Conspiratorial Rule

It is hard to know, but most likely the conspiracy theory is one of the oldest parts of human society. In fact, the popularity of conspiracy theories is probably a good measure of social trust. Low-trust societies, like you find in the Middle East, tend to be shot through with conspiracy theories. High trust societies in Northwest Europe tend to have less of it, but even they are prone to bouts of conspiracy mongering. The Great Fear that swept through rural France is a good example.

In modern times, the conspiracy theory has been formalized. The assassination of John Kennedy is probably when this formalization process began. For example, a conspiracy theory needs a series of hard to accept coincidences. In the case of Kennedy, we have the amazing marksmanship of the shooter and then his unlikely assassination at the hands of a Jewish gangster, while he was in police custody. The Jack Ruby part is what made the whole thing perfect for the conspiracy theorists.

The first step in a conspiracy theory is that the obvious answer or the official answer must be eliminated as a lie or implausible. In the case of the Kennedy assassination, the start of the conspiracy dynamic was the dismissal of Oswald as the lone actor. It is a variation on the old Sherlock Holmes line. Once you eliminate the parsimonious explanation, then the more complex and convoluted explanations become more plausible. That opens the door to endless speculation.

We see this with the QAnon cult on-line. All of it starts with the assumption that the obvious answer is wrong. For example, it is plainly obvious that Bill Barr is covering up the FBI spying scandal. He’s had years to do what should have taken a few months. Instead of accepting that rather obvious and plausible explanation, the QAnon people reject it and instead weave wildly complex theories about how half of Washington is about to be charged with crimes.

Another aspect of the formal conspiracy theory is the liberal use of the associative property to connect unrelated events. Person A knows Person B and Person B once had lunch at the same place as Person C. If any of these three people can be tied to the event in question, then it is assumed the other two are connected. The weakest associations are enough to assume a conspiracy. The associative property is an essential element of the modern conspiracy theory.

In the case of Kennedy, for example, organized crime is a popular player, because Jack Ruby was a minor criminal. His tenuous association with organized crime opens the door for linking any number of underworld characters with the assassination. It also opens the door for all sorts of theories about the Kennedy administration’s connections to organized crime. The associative property then ties communism, organized crime and the Cuba situation to the assassination.

Probably the most overlooked aspect of the formal conspiracy theory is the personalizing of complex events. The conspiracy theorist assumes there is a small group of people behind the events in question. These super-intelligent, shadowy figures pull the strings from the shadows. Even when a government agency is at the core of the conspiracy, it is really a core of individuals within that core that is secretly manipulating the organization.

This turns up with the spying scandal. The reality is, the Washington-based intel community is horribly corrupt. The spying and subsequent cover-up is a product of a culture of corruption in these institutions. For the conspiracy theorist, that does not work, so they focus on a few “shot callers.” Of course, it was not just mere partisan zeal that led them to spy on Trump people. They are part of some shadowy organization that is secretly doing all sorts of bad things.

Probably the most important part of the modern conspiracy theory is that it must flatter the person obsessed with it. For the conspiracy buff, the thrill is in feeling that they have figured it all out. Those super-intelligent people working in the shadows were not smart enough to outwit the conspiracy hunter. Everyone else falls for the official story, but the conspiracy theorist knows the real truth. Paradoxically, the conspiracy theory makes the world a much simpler and safer place for them.

The best example right now is the Left’s obsession with white supremacy. They cannot accept that their vision of Utopia is not very popular. That’s the first step in a conspiracy theory, the rejection of the most plausible reason. That allows them to spin wild tales of secret Nazis and spectral supremacists. Rather than confront reality, which is frightening and disconcerting, they have created a series of conspiracy theories to explain why the world is not as they imagine it.

This is why conspiracy theories are a useful metric to gauge social trust. When order begins to break down, people naturally look for reasons. That opens the door to speculation and then conspiracy theories. This, in turn, erodes social trust, which is the foundation upon which every ruling class rests. As that foundation falters, the ruling class looks for reasons. Since blaming themselves is always off the table, they naturally begin to speculate, which opens the door to conspiracy theories.

America is now ruled by conspiracy theorists. That is clear in the debate surrounding the first Trump-Biden debate show. The Left is obsessing over white supremacists and the old Gavin McInnes fan club, the Proud Boys. They have any number of conspiracies involving those things, but now they are cooking up conspiracies as to why Trump did not properly denounce them. It must mean something! For the people in charge, it is conspiracy theories all the way down.

None of this is to say there are no conspiracies. The FBI spying scandal, for example, is a good example of a conspiracy. It was corrupt and self-important mediocrities playing at spymaster. In a functioning society, they would be in jail now and that would be the end of it. In a conspiratorial state, they remain free as one side conspires to defeat the white supremacy conspiracy, while the other conspires to cover it all up. The QAnon people strap on their aluminum foil hats to sort it all out.

Media Note: My YouTube conversation with Cotto and Gottfriedd is now up for the enjoyment of everyone. Make sure to subscribe to their channel, as it helps them get noticed by the Borg that controls YouTube. It was a fun show. I don’t do a ton of these live stream things, so the quality of my performance is inconsistent. I was quite intoxicated for this one, so I had a good showing.

Promotions: The good folks at Alaska Chaga are offering a ten percent discount to readers of this site. You just click on the this link and they take care of the rest. About a year ago they sent me some of their stuff. Up until that point, I had never heard of chaga, but I gave a try and it is very good. It is like a tea, but it has a milder flavor. It’s hot here in Lagos, so I’ve been drinking it cold. It is a great summer beverage.

Minter & Richter Designs makes high-quality, hand-made by one guy in Boston, titanium wedding rings for men and women and they are now offering readers a fifteen percent discount on purchases if you use this link.   If you are headed to Boston, they are also offering my readers 20% off their 5-star rated Airbnb.  Just email them directly to book at sales@minterandrichterdesigns.com.


For sites like this to exist, it requires people like you chipping in a few bucks a month to keep the lights on and the people fed. It turns out that you can’t live on clicks and compliments. Five bucks a month is not a lot to ask. If you don’t want to commit to a subscription, make a one time donation. Or, you can send money to: Z Media LLC P.O. Box 432 Cockeysville, MD 21030-0432. You can also use PayPal to send a few bucks, rather than have that latte at Starbucks. Thank you for your support!

333 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
19 days ago

> This turns up with the spying scandal. The reality is, the Washington-based intel community is horribly corrupt. The spying and subsequent cover-up is a product of a culture of corruption in these institutions. 
Indeed. When was the last time the FBI foiled an actual terrorist plot they didn’t cook up themselves?

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

Since its inception. Look at what it did for Wilson.

Amwolf
Amwolf
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

The American government is illegitimate.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  Amwolf
19 days ago

all western governments are

Amwolf
Amwolf
Reply to  sentry
19 days ago

That they are.

Amwolf
Amwolf
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

The US government only cares about feeding big pharma, the military industrial complex, big agriculture, the intelligence community (IC), Israel and the police state.

Last edited 19 days ago by Amwolf
RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

Here’s a link to the story for anyone interested: https://howiecarrshow.com/2018/03/22/2322/

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Chet Rollins
19 days ago

The portrayal of the FBI and CIA that comes out of Hollywood helps these organizations. Even the ones that seem negative make them look like they recruit the best people and are capable of pulling off incredible missions. The reality was Aldrich Ames. Now it is a small hippo waiting to go to a diversity seminar.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Barnard
19 days ago

In the late Fifties/early Sixties government money was funneled to Hollywood to promote the FBI in film and on television.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

There was always close collaboration between Hollywood and the national security agencies. LA has a facility called Lookout Mountain which was a state of the art film studio that provided motion picture services to the military. Most of tge atomic testing footage was processed their. They also made classified training films. Numerous Hollywood personalities would narrate, act in them.

ZerohTollrants
ZerohTollrants
Reply to  skeptic16
18 days ago

It wasn’t just Uncle Addie and his German Superfriends making enormous amounts of celluloid propaganda, that’s for sure. Every time I get into a marathon of really old movies, I’m shocked at just how much I pick up. I guess I shouldn’t be, but it is what it is. The movies made from the 70s on, that I grew up with, sometimes catch me off guard, as well, because there’s nuanced bits of propaganda that is subliminal. Go watch the Lethal Weapon movies and notice the Anti-Apartheid messaging you may have missed upon first or subsequent viewings. Or, maybe not.… Read more »

threestars
threestars
Member
Reply to  ZerohTollrants
17 days ago

The anti-Apartheid message in LW2 was also overt.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Reply to  Barnard
19 days ago

Another was the definitely unhinged FBI Agent Robert Hanssen. He spied for the Soviet Union and then Russia off and on for over 20 years despite tipoffs. At one point, the FBI suspected a CIA agent and at another they realized they had a mole inside their organization and Hanssen investigated himself.

Julian
Julian
Reply to  Barnard
19 days ago

And this is no accident. The collaboration between those agencies as well as the DOD and Hollywood is well documented.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Barnard
19 days ago

Given their corruption, it is a good thing they are incompetent. Imagine the damage a corrupt and competent agency could do.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Chet Rollins
19 days ago

“In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and the next place, oblige it to control itself” – J. Madison Computing power and electronic surveillance has become so easy, so untraceable, and so ubiquitous that the chances of getting “caught” are almost nil. Snowden tried to warn us, and the whole country yawned. When the “Patriot Act” was passed authorizing the public part of this “temporary” expansion of government surveillance the smart money knew it was only going to… Read more »

Last edited 19 days ago by ProZNoV
Drew
Drew
Reply to  ProZNoV
19 days ago

”Snowden tried to warn us, and the whole country yawned.”

And why not? When you collect that much data, your problem is not having enough analysts and enforcement officers. The government might know everything about the citizens, but it still can’t do a whole lot about it.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Drew
19 days ago

Notable “chilling effect”, for one. Only sociopaths who just don’t GAF run for office anymore. Ever want to run for office? What about your teenage browsing history? Or much worse, your teenager’s browsing history? Better tow the party line…. Ever want to go to an Academy or work for a 3 letter agency? Well, you’d best think long and hard before saying “no” on your recreational drug use questionnaire. Tell the truth..you’re not admitted. Lie, and some photo from your past may doom you. Ever had one very strong opinion at 18 that is embarrassing beyond belief (and possibly illegal)… Read more »

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  ProZNoV
19 days ago

Human life cannot survive modernity period. If you doubt me, note that save Israel no country has a fertility rate at or above replacement. Its not hopeless but in the modern world only non participating highly religious people like the Amish and Orthodox Jews and some nationalists here and in Europe are having children these days. People do need to understand that voting and working within the system cannot solve existential problems like we face. These are problems of deep rooted social and political corruption and would have to be dealt with by an authoritarian outsider movement. Ultimately it means… Read more »

Sam J.
Sam J.
Reply to  abprosper
14 days ago

“…These are problems of deep rooted social and political corruption and would have to be dealt with by an authoritarian outsider movement…” Why do people say these sort of things? I expect it’s some sort of deep seated catharsis of burning the whole thing to the ground like the BLM. It’s not necessary. As much as I really, really hate what the Jews have done to my country they have the right idea about changing it. Find the weak points and steadily chip away at them. It’s been very successful for them, they own the damn country. Well we can… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Drew
17 days ago

Don’t cower too soon. Yes, Big Brother is watching. But it’s an unavoidable fact that, the more data you gather, the more irrelevant data you gather as well! Sure, there are sifting and sorting mechanisms but they are only as good as the people who program or operate them. Finally, consider the ever-more “diverse” workforce doing so, and you have a very handicapped Big Brother.

Drake
Drake
19 days ago

I never got that deep into the Kennedy stuff because the marksmanship was not that amazing. The kill-shot was from 70 feet (not yards) with a military rifle on a target moving directly away from him. Now Jack Ruby – that was weird.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Drake
19 days ago

Though the best take on the “conspiracy” was by Mr. Rate. “Them boys on the grassy knoll were dead within two hours. Buried in unmarked graves out past Terlingua”. “How do you know?” “Still got the shovel”
Carcanos are uneven in quality–but the good ones are very accurate. And the 6.5×55 is effective and low recoil. Easy shot.

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

Forgotten Weapons has a good series on the Carcanos. Some of them were good rifles, contrary to what a lot of people believe.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

Visited there once on a trip to Dallas. Yep, all the photos create much more impression of distance than in person. I’ve snap shot deer at longer distances offhand and hit with the first shot.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

And I have no doubt you could have killed the Secret Service agent who’s head was supposed to be in the way.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

We I visited the place a few years ago, I was quite surprised at how small an area it was.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  usNthem
17 days ago

Using top-secret technology, the CIA spatially shrunk Deally Plaza so that the conventional explanation would be more credible 🙂

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

I don’t think the grassy knoll shot would have been that easy and don’t see how the people only a few feet away wouldn’t have been able to pinpoint it or how such a shooter could get away. Further, what if he missed and the bullet hit the limo from and angle incompatible with the book depository? Ironically (?) the autopsies of Tippett, Oswald and Ruby were competently performed by the local medical examiner who legally would also have done JFK’s. But JFK’s body was illegally removed from Texas and a totally botched autopsy was performed at the premier US… Read more »

Homer
Homer
Member
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

Exactly. I also visited on a trip to Dallas. I was stunned at how small the area was. All the photos I’d seen all my life gave the impression of a large area. Standing on the grassy knoll was so close to the picket fence it would have been impossible not to hear a shot coming from behind you. That’s why all those photos of people who threw themselves on the ground on the grassy knoll make perfect sense. And all the photos of people running up the grassy knoll after the shooting make perfect sense. The place was so… Read more »

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Homer
19 days ago

A cop was directed to go up to the railroad bridge to see what happened and had to run up the knoll to do so. The spectators were following him. I think the grassy knoll shooter is unlikely. If there was another shooter, it was from one of the other buildings or from a cluster of trees across the plaza near the railroad bridge.

Diversity Heretic
Member
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

Oswald had a scope. But I submit that no shot is “easy” when the target is the president of the United States. And strangely, the Warren Commission found that his first shot was a complete miss–missed not only Kennedy but the entire limousine; Then the next two shots, which had to have been more hurried were hits. One theory that I read years ago is that the first shot was a hit, but a glancing blow to Kennedy’s head that somehow ricocheted off his skull. But the marksmanship was a little strange under the circumstances.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
19 days ago

I saw a realistic reenactment of the shooting on TV (can’t find it now). They had a cart dragging watermelons past an elevated shooter on a similar path as Kennedy’s car with a Carcano 6.5mm rifle at the appropriate distance. They repeated the exercise a few times. Usually the first couple of shots were misses of glancing hits because they are moving laterally to the shooter. Then the car takes a turn and is moving in a direct line away from the shooter – that’s the easy shot that blasted the watermelon every time.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Drake
19 days ago

All the shots were more or less in line relative to the (presumed) shooter location in the Texas School Book Depository.
I really don’t see how the first shot could have missed the entire limousine. That was one of the reasons Warren Commission member Sen. Richard Russell was skeptical of his own report.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
19 days ago

Actually it isn’t really all that exiting. A few months ago- I believe it was on the Discovery Channel- took up this topic yet again and the final conclusion was that the shot that hit Kennedy in the head was actually fired by accident by a secret service agent in the follow-on car, who was holding an M-16 at the time. According to the agent, other SS in the same car and witnesses on the street, the agent holding the rifle heard the shots from above and behind and picked up the rifle and flicked off the safety. As he… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Steve
19 days ago

That a Service Service agent inadvertently killed his principle with an accidental discharge would explain a lot. Hickey was carrying an AR-15 and those preceded the M-16 by a year or so. They were both notorious for “slam fire” discharges, which I can actually attest to – there were still some of those old A1’s floating around when I was in the military. It’s didn’t take much of a drop, some times just a few inches from the ground, to let loose a round.

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Forever Templar
19 days ago

That assumes you are cocking the weapon, which goes against a prior statement made wrt switching off the safety (safety can not be engaged on an uncocked weapon). Regardless, we need to know if Secret Service requires such weapons to be carried with no round in chamber. That certainly is not the case with sidearms. My first rifle was an A1. Still have it Never had an unintended discharge, albeit there is a lot of different non-milspec ammo out there to get in trouble with. Every round dumped unfired has a dimple on the primer. This seems the case for… Read more »

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Steve
19 days ago

Read the book, “Mortal Error” by Bonar Menninger. It lays out a very convincing case that an accidental discharge by the SS agent was the headshot that killed Kennedy.

It’s very convincing from the ballistics angle, and it explains the cover-up as well, just as you mention. But the improbability of it occurring during the actual assassination attempt, well… the history of America is full of such improbabilities however.

Last edited 19 days ago by Tom K
Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Tom K
19 days ago

Improbable, or more like sad if true. I was never a Kennedy guy, but Jesus, imagine being the guy who accidentally killed him, like you said, during an actual external attempt. Talk about a mind job an excuse to hit the bottle.

Julian
Julian
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

It was 265’. 81 meters.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

Oswald was also trained by the Marines and qualified as Sharpshooter. He could have made the shot at a greater distance easily.

ZerohTollrants
ZerohTollrants
Reply to  thezman
18 days ago

If you want a real JFK conspiracy theory, how come the only footage came from a Jewish citizen, Abraham Zapruder?
No one ever talks about that, lol.

Marko
Marko
Reply to  Drake
19 days ago

Kennedy got shot when most Boomers were young and impressionable. Thus the continuing obsession. It was Israel by the way.

ronehjr
ronehjr
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

I always go with the jews when any conspiracy comes up, one because I’m intellectually lazy, and two because it seems like 99% of the time that is usually correct.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

JFK was not to keen on Israel getting nuclear weapons. The jews would have seen that as an existential threat. CIA chief of counterintelligence James Angleton was the CIA point of contact with Israel and in a perfect position to cooperate. After JFKs death, Israel stole bomb grade uranium from a plant in Pennsylvania. This was used to make two nuclear bombs in time for the Six-Day war. I think the Israelis knew or suspected that the USS Liberty heard transmissions about the deployment of these bombs in the Sinai and that this is the reason the USS Liberty was… Read more »

Diversity Heretic
Member
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

Israel quite likely had nuclear weapons as early as 1960, at the time of the first French test in Algeria. There was close cooperation between the French nuclear weapons program and Israel, probably in exchange for Mossad information about the FLN in Algeria. Kennedy was, as you note, very anti-proliferation.

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
19 days ago

For any state actor with anything on the ball nuclear weapons are not that hard, unless you’re Iran and you have a low watt elite and an intelligence service that is half Mossad.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
19 days ago

Persians are not Arabs. Most of the intellectual achievements of the Islamic Golden Age were from Persians.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
19 days ago

DeGaulle cut off nuclear cooperation with Israel. Perhaps that had something to do with the assassination attempt.
Israel did not have a uranium enrichment capacity in 1960. I don’r believe their reactors at Dimona would have produced enough plutonium for a bomb in 1960. Further, if they already had a bomb in 1960, they would not have needed to steal bomb grade uranium from the US in the mid-1960s.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  skeptic16
17 days ago

Israel got their fissionable uranium or plutonium by stealing it from the USA. You can learn that much by reading Tom Clancy novels.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

It’s widely thought Israel achieved nuclear capability well before Kennedy’s demise, and if true, they likely got the fissile materials needed from America. There wasn’t much need to knock off JFK. The story behind the nuclear escapade is kind of amusing; it was the equivalent of a jogger ripping off a 70-inch 4K television from the display at Walmart and trotting off.

Last edited 19 days ago by Forever Templar
skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Forever Templar
19 days ago

No. It’s pretty well established that Israel stole highly enriched uranium from a US plant that made fuel for US Navy ships/subs in the mid 1960s. The company that owned the plant was run by a dedicated Zionist. There would be no need to do this if they had the materials earlier.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

See the article “Did Israel Kill the Kennedys” at Unz, June 3, 2018, by Laurent Guyenot.

https://www.unz.com/article/did-israel-kill-the-kennedies/?highlight=laurent+guyenot

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

Kennedy knew about Dimona and also wanted AIPAC (& similar) to register as foreign agents. LBJ, by contrast, had a longstanding affair with Irgun and Stern gang supporter Mathilde Krim (who apparently was in the WH when the Liberty was attacked.)

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Drake
19 days ago

Just a quick look on google to a few sites mentions over 200ft. I assume you have looked into this more than I have.

Hesperado
Hesperado
Reply to  David Wright
16 days ago

Yeah, 70 ft. sounds like bullshit.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Drake
19 days ago

If there was any conspiracy behind the assassination, and it’s a stretch to call it a conspiracy, it was due to acts of omission. The short version is Oswald was a known whack job and his communist ties and meetings with Castro and Moscow were documented extensively. Robert Littell in a great fictional account of this, SISTERS, made a good case the FBI and IC knew Oswald was a Soviet sleeper who had been activated and the information was withheld because they were pissed because of the Bay of Pigs. Whether true or not it seems more plausible than other… Read more »

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

Oswald was almost certainly a Soviet agent. He was an actual defector to the Soviet Union who had returned to the US with his Soviet wife. You know how many returned defectors there were in the entire US at the time of the JFK assassination? Three. One of whom was some crazy cat lady the Soviets didn’t even want. Oswald was part of an extremely elite club. Combine that with his communications to Cuba and I don’t know why you’d look anywhere else.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
19 days ago

Why was Oswald readmitted to the US so easily? If he was a genuine defector, he would have been thrown in jail as he told the US embassy he was going to give classified info to the Soviets. Alternatively, why wasn’t he used for propaganda purposes as someone who actually lived in the USSR and didn’t like it? Is there any record of an interrogation of Oswald by the CIA or FBI before the assassination?

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

The other two defectors weren’t in jail (I believe the woman spent time in a mental hospital, though) and over the years most returning defectors have not been jailed. Your assertion is at odds with established reality. Oswald had virtually no access to classified intelligence no matter what he told the embassy, and they probably knew it. He was a 20-year-old former marine with a poor disciplinary record who liked to spout pro-soviet propaganda and who got a hardship discharge to care for his mother — he was a know-nothing grunt. Him not being interviewed by intelligence is pretty thin… Read more »

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

If JFK was shot by nutjob Oswald, all Oswald would have had to do was take his pistol and go out to the curb and shoot JFK when he came by, as happened in 1914 archduke Ferdinand. Why bother with sneaking a disassembled rifle, reassembling it, shooting, leaving the building, getting on and off a bus, taking a taxi after offering it to another person and all the rest of Mr. Oswald’s wild ride?

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

Training.

miforest
Member
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

so he wouldn’t be caught . remember he shot a cop too.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  miforest
19 days ago

If he was a nutjob, why would he care about getting caught? Even according to the official story, he left all his money behind for his wife that morning. Doesn’t sound like someone who cared about escaping. In fact, why didn’t he bring his pistol to work that day?

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

Even nutjobs sometimes care about getting caught. Serial killers try to avoid getting caught, but they are still nutjobs.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

Just like our pissed left wing media in 2020 does. Ignore stories they don’t like.
If the administrative state was pissed at Kennedy they did not have to pull the trigger or set it up. Just ignore Oswald even though they know he wants to kill the President.
Same with 911. Chances are Israeli and American intelligence knew about the dirt bags. Just ignore them. Let them come our way.
Same with Lenin. Let him pass through Europe into Russia.
Evil knows what it is doing. By just doing nothing they are doing something.

Last edited 19 days ago by G Lordon Giddy
Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
19 days ago

Yes, strong analogy there re today’s press. While nothing would surprise me at this point, as is the case with increasingly large numbers of Americans, the 9/11 inside job conspiracy theory has one flaw I think is fatal. That easily could have led to an uprising against Bush or a demand that one happen. As for what you suggest, though, yes. We already know some of the hijackers were on the FBI’s radar screen. I won’t discount there were intentional omissions there, along with a shitload of incompetence and a lot of PC-compliant nonsense. IIRC, CAIR had input into federal… Read more »

Last edited 19 days ago by Jack Dobson
Valley Lurker
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

A fictional account that is a hell of a lot of fun as well is American Tabloid by Ellroy.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

A Russian general wanted to defect, but only if he could bring his niece with him, as she was his last living relative.

Oswald got them both out. How?

He married the niece.

He was a deep cover mole for our side, not a Soviet sleeper. In the end, a patsy, expendable.

Last edited 19 days ago by Alzaebo
G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  Drake
19 days ago

Yea, I stood in that window in Dallas and looked at the shot.
Any average marksman could have made the shot. It was amazing how close the shot was actually. That building should never have been left open to access.
But how Oswald got there? Very strange. And Ruby? Even stranger.
I can see why conspiracies remain about the Kennedy assassination.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
19 days ago

When government isn’t forthcoming or truthful they actively encourage conspiracy movements.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Drake
19 days ago

Discovery Channel did a recreation of the “Magic Bullet” shot. They created mannequins of JFK and Connolly with materials equivalent to bone and tissue. They took pains to locate the entrance wounds and set up the shooter at the right height, distance and angle. The shot using the same rifle type and ammunition was a little bit more damaged than the actual magic bullet. But the odd part is that they traced the path with an animated overlay and the bullet clearly exits JFK’s chest even though the narrator says “Kennedy’s neck”. So, either the re-creators missed some detail (downward… Read more »

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

Once a bullet hits bone, you can’t reliably predict its subsequent trajectory. In real life it’s going to be different every single time.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
19 days ago

That still doesn’t change the fact that the narrator said something completely opposite to what their own trajectory showed.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  skeptic16
19 days ago

IIRC, the Discovery Channel code was turned into a game and was sold for a brief period before OUTRAGE! carried the day. The Canadian journalist Colby Cosh played it to see if he could generate a constitutional crisis (sadly I don’t recall how his game turned out.)

Q-ship
Q-ship
Reply to  Drake
19 days ago

Some of the most compelling evidence pointing to a conspiracy is the fact that all but one of the physicians involved in the treatment of Kennedy stated that he had an exit wound in the back of his head. It is not difficult to tell the difference between an entrance and exit wound, and the physicians involved in his care had, combined, decades of experience treating gunshot victims. Parkland was the main trauma center in Dallas.

ZerohTollrants
ZerohTollrants
Reply to  Q-ship
18 days ago

Kennedy’s morgue photo is available online. He’s definitely missing the back of his noggin in the photo.

ZerohTollrants
ZerohTollrants
Reply to  Drake
18 days ago

Wow, I didn’t know it was only 70 ft! I think I could still make that, and I wear a trifocal lens and am super rusty. Some conspiracies I tend to just shrug off and find pretty benign, (who cares if some people think Jesus rode dinosaurs or that the Earth is flat, lol?), but the Qtards and the lefty loonies are out of control and downright dangerous. The postal service isn’t removing mailboxes so you can’t vote, the Proud Boy Puerto Rican tee shirt salesmen aren’t cooking up a RaHoWa, and Tom Hanks isn’t eating babies for their adrenochrome.… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Drake
17 days ago

Er, and how do you explain the “magic bullet” then? Pretty amazing trajectory to hit two separate men.

whitney
Member
19 days ago

And another thing is the propaganda convincing normies that to believe in any conspiracy is to be a crazy person. This even goes for some educated people who have a working knowledge of history and understand conspiracies are the norm not the exception. I have shaken one or two out of that by pointing that out. You don’t even have to be specific because if they know history they have their own favorite conspiracy from past they can pull up. The thing is I don’t think any of it sticks. They’re like seals, popping up from beneath the surface, looking… Read more »

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  whitney
19 days ago

The official 9/11 story is a conspiracy as is Watergate, Iran-Contra and the Lincoln assassination.

Editor George
Editor George
19 days ago

The most disgusting thing about the debate is that Wallace had clearly coordinated ahead of time with the Cathedral to launch the “white supremacy” narrative. When people read “historical fiction,” they know that the author has taken liberties, often big ones. But the strange thing is that the world presented by contemporary “journalism” takes even greater liberties with things that living people can see with their own eyes–if they have eyes to see. If you picture a venn diagram with “reality” as one circle, and “portrait of reality fed to you by the Cathedral” as the other, then the two… Read more »

Last edited 19 days ago by Editor George
Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Editor George
19 days ago

That piece of Jewish garbage was pushing other shitlib fairy tales too. F*** Wallace. California’s forest fires are the result of global warming? Pull my other finger you neolib fart sucker, it has bells on it.
The mass media had no place anymore. The debates are obsolete too. These fuggin morons are still guarding the gate while the walls around it have collapsed.
I hope Biden and Wallace die is a fire…

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Glenfilthie
19 days ago

Who knew that Fire causing Global Warming stops at the Canadian Border?
Maybe it’ll make it that far north for their next election.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Bilejones
17 days ago

Your observation is very much like the observation that, during their tenure, the Soviet Union would have “droughts” and “bad harvests” yet just on the other side of a border, a free country would have normal to good harvests. 🙂

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Glenfilthie
19 days ago

Wallace parroted a shitload of deranged left-wing conspiracy theories the other night–a resurgent Klan, Antifa is an illusion, global warming caused the fires, and so on. On top of his blatant election interference on behalf of Biden, he should be shitcanned just for that. Fox is under enormous pressure to fire him but the Murdochs are part of the Cathedral so they may spare Wallace. Either way he’s ruined.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

Hmpfffff. I never used to be an antisemite, but I am now. I am seeing a pattern, and I don’t care who calls me a conspiracy nut or other slurs. The joos might want to have a care because I consider myself something of a Yesterday Man and I used to be firmly on their side. The way things are right now, I wouldn’t pish on one if he was on fire. For me the JQ is now settled. Another question arises: are these Jew media slobs doing what they do because they are Jewish, or because they are just… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Glenfilthie
19 days ago

Somewhat the same. I used to be closer to Z’s position on Jews but their anti-White hatred and their raw power are obvious and the evidence of its destructive effect is too overwhelming to discount. Like Z, though, I still think most people who go further than me on the issue take it to an extreme that really isn’t plausible. For instance, few of them will acknowledge that Jewish power actually is on the decline and much of the frenzy we see out of their federal protectors reflects that. This runs counter to the all-powerful belief. It’s a generalization, and… Read more »

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

I view jews the same way I view blacks. There are certainly many individual blacks who are good people. I’ve known a few in my life. But overall it is good for whites to have blacks living in our society? The answer is clearly no. The same analysis applies to jews. While there are undoubtedly many fine jewish people, overall jews have been a disaster for white society. I would argue that they have been much more destructive to our heritage than blacks. We must separate ourselves from both groups if we are to survive. The only question for me… Read more »

StanP
StanP
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
19 days ago

If you have rats in your house, you don’t get a clown…
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBqwtHnc9ho
you call pest control.

StanP
StanP
Reply to  StanP
19 days ago

Anyone know the number ?

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

You think those who revere Masada have any problem with a couple shops getting burned and looted?
Like all nations, they deserve and belong in their own space; which is not our space.

ZerohTollrants
ZerohTollrants
Reply to  Jack Dobson
18 days ago

The Critical Race Theory is the same as Racial “Sensitivity” line, the mess about the PB’s were the two that set me off the most.

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
Reply to  Editor George
19 days ago

Wallace kind of reminds me of Cronkite. Sort of has a grandfatherly demeanor and an old timey presentation style.

The next generation of journos, like Brian Stelter, are pretty bad.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
19 days ago

Cronkite was a real left-wing POS, too. Folks of his generation just could hide it better.

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

he was a lefty – but it seems like everyone liked and respected him. As long as he doesn’t hate the population he’s broadcasting to, I don’t care what his politics are.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  krustykurmudgeon
18 days ago

You should. Tolerating leftists in the media makes their usual modus operandi of subversion much easier.

Lord Jim
Lord Jim
19 days ago

Another wrench in the works is how shitlibs put the label of “conspiracy theory” on entirely true descriptions of their behavior.

The whole shitlib propaganda effort can, in fact, be boiled down to two words: dishonest labelling.

But I’m not “owning” them by pointing this out. It’s a very powerful tool, and they’re very good at it. We’ve got to get into the labelling business one way or another, even if that will be fighting on enemy turf, so to speak.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Lord Jim
19 days ago

Dishonest labeling, and its variant – saying every criticism of them is a lie. Biden can simply waive away every truth thrown at him by simply saying it isn’t true. The media agrees, and low information voters assume they are right.

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  Lord Jim
19 days ago

Clever labeling is one of the commie lefts (read: Democrats) best tools. That and putting “justice” behind every unjust unequal policy they can devise. They just love their descriptive meaning changing words not realizing that putting “democratic” in front of “socialist” changes it about as much as putting “national” there. They also love to blame everything from Ft Sumpter to the Cali fires on white supremacy and/or Christian bigotry or as they call it theocracy. There are probably fewer actual white supremacists in America than abortion clinics and if we Christians wanted a theocracy we would have created one when… Read more »

Last edited 19 days ago by Hoagie
steveaz
steveaz
Reply to  Lord Jim
19 days ago

The powers to Label, and to declare Alarms too. The power of Alarm used to reside properly in parliaments, or at least be answerable to them, but now the power to cry “Wolf” rests in feral social media rage mobs, college campus humanities departments and the MSM, with urban politicians coming along for the ride. You cannot run a self-governing Republic like this: heaving and pitching and whiplash-ing the citizenry every time some loser equates his small-world problem with a national crisis. To paraphrase the ex-Mayor of Chicago, Rahm Emanual, “Whoever can declare the crisis, will win in its wake.”… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Lord Jim
19 days ago

Dishonest labelling works if you have an ignorant (or simply willing) populace and you don’t overplay it. While there are plenty of ignorant and/or willing members of the populace, they have also far overplayed the labelling (“fiery, but mostly peaceful” being the most humorous thus far). A big reason censorship of the internet is the major objective presently. It does remind one of late stage USSR propaganda and the response of its citizenry.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
19 days ago

Put the whole Spygate to a bunch of mediocrities (just watch any of them in live testimony) trying to score brownie points with what they thought would be the incoming administration. Then the “oh shit” moment. But more a school fish or flocking birds than a bunch of people playing 4D chess. The only thing that is saving them was the mediocrities are being investigated by other mediocrities–all with eyes focused on getting the pension.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

I don’t think Barr is a mediocrity. He is covering it up for some reason. My only guesses are that he thinks it will harm the country to expose everything, or he is a phony swamp creature play acting as a patriot. Maybe both.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

Possibly, but the FBI corruption is so obvious. If executive branch integrity is his concern, cleaning up the FBI would be the logical step. I grew up thinking the FBI was very professional and ethical. But anyone with a brain now knows to never talk to them without a lawyer and recording device, and to assume if they target you, they will cheat and lie to get you.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  DLS
19 days ago

Richard Jewel is as important to Current Year America as Bernie Goetz was to Juliani NYC.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  DLS
17 days ago

I had a similar upbringing. Despite being a “mostly” law abiding citizen (no questions about my teens, please), I broaden your suggestion: beyond perhaps identifying yourself, I would never make any statement to any law enforcement agent without at least careful thought, and perhaps only when my own counsel was present. While I’ve never had to, I have never seen anyone claim that you should consent to a search of your person, vehicle, home etc. (if you have a choice.)

b123
b123
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

So basically he’s stuck in the 1980s, trying to protect the “integrity” of the system and country. If that’s the case, it’s honourable, but naive.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  DLS
19 days ago

Barr either is protecting the institution or, as I suspect, his role in burying Lon Horiuchi’s outright murder of Randy Weaver’s wife could be used against him. He’s covering up once again, obviously.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

Bingo to your bingo.

Barr is protecting the Swamp.

Of course he’ll dress it up in fancy lingo, he is fluent in Beltway.

Last edited 19 days ago by Alzaebo
SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  DLS
19 days ago

No. Barr isn’t, but institution he runs is. Two observations: With no special knowledge, I think Barr has the proverbial “wolf by ears” problem. This was a coup attempt, but fully disclosing that comes with all sorts of problems for public confidence and the institutions he loves. Doing nothing has the same effect. So I suspect he is desperately trying to find a middle way. Second, have done turnaround work for years. Even if you and a small team are installed with the sort of authority the private sector has, it can be amazingly hard to root out organizational sedition… Read more »

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

There’s nothing the FBI does that is useful that could not be handed off to the marshals, DHS, or secret service.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  SamlAdams
18 days ago

I don’t think he has to root out all the traitors. He just has to hang Comey, Brennan, Clapper and Strzok. That would be easy, it would serve as a warning to all the smaller moles, and it would restore enough institutional confidence for the normies to bury their heads back in the sand.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

Bingo. D.C. is a left-wing, government town, too, and serving those interests boosts salaries and perks. Yes, their idiocy not only is palpable but likely how they screwed up and got caught, as is the case with most criminals.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
19 days ago

The best example right now is the Left’s obsession with white supremacy. They cannot accept that their vision of Utopia is not very popular. That’s the first step in a conspiracy theory, the rejection of the most plausible reason. That allows them to spin wild tales of secret Nazis and spectral supremacists. Rather than confront reality, which is frightening and disconcerting, they have created a series of conspiracy theories to explain why the world is not as they imagine it. Disagree on this entirely. The radical left in America today draws its foot soldiers from bored middle and upper class… Read more »

Last edited 19 days ago by Dinothedoxie
Marko
Marko
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
19 days ago

No, it’s their guilt that they still have a utopia while their pet minorities still live in squalor. They’ve been working for 60 years to get blacks & browns into the white-picket fence suburbs, and so far only a trickle have arrived. Even Asians, who like suburbs too, tend to live amongst themselves and not with their fellow paleskins. And Lefty is still convinced that whitey is somehow keeping the brown down. Thus the spectral presence of “white supremacy”. They really do want a thoroughly mixed utopia where everyone has an IQ of 110, but it’s never going to happen.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

The truth is minorities care about integration even less than whites.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Chet Rollins
19 days ago

True, but they also cannot produce their own wealth. Hence the rage of needing people you hate.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

I agree. They’re obsessed with equality, and consider the greatest evil to be discrimination. Race is merely skin color to them and nothing else, so of course in the absence of racism and discrimination we’d have equal outcomes.

Retired
Retired
Reply to  Wolf Barney
19 days ago

They will soon, if not already, support discrimination—against whites.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Retired
19 days ago

Uh, did you just wake up after falling asleep in the 1950’s? Explicot institutional anti-white racism has been baked into the cake for 4 generations now.

Keyshawn
Keyshawn
Member
Reply to  Wolf Barney
19 days ago

Just saw a car in VA suburbs that had a bumper sticker with three skeletons dancing with the quote, “we are all the same underneath, be kind”
A white woman about 50 was driving. These are the real merciless types.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Keyshawn
19 days ago

I’m not a bumper sticker fan. Unless the bumper sticker is there to conceal *cough* Bondo cosmetic deficiencies in an old beater.

Yellow Dan
Yellow Dan
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

I’m sure guilt plays a role in the Far-Left’s behavior, but it’s not quite a simple as that. If the far-left really believed their dogma, they’d invite blacks and browns to live in their neighborhoods along with them, not flee from them at the first sign of diversity. I think humans naturally need an external aggressor to organize around. White normies in the heartland are an approved target by the regime, so upper middle class antifa types find reasons to attack them as immoral and deserving of punishment, despite their own obvious hypocrisy; thus, the conservative right are the real… Read more »

b123
b123
Reply to  Yellow Dan
19 days ago

It’s cognitive dissonance. Their real world experience (staying far away from minorities) doesn’t line up with their worldview. They feel guilty about their wealth and privilege.

Because they’re so virtuous, it can’t be *their* fault that blacks are still poor. So it *must* be Badwhites’ fault.

White liberals are just morons who are out of touch with nature and reality. When things collapse, the libs are getting it first, as we saw in Minneapolis.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  b123
19 days ago

 it can’t be *their* fault that blacks are still poor. So it *must* be Badwhites’ fault.

There’s door number three: it’s the blacks own fault.

Keyshawn
Keyshawn
Member
Reply to  b123
19 days ago

Oh, I do hope so. The self righteous white female scold is the class I’d like to see walk the plank first…. Popcorn!

Keyshawn
Keyshawn
Member
Reply to  Yellow Dan
19 days ago

Its white men… White men created this problem,,, its white men that will need to fix it. First by waking up

b123
b123
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

Anglo guilt is the worst.

The whites in Brazil never gave a shit about the blacks and browns living in squalor.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

Did anyone get Biden’s line in the debate, “The suburbs are largely integrated?”

I laughed at that. What a complete lie. But Trump was smart to not address it, as the truth is something even normiecons can’t stand to hear.

Last edited 19 days ago by Vizzini
Keyshawn
Keyshawn
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
19 days ago

There are no blacks in the. Suburbs but its Persians/Chinese/Latins for sure

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Keyshawn
19 days ago

Persians and Chinese are still fortunately a very small percentage of the US population. All Asians total are about 5-6%.

Asians tend to clump. Most suburbs in the US have very few Asians.

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

Trump’s pandering isn’t going to help. And it could be fatal to his election chances. The “Platinum Plan” May help depress vibrancy turnout, but it may also depress working class white turnout. Kushner is quoted as saying that the “trailer parks” aren’t going anywhere, they have no other choice. They are the ones who have to live next to the violent and dangerous, and they do have a choice, which is to say, F*** it, why vote?

Ja’Mel
Ja’Mel
Member
Reply to  Marko
19 days ago

I just left NOVA, and had a business with customers from our “melting pot”. Iranians, Chinese, mixed Chinese and americans, French Africans via Europe, a German, Cubans and, some Americans. When the whole bunch got together, they were not comfortabe with eachother, and stuck with their own. But they all fired me when BLM found some comments I made about the riots. That I’m a white supremecist they could all agree on! Ungrateful degenerates. What kind of culture do they want? They all had their kids in Farsi, Chinese, Spanish, and German language and culture classes. What do they want… Read more »

Sam J.
Sam J.
Reply to  Ja’Mel
14 days ago

That is awful. Truly awful.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
19 days ago

Well said, but you and Zman can both be correct.

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  DLS
19 days ago

This. Also, left out of Zman’s analysis (though inferred and stated in the past) is the IQ issue: dumber people are more likely to believe in odd mysticisms than smarter people. This isn’t to say the smart people don’t believe in stupid things, but that a dumber person will see a gap in either “cause” or “effect” and instead of filling it with facts and reason, they will fill it in with whatever the shaman down the street saw in the chicken entrails. With thoroughly dumber elites it’s entirely possible for them to both despise white people, and believe that… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
19 days ago

I don’t know – it takes some high IQ sophistry to explain away the obvious (see, e.g., gender studies).

ZerohTollrants
ZerohTollrants
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
18 days ago

Black people’s entire LIVES are just a daily series of one conspiracy theory on top of another conspiracy theory. If you’ve never been around a number of them, it would stun the average white, as to their child-like magical thinking and gullibility.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  ZerohTollrants
18 days ago

See OJ Simpson

Quentin Vantassle
Quentin Vantassle
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
19 days ago

Agree with Dinothedoxie. I refer back to The True Believer by Eric Hoffer on a daily basis because it explains so much of what passes today for normal behaviour.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
19 days ago

Like the various flavors of Right, any and all of these reasons exist on the Left. To varying degrees, some or all apply (lack of life meaning/purpose, false superiority complex, pathological exo-altruism, just plain bat-shit crazy, seeing leftism as an easy means to power, etc.).

Hilltop
Hilltop
19 days ago

Q is just tardfeed. Its main purpose is to make conservatives passive: to get people to wait for that sweet, sweet retribution that will magically come from…somewhere.

If the Qtards had spend the same amount of time on some sort of real-world organization building, campaigning, messaging, etc. they might have gotten something.

I guarantee you Q is created by very clever shitlibs. The fact that shitlibs are scoring extra political points by “denouncing” Q is just an extra brilliancy by their propagandists.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Hilltop
19 days ago

Do you mean very (((clever shitlibs)))?

Hun
Hun
Reply to  Hilltop
19 days ago

Q is just tardfeed. Its main purpose is to make conservatives passive

That’s a conspiracy theory.

Probably correct, though.

Member
Reply to  Hilltop
19 days ago

The Q stuff seems like just another example of “spectatorism” which bedevils the Right in many different ways. You see it obviously in the addiction to sportsball on TV but it’s a persistent theme of Our People. Perhaps this comes from Christian passivism too. Just “let go, let God” as they like to say. The idea that unseen forces, whether of a spectral or physical nature, are just moments away from riding into town and rounding up the bad guys, is very tempting. If we could take even 15% of the time people spend hoping, watching, praying, and frankly posting… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  pozymandias
19 days ago

Biggest problems I see w/ going from online forums to IRL organizing is fed infiltration concerns – how do you ID potential comrades from online life without drawing los federales? This comment alone gives me concerns.

Member
Reply to  c matt
18 days ago

At some point people need to get over the fear and just admit that, no, there’s no way to make sure everyone who joins something isn’t a phony or a fed. The Left has this problem too though and it doesn’t stop them. Yes, they may have some level of official support but the Deep State itself has divisions within it. Also, there’s nothing illegal about any of what I’m talking about except perhaps trivial violations of the unenforceable mask and social distancing orders. People getting together to share prepping ideas or doing reloading together? Even getting an armed block… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  pozymandias
17 days ago

I’ve said it many times before but I’ll say it again: the Lone Wolf never fears one of his comrades turning him in.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  pozymandias
19 days ago

Welp, I made a foolish statement yesterday, saying moderate secularists were on the amoral spectrum.

Amoral? We’re not the ones witch hunting and jailing people absent harm, mass murdering other people in their own lands, or inverting our own philosophies to defend criminal scams by our betters.

What’s worse is the doubling down on ruinous policies while shunning all responsibility for the social consequences.

Trust? Conservatives honored a homosexual pedophile like Denny Hastert.

I’d say both sides have too damn much trust, and mistake it for morality.

Last edited 19 days ago by Alzaebo
Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Hilltop
19 days ago

There are two utilities being served by Q, so I welcome (but dont believe) them. One is, you dont get mass support for drastic action via dialectic. “They have the wrong policy” gets zero pitchfork wielding mobs to through the bastards out. “They are raping and sacrificing children” gets you a galvanized support base willing to do what is necessary. It is also social counter-proof. Our enemies wear BLM or rainbow flag shirts to show their side; now we have Q shirts. They are all goofy, but is having a Q shirt really more stupid than rooting for something juvenile… Read more »

SixxSigma
SixxSigma
19 days ago

Q Anon is rooted in the great conservative fantasy of a democratically elected politician riding into Washington on a stallion and liberating us from the clutches of the left. The reality is that we are on our own and no one will be coming to our aid, least of all some cadre inside the beltway or posting on an internet message board. Hedge accordingly.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  SixxSigma
19 days ago

We live under “Graham’s Killhouse Rules”. Don’t ever forget it.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  SamlAdams
19 days ago

That’s reality but most still live in the delusion that someone else will save or do something for them instead of getting off their ass and doing something themselves…Most just want to post online so they feel like they are doing something…Kind of like the left virtue signalling about equality but live in an all white neighborhood…

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  SixxSigma
19 days ago

Not rooting for Trump to lose, but if he does, the destruction of “Q” would be the greatest benefit to us.

Last edited 19 days ago by MemeWarVet
Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  MemeWarVet
19 days ago

The left-wing runs hundreds of versions of Q, many under the guise of “news.” The few right-leaning propaganda outlets have their versions, too. Nothing on that front will change regardless of who wins. These are all State-sanctioned, and don’t discount Q is as well.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  SixxSigma
19 days ago

Qanon is there to run out the clock as America is transformed demographically. Patriots are distracted from the immigration issue while being reassured that Dems will be arrested for their crimes. There’s a youtube channel called X22 Report that announces every day, that soon, real soon, the arrests are going to happen. That can keeps getting kicked down the road…

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Wolf Barney
19 days ago

X22 Report sounds similar to the Conservative Treehouse, who are just sure that mass indictments and arrests are coming….any day now…any day….

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

The greatest achievements of the Trump Administration were totally inadvertent. Chief among them was the revelation of just how corrupt the DOJ/FBI is. Trump didn’t cause it to be exposed. The scandal unraveled on its own. The Deep State will stay entrenched regardless, but no one trusts its constituent parts now. They probably could have sucked up to Trump and kept a lid on it. Thank God they didn’t. Citizens distrusting their government, which is rampant now, is a huge plus.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

If you think the purpose of Q is indictments, then you say “king me” a lot when you try to play chess.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Wolf Barney
19 days ago

Just as soon as Iran develops nukes.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  c matt
19 days ago

Upvoted for the sarcasm.

Bibi’s being thumping that drum literally every year since 1979.

Khomeini and crew were indeed another psyop to keep Aryan Persia from reclaiming her historic influence. Puppet government.

Last edited 19 days ago by Alzaebo
b123
b123
19 days ago

I wish whites were as racist and tribal as the Dems and media narrative says we are.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  b123
19 days ago

That’s white man’s biggest crime.
turkey and azeribaijan(muslims) are currently attacking armenia(christians), no one gives a shit, outside of Russia, the eternal enemy of the globalists.

Last edited 19 days ago by sentry
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  sentry
19 days ago

The more time passes, the more I am convinced Edgar Cayce was 100% correct that Russia will be the savior of the world.

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

Russia will be the savior of Russia, and that might be enough.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
19 days ago

The Caucasus, our Home. Agree.

Last edited 19 days ago by Alzaebo
Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

Even five years ago I would not believe that but now do. And let’s face it, the greatest threat to White Americans isn’t foreign, as we all know now. Part of me cringes at the thought, but we could be liberated by a foreign power if and when White genocide goes to the next level. That power could be Russia for all we know. The likelihood, of course, is that we will be on our own.

b123
b123
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

There may be alot of white human capital to take, but as a whole we have demonstrated that we are destructive to a society.

If you let us in, how do you know who is a goodwhite and who is a badwhite? They’ll just say fuck it, not worth the risk.

Diversity Heretic
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

Moscow may yet be the Third Rome.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

Fatima, handmaid to Mary, Queen of Heaven, agrees.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  b123
19 days ago

Yeah. Then we could secretly wear those great uniforms and sing those rousing songs together.

Last edited 19 days ago by Epaminondas
Keyshawn
Keyshawn
Member
Reply to  b123
19 days ago

I’ve been saying the. Same thing!!!! I WISH there were powerful. Groups of white supremisists!

Felix Krull
Member
19 days ago

In the case of Kennedy, for example, organized crime is a popular player, because Jack Ruby was a minor criminal. 

And because Joe Kennedy was a notorious gangster, whose mob connections secured his son’s presidency.

Last edited 19 days ago by Felix_Krull
DLS
DLS
Reply to  Felix Krull
19 days ago

And because Richard Daley rigged the Chicago vote, swinging the winning margin of Illinois electoral votes to Kennedy.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  DLS
19 days ago

Yes. I edited the last clause in after I posted.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Felix Krull
19 days ago

And then the kids decided to go AFTER the mob his dad’s friends. Old Joe suffered a debilitating stroke during JFK’s first year. History might have been different otherwise.

Entry-level Larper
Entry-level Larper
19 days ago

One of my neighbors in the southern college town where I grew up turned his garage into a Kennedy assassination library.

After work, he’d be in there for hours poring over some of his literally hundreds of humidity-browned books and magazines, hoping to find that one undiscovered piece of evidence, or connection, that would be the magic bullet.

I’m not actually sure what this says about society or politics, ha, it’s just a vivid memory. He certainly enjoyed it.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Entry-level Larper
19 days ago

Heh. A real life Dale Gribble.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Entry-level Larper
19 days ago

As an Englishman, I must ask what the fascination with Kennedy was? Fair enough, he was assassinated, which always elevates the victim to sainthood, but from the (admittedly few) reports I have heard and documentaries I have seen, people loved him very much before this. Have I been had by pro-Kennedy propaganda? He seemed to me like a very slick con-artist, but then I suppose he was a politician.

Apologies for ignorance, generally interested in Americans thoughts of the man.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  OrangeFrog
19 days ago

Kennedy became president after a fraudulent election widely recognized as such. He very well could have lost re-election, and the country was quite divided over him prior to his assassination. What you see and read abroad is part of a highly coordinated propaganda effort by Kennedy sycophants. It is starting to sputter. Many people loved Kennedy and about as many hated him.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

That reminds me of going home on the school bus on the day he was assassinated. I was in 8th grade. It was a Friday, we got out of school early, not because of the assassination, but because there were tornado warnings. I was struck by the number of kids crying and the equal number of kids laughing & joking about it. This was the deep South. Most of us were just lost in our thoughts I guess, but I was observing the reactions. I stayed glued to the TV the entire weekend which I didn’t normally do, and saw… Read more »

ronehjr
ronehjr
Reply to  OrangeFrog
19 days ago

It seems mostly they were not run of the mill ugly like most politicians, especially the first ladies.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  ronehjr
19 days ago

Yes. Being good looking is certainly the golden ticket in a large scale democracy.

ronehjr
ronehjr
Reply to  OrangeFrog
19 days ago

The memory of Eleanor Roosevelt was still fresh.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  OrangeFrog
19 days ago

the fascination with Kennedy was? A lot of it was JFK’s youthful nature as compared to the outgoing Eisenhower, who, by 1960,had come to be perceived as a square fuddy duddy rather than the Supreme Commander of Allied European Forces. JFK also initiated several visionary peacetime programs during his term in office, some for better, some for worse. The main ones are the Apollo moon program, the Peace Corps, and the Navy SEALs. Those, along with JFK’s glamorous young wife and family helped create the whole, “Camelot,” mystique in DC. I’ve never understood why JFK picked LBJ as a running… Read more »

krustykurmudgeon
krustykurmudgeon
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

it’s interesting how the left has become more nihilistic since JFK. I think part of it was Vietnam which became a thing after he died. The antiwar movement became the breeding ground for people who would go into politics later on (like Bill Clinton)

Higgs Boson
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

I never questioned it before, but why was LBJ JFK’s running mate. Surely Kennedy wasn’t blind to the fact Lyndon was a grenade in the unicorn punchbowl. Was he Kennedy’s Kamala?

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

I’ve never understood why JFK picked LBJ as a running mate. I can only assume he was told to pick LBJ, because voluntarily choosing him would be as dumb as Biden choosing Hillary.

It was critical for JFK to choose a Southerner (or at least a Texan) to get support in the South. Not sure why it had to be LBJ. LBJ was a leader in the House, maybe his ambition demanded it. LBJ and the Kennedys despised each other.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Tom K
19 days ago

Tom,

Thanks, I forgot JFK needed Southern support.

That said, LBJ was well-known for playing dirtier than dirt even when he was coming up in Texas politics.

Maybe JFK thought it was best to keep LBJ close so he could keep an eye on him.

The Right Doctor
The Right Doctor
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

Johnson on the ticket was to reassure the anti-Catholics who were worried about having the first Papist in the White House. LBJ was the big gator in the Senatorial swamp at the time. When JFK got shot I recall numerous adults saying he deserved it. I lived in Alabama at the time.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

He took us to the Moon!
Unimaginable, before that.

The Right Doctor
The Right Doctor
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

Getting shot was JFK’s best career move, straight into the Pantheon for doing nothing but getting shot. Obama did him one better: into the Pantheon for doing nothing whatsoever, for being ‘who he was’ – or rather, what shade of human he was.

Gespenst
Gespenst
Reply to  The Right Doctor
19 days ago

Same for Martim Luther King.

Grey Hair Businessman
Grey Hair Businessman
Reply to  OrangeFrog
19 days ago

It works similar to imprinting, a phenomenon by which “rapid learning occurs during a brief receptive period, typically soon after birth or hatching, establishes a long-lasting behavioral response to a specific individual or object, as attachment to parent, offspring, or site.” Older Boomers came of age post Kennedy Assassination, in the latter half of the 1960s when social unrest was very high. Part of Kennedy’s admiration comes from the nostalgia that generation has for simpler, more unified and peaceful times before their teenage years in the violent Civil Rights Era. You see this in Boomer affection for movies like Back… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Grey Hair Businessman
19 days ago

Thanks for that. Your points 1 and 2 are very good rules generally for reasoning about the popularity of famous people.

Din C. Nuttin
Din C. Nuttin
Reply to  OrangeFrog
19 days ago

JFK flew in to Idaho, and was greeted by signs saying “Less profile, more courage”. My sentiments exactly, at the time.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  OrangeFrog
19 days ago

It was the biggest news in the world, to us. Is there a shock or event as stunning in British history, something you hold in similar regard?

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Alzaebo
19 days ago

It was the biggest news in the world, to us. Are you referring to his assassination? If so, in my lifetime I cannot think of anything that would come close to such an event. I was not born when Kennedy met his maker, in fact I was not born even fifteen years after, so my only knowledge of how momentous events are has been books and words from my elders. Oddly enough, the thing that stands out the most in my life, where people were calling everyone they knew, listening to the radio and transfixed by the TV… was 9/11.… Read more »

Kapper
Kapper
Reply to  Entry-level Larper
19 days ago

Did he also have lots of UFO books? That was also very big in the 1960s and 1970s.

Entry-level Larper
Entry-level Larper
Reply to  Kapper
19 days ago

Not that I recall. He was a Kennedy monomaniac.

My main impression at the time was amazement at how much material there was, not just on the Kennedy presidency, but just on the assassination specifically.

Unfortunately, I was just a kid. It would probably be interesting to interact with someone like this as an adult, and see what lessons you could learn from such an extreme example of the “conspiracy theory type.”

b123
b123
19 days ago

Multikult will fail, because of human biodiversity. Boomercons and civnats can’t understand this. Our even crazier leftist elites certainly can’t.

White supremacy is a cope for the fact that you cannot replace people group A with people group B and have the same results. It’s white supremacists stopping Somalis from dominating the doctor and lawyer trades.

They are in denial, just like the civnats who “don’t see race”. The narratives are a reflection of our insane elites and AWFLs. Black men will never be the middle class Subaru drivers in large numbers. Their entire worldview is false.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  b123
19 days ago

Their entire worldview is false.

Blank slatism and the perfectability of man are two of the most egregious lies going.

Alfred Doolittle
Alfred Doolittle
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

Deleted. Btw, why can’t I simply delete a comment, or can I?

Last edited 19 days ago by Alfred Doolittle
ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  b123
19 days ago

Or…Brazil. “The country of the future…and it always will be.”

No thanks. Not that I have any choice.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  ProZNoV
19 days ago

No thanks. Not that I have any choice.
You know if everyone of you that thought that way actually banded together with others who thought that way then you would have a choice to determine your future instead of letting it be determined for you…

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  Lineman
19 days ago

I am completely on board with your strategy, Lineman. Go to an area of the country where the “elites” would never venture and live your life as a free man. The problem for most on our side is they have too much invested in their current locations. I am sympathetic to that line of thinking, especially when it involves leaving behind family. But in the end, I think your strategy is the only viable solution. The first step has to be regaining confidence in who we are by associating with like minded people. Only then can we think about recovering… Read more »

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
19 days ago

Come on over to https://www.upic.works/index.php
where we are coming up with ideas and solutions for building Communities…

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  b123
19 days ago

Progressivism failed when they forced affirmative action on us. They’ve been gaslighting us ever since. Brainwashing children is still not enough for these people.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
19 days ago

They have any number of conspiracies involving those things, but now they are cooking up conspiracies as to why Trump did not properly denounce them. It must mean something! For the people in charge, it is conspiracy theories all the way down. About the time that the Berlin Wall came down and the Warsaw Pact dissolved (or maybe a few years later when the SU fell apart) the Soviet Unions foreign minister publicly stated to a group of Western diplomats that “We’re going to gravely injure you – we’re going to stop being your enemy”. The statement stuck with me.… Read more »

sentry
sentry
19 days ago

I don’t follow QAnon, all the theories about Trump being god-emperor who fights secret cabal of pedos sound trashy.
But Epstein, Nxivm & John of God were caught during Trump mandate. There is some truth to QAnon, meaning Trump doesn’t cover for pedos.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  sentry
19 days ago

The known and documented facts about Epstein are far worse than any conspiracy theory about a pizza shop fronting for a pedo ring.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

Just ponder this: Dennis Hastert the boy-raper was two heartbeats from having the nuclear launch codes.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
19 days ago

The best example right now is the Left’s obsession with white supremacy. They cannot accept that their vision of Utopia is not very popular.

I wish they bloody well would! Good essay.

usNthem
usNthem
19 days ago

The thing is, conspiracy theories from the right often have some basis in fact or observable reality or the interpretation there of, whereas on the left it’s just made up crap or willful disregard for reality. For example White supremecists lurking behind every bush or the fact that joggers aren’t THE criminal problem in this former country.

David Wright
Member
19 days ago

No mention of Roswell suggests you are not serious on conspiracies 🙂

Russian influence is not a conspiracy just a planned and planted lie to disrupt any real conspiracies done by the left. Hillary is Dr. Evil.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  David Wright
19 days ago

It is to continue a grift when all is said and done. Fortunes are made to “counter” Russia, and its purported influence in our elections causes more funds to flow to the right coffers. It was hilarious to find that Hunter Biden received $3.5 million from the mayor of Moscow’s wife, and illustrative of what is happening there.

Hun
Hun
Reply to  David Wright
19 days ago

Somebody had to plan and plant the lie. Unless it was done by a lone “genius” then that was a conspiracy.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  David Wright
19 days ago

It seems like UFO conspiracies had their heyday in the 90’s and aren’t really a thing anymore.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  MemeWarVet
19 days ago

Are you kidding? The “Tic-Tac” sightings have reinvigorated the genre.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  David Wright
19 days ago

“The History Channel”.
If that ain’t a conspiracy, I don’t know what is.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
19 days ago

 For example, it is plainly obvious that Bill Barr is covering up the FBI spying scandal. He’s had years to do what should have taken a few months… This turns up with the spying scandal. The reality is, the Washington-based intel community is horribly corrupt. The spying and subsequent cover-up is a product of a culture of corruption in these institutions.  There is another dimension to conspiracy theories, and the FBI corruption scandal is a perfect embodiment of it. People do not want to come to terms with very unpleasant aspects of figures and institutions they once respected. The FBI… Read more »

Diversity Heretic
Member
19 days ago

I used to dismiss the Kennedy assassination conspiracy theories as tinfoil hat stuff until about a year ago, when I read a book about, of all things, the moon program during the presidency of John F. Kennedy. In October 1963 Arthur Krock, a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist (back when the prize meant something) wrote an article on the CIA that included the following quote: If the United States ever experiences an attempt at a coup to overthrow the Government, it will come from the CIA and not the Pentagon. The Agency represents a tremendous power and total unaccountability to anyone.… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
19 days ago

And then there’s RFK-assassination; at least as fishy as his brother’s, if less spectacular.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr
Nunnya Bidnez, jr
Reply to  Felix Krull
19 days ago

not to mention that time the secret agent Kopechne tried to assasinate Teddy.
Coulda been a hat trick.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Nunnya Bidnez, jr
19 days ago

Hmmm, yeah, “fishy”

Cameron
Cameron
19 days ago

Re: the Kennedy assasination – There’s a bunch of cheap Carcano rifles (what Oswald used) on the market right now – surplus from Italian police.

JeepEr
JeepEr
Reply to  Cameron
19 days ago

I’ve always wanted a calvary carbine.

Diversity Heretic
Member
Reply to  Cameron
19 days ago

What about ammunition availability? The 6.5mm Mannlicher should be a decent deer cartridge.

Cameron
Cameron
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
19 days ago

All calibers seem to be in short supply – searching wikiarms I can’t find 6.5 x 52mm Carcano in stock. I’m sure it would work against whitetail just fine.

CAPT S
CAPT S
19 days ago

Much has been discussed here about the enstupidation of American education. Logic (and debate, and Euclidian geometry) used to be taught from middle-school onward … now it’s confined to classical homeschools and other small, unenlightened corners of non-government education. That said, a classical grasp of logic would undermine 90% of conspiracy theories. But alas, our dumbed-down culture is vulnerable to every logical fallacy under the sun.

Then there are the other 10% that are true criminal conspiracies but we’re too bombarded by fallacy and trivia to notice.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  CAPT S
19 days ago

In a system where 90% of kids graduate, schooling will change dramatically over time. Back before the 1970s, possibly before that, a much lower proportion of people graduated, but at least the drop-out had an education corresponding to the last completed grade. If you dropped out of the 8th grade, you at least had a 7th grade education. Today, kids are graduating from high school who can barely read, cannot write at all and functionally have a 5th or 6th grade education. These kids have to sit in a physical classroom, they have teachers and books and all of the… Read more »

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  tarstarkas
19 days ago

All too true, but that is not the crux of the problem. The crux of the problem is that, in order to accommodate the least and the lost, all curriculum is “dumbed down”. The more substandard, low intellect, behaviorally impaired students, the less strenuous the curriculum—such that students of higher ability are educated less and less to the limits of their ability. We all suffer for this. As a parent, I was most afraid that my children were not being pressed to their limits. When a found this to be true, I had to transfer my children from public school… Read more »

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  CompscI
19 days ago

The desire for every kid to graduate high school caused that. The whole reason they dumb stuff down is so everyone can get a diploma. If it were just accepted that in order for anything to mean something, a lot of people won’t be able to do it, we would accept the outcome. All we have really done is substitute middle school with high school and high school with college. I’m not sure about the earlier years though. But I have no problem believing that this mentality has drifted downward into the lower grades. Our standards are so low that… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  tarstarkas
19 days ago

C’mon man, Corky was good for some yuks back in the day.

Higgs Boson
19 days ago

The lifeblood of conspiracy theories is fear. The power distillery depends on it for existence. It is how our overlords take the pulse of the dirt people. Be the beast that starves the machine.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Higgs Boson
19 days ago

No it isn’t. It’s when people find out–often by FOIA decades after an event–that it was manufactured. Sometimes the truth was denied and some times false events were manufactured. And good people made life-altering decisions based upon the false information the government promoted. “Operation Mockingbird” (look it up) is alive and well.

Hun
Hun
19 days ago

Not all conspiracy theories are equal. When I hear someone talking about governments covering up alien encounters or about secret Nazi organizations preparing for revolution, I know that the person is either crazy or a shill.
On the other hand, it is obvious that the chances of 9/11 having happened as the government claims are zero. Same with the chances that idiotic Covid measures are only due to incompetence and little local despots.

Last edited 19 days ago by Hun
Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Hun
19 days ago

<i>Not all conspiracy theories are equal.</i>

Yes.

The term is problematic, a catch-all for anything outside the mainstream interpretation of events. By lumping everything in with David Icke and Alex Jones, the usual suspect can always point to them and say: “You don’t believe in government? Then you’re just like them, space lizards and moon hoaxers.”

If I were an evil, globalist overlord, I’d persecute anyone who spoke the truth in a serious and well-reasoned manner, and only allow cooks and snake oil salesmen to tell the truth, so that truth-telling became associated with crazies and grifters.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Felix Krull
19 days ago

“Conspiracy theory,” is a rhetorical tool used to shut down legitimate debate and discussion.

Educated.redneck
Educated.redneck
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
19 days ago

Yeah, it is racist to call someone a conspiracy theorist. Lol

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Felix Krull
19 days ago

Yes, the term is terrible.
Frankly, it is more likely we are ruled by shape shifting lizards than men in sundresses are actually women or that some men menstruate.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Hun
19 days ago

When the government sanctions a conspiracy theory it is known as, “the official story.”

Or, in the case of Beer flu, it is called “the settled science.”

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Hun
15 days ago

What happened with the virus is we saw Draconian Measures (people dragged off and/or locked into their apartments in China.) The solution here was more money printing–and give the proles who already live paycheck-to-paycheck a couple of $600 checks.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
19 days ago

Conspiracy is how the minority rules the majority. It’s a fact. Unfortunately many find it too entertaining to root out.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Paintersforms
19 days ago

Unfortunately many find it too entertaining to root out.
I would say most are too lazy or self involved to root it out rather than being entertained by it…

Last edited 19 days ago by Lineman
Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Lineman
19 days ago

That’s certainly possible. I don’t know how else to comprehend the Q phenomenon, except entertainment. Or hopium, which is just a kind of escapism.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Paintersforms
15 days ago

Root it out how, exactly? This goes back to DB’s assertion that we’d be better off owning a media outlet and the blackmail tapes than winning rigged elections.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
19 days ago

We need a better term to describe what are derisively called “Conspiracy Theories” today. The zealous partisan shenanigans over at the FBI is what you would call a conspiracy and charges against them would include conspiracy to commit whatever crime they committed. The official 9/11 story is an international conspiracy theory. The real problem with conspiracy theories isn’t the unlikelihood that the paragons of virtue in various government agencies would never conspire to do illegal stuff, it’s that the conspiracy theorists could not possibly know the stuff they say they know. They find or make up little inconsistencies in the… Read more »

Gamma Lord
Gamma Lord
19 days ago

Just in case anyone is wondering, Qanon has been conclusively debunked for years. Lists have been generated of failed predictions, but like all cults, its members rationalize away failure. https://old.reddit.com/r/Qult_Headquarters/comments/93v1ui/a_noncomprehensive_timeline_of_qs_failed/ Here’s another example from someone most of us are familiar with: Remember this?the first to be arrested will be McCabe & Strzok. maybe as early as Monday or Tuesday next week.— Greg Rubini (@GregRubini)Apparently Mr. Rubini’s source is unreliable.https://voxday.blogspot.com/2020/02/a-q-disproof.html He rationalizes away the obvious hoax and disproof as the source merely being “unreliable.” He’s still posting Q nonsense on his website. Conspiracy theories like this one serve as a powerful… Read more »

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Gamma Lord
15 days ago

I’m on record as having no use for the Q-tards. One thing I’ll give them credit for is highlighting (for those willing to see) the issue that no government agency is interested in prosecuting criminals within their own ranks.

Remember Aaron Danielson
Remember Aaron Danielson
19 days ago

Regarding the Proud Boys, I would urge them to recognize just how much in danger they are: It doesn’t matter if Trump or other e-celebrities throw you some verbal support. “Law enforcement” is out for your blood: https://twitter.com/LynnLock328/status/1311349607654240258 It’s hard to come to terms with the reality that rule of law is gone and that you’re on your own. But that’s where we are and if anything, Trump just painted a huge target on your back, just like when he tweet-encouraged his supporters to go to Portland and then Danielson was shot later that day. Stay home, stay alive, and… Read more »

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Remember Aaron Danielson
19 days ago

This is a major problem even for the broad approved right. The normie-con thinks the cops are on their side. They actually do really think this.

Fred
Fred
Reply to  tarstarkas
19 days ago

Reinoehl’s accomplices still haven’t been arrested. He wasn’t a lone wolf, yet he was framed as one to make us forget about the rest of the mob that hunted Danielson down.

Last edited 19 days ago by Fred
Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  tarstarkas
19 days ago

That’s fortunately taken a hit even though you are generally right.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

It can’t happen soon enough. The cops, that is the guys who eventually show up when you call 911, are extremely vulnerable to a hostile public. A sophisticated resistance could utterly crush them, especially if they have to play by the rules. They would eventually change the rules, but they are outnumbered and outgunned. The real problem is getting them to see the cops are the frontline of the enemy. They would load (our) old women onto cattle cars if they were ordered to do so.

TomA
TomA
19 days ago

Conspiracy theory aficionados, like fantasy football participants, are largely in it in order to alleviate boredom in their lives. IOW, it’s a fun pastime that involves some mental exercise and creates an illusion of control over one’s environment. In our modern world devoid of real hardship, it’s a surrogate means of testing one’s mettle. Rioting is the LARPing version of this same need.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  TomA
19 days ago

So much of what we have to put up with is because some useless tool is bored. I have been convinced that boredom has been the reason behind almost all activism since I have been alive. I suspect many people innately know that their lives are meaningless and do not have the mental strength to do something half decent about it. The result is rioting, protesting and actively seeking to crush the old order. For those doing the ‘protesting’ at this moment, and indeed for all activists in general, if we could give them what they wanted right away, tomorrow… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  TomA
19 days ago

Fantasy football participants — and gamblers as well — are almost exclusively conspiracy theorists in that they’ll swear up and down that every time they lose it’s due to the game being fixed.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
19 days ago

Good take. Fat ass Barr could have brought charges long ago, Lindsay Graham is forever ready to romp, as is Shaun Hannity forever telling us charges are just around the corner. Chris Wallace and Joe Biden tell us white supremists are behind the violence and by the way Antifa is just an idea.
Meanwhile Trump has the attention span of a knat and keeps the never Trumpers like FBI Director Chris Wray comfortably in a job stabbing him in the back.
Its not a conspiracy theory, it’s a clown show.

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
19 days ago

May I mention the story regarding our old Austrian chancellor who actually died peacefully in his sleep as an old man in South America?

Perhaps not. Sorry. Let’s stick with Kennedy. At least JFK’s wife was still beloved by the American people years after his death.

With Eva Braun, not so much.

Last edited 19 days ago by Karl Horst (Germany)
skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
19 days ago

One of the first if not the first use of the term “conspiracy theory” was an internal CIA memo on how do deflect negative political consequenc