucky tribes herded into your camps fared poorly even though you lost. The Germans named them concentration camps as a useful piece of propaganda and to imply that there… Read more »

Last edited 3 years ago by james
Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
Reply to  David Wright
3 years ago

@ David Wright Actually it’s a very accurate statement.  It was German noblemen who encouraged German peasants to immigrate to Texas with the intention of colonization. The Black Forrest was almost completely de-forrested in order to provide fuel for the growing industrial revolution and the underclass in Germany were getting out of hand as farms began to collapse. Unfortunately, malaria and the Comanches took their toll as they got off the boats. But those Germans who did survive left their mark all over the Texas map in towns you can find today such as New Braunfels, Fredericksburg, or Lukenbach. I… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

There are interesting videos on Youtube of current Germans traveling to Texas to compare their modern language with the fossilized German still spoken in the backwaters of the Lone Star State.

The German dialect spoken by our local Amish is even less mutually intelligible.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
3 years ago

We should go back to that loose confederation of states with some modifications like they were SUPPOSED to do in Philadelphia in 1787.

yom kippur
yom kippur
3 years ago

“The more the water boils, the more the lid is pressed down.”

Exactly, and as our economic zone grows more dissimilar and “diverse”, the more tyrannical our elite will become in desperately trying to keep it all together:
comment image

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  yom kippur
3 years ago

My goodness. The waistline on the hippo in the center, I’ve not seen a beam like that since I visited the USS Massachusetts.

Vizzini
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Is that what “quantity has a quality all its own” means?

ChicagoRodent
ChicagoRodent
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Diversity is our strength. Then again I’m not her chair or toilet.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  ChicagoRodent
3 years ago

I guess the toilet is hopeless, but if I were the chair I would try and walk away when I saw the sky darkening above me 🙂

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Group photos used to be arranged by height, not girth.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

It’s a herd of water buffalo about to head out to the Zambezi to wallow in the mud flats.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  yom kippur
3 years ago

I assume these are prison guards which is bad enough. Can you imagine when this becomes the norm for police and military?

Defund Defund Defund
Defund Defund Defund
Reply to  skeptic16
3 years ago

Police are already going that way: the reason so many big city police departments betrayed white working people and sided with black rioters and their enablers and sycophants is that they’re increasingly staffed by black officers managed by ADL-approved supervisors and chiefs. This is why I fully support defunding the police.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  skeptic16
3 years ago

And medical schools?

Rich
Member
Reply to  yom kippur
3 years ago

Is this Georgia Department of Corrections or the new Space Force?

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Rich
3 years ago

The Space Force. They’re going to use that woman’s gravity to draw Mars closer to us.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

I believe she’s more than capable of generating her own black hole.

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  Rich
3 years ago

.

Last edited 3 years ago by Valley Lurker
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Rich
3 years ago

Spacious Force

Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
Mysteerious Rooshian Vooman
Reply to  Rich
3 years ago

Yes.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  yom kippur
3 years ago

I don’t recognize the uniform. At least they’re not bearing firearms, so at least that’s reassuring 😀

lo-tech
lo-tech
Reply to  yom kippur
3 years ago

These are guards of some kind? What the heck is a morbidly obese woman supposed to accomplish as a guard? And when one of the 4-5 normal-sized men in that photo get promoted ahead of them, it will no doubt be some kind of civil rights lawsuit…

Last edited 3 years ago by lo-tech
Sit on it!
Sit on it!
Reply to  lo-tech
3 years ago

What the heck is a morbidly obese woman supposed to accomplish as a guard?

That’s an easy one. Sit on any troublesome prisoners.

Barnard
Barnard
3 years ago

An additional problem with social media and the internet is these people think they are experts on everything, but know almost nothing. The Trump tax return leak is another good example. We now have thousands of blue check liberals on Twitter, most of whom couldn’t pass accounting 101 claiming Trump cheated on his taxes. All they have done is demonstrate their total ignorance of tax law and real estate investing. People on the right who venerate the Founders should understand how few Americans today the Founders would have wanted to have the franchise.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Barnard
3 years ago

these people think they are experts on everything, but know almost nothing.

I think this applies to the last several decades of Liberal Arts and Humanities grads as well.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Barnard
3 years ago

Well put. On that very topic this morning, I posted on ZH more or less: “It was not without reason that the Founders of this country only let educated, property-owning males vote, or that States had their legislatures choose the President and Vice President.”

usNthem
usNthem
3 years ago

If this was true 200 years ago, it’s exponentially worse today. As for any kind of peaceful separation, I can’t see it. The powers that be won’t allow it, while they continue to pour gas on the flames.

BTP
Member
Reply to  usNthem
3 years ago

I wold suggest that the principal utility of a post like Z’s is how it outlines a solution that is at once obviously necessary, the only possible peaceful result, completely reasonable, and also utterly impossible.

They will never let us go.

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  BTP
3 years ago

BTP and usNthem, that was exactly what the ruling apparatchiks of the Soviet Union thought: They would never let the captive nations (peoples) go. Until it happened.

Ja’Mel
Ja’Mel
Member
Reply to  BTP
3 years ago

If white men woke up, we could do it. When it comes down to it, all of our problems are white men having allowed them to happen. The 19th amendment, the war between the states, protestantism…etc hehe.

anonymous
anonymous
3 years ago

Re: The discussion in the previous post about Americans being noticeably dumber. I’ve been studying autobiographies and books written by the scientists and engineers of the early 20th century. There is something there: Everyone today seems far less accomplished, and the crap they focus on seems far more trivial and poorly executed. But this can’t be genetic. It’s only been one or two generations: Unless there was some genetic-bottleneck mass-murder of the intelligent that no one talks about, something else had to have changed. I’ve also been noticing what I can only term morphological differences in people today, pretty widespread.… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  anonymous
3 years ago

Everyone today seems far less accomplished, and the crap they focus on seems far more trivial and poorly executed. I think one aspect to consider is the way that language has been allowed to erode, along with many other things, learning to speak well and write well appear to be in sharp decline. If a language declines, and fewer people are able lay out complex ideas, I do not think it bodes well for any attempt at making new discoveries. Today, I have been skim reading some chap’s PhD thesis, the use of language in it was awful. This is… Read more »

james wilson
james wilson
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

When Tocqueville decribed Americans as the best educated people on earth in 1831 most attended school for six or eight years, if at all. They continued their education at work and in civic life. We are not more highly educated but rather more highly indoctrinated and stupified.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  james wilson
3 years ago

I was shocked in the late 80s when the young, at the end of or fresh out of high school, were obsessively piercing themselves with pins, over and over, out of sheer, bloody boredom.

We have simply GOT to get the kids working again, bringing them into the adult world. They’re dying for jobs and experience.

Instead, we’re subsidizing foreign labor.

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
Vizzini
Reply to  anonymous
3 years ago

Unless there was some genetic-bottleneck mass-murder of the intelligent that no one talks about

The Civil War (655k dead, 1 million+ casualties), World War 1 (204k dead, 320k casualties), World War 2 (670k dead, 1 million+ casualties), and to a lesser extent the Korean War (92k dead, 128k casualties) and Vietnam (153k dead, 211k casualties).

Mass murder, you say?

Last edited 3 years ago by Vizzini
Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

Re bottleneck, I was just going to say, “see, Battles of Ypres.” Or the sunken road at Antietam.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  anonymous
3 years ago

Look at the breadth of knowledge and experience a man like Teddy Roosevelt had compared to the men who have run our country for the past several decades.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  anonymous
3 years ago

As to those nootropics, the Z noted that drugs from the New World- tobacco and coffee (and Eastern tea)- gave us the ability of extended sitting, listening, writing, reading, and debate.

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  anonymous
3 years ago

Changes in reproductive rates in the important slices of the bell curve happen within years, sometimes as long as decades. With generational lengths of 20-25 years, the last 140 (200?) years of dysgenics has had ample time to come to fruition. This is compounded by the bottlenecks of industrial war, which overwhemlimgly killed white males from the middle and right hand of the bell curve. The intro segment to Idiocracy is funny because it is very and literally true.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Educated.redneck
3 years ago

Your points on dysgenics is right of course. I blame the apparent loss of intellectual sharpness due to changes in education methods. It’s not like successful people suddenly started seeking out the stupidest, laziest spouse to breed with (in majority of cases.) But we did water down our education systems, big time.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  anonymous
3 years ago

You’ve got to keep in mind that the audience has gotten dumber. So, while the author may be supremely intelligent, the editor and publisher are telling him to dumb it down. There is some statistic that claims a book will lose a certain percentage of the audience for each mathematical equation.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  anonymous
3 years ago

Because there wasn’t as much money. So if you had aspirations, you really had to be kick ass to make a name for yourself, push and push and push yourself, but if you did make it the reward was that much sweeter and better. The payoff was you go into the history books and become wealthy or you die hungry and forgotten. If you have all of these excess dollars sloshing about, their value is less and hence the value of who can get hold of them is less. We used to, I think, see something similar in English pop… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  anonymous
3 years ago

You are right about genetics. Virtually nothing can change in just a few generations (exceptions: selective breeding, but even in these cases the genome itself of the animals doesn’t change much; you are just selecting for desired alleles (traits)). Surely a lot of the changes in a century or so are due to the benefits (and non-benefits) of technology. People today are fatter, lazier and not mentally exercised as they were in Great Grandpa’s day. Virtually all of the first two are explained by diet and reduced exertion. Environmental toxins can affect all three. The ignorance part is highly explained… Read more »

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

Albion’s Seed by David Fischer explains a great deal about influence of England, Scotland and Ireland upon the US and why things are as they are in your country. For example, sod huts iare not an American invention as I’m sure many were taught in your US History classes. But were brought over from Scotland. Much about your present situation can be traced right back to how things were 150 years ago. As the Zman implies in this blog post, most of what you’re going through now is nothing more than a repeat of your past. A Nation Without Borders… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

Thanks, Herr Horst, it sure would be nice if we were just going through a stage.

To think we used to laugh at those silly Victorians.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

My ancestors arrived in 1623 and eventually helped establish Beverly MA. The house he built is still there. Our family name is mentioned in the last chapter of Hackett’s book as one of the families that fell outside of the pattern. My ancestor was from southwest England where most of the New England settlers were from east England. My ancestor was part of a purely commercial company rather than religious fanatics. At one time members of the company stayed at Plymouth Colony and had to leave because the Pilgrims were assholes. Despite this, on of his descendants was a chaplain… Read more »

BTP
Member
3 years ago

Codevilla wrote on this topic from a different direction a couple days back, and it’s useful to read that also. Thinking through the implications of a Trump loss in a couple months, he suggests our side will have to focus thus: To avoid having the left’s priorities forced on them and eschewing desire to force anything on the Left, to avoid a civil war of which the armed forces must be the arbiter, they would ask their voters to support plans for so de-centralizing government—that is, for a much-expanded federalism—as to guarantee their right to live the kinds of lives… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
3 years ago

I find myself on both sides of this topic. There are certainly deep regional differences that continue to make coexistence difficult, and yet I recognize ‘American-ness’ in people from all over the country. There is a half-formed nation, I think, but neglected, the project of nation building halfheartedly pursued or abandoned.

Which is probably why I’m still a fan of federalism, because Americans will come together to defend each other, yet it’s still better to let people govern themselves and avoid the civil warring.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Paintersforms
3 years ago

The Zman himself noted that French provinces spoke different dialects.

Felix Krull added that no one could speak or understand Jutland.

Their past, our future?
That would accept the ‘melting pot’ premise. Except with ladyboy trannies.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

I see my mistake. Accepting unConstitutional federal powers.

Speaking as a 1910 libertarian, the best tradeoff in most of our issues still seems to be the original:
the 10th Amendment.

But, that’s useless nostalgia, with the Hordes arriving. Things have changed.

lo-tech
lo-tech
Reply to  Paintersforms
3 years ago

PaitnerofForms, I agree with you. “Conservatism” as presently defined is not going to solve all our problems, but the Constitution and federalism were in fact conceived to address some of the exact problems we are now facing. They are good concepts, and not exhausted, in my view.

Last edited 3 years ago by lo-tech
Veeze
Veeze
3 years ago

Good job today, Z!

Sandmich
Reply to  GetBackUp
3 years ago

One can dream. Maybe that would be the one good thing about a Trump win, that the left, the nominal rulers, would tire of the bother of ruling of people they despise.

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
3 years ago

Several nuggets of wisdom in this essay, beginning with…”America was a land with people, rather than a people with a land”…and ends much the same way…”It is a land of people, lots of different people, not a people with a land”….
ZMan concludes “What will bring peace, is what always kept the peace. That is peaceful separation”.
Depending on how one might define ‘peace’ and ‘separation’, likely it will be a choice – peace, or separation. Pick one.

ronehjr
ronehjr
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
3 years ago

I’m not sure pointing out a solution the ruling class will never try could be qualified as ‘optimism.

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  ronehjr
3 years ago

My apology if you read anything into my comment that could be construed as optimism.

Ja’Mel
Ja’Mel
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
3 years ago

I think it could happen. If we worked out a separation, even one like the original constituion implied, we could do it. We would have to let people be with their people and socially discourage mixing. I’d give up a few states to blacks or latins or Indians, for peace.

But its going to take a huge disaster like a major war. We can’t get their through persuasion. People minds are too liberal.

Stranger in a strange land
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Ja’Mel
3 years ago

The social discouragment of which you speak in many cases might well require some more, shall I say…physical methodology.

Last edited 3 years ago by Stranger in a strange land
TomA
TomA
3 years ago

I would argue that the problem is even deeper than the mixing pot conundrum. At the root, the Elites need to establish firm control over the masses because the peasants are well armed and will likely revolt when the Ponzi scheme collapses. Then, OH BOY, there will be hell to pay (think French Revolution redux). So they either manufacture docile sheeple or set them to fight among themselves as diversion. But there is an effective Plan B.

Stephanie G
Stephanie G
3 years ago

Has there ever been a country with a unified people? Here in GB there are parts of the country that have looked down on each other for centuries. Northerners consider southerners to be effete, snobbish,pretentious,insincere and obsessed with money. While southerners endlessly mock the North for its endemic poverty and it’s relentless terrible grimness. Both groups like to laugh at people from the West Country who are thought of as gurning bucolic peasants with thick almost impenetrable accents. Here in Scotland we look down on the people and culture of other parts of Scotland and the whole of Britain looks… Read more »

MikeCLT
MikeCLT
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

What is the Irish problem?

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  MikeCLT
3 years ago

Irish Catholics I’d guess. Never hear anyone complaining about the Protestants.

Last edited 3 years ago by Paintersforms
Bruno the Arrogant
Bruno the Arrogant
Reply to  MikeCLT
3 years ago

Let’s put it this way – my Irish grandmother, several generations removed from the old sod, died in 1995 still hating the British she’d never actually lived under.

To this day, you’ll notice a lot of Irish still working to undermine the WASP elite, despite that elite being largely defunct.

Ethnic hatred accounts for a lot more of our politics than you might suspect with a casual glance. Even before we started celebrating diversity. I suspect that even a lot of the participants don’t realize the roots of their conflicts as ethnic, but here we are.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
3 years ago

I see it the same way. And I see the Civil War as mainly an ethnic feud of English vs Scots Irish with others mixed in. In fact, growing up in the south this was apparent in attitudes and so forth, for me merely an observer whose family was from Italy of all places.

Incidentally, I have always thought an instructive bit of history for Americans, anybody really, would be the Guelph and Ghibelline wars. Many parallels with what we are experiencing today. Worth checking out.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
3 years ago

I’m surprised that “European” ethnic enmity would last that many generations, especially removed from the mother countries. Ah, for the good old days, when a “mixed marriage” in many parts of America meant, for instance, a Lutheran and an Episcopalean 🙂

Johnny
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Pat Casey and Kevin Macdonald are Irish background. I wonder if some other prominent names are also.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

My new litmus test for SCOTUS appointees is a Freedom of Association absolutist. We need to get some one out there asking political candidates where they stand on FOA.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  c matt
3 years ago

I’m not optimistic about ACB. Women who use both parents’ surnames are usually going to be a problem. White women do it to defy the patriarchy. Black women do it because their parents rarely get married.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  skeptic16
3 years ago

It remains unclear how much a wife who’s had seven children defies the patriarchy. If naught else, it proves she’s a good Catholic 🙂

KGB
KGB
Reply to  skeptic16
3 years ago

When I was married 10 years ago, I made sure my wife said “love, honor, and obey.” None of this “cherish” or “respect” bilge. The surname gambit is a huge tell regarding a woman’s presumptions regarding her place.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Truer words were never said, the rest have no power over each other beyond the normal squabbling.

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
lo-tech
lo-tech
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

It also worked when there was a lot more space. One can still find space in this country, in theory. But any economically dynamic area now is a traffic-choked mess, with a rapidly expanding multicultural underclass.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Biologically multicultural but not ideologically so. The latter is an invention of the 20th century.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

19th century, when all the Euro immigration finally came to a stop. The 20th century was when the adaptation actually happened. Largely worked, too.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Stephanie G
3 years ago

Has there ever been a country with a unified people?
maybe if the country is very small like luxembourg or something

City-States
City-States
Reply to  sentry
3 years ago

This is a good point; I think it’s because countries like Luxembourg are essentially city-states. When coupled with krustykurmudgeon’s map of Pennsylvania… …I think this observation shows us the way forward for peaceful separation: self-governing city-states surrounded by Autonomous Territories. The problem is how to get the rootless cosmopolitan elite in the city-states to relinquish their obsession with “converting the heathens” and their control over the Autonomous Territories. For example, the Electoral College might be one of the few things holding this dying country together. Without it, the New York metro, the Chicago metro, the LA metro and the Bay… Read more »

Last edited 3 years ago by City-States
Sandmich
Reply to  City-States
3 years ago

Depends if the center collapses, then, like in the dying U.S.S.R., every potential local potentate will try to form up his own country that he can be ruler of.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Sandmich
3 years ago

But that didn’t happen in the USSR. It was already a collection of countries that simply broke apart from the Union.

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
Reply to  City-States
3 years ago

well the problem is that the urban people FEEL victimized. If you’re in California – do you want senators from Wyoming to pick judges to determine what YOUR gun laws should be?
Maybe RBG is there King Hamlet or Steve Biko.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  City-States
3 years ago

What you describe (Electoral College obsoleted) is quite possible. Removing the Electoral College and (might as well) get rid of two Senators from each State. Of course, these would require amending (or rewriting) the Constitution. Absent a more sudden collapse (civil war, revolution, partition, etc.) in fact, that is a logical and predictable change over many decades. As a liberal democracy grows more powerful, there is a natural urge to remove checks to its power, two of which are cited above. The logical outcome is a purely proportional representative parliament. Of course, whatever remaining shreds of State autonomy or rights… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
3 years ago

(“The great patriotic struggle…” Ha! Stalin salutes you!)

“The Puritan settlers were on one side of the English Civil War, while the people of the South were on the other.”

Now there is an interesting thought experiment.

What if the Colonies had not become one country, but two?

(And then, what about Canada?)

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
Diversity Heretic
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

An interesting thought experiment is what if North America had evolved along the lines of South America with some large powers and a number of small ones.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
3 years ago

Balance-of-power theory is basically two large states balanced by three small.

Yours is an interesting proposition indeed; when we were all British or French citizens, I think the powers had a Europe of the Americas in mind, with sovereign Indian nations as confederations, a League.

Bruno the Arrogant
Bruno the Arrogant
3 years ago

I’m not sure how you peacefully separate on a planet that’s run out of real estate to separate to. It’s not like any of the countries currently holding the land are going to surrender it without a fight. There’s no more American frontier for disgruntled Europeans, not even a wild west for disgruntled Easterners to escape to. Mars, maybe? I can see some advantages. First, it’ll be expensive to get there, which pretty much rules out any Section 8 transplants. Then, staying alive would be difficult enough that any Affirmative Action imports would probably Darwin themselves out of the picture… Read more »

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
3 years ago

When there’s no frontier to escape to, that’s when diversity + proximity = war (Chateau Heartiste) makes an appearance.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
3 years ago

Imagine being that white guy who misses the last flight to Mars

Last edited 3 years ago by Falcone
ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

“Sure, I want to die on Mars. Just not on impact.” – E Musk.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
3 years ago

That’s how I see it. In the Christ’s time, the human race totalled 200 million.

In 1960, it was 3 billion. Now?

What I suspect is tptb intend to force a new, wide open frontier. (We kill each other.) Of course, after they have ridden that wave to the top, an insanely dangerous gambit.

In the long stretch of time, it will be seen as all for the best.

The civilized world was already responding to Nature’s demand, slowing growth– but no, the powers did not get to the top by being civilized.

Last edited 3 years ago by Alzaebo
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Alzaebo
3 years ago

Re last statement. True enough. The problem is the less-civilized parts of the Globe are breeding like rabbits. Virtually all of their “success” was initiated (Western medicine, food, tech) and is sustained by flows (gov’t, NGO) from richer countries (pri