Our Abductive Mind

Note: I have a heretical post full of crime-think behind the green door. This is a post about the sitcom The Big bang Theory.


One of the odd experiences you have on this side of the great divide is you notice just how many ridiculous things people accept as true. It’s not just gullible and stupid people who walk around with heads full of nonsense. Lots of smart and thoughtful people cling to ideas that are superstitious and primitive. Often people who make the journey to this side of the great divide struggle with the fact that for most of their life they have believed things that are ridiculous or devoid of any truth content.

A good example of something most people think is true, but is complete nonsense is the claim that your diet determines your health. More specifically, the claim that the Standard American Diet, as recommended by the rulers, is the key to long life and healthy lifestyle. That means lots of carbohydrates, rather than proteins and fats, especially from meat. Not only is there no truth to these claims, the Standard American Diet is probably the exact opposite of the truth.

The fact is, outside of the extremes, like starvation or morbid obesity, diet has little to no impact on your health. All of the “evidence” trotted out in favor the SAD is based on nonsense studies that are easily refuted. Humans are omnivores, which means we can survive on a wide range of foods. The main problem for modern humans is too much food, so many become obese. Otherwise, the combination of foods you eat has no measurable impact on your health or your lifespan.

The thing is, you can carefully explain this to someone and they will nod along maybe, seeming to get what you’re saying, but as soon as they get the chance, they will repeat the approved lines about diet. A man who has seen every man in his family get colon cancer, despite their diet and lifestyle, will cling to the idea that he can prevent colon cancer by eating oatmeal for breakfast. It’s no different than thinking he can appease the gods by sacrificing a goat on the prescribed day.

Another great example is mass media. One of the funny things about this age is the more partisan you are, the more trusting you are of the media, despite the fact partisans on all sides are sure the media is covering up the truth. Trump haters have fallen for every race hoax perpetrated by the media over the last five years. The old alt-right, the guys sure the media is controlled by little men in volcanoes, accepted without question the media claims about the Covid pandemic.

The Gell-Mann Amnesia effect is one of those remarkable observations that gets to the heart of why mass propaganda works. It’s not that good propaganda tricks people into believing lies. It’s that in every population, there is a percentage that will believe the lies being spread. It is not always the same percentage, which is what makes this so useful to the propagandist. That percentage does the hard work of repeating the lie in private conversations to friends and family.

Joseph de Maistre said, “False opinions are like false money, struck first of all by guilty men and thereafter circulated by honest people who perpetuate the crime without knowing what they are doing.” That right there is why so many people, even very smart people, believe some amount of nonsense. They get the nonsense from people they know and trust, so they are inclined to believe it. At the minimum, they play along with the nonsense, for the sake of social peace,

This is the great insight of the propagandist. The purveyors of the big lie don’t start with the big lie, but the small ones. Maybe the small lies undermine some authority figure in society or maybe they nibble away at some accepted truth. Other small lies offer alternatives to the official truth or suggest motivations for why the authority is not being honest with the people. Over time, the little lies accumulate to the point where some people are unwilling to believe their own eyes.

Again, the diet stuff is a great example of this. Everyone who goes to a new doctor has to answer tons of questions about health history and the health history of family members, maybe going back a generation or two. They do this because disease runs in the family and disease runs in families because it is genetic. Yet, the same doctor will tell you to eat more grains and vegetables and lose a few pounds. A lifetime of little lies about diet have conditioned him to doubt his own training.

The most likely reason for this strange willingness to accept pretty lies is that humans are natural story listeners. For a very long time, most of human history, in fact, humans passed around knowledge with stories and songs. Most likely, we are wired to be more receptive to a good tale, than the hard truth. A story about how eating the right food pleases the gods and brings good health is something our ancestors heard around the campfire when they first climbed out of the branches.

Our deductive mind is that which allows us to know important truths about the world, while our inductive mind allows us to think about how the world should be. That conflict between is and ought is resolved by the abductive mind, which resolves these conflicts with amusing tales and easily remembered sayings that let us ignore these conflicts and focus on the act of living. Trog angered the gods is more easily accepted than Trog was eaten by a bear, because that’s what bears do.

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TomA
TomA
9 days ago

Awareness of reality matters, but you must practice in order to get good at it. On the topic of the obesity epidemic, go to a McDonalds (or the grocery store if you prefer) and make an assessment based upon your own visual data input. Do this with a simply count by category (trim/fit, hefty, and fat). Don’t forget to include young children. The results with shock you.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

True, but what would life expectancy be is people were as thin as they were in 1920s? Also, would their lives be better, i.e. less joint pain, etc.

But the deaths from despair for Whites, which, of course, is completely ignored by TPTB, is a far more important issue. White men are acting more and more like Native Americans (though we lack their almost complete vulnerability to alcoholism, Irish excepted), which is what happens to a defeated people.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

There are very many fat old people who you would think would be dead. I mean 75 plus age. Modern medicine keeps them going but a bunch of obese related maladies hound them and keep them on scripts. Quality of life suffers indeed.

Do you ever just look at historical bios on past generations and even actors on IMDB. So many died of heart attacks, strokes and the like at an early age and mostly all of them were thin. I’m sure smoking helps that for sure.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  David Wright
9 days ago

that’s not my experience — seeing lots of obese people post 65 much less 75+

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

More so in post 65 but we age groups as we know are so. What was it that I heard, the average woman weighs more than the average man from 1965. Exaggeration maybe but not by much.

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  David Wright
9 days ago

I’ve watched any number of Army training videos from the early 60’s and the Viet Nam era. Even though we are seeing 18 to 20 somethings in action, these guys look like they are from another planet—bone thin, lanky, etc. they don’t look like any grouping of American soldiers I see today. Perhaps today we live longer, but it’s hard for me to believe we live as well given our current food choices/recommendations.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

It’s not just diet/food choices, but all the chemical additives. I go through the grocery ads and everything is junk filled with high fructose corn syrup and enough preservatives to embalm a corpse. If you generally stick to the perimeter (meat, fruit/veg/dairy) you’re much better off.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

soldiers weren’t all taking steroids back then. they are now.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

Projection is your friend.

The Right Doctor
The Right Doctor
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

I was in high school in the sixties. Half the people would be described today as very skinny if not too thin. Some of the ones we sported with because of their weight would be below-average in my local (heavily mestizo) middle school.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  David Wright
9 days ago

oh people are bigger and heavier than they used to be, that is not in doubt. i just don’t see *any* old + obese people. fat yes, but not obese.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  David Wright
9 days ago

Smoking is the killer. And I say that as a reformed smoker. (Quit back in ’99.)

diconez
diconez
Reply to  David Wright
7 days ago

partly smoking was much more widespread, but also i bet their quality of life was much better while thin. usually heart disease didn’t last decades, like it does now. wonder if the tradeoff is worth it.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

All I know is lots of red meat and green vegetables make me feel fantastic! Listen to your body, not the nutritionists.

Last edited 9 days ago by Paintersforms
DLS
DLS
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

That is my experience as well. I can tell after I eat something whether it was good for me based on how I feel. Too many carbs and I get spacey and sleepy, but not enough and I get fidgety. A large breakfast with eggs and lean meat start the day solidly. Mixed nuts and pistachios mid-afternoon give me a nice energy boost and my curb appetite. I try to have one big meal for lunch or dinner, and one smaller lean one. It’s all about balance and being mindful of how foods make you feel. I think Zman is… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

Yep, you body tells your brain what it needs

We have to learn to interpret it. That should be everyone’s life goal to learn to interpret it. It’s what they call “the art of living”

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

Actually, if you are eating unprocessed meats and fresh fruits and vegetables, you are probably 95% of the way to the best diet humanly possible. I’ve never heard credible claims that highly refined carbs (flour, etc), sugar in its various forms, and chemical additives are good for us, especially in the quantities the average person consumes them. In fact, some doctors (Atkins, etc.) point out that much of what humans eat now wasn’t even an option pre-civilization (cereal grains, domesticated animals). Ten thousand years sounds like a long time, but it’s nothing by evolution’s standards. Of course natural selection is… Read more »

Last edited 9 days ago by Ben the Layabout
Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

I think Sailer had it right. Look at your relatives that lived a long time and do what they did.

Brewer Baker
Brewer Baker
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

Smoke cigarettes and screw the family goat when they aren’t diddling one another. Drive without a seatbelt and down ten white lightening shots before hopping behind the wheel. Work in the mines without a respirator and hock up black soot. Yet somehow they persisted into their late 90’s. No foolin’.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Brewer Baker
9 days ago

Long life is mostly genetic as is resistance the world killing you for all kinds of dumb things you did out of stupidity or necessity.
For those with less resistance , a healthy diet reduces the need for medicine or surgery later on.
Since no matter what people tell you we don’t yet understand how the body works enough to custom tailor nutritional regimens understand we live in a profoundly unnatural circumstances for our species take a good multivitamin for most plenty of Vitamin D as well eat the healthiest food you can and that is all you can do.

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

They lived with White people.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

Take away the metformin and insulin these fat diabetics are using and you’ll see the mortality rate skyrocket.

diconez
diconez
Reply to  thezman
7 days ago

food brings both pleasure and nourishment, so of course it’s a moral issue. feed the starving. don’t be a glutton. have some discipline and don’t eat meat Fridays for our Lord. and so on. that said, both extremes can be too populated at times, either in the older malthusian famine days, or the postmodern empty gluttony days. the latter may live longer, but quality of life doesn’t follow along always… white deaths of despair do include the obese white hinterland fatsos as well as mostly white anorexic girls. the ones in the middle are also affected though, as the schizo… Read more »

Phoenix
Phoenix
Reply to  thezman
7 days ago

Doubling down on the illogical thinking and adding some more..

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

My daughter does a lot of surgeries — limb amputations — on obese diabetics who let their diabetes get out of control. She hates those surgeries, because it’s literally chopping off dead parts one at a time until the person finally dies. The only reason this happens is because the diabetic does not do what it takes to control their blood sugar and this has to do with diet and lifestyle as well as medicine. You almost never see skinny diabetics needing limbs cut off.

Crispin
Crispin
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

Say what you will, but removing a leg is a fast way to lose 30 lbs.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

Huge % of obese noggers have ‘the diabitiss.’

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  3g4me
9 days ago

I’ve heard them call it “the sugars”

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

Irish excepted? Racist motherfucker.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

I don’t think the Irish are more prone to alcoholism than anyone else at least on a genetic level since most of them are heavily Scandinavian in ethnic makeup, not Celt . Its the culture for which you can in part blame the Catholic Church. And note too alcohol use in Ireland is way down among Whites. My guess is they are using X instead. Now as to despair, its not just us. Its every group with an IQ above 90 or so who isn’t extremely religious is at most replacement. Modernity and Consumerism sterilize mankind. That means everywhere even… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

What would it be with the current obesity rate, minus modern pills and chemicals and surgeries? Lots of people spend 10 years on the brink as medical zombies until their obesity finally kills them.

But absolutely, alcohol and opioids are our worst killer. The scale of the opioid crisis is staggering and nothing has been done. Also, casual alcoholism is quite common. People just brush it off as funny or a few drinks but they are addicts. At least whitey can handle alcohol a bit better.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

My comment was directed at learning to become reality aware, and the obesity experiment is an easy opportunity. But you can substitute other criteria if you prefer. For example, learning to “track” is simply a matter of observing people in motion on soft ground and then carefully examining their footprints as you follow behind them. You will soon learn that you can quickly approximate size and weight from the shape and indentation of the print, and also correlate other behaviors with orientation and spacing. Learn a new skill today!!

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  TomA
9 days ago

We tracked IA’s in the desert here for about 3 yr’s. Great fun—until they figured it out. Now they manufacture “booties” from carpet scraps and heavy felt. The prints they leave are pretty undetectable and ground disturbances blow over quickly. Once they leave the washes, they are undetectable.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

O/T One Reaper with a infrared camera can track illegals in real-time over an area of in excess of 300 square miles. In wartime, this can be used to fix fire coordinates with devastating accuracy. Or alternately, could enable near immediate interdiction by Border Patrol if authorized. But learning to track is primarily about teaching your brain to focus on reality with a purpose. That’s a skill that may come in handy in a few months.

Last edited 9 days ago by TomA
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  TomA
9 days ago

people who exercise all the time are often miserable

any benefit from excessive working out is negated by a lousy attitude

in my experience

B125
B125
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

What are you talking about lol.
So many benefits to working out.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  B125
9 days ago

“excessive”

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

Biggest benefit I detect at advanced age is in keeping the joints flexible. Much of what I learned in rehab was basically Yoga. Not to be denigrated.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

Damn straight. A good stretch is a good workout in itself.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

Yep

Playing basketball (shooting mainly) is great exercise too. Getting the arms up, stretching them, a little jump.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

you got to run!

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

i do yoga for that reason. also take fish oil capsules daily for happy joints.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

Yoga is excellent

And pretty much is the workout all anyone needs

or something similar to yoga. Swimming is probably the best exercise of all. And it’s incredibly useful in real life. Gardening, st bending over picking up things and working the arms and lower back.

Just be active. I think too much time in the gym is counterproductive. Plus better to be outside when exercising

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

My wife teaches yoga, or she did until the coronadoom. But me, I can’t do just exercise for the point of exercise. Instead I arrange my life so I’m carrying hay bales, buckets of grain, wrangling calves and goats, walking fences and doing other stuff that gets me out and moving.

Fifty reps with a t-post driver will get you feeling it in your arms and chest.

Last edited 9 days ago by Vizzini
Lineman
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

Fifty reps with a t-post driver will get you feeling it in your arms and chest.
Yes it will Brother along with digging with a post hole digger… Splitting all your firewood with a 8 or 10 pound maul will help keep you healthy as well…

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

I’ve always been the same – couldn’t exercise just for the sake of exercise. I always got mine from playing multiple sports – basketball, football, handball, racquetball, tennis etc. The competition was the main reason with the added benefit of exercise! These days, since I’ve been working from home, I’ve taken to walking three days a week, usually totaling around 20 miles/week. We also live a pretty hilly area, so there’s good cardio to boot.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

1. fence walk warmup
2. 10 grain bucket lifts
3. 5 feed bag carries
4. 20 shovel digs
5. 20 hay bale tosses
6. barb wire pull
7. 1 calf chase
8. cow patty frisbee cooldown

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Alzaebo
9 days ago

There you go. I could market that.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Alzaebo
9 days ago

Y’all have your preferences for what you think is important: core exercise, stretching, flexibility, cardio, etc.

My focus area for well being is to exercise wherever the three covid trapped teens in my house aren’t.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Alzaebo
9 days ago

Er, I take the dog out for a ten minute walk around the neighborhood 🙂

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

I’m the same way

I can’t do exercise just for exercise. I need a sport to play or a chore.

I hope to have a little farm soon enough and get myself out there doing real work

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

I bought a small farm a while back. I decided to plant an orchard because, hey, you plant it and forget it!

uh huh

buying the trees;
digging holes;
setting a deer fence;
planting;
watering;
pruning-a lot of pruning!
mulching;
you get the idea.

There is no such thing as a laid back farmer, especially if you want to sell or be self sustaining.

next are chickens and goats.

If you can, do it. It is very rewarding.

(Forgive me for not capitalizing)

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

Pilates is good as well.

The guy who invented it was a pretty stout dude.

rashomoan
rashomoan
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

If none of these work, or even if they do, try this: The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook by Clair Davies. It is the best investment I have ever made. I bought a 120 acre farm at age 54 and spent plenty of time riving t-posts, digging holes for trees and fence posts, irrigation trenches, etc, etc. This book shows how to deal with injuries to muscles and soft tissue that often manifest as joint injuries in a way that you can treat yourself. Saved me thousands in physical therapy and kept me on the job.

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
Reply to  rashomoan
9 days ago

Thanks for that. Similar situation. Feeling the tiredness and soreness right now!

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  rashomoan
8 days ago

thanks for the tip!

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  B125
9 days ago

Too much working out makes Jack a dull boy Just exercise outside playing sports and do yard work and chores. Swim as much as possible. Play hoops at the park. Throw a football. Hit tennis balls. Too much time in the gym is not good for a person and gives you muscle where you really don’t need it and isolates muscle groups that should be working in unison. I have yet to meet a buffed up gym rat who can pick up and move a piece of furniture or last 30 minutes doing gardening or anything resembling farming. It’s almost… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

I always enjoy it when bodybuilder types show up at indoor climbing gyms.

They break their wrists high-fiving each other for completing 5.4 grade routes that are no more difficult than a ladder.

Last edited 9 days ago by The Wild Geese Howard
Sam
Sam
Member
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

I just walk these days, adn help my dad around the yard

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Makes sense that it would be possible to become addicted to endorphins so that they lose their effectiveness.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

excessive working out will do permanent wear on your body. people can get compulsive about anything, but exercise can produce a genuine euphoric high feeling, so that draws in the dopamine seekers.

it’s good practice to have a goal in mind, and then make a training plan to achieve that goal. and not just camp out a Planet Fitness for 2 hours every evening after work…

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

The pizza is good there.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

All that muscle turns into disgusting flab you can NEVER get rid if you worked out a lot with weights when younger.

Check out Arnold Schwarzenegger. He’s got bigger boobs than Kamala

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Muscle cells are muscle cells. Fat cells are fat cells. They don’t swap out. Fun fact: you will never have more muscle cells than you were born with. You can make them bigger, but you can’t make more of them. Not like bone or skin cells replenishing.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  RoBG
9 days ago

Well, then something happens to these old weightlifter guys

I have no man boobs but I see lots of guys who do, especially guys who used to bench press a lot

Maybe it’s drugs in the water too or something. IDK TBH

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

excess muscle tissue turning to flab isn’t a problem i need to worry about 🙂 just want to signal my body to hold onto the muscle i already have 🙂

but yeah, arnold looks terrible. plus he jacked up his organs with steroids.

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

I neither agree nor disagree, but I will note that in my younger days I’d exercise and be sore a little bit the next day and then would be able to dodge being sore at all if I had to do anything strenuous (a ton of yard work for example). As I got older that got to be less and less the case and soon I was starting to not be sore as I went to the gym to be sore again. I figured that it was probably making me more miserable than I cared to be: sure without exercise… Read more »

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
9 days ago

Problem as I see it is basically, “Use it or lose it!” Sore is the price you pay for keeping your strength, balance, and flexibility. Doesn’t need to be excessively strenuous, but sitting around does not produce positive benefits at advanced age.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

Living the Truth and strength are both achieved through embracing discomfort. First step is to orient the mind toward that discomfort. Without first converting the habitual aversion to discomfort into a habitual need to seek discomfort, the rest is just debating the style of roofline on a house built on sand. Pretty lies lurk. When you seek strength you will come to know what type of fuel beat serves this. Individuation matters. Know thyself. I like to nerd out on nutrition and physiology but this notion is the one I return to when the noise in the system gets cranked… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Screwtape
9 days ago

No strain, no gain.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

do body weight exercises, they are less likely to cause muscle soreness. not training is going to do more than make you sore…

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

I was in the process of putting together an “old man exercise routine”, but then Covid hit and my gym closed down. The next closest gym if a Planet Fitness where I’d have to dress in a hazmat suit to exercise or an LA Fitness which, for some reason, is stocked with roid freaks. I gotta plan though for some outdoor fitness, we’ll see how it goes…

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
8 days ago

you can do a lot with B/W and no equipment. or a pair of dumb bells. but if you want an all around great training tool get a kettlebell. probably the only decent thing to come out of russia…

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

I always found weightlifting awkward, painful, and not very productive. Then I had a personal trainer for a roommate and he showed me a powerlifting book that went over the body’s mechanics and how strength is generated.

It was a revelation that had me loving the weight room. Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. Highly recommended.

https://startingstrength.com/

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Paintersforms
8 days ago

yah, have the book, and the DVD! i always liked lifting, but when i moved off the machines to free weights, i started *loving* lifting. there is a sensual aspect to moving steel 🙂

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
9 days ago

advil + tylenol

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
9 days ago

Yeah I get where yo are coming from

All I am trying to do is impress upon younger guys that working out with weights can be harmful long term, and those muscles turn to hideous flab and man boobs.

Better to exercise, outdoors preferably, and do things where all muscles and so forth work together rather than isolating muscle groups for purely aesthetic results.

Last edited 9 days ago by Falcone
Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Just stop. Its fine if you don’t lift but stop trying to bend the truth around your preferences (and grossly misinformed opinions and assumptions). Some roided up body-builder turned actor is not representative of weight training as a practice. Muscle doesn’t “turn to hideous flab”. You have it reversed. Well rounded activity is great. Outdoor activity is great. Resistance training within the confines of proper form, periods of rest, and nutrition is one of the most beneficial physical activities a man can do for overall wellness. If only we had the problem of men wearing themselves out from lifting. Sheesh.… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Screwtape
9 days ago

Yes, low T among white guys is a definite problem

But again, I have yet to meet a gym rat who can pick up a sofa 😉

Or swim fast

Or even have hand eye coordination to catch a football without being a total klutz

Other ways to cure the Low T problem

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

The boobs on bodybuilders are a result of the steroids they take messing up their hormones. Same as how women on steroids end up with genitalia like a hyena.

Semi-Hemi
Semi-Hemi
9 days ago

My late father thought that op-ed columns in the local paper had to contain only verifiable truths. When I asked him why he believed that he said because its in the paper and they had to always tell the truth.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Semi-Hemi
9 days ago

It is always crushing when a lad figures out his father has been had at some point in his life. I don’t mind being made a fool of, but when I saw it happen to my own father… It’s painful. Particularly when you look up to them in so many other ways. Still, we’re only human.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

Yep, but then our dad’s are only human, and we are dads too and my son I’m sure will say “Can’t believe my dad fell for all that dissident crap back in 2020, wtf was he thinking?”

I remember my dad bought this self-inspiration cassette box “swimming with the sharks”. It was how to stay ahead in a cut-throat world. I thought it was all pretty retarded. But we are all susceptible to it.

Sam
Sam
Member
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Not this cracker!

Lanky
Lanky
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

Then there is the opposite: those of us who knew that our fathers were wastes, and yet here and there were glimmers of humanity. Both of my parents were addicted to crack. Mom did a complete 180; dad eventually died. The only good thing he did for himself was work out. A bodybuilder, in fact. I saw him shortly before he died, after a seven-year hiatus in our relationship. We went to our old crabbing dock and I untied the traps and threw one far out into the fog. Behind me, I hear “Wow, son. You don’t throw like a… Read more »

Last edited 9 days ago by Lanky
tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

A good going over of our views will cure us of any notion that we don’t hold any silly beliefs ourselves.
We live in a world absolutely saturated in lies and distortions spread by some evil people, but also by very good people who do not know they are lies.
I was having back trouble some years ago and I cannot tell you how many people who I interacted with in various capacities swore about the efficacy of magnet bracelets, chiropractors and other wacky so-called treatments. Probably all of them meant well.

Mockingbird
Mockingbird
Reply to  tarstarkas
9 days ago

I’m personally a believer in the magnet bracelets. Everybody is doing the best they can–if they could do better, they would. The point is we don’t judge people by their value, but by their values.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Mockingbird
9 days ago

I’m not passing judgement in this case (though I have no problem passing judgement on people). My point is that everyone has been rendered incapable of rationally thinking about a topic. All of this advice was friend of a friend narrative (my best friend’s sister in law says it worked) and mostly was unsolicited. The other point was it’s not just politics and race and the stuff we are interested in. It is everything.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

There but for the grace of God go we. Eventually it will be our turn. It’s happening to me and I am only in my 50’s. I sometimes do shit that is so stupid, I want to punch myself in the face afterward. Handle your fathers with love and discretion.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

My father was wise. I miss being able to talk to him. We didn’t agree on everything, but he was always worth listening to. He was born in 1917, so his teen and young adult years were during the Great Depression, then he fought in World War 2. He was a product of privation and peril no American today can imagine — even my son with 5 combat deployments didn’t see the volume of slaughter my Dad endured — North Africa, Anzio, Monte Casino, the Po Valley and points in between — though my son did see a good bit.… Read more »

Last edited 9 days ago by Vizzini
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

As difficult as life was for our parents and grandparents, etc. they had the benefit of knowing there was a family and close knit community that loved them no matter.

The power that family and community give one to persevere in life is something we have all lost and need to get back. Pronto.

Strange but when I go back home and am around my family, I feel close to invincible. The atomization of modern life is weakening us immensely.

Last edited 9 days ago by Falcone
Lineman
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

That’s why they want us alone and atomized because we are easy pickings for them then…When you have a Community behind you it’s a lot harder for them to take you out… People want some big grand cause they can throw their life at but don’t want to do the small things that will make success more likely in a big event…

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Semi-Hemi
9 days ago

Given the history of the news industry, it is amazing they were able to convince so many of people they were objective truth tellers. In America, the news industry has been propaganda since the days of the Colonial pamphleteers. One of my favorite examples is from David McCullough’s book on the Wright Brothers. After their first successful flight they sent a short telegram to their family in Dayton so they could put a notice in the local newspaper of their success. The telegram operator asked if he could inform a friend was a reporter at the Norfolk Pilot-Union. The Wright… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Barnard
9 days ago

There is a theory that the push toward universal literacy was actually a ploy to make sure everybody fell under the sway of the media. The media–print media, anyway–is pretty worthless if nobody can read. Sounds pretty conspiratorial, but I thought I’d throw it out there anyway.

Sam
Sam
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
9 days ago

I just read about that from Mortimer Adler’s How to Read a Book (great book, btw). He said exactly that. That those who can only read at an elementary level, are VERY susceptible to propaganda.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
9 days ago

I beg to differ. I like Mark Twain’s comment: “The man who does not read books, has no advantage over the man who cannot read books.” Perhaps it is relevant that he said “books,” not “newspapers.” And this advice, from a man known for his tall tales.

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Semi-Hemi
9 days ago

“It’s in the paper” is a hard one to overcome in the mind of the normie.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Wolf Barney
9 days ago

It’s hard to believe that’s true any longer. Everybody notices that when the “papers” describe some crime witnessed by multiple people and the only description of the perps is the clothing they were wearing (sneakers, jeans, hoodie) — well, even the wokest of the woke knows what that means, whether they admit it publicly or not.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Semi-Hemi
9 days ago

I looked up “tautology” in the dictionary and saw a picture of a man that had to have been your pappy. RIP.

Epaminondas
Member
9 days ago

The biggest fairy tale of all is the egalitarian argument. You’re seeing this equality nonsense fall apart as this election fraud comes into sharper focus. The biggest proponents of radical egalitarian policies are the ones perpetrating the voter fraud. And now the entire planet sees it. Interesting times.

Last edited 9 days ago by Epaminondas
Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Epaminondas
9 days ago

Egalitarian lies are going to attract the liars

Egalitarianism = last bastion of the scoundrel

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

The usual canard:
“Free men are not equal, equal men are not free”.

B125
B125
Reply to  Epaminondas
9 days ago

But they are radical, they truly believe that all races are equal. What is causing this inequality? White racism, or systemic racism. They are getting more and more radical and anti-white, because white people keep white people-ing and black people keep black people-ing. Nothing has “fixed” it.

Although, given gen z’s obsession with rap music maybe they will close the gap by forcing whitey down to blacks’ level.

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  B125
9 days ago

Watch TV lately? They already have.

Sam
Sam
Member
Reply to  Hoagie
9 days ago

What. Do. You mean?

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  B125
9 days ago

White people stand as a stark reminder of the foolishness of their equality of the races proposition. Therefore, White people must be eliminated—either through genocide or through social/economic sanctions.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  CompscI
9 days ago

If your goal is equality, destroying superior specimens is a viable method. Not optimal, certainly by our point of view, but possible. 🙁

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  B125
9 days ago

I’ve been working on an essay that among other points, argues that White Supremacy and Systemic Racism are so evil and powerful that they even affect the Negroid race in times and places where there are few or no Whites! Surely this is the cause when Blacks take over a city or a country, and the place goes to shit, it somehow must be the White man’s fault. He took the magic with him. Based on what I’ve read about sub-Saharan Africa, apparently the Caucasian race’s power was so malevolent that it kept the people in Africa living in paleolithic… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
9 days ago

This has been a year of verifying stereotypes. Starting with Jussie Smollett , the Jig Jew Jessie. The Jew plans a racial hatred crime against Whites,the black screws it up and the shirt-lifter adds all the nice bits of artistic adornment.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Epaminondas
9 days ago

Election fraud has always been a problem of course. What is new — to me — is this is the first time in my living memory (I’m late 50s) at least, that one side is vehemently challenging the counts. Like most of us here, I wish Trump the best. Even in the likley case he fails, he has still done a great service in highlighting the skullduggery of the other side. He has nothing to lose. Of course, the Liberals just call him a spoilsport, who would not accept the will of the people or some such rubbish. Yet another… Read more »

Last edited 9 days ago by Ben the Layabout
Drew
Drew
9 days ago

Otherwise, the combination of foods you eat has no measurable impact on your health or your lifespan.”

Say, didn’t sailors cure scurvy, of which many had died, by consuming citrus (i.e. alter their diet)? Or are you trolling? Asking for a friend…

whitney
Member
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

people are so annoying sometimes

Towans
Towans
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

Sartre was French so…

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

i think the point is, if you don’t have *adequate* nutrition (e.g. sufficient vitamin C), you are going to end up “inside the extremes”. this really is a shockingly silly hill to die on.

Spin geraht
Spin geraht
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

Completely unrelated, what’s the deal with “membership”?

Mockingbird
Mockingbird
Reply to  Spin geraht
9 days ago

I wonder that too. I wrote to Z about it, and he didn’t know either. So, all you folks out there like Whitney, how to we become a member? (It’s not by subscribing, I already do that.)

Notta Member
Notta Member
Reply to  Mockingbird
9 days ago

You need to have a really large member or date a fellow who does.

whitney
Member
Reply to  Mockingbird
9 days ago

I don’t know. I thought it had something to do with Disqus when I first started commenting. I was using Chrome then and things would just magically coordinate. Now I use DuckDuckGo and it’s still there. I dont know

Brewer Baker
Brewer Baker
Reply to  whitney
9 days ago

It means they’re tracking you across platforms.

Sam
Sam
Member
Reply to  Spin geraht
9 days ago

Yeah…

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Drew
9 days ago

should be pretty obvious he doesn’t mean it like that

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Drew
9 days ago

Nutritional deficiencies have always caused problems (vit C and scurvy, iodine and goiter, calcium/magnesium and osteoporosis, etc.) Most recently the studies citing very low vitamin D levels in patients hospitalized for Covid-19. You’d think that’s what the gov’t should be promoting, wouldn’t you?

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  RoBG
9 days ago

The RDA for various vitamins/minerals was established generations ago and is apparently the bare minimum to prevent things like scurvy or other nutritional diseases. The optimal amount for health/well being is generally a lot higher – but you still have people repeating the axiom that Americans pee is full of vitamins. And then you have people like my husband, who are convinced that all their over the counter vitamins will maintain health despite being primarily sedentary.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  RoBG
9 days ago

Encouraging Vitamin D consumption doesn’t induce humiliating subservience quite the way the mask diktats do, dontchaknow…

Moe Noname
Moe Noname
9 days ago

Trog deserved to be eaten. He was rayciss to the friendly, peace-loving vegetarian Neanderthal tribe on the other side of the river.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Moe Noname
9 days ago

plus he was a demon

Trogomizer
Trogomizer
Reply to  Moe Noname
9 days ago

comment image

Sam
Sam
Member
Reply to  Trogomizer
9 days ago

Seriously,,, can you beat. GL? What was with the 1960s glasses, and the men’s shoes?

David Wright
Member
9 days ago

I can’t remember exactly the subject but Joe Sobran writing about how embarrassingly long it took him to shake some belief in a system. We are indoctrinated formally and informally on many things with little chance to ponder the truth of something. Easier to just go along or repeat, usually unknowingly.

This current madness we are going through exposes much of that with the people I know well. Many are not stupid but their behavior shows otherwise. Best I can do is constantly check my own premises.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

We learn by stories, and all stories are, at their heart, a morality tale. Good vs evil. Protagonist vs antagonist.

With food, it’s a tale of you (the protagonist) vs a bad diet or carbs or gluten (antagonist). They are trying to destroy you so you must overcome them.

With Progressives, it’s a tale of them vs evil White racists.

We must always remember to couch our arguments as stories placing the person that we are trying to convince in the role of the hero overcoming an evil antagonist. It’s how they learn and how they come to our side.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

(((Carbs)))? I think gluten gets a bad rap. Gluten is the whyte supremes of modern food. <1% of people explode from the greatest threat to our GI’s. But suddenly everybody is “sensitive” and scouring the ingredients for clues of gluten supremacy and now bread and pasta must be made out of rice and garbanzos (“good carbs”) or some kid will blast his pants on the way to indoctrination camp. Meanwhile the real problem is not some protein found among many, the one that also happens to give bread all its structure and enjoyable texture, but its the fact that diet… Read more »

Lanky
Lanky
Reply to  Screwtape
9 days ago

Argument over change I overheard yesterday between a black male and a cashier.
“Man, you don’ understand: I’m a mathematician!”
What was he buying, you ask?
Lottery tickets.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Lanky
9 days ago

One MI couple actually did beat the lottery using math. https://tinyurl.com/ya2hv4wy It’s a real hoot. BTW: that game where they made their money was ended. 😉

roberto
roberto
Reply to  Screwtape
9 days ago

Always funny to see products which never had any gluten in them anyway labeled GLUTEN FREE in big print on the packaging.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  roberto
9 days ago

Same with “organic.” That word basically means “2X the price.”

Sam
Sam
Member
Reply to  roberto
9 days ago

Pretzels

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Screwtape
9 days ago

I’ve heard the gluten problem is from modern grains bred for maximum efficiency, or additives destroying the GI/gut biome. Both sound plausible.

In any case additives sound like a bad idea to me, and I prefer cultivars from the preindustrial food supply. More like how nature intended.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

Today’s wheat is not your grandmothers wheat.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Bilejones
9 days ago

And you’re not using your grandmother’s sourdough starter to ferment the dough. That also matters.

Modern bread is just different from bread in the past. For some, it’s an issue. For others, it’s fine.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

Did you read that in the media?

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

Multiple places, yeah. And it jibes with what I learned in college, lived experience, etc., so I’m cool with it.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

Learned directly from medical researcher.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

if you are sensitive to wheat, you will get digestive distress when you eat it. like bloating, and/or acid reflux. many women with bowel health problems are sensitive to wheat but not aware of the connection.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

The idea is that the wheat is different today and that might be what’s causing the sensitivity. Different composition, different compounds or whatever— enough to throw off the biochemistry. No idea if it’s the cause, but it seems plausible, especially considering how unnatural a lot of these plants are nowadays.

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, you know?

Last edited 9 days ago by Paintersforms
Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Paintersforms
8 days ago

I have read that and tend to think there is something to it. fucking food scientists have gotten their evil hands around all kinds of things, always making them worse. tomatoes are a classic case. and yah, don’t touch shit that’s working well! 🙂

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

Exactly. Also, factor bread doesn’t use sourdough to ferment. Sourdough helps break down the gluten, in essence doing some of the digestion for you.

This is especially true of “no-knead” sourdough bread where you have very long fermentation. People with digestive distress from bread should try sourdough breads. It may help. (It also might not help, btw.)

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
8 days ago

agree that sourdough is less prone to cause (me) issues. kind of want to start making my own, too.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

Modern factory bread has a lot more gluten than in the past due to changes in the wheat. In addition, they don’t use sourdough yeast, which helps in the digestion of gluten.

Basically, even if you were eating the same amount of bread as someone in 1930, you’d be eating lot more gluten and it would be harder to digest. For some people, that’s an issue; for others, it’s not. But our bodies are having to deal with more gluten.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

Very interesting. I wonder why they’d change the yeast. Another victim of efficiency?

Also: does sourdough involve bacteria?

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

Whoops. Hold up on the increased gluten in modern wheat. My medical researcher says it may be more complicated than that. It might be the kind of gluten.

Regardless, two definite issues are not using sourdough for fermentation and all crops lacking the micro-nutrients because they’ve been leeched from the soil.

Your body is not getting a lot of the help that it once got to digest your bread (and other food). Again, bothers some people but not others.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

Point being they jacked with what worked and now it doesn’t work.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

Factory bread smells like bleach or something after a few days

Disgusting

Brewer Baker
Brewer Baker
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Learn to make your own yeast bread. No-knead takes five minutes for really excellent bread. A six quart or larger cast iron pot with a tight-fitting lid is the perfect bread oven — you can buy Lodge for less than twenty bucks. Buy organic grains and flours from Bob’s Red Mill or King Arthur. So easy for such a great reward.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Brewer Baker
9 days ago

Yep. I used use the Lodge cast iron combo cooker. Drop the dough on the heated skillet portion and put the heated pot on top. Much easier than trying to drop into a single pot.

Also, might I suggest cranberry pecan sourdough. Best toast you’ll ever have.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
8 days ago

that’s not toast, that’s dessert!

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

ok, when i was a kid (60’s) bread would go stale in a couple of days. now, it kind of never goes stale, it just gets moldy. so something is very different in the process.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Paintersforms
9 days ago

Modern tech has given us genetically modified foodstuffs, built-in pesticides and so forth. Who knows what the long-term effects are? But gather round boys and girls, here’s a food tale from the days before it took a chemical engineer to bake bread! Did you ever wonder what the “enriched” in enriched white flour was? Several centuries back, white flour and the bread it made was a luxury. As technology improved, white flour became affordable. It was quickly discoverd, alas, that the peasants, who had previously survived on brown bread, tended to starve if they ate the white bread. So they… Read more »

Last edited 9 days ago by Ben the Layabout
Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
9 days ago

I never got that. All these nutrients get stripped during production, then they add chemicals to replace the nutrients. It seems silly and probably not as healthy, but I guess they can produce more and cheaper food that way. Gotta keep the workers fed so they can keep working!

The fact that such a degraded food was seen as a luxury at one time is just stupid imo.

Last edited 9 days ago by Paintersforms
Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Paintersforms
8 days ago

it was cheaper to make (i.e. grind) brown bread.

Peabody
Peabody
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

That is much easier said than done for people such as myself who at least try to draw conclusions based on evidence or reason. For instance I have one friend to whom I can talk about forbidden topics without getting screamed at. Yesterday I tried (for probably the 10th time) to explain why I know The Rona to be a scam. I said I know I have moles in the yard because I can see their hills. I know it’s been raining heavily because the river is over the bank, etc. I know there’s no pandemic because I don’t know… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Peabody
9 days ago

TV really seems to have a hypnotic effect on many people.

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
9 days ago

Best line I ever read was “its called programming for a reason.” Might have been a comment here actually.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
8 days ago

welcome to the land of the lotus eaters…would you like a taste?

Last edited 8 days ago by Karl McHungus
CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Peabody
9 days ago

Look, many folks whom you and I know are basically incapable of critical thinking, so they depend on others to do so for them. That’s probably genetic in basis. Accept it and accept them for who they are, which I hope are decent people in all the myriad ways we need decent fellow citizens. All have a place.

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  Peabody
9 days ago

She remains unconvinced because the known pathological liars on tv are telling a different story.

Whether they were lying or just wrong, everything we were told early on about corona was wildly, laughably inaccurate. People were going to be left to die in the hallways of hospitals. The crematoria and morgues weren’t going to be able to keep up with the bodies. In any sane society, the media, the “experts”, etc. would be laughingstocks and angry mobs armed with pitchforks and torches would be hunting them down. Yet, most people still listen to these clowns.

Last edited 9 days ago by Federalist
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Federalist
9 days ago

Whether they were lying or just wrong, everything we were told early on about corona was wildly, laughably inaccurate.

The gaslighting was ridiculous.

“It can live 6 million years on any surface in direct sunlight and is unaffected by summer heat!”

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
9 days ago

They’re still pushing that. Yesterday I ventured out to some stores for the first time in 6 months, in search of a few table lamps. Every location now has a greeter, like Walmart – a woman telling me that she has carts that have been freshly disinfected. I’ve blown past the Walmart mystery-meat greeters for years, and I did the same to these idiot White women. Boy does it irritate them. I’ve had managers reproach me and ban me because I won’t talk with greeters.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  3g4me
9 days ago

At my Wal*Mart I think the “greeters” priority is to reduce the amount of, er, unpaid merchandise that walks out the store 🙂

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
8 days ago

here’s to all the Walmart greeters, killed in the line of duty 😛

DLS
DLS
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
9 days ago

Also, the current mask religion is because they measured how far someone can spit in a laboratory, and determined people are dangerous at less than 20 feet away.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Peabody
9 days ago

How would you frame this situation as a story rather than observation and evidence to encourage a change in perspective? You can’t. Just as you can’t grow crops in the desert – at least without irrigation. She’s getting hit with hours and hours of stories from the other side every day. Hard to break through with some people. Focus your energy on those who are somewhat receptive. The best that you can do with her is try to undermine her trust in the TV or really the system. That’s a hard job. Believe me, I understand. I have such people… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

That’s fun to do. Unfortunately, it does not change their minds in the slightest. But it does mock them, which is one of Zs suggested courses of action.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Peabody
9 days ago

This is a variation of Gell-Mann amnesia. Most people do not know anyone who died of covid, but they believe the death counts anyway. And people who know someone who died with covid, also are close enough to the situation to know the real cause of death.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
9 days ago

Nutrition and diet is one of the areas that it’s most apparent the current consensus is based almost completely on inertia and not any sort of dispassionate analysis. The most laughable example is BMI measurement for reasons that should not have to be explained. The second most is the ‘carbs are good’ bandwagon. Truth is, the reason why atkins works is because you don’t spike your sugars, which makes you want to eat less, which makes you lose weight. I’ve had friends who went to atkins and then did a seven day fast like it was nothing. One lost 100… Read more »

Last edited 9 days ago by Chet Rollins
Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  Chet Rollins
9 days ago

Building muscle is important because muscle burns glucose, which comes from carbs and lessens those sugar spikes.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Wolf Barney
9 days ago

muscles can also burn fat.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Wolf Barney
8 days ago

if you don’t want sugar spikes, don’t eat in a way that causes them.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Chet Rollins
9 days ago

The whole food pyramid developed in the 60s, which pushed carbs on the population for the last 50+ years, was funded by the sugar industry. This connection went unnoticed for decades.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  DLS
8 days ago

grain industry.

Falcone
Falcone
9 days ago

my grandfather used to tell us that doctors were the new priests and would eventually go overboard harping on one’s good health. I took it to mean that because the body is one’s temple that keeping it healthy was being a good Christian — thereby tying medicine and religion into a similar human enterprise.

Notice how doctors today frown on you like a priest if you confess to having a few extra drinks.

He also said in every town there is only one good doctor.

Wise old doctor he was.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Notice how doctors today frown on you like a priest if you confess to having a few extra drinks. Indeed. The moral judgement comes thick and fast. A recent visit to the doctor for my wife, who had a bruise, led to the doctor (female rag head) initiating the following brief exchange: Doctor Rag Head: I have to ask, about the bruise… Does your husband abuse you? Wife: Only verbally. Apparently, the doctor did not get this joke; rather, she looked at my wife in a concerned manner. I told her later that this woman should not be joked with… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

The mental health questionnaires are the most terrifying, along with the firearms question.
Rest assured, we’ll all be considered mentally ill in twenty years.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Chet Rollins
9 days ago

I’ve can’t remember if I’ve ever had to fill out one of those, but suffice it to say that if you admit to depression or suicidal thoughts on those forms, you’re a moron. Suicidal thoughts, in particular, are grounds for involuntary mental health confinement and evaluation.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Vizzini
9 days ago

Yeah, here in FL I’ve seen that first-hand a couple times. What blows me away is that they keep the person for a maximum of three days. As if that is going to magically alleviate a true suicidal or other unhinged person.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
9 days ago

I know someone who was kept a week just for a hearing, and then the magistrate decided, “Oh, our bad. You’re fine. Sorry about the inconvenience.”

David Wright
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

My good laugh for the day.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  David Wright
8 days ago

Dr Raghead cracked me up. “is your husband beating you enough?”

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

Your selection criteria for doctors needs work.
Step 1. Select only those who might be mistaken for yourcousin.
Step 2. Rule out any that might be beneficiaries of affirmative action. Prominent relatives, Physical disabilities etc.
Step 3. Check out who the co-authors are on any papers/studies that they have written. With whom do they associate and regard as their peers?

Then a quick scan through the review sites..

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

No doubt !!!

Never joke with those people. Look at how Trump joked about Russia getting Hillary’s emails and they took it seriously enough to impeach him.

These progs have no humor and are dangerous

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

Doctor Rag Head: … Does your husband abuse you?

Wait, I thought they were cool with that.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Federalist
9 days ago

That’s only if the beater is non-White.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

Wouldn’t know. I haven’t been to a doctor in six years, and I can’t remember how many years it was before that. I don’t go to doctors for opinions on my lifestyle. I go for specific issues that I need addressed.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

I believe they are required to ask about abuse. I had a health scare that took me to the emergency room a few years ago. I was having heat exhaustion that felt like a heart attack. I recall the doctor asking me if my wife was abusive. I was completely puzzled about what that had to do with my symptoms.

Sam
Sam
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

Hilarious!

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

Don’t lay all the blame on the MD’s. Very likely they are required by law to ask those types of questions. I knew a woman (mid-50s) who was dopey on pills, slipped, fell and hit her eye against a table leg in a room full of witnesses. Fortunately, she wasn’t seriously harmed. She did get a black eye. Even so, she later said the police came to her home asking if there had been a domestic abuse incident. She was divorced and lived alone. And this, in a relatively sane part of the country.

roberto
roberto
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

Just do what I do, lie.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

I don’t answer any of the none health related questions.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Bilejones
9 days ago

This. The doctor’s don’t care. They’re required to ask, you’re NOT required to answer.

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

On the questionnaire for new patients, they now ask if you are a gun owner. 

Answer “fuck around and find out.”

David Wright
Member
Reply to  Federalist
9 days ago

Do bazookas count?

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

don’t answer inappropriate questions like that. my experience is they still see you.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Karl McHungus
9 days ago

Probably better to lie, or they will take no answer as a yes.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  thezman
9 days ago

I never answer any of those questions, and I’ve never been pressed on it.

Melissa
Melissa
Reply to  thezman
6 days ago

They have asked kids the “guns in the home” question.

Technojunkie
Technojunkie
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

That’s why commies colonize the Medical Industrial Complex early and often. Not so much trauma care where it’s obvious whether you know what you’re doing or not but damn near everywhere else.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Technojunkie
8 days ago

commies don’t care about doctors, at all. now school teachers they take very seriously.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

That has to do with the corporatization and financialization of medicine. The local independent doctor with an office attached to his/her home was denied admitting privileges and insurance compensation unless he joined a “network.” This was sold as a way to “keep costs and prices down.” Of course the opposite happened. You can’t even go to the ER anymore w/o prior network approval and premiums outpace inflation by a factor every enrollment period.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  RoBG
9 days ago

Keep in mind, rising ER costs fund the main mode of primary healthcare for illegals.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  DLS
8 days ago

translated: illegals go to emergency room for all health needs, drive cost of hospitals up for everyone else.

Screwtape
Screwtape
9 days ago

Media is like standing in the cereal isle. Corn and sugar or wheat and sugar. How would you like your sugar? Both!? Ah, fair and balanced.

My working theory is that we are in the final two months in a galactic feedlot. You know, when the alien ranchers and their deep state lizard hybrid ranch hands really put the weight on us and more importantly that corn-fed marbling. Thats all the flavor really.

This whole hoof and snout wuhan thing is spooky though. Wouldn’t want to get “infected”.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Screwtape
9 days ago

My working theory is that we are in the final two months in a galactic feedlot.

Nah, it’s just the Cloud People rolling out the Great Reset:

Klaus Schwab and his great fascist reset



https://winteroak.org.uk/2020/10/05/klaus-schwab-and-his-great-fascist-reset/amp/

Last edited 9 days ago by The Wild Geese Howard
RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
9 days ago

Whitney Webb has been reporting on this for a while. Too bad all the people doing real journalism have been relegated to the fringes.

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
9 days ago

Hold on pal, the NYT told me this is just crazy talk despite it being on the WEF website! Take that conspiracy talk elsewhere!

Thorsted
Thorsted
9 days ago

Correction?:”mind allows us to think about how the word should be.” It must be the world.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Thorsted
9 days ago

In my ongoing readings of Buddhism, this is (to me) one of the logical truths of Buddhism: the universailty of dukka, usually called “suffering” but more accurately “dissatisfaction” with the way things are. “Craving” ties in with suffering (I’m not fully up to speed on the distinction). Impermanence: everything arises and fades away. As you said, at least one commentary says that the fundamental problem of human existence is disappointment with the way the real world is (= dukka) and people live in “ignorance” of true reality, instead trying to change the world to reflect our desires (perhaps this is… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

Trog angered the gods is more easily accepted than Trog was eaten by a bear, because that’s what bears do.

True, but the stories that lasted from the past were stories that provided a lesson that actually helped people avoid danger. German fairy tales are remarkably dark, but they did keep kids from doing things that could get them into trouble.

Our current fairy tales won’t last because they make life worse for those who believe them.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
9 days ago

I doubt witches like Kamala and Hillary would have gotten anywhere had enough children been exposed Grimm’s fairytales

Thank God my grandma used to read them to me.

Last edited 9 days ago by Falcone
usNthem
usNthem
9 days ago

Of course another good example is joggers. Up until 60-70 years ago, everyone knew the score and acted/treated them accordingly. Now, after 55 years of age incessant brainwashing that they’re just like us, bleed red blah, blah, blah, here we are. Joggers slaughtering each other and everyone else on a daily basis and the vast majority ignoring it or willfully turning a blind eye. Of course the main slimes media also willfully refuses to report on it. The purveyors of these lies hopefully will have much to answer for.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  usNthem
9 days ago

That’s the greatest part of the lie: Joe Average feels so free with his democracy he doesn’t believe that there is anything bad about it. He may even tacitly agree that he is not truly free, but when you start talking to these people about what the ‘elites’ are up to, well then ‘Surely! They wouldn’t do that! You’re being silly!’. The NPC mentality was once again brought home to me I think yesterday or the day before. A commenter here posted a video of two men resisting supermarket security in Bristol, UK. With the exception of the two legendary… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  OrangeFrog
9 days ago

supermarket security”

Can we have NOTHING?! ffs

Falcone
Falcone
9 days ago

It’s a FACT that my cat wards off nightmares

If he’s sleeping next to me, never have them. In fact only good dreams. Nightmares occur only when the little fluff ball isn’t there protecting me.

Scientists would obviously deny any relationship between the two

Friggin morons

Last edited 9 days ago by Falcone
Outdoorspro
Outdoorspro
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Or, your cat chooses not to sleep next to you because you are moving about having nightmares. Cause<>Effect. Which is which, eh?

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Outdoorspro
9 days ago

Possible but unlikely give the specifics of the set up

If he’s in the room and the door’s closed, never a nightmare

If he’s locked out? Uh oh. One time I dreamt I was having sex with Hillary. No joke !

Montefrío
Member
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Do not under any circumstances read the late Jacques Lacan’s speculations on the origin of dreams.

el-porko
el-porko
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

.

Last edited 9 days ago by el-porko
RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

Oh no. Surely you woke up before, you know. . . .

Vince
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

There was a show in the 80’s, an Outer Limits episode I think, with (Drew Barrymore?) a little girl threatened with asphyxiation in her sleep by an evil gnome under her bed. The family cat fought a monumental battle and overcame the little breath stealer.

Karl McHungus
Karl McHungus
Reply to  Vince
9 days ago

I think that was some other show, a TV movie. Trilogy of Terror maybe.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Vince
9 days ago

See !!! There is a mythology around cats and dreams for a reason 😉

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Vince
9 days ago

The short “General” from this movie: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat%27s_Eye_(1985_film)

DVDC
DVDC
Reply to  Vince
9 days ago
Last edited 9 days ago by DVDC
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Vince
9 days ago

That’s “General,” the last segment of Stephen King’s Cat’s Eye:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cat%27s_Eye_(1985_film)

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Falcone
9 days ago

I had a nightmare the other night that ravens the size of camels were peering through our first floor windows. Our cat had recently passed. There you have it!

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
9 days ago

People want (well, maybe not us realists) so badly to believe all humans, all races are the same. They see that cool, smart black guy on TV, or the guy they work with, or the smart GOP politician, and tend to project that guy on all black people. It makes them believe they can all be like that guy if only…(fill in remedial social program or anti-racist behavior by whites here) The huge, obvious differences like the sky-high crime rates, the no-go zones, the domination in certain sports, the abysmal school performances, and all around dysfunction are ignored or downplayed… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  Wolf Barney
9 days ago

Omg. I think 50% of Hannity’s guests are black. The normiecon obsession with blacks is just as much as libs’. Conservative blacks are also narcissistic – look at me, a black womxn who is a conservative!

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  B125
9 days ago

“…look at me, a black womxn who is a conservative!…”

Or a grifter. Sorry to paint with such a broad brush, but really I can’t think of one that I seriously believe is not. They have no credibility with me.

Last edited 9 days ago by CompscI
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  B125
9 days ago

Manosphere pundit Rollo Tomassi is friends with Hotep Jesus and just did a 3 hour show with Candace Owens.

B125
B125
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
9 days ago

Given Rollo’s looks these days, I’m starting to think his redpill is a LARP. No amount of game can overcome his unfortunate genetics as he’s aged.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  B125
9 days ago

Yeah, I wonder about some of those guys.

I mean, WTF is with the sketchy male torso sculpture on Rich Cooper’s wall?

That is way too Podesta-esque for me.

Bilejones
Member
9 days ago

A clue to the Standard American Diet lies in the fact that it’s produced by the Department of Agriculture.
The primary concern is the financial health of the American farmers not the physical health of the American people.
In Heels Up Harriss’ Homeland your choice of food is very important to your health .
(And that of the food)

Last edited 9 days ago by bilejones
Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Bilejones
9 days ago

Missed the link on the previous comment.
Last couple of lines doesn’t make much sense without it.

A clue to the Standard American Diet lies in the fact that it’s produced by the Department of Agriculture.
The primary concern is the financial health of the American farmers not the physical health of the American people.
In Heels Up Harris’ Homeland your choice of food is very important to your health .
(And that of the food)
https://mol.im/a/8961253

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Bilejones
9 days ago

Corporate farms, not family farms, as healthy and sensible as corporate medicine /s

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Bilejones
9 days ago

Brought to you by the Corn Lobby, the Sugar Lobby, and the Wheat lobby.

Lanky
Lanky
9 days ago

Literal joggers are my favorite. BDSMing your knees for an hour every day across dirty miles of uneven concrete

roberto
roberto
Reply to  Lanky
9 days ago

Some runners have no problems or issues with their knees. Ask me how I know.