The Modern Prison State

One of the unexpected consequences of the information age is that we have less reliable information, despite have vastly more data. We have facts about the world now that were unimaginable a generation ago. The facts of our society are stashed in massive searchable databases that are accessible to most everyone. You may need some skill to access them, but the data is there. Even data that should be private is available if you are willing to pay for it.

In contrast, the information about our world that we can trust has collapsed into the set of things we can verify on our own. Information is not the same as data, which is a collection of facts. How many miles you drive to work every day is a fact. Information is what we can derive from those facts. If your commute takes an hour and it is 50 miles, we can conclude that you mostly use the highway to get to work, based on some simple math using those two data points.

In theory, information should be value free, as it is facts plus testable logic, with the result being subject to comparisons with the reality. If the information you derive from someone’s driving data indicates he is breaking the speed of sound on his way to work, we know your facts or logic are wrong. The trouble here is that information is not readily testable against reality. We tend to rely on the reputation of the person providing the information and how it fits within our own observations.

That’s the other important distinction between data and information, at least regarding the way in which these words are used in popular discourse. While they are often used interchangeably, data is an objectively true fact, while information is true according to a set of logical rules. Since those rules can be conditional, information can be valid and invalid, depending upon those conditions. “All bachelors are unmarried” is true as long as the word “bachelor” is defined to mean “a man who has not married.”

This may seem a bit esoteric, but it gets to the heart of the crisis in the West. For most of human history and all of Western history, the relationship between data and information was different than we see today. For medieval man, there was never a lot of data about the world, but he could trust the information about it. This was not just the natural world. He could trust the truths about his society, his gods, the people in charge of his society and the sources of his information.

In the modern age, and really just in the last generation, this relationship has flipped around the other way. We have all the data we need for any question. We know more about world than we really want or need to know. What we lack is information and more important, trustworthy sources of information. Medieval man could rely on the Church or the local lord to maintain the rules of society. The only thing modern man can know about his sources of information is they are wrong.

Modern man is now awash in both misinformation and disinformation, in addition to false information. Misinformation is deliberately inaccurate information, which is intended to deceive. Disinformation is deliberately inaccurate information, but from an institution like the state or the media. Of course, false information is information that is inaccurate due to bad data or logic. Compounding this is the current campaign against misinformation and disinformation.

The first thing you should notice is the people most responsible for the tsunami of disinformation are claiming to be at war with disinformation. Unless this results in mass suicide by media and entertainment, it means they are lying. Note also the use of the term “expert” in that piece. There is no such thing as a disinformation expert, outside of the institutions promulgating disinformation. One cannot be an expert at doing something unless you are actually doing that thing.

Note also how the primary sources of both misinformation and disinformation talk about this phenomenon as if they are the victims of it. The managerial class is the single source for the flood of false information. Pranksters may post gags on line to fool people, but the practical joke has been a part of life since the stone age. The online version is just an extension of the flaming bag of dog poo. What the managerial class is doing is a firehose of falsehoods with the stamp of authority.

Put another way, the new phase of the misinformation/disinformation tsunami is the managerial state crying out in pain as it strikes the society over which it rules. The next front in the crisis will be agents of the state arresting people on trumped up charges, for imaginary crimes against the state. This is the Douglas Mackey case. An entirely powerless person is arrested for a crime that does not exist, because the disinformation system says he was passing misinformation on-line.

Since the first humans began to settle into large communities, human organization has relied upon social trust, enforced by a code. Social trust worked in two directions, vertically and horizontally. People could trust their neighbors because they were like them and accepted the same codes of conduct. People trusted their rulers because those rulers enforced the code and attained their positions based on the logic in that code of society. Trust was side-to-side and up-and-down.

Modern economics is turning the horizontal trust of American society into cash equivalents and hauling it away to the pirate coves of finance capital. Americans are living in a world of strangers. The disinformation campaigns intended to distract from this realty are eating away at the vertical trust. Americans no longer trust the people in charge of their society. That distrust is quickly morphing into a distrust of and contempt for the system itself.

Smart people look at the economic model of America and wonder how it can keep going on as it is. The fact that it does go on suggests it can keep going on, but it seems to be violating the rules of the universe. The same can be said for the collapse of social trust and the growing contempt for the system. How long can the people in charge expect to remain in charge when the people over whom they rule are increasingly convinced the rulers and their system are evil and corrupt?

Perhaps that is the final trick of financialization. The first trick was to subvert the basic rules of exchange between people. All of those rules we learned from economics no longer make any sense. The final trick is to subvert the rules of logic themselves, making it so no one can believe or trust anything or anyone. The disinformation age is the final part of the modern prison. Everyone is alone, no one can trust anything, even the laws of the universe. You just have to do what you are told.


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My Comment
Member
3 years ago

We have to remember that only our side distrust the mainstream news and the appointed experts. I don’t know of a single Democrat who mistrusts the NYT for example. They all feel that they are smart in believing the experts. They are firmly convinced that the science is settled on global warming and only science deniers doubt that. They automatically believe every new narrative spewed by the NYT and others. Those of us who doubt are bad people in their eyes. If we are allowed to express our doubts people will die. Besides, in the greater picture we no longer… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

I propose a slight expansion of your topic today: Money (or prices) as a form of information and communciation. Money itself is traditionally a store of value, a medium of exchange, and a unit of account. It’s a form of information, in the sense that (if money were truly reliable) it is an appraisal of the value of a good or service, or of a quantity of money itself. Our current money fails miserably on the first count over long periods of time, primarily due to it being “fiat” (unbacked government money.) You can fill in the details if you… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
3 years ago

Excellent and profound.

“You will believe our information, serfs,” the liars cry out. It cannot hold and cannot go on.

dad29
3 years ago

The final trick is to subvert the rules of logic themselves, making it so no one can believe or trust anything or anyone.

One step removed from Babel, where no one could understand the speech of others.

acetone
Member
3 years ago

Great article. Could be easily expanded into a series. 1. The problem with data. Its is being lost because it is increasingly politicized (e.g., hate facts, census data, pictures/names of criminals) and commercialized for profit. 2. The problem with the processing of raw data into information. Biased analysis (e.g., “ends justifies the means” — see all information produced by DC think tanks, see all the information presented as news) and bad analysis (e.g., mediocre people that are increasingly bad at assessing data). 3. Problem with dissemination of information. Centralization of media and decay of the business models of traditional media.… Read more »

American Citizen 2.0
American Citizen 2.0
3 years ago

We need a way out. We need some leadership that can help us find a way out. This thing that Fox News and everyone on the far right is doing over the last couple of years where they just keep pointing out how awful life is but never make any really bold leadership moves is starting feel extremely very much like a grift. Everyone is great at pointing out how awful the situation is every day. Tune in tomorrow for news about how awful the situation still is. The day after that… still horrible. It’s getting old. I think I… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  American Citizen 2.0
3 years ago

Fox news is learned helplessness

OMG CAN YOU BELIEVE THE DEMS DID X

acetone
Member
3 years ago

Zman, here is an interesting news story from your neck of the woods. Story is about a kid that passed only 3 classes in his 4 years at a Baltimore area high school, yet finished in the middle of his class. Fingers are getting pointed at the school district for this kids problems. Do you have any thoughts about the situation?

https://foxbaltimore.com/news/project-baltimore/city-student-passes-3-classes-in-four-years-ranks-near-top-half-of-class-with-013-gpa

KGB
KGB
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

“France has pulled her son out of Augusta Fells. He’s now enrolled in an accelerated school program at Francis M. Wood in west Baltimore. If her son works hard, he could graduate by 2023.”

He’s been late or absent 272 times in the past couple years. What are the odds he “works hard” and graduates? Z-Man, you need to get out of that place ASAP.

dlr
dlr
3 years ago

Do you know that your Contact and Donate buttons don’t work? The ones up at the top of the page. The reason I went looking for your contact info was to tell you that your SubscribeStar notifications system is screwed up too. I signed up for a monthly membership, and asked to get emailed notifications, but they only email notifications of your occasional premium posts- they don’t send out notifications of your free ones, which is really messed up. I emailed them and told them about the problem and they just blew me off. Maybe you will have better luck.… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  dlr
3 years ago

Agree.

And the fucked-up comment system here tells me that if I try to post a one word comment here saying that I agree it rejects the comment as being too short. Thereby forcng me to waste time complaining about the fucked-up comment system.

Z-Man is rapidly falling behind even the US in terms of infrastructure.
$7 Trillion should do it. (for his blog at least)

Nighthawker
Nighthawker
3 years ago

What’s the best way to login in here now, Disqus doesn’t work anymore.

Lucius Sulla
Lucius Sulla
3 years ago

Perhaps we are actually in the midst of the next great wars? In the Stone Age, wars were fought with stone weapons and tools. In the Bronze Age, wars were fought with bronze weapons and tools. In the Iron Age, wars were fought with iron weapons and tools. In the Industrial Age, wars were fought with industrial weapons and tools – machine guns, tanks, airplanes, eventually nuclear bombs (with unbelievable, unprecedented carnage). If we are now in the Information Age, perhaps this is how war will be fought, or is being fought, using information, mis-information, and dis-information to defeat enemies,… Read more »

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Lucius Sulla
3 years ago

When people have their basic needs met, they acquire lots of leisure time and avocations which substitute for the ancestral work ethic that was needed to stay alive in bygone times. It is during this leisure time that information becomes highly influential as a vector to the subconscious mind and may alter habitual behaviors and biases. As such, the control & misuse of information flow for mass indoctrination is both a viable & powerful weapon. The tech tyrants know this and they have used their wealth to surreptitiously purchase their way into controlling alliance with DC, and therefore have no… Read more »

Paul Bonneau
Paul Bonneau
3 years ago

Oh, the other funny thing about trust, is that you can have too much of it. I have been watching Korean and Chinese shows a lot recently. You will see people say things like, “If you can catch a falling leaf, you will spend the rest of your life with the person you are accompanying.” This does not result in guffaws, as it would in America. Or “if you eat ground up rhinoceros horn, you are sure to get pregnant quickly.” Half of traditional oriental medicine looks like a big joke. A constant theme of these shows is people being… Read more »

Paul Bonneau
Paul Bonneau
3 years ago

“For medieval man, there was never a lot of data about the world, but he could trust the information about it.” I find this highly doubtful. More like, the peons had to take what the lord said as true, because questioning it had severe consequences. Inability to question is not the same as trust. This notion of social trust has an element of insanity in it. As in, you are insane to trust anyone who is not within a very small circle of associates whose behavior you have observed for years. I think when people talk about social trust, they… Read more »

Tom
Tom
3 years ago

I’d strongly recommend Thomas Sowell’s “Knowledge and Decisions”. It provides much more useful language for describing these concerns which overlaps with you slightly Z: “Various kinds of ideas can be categorized by their relationship to the authentication process. There are ideas that have been systematically prepared for authentication (theories), ideas not derived by any systematic process (visions), ideas which couldn’t survive any authentication process (illusions), ideas which exempt themselves from the authentication process (myths), ideas which have already passed the authentication process (facts) as well as ideas known to have failed – or certain to fail – such a process… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Tom
3 years ago

I have nothing but respect and affection for Thomas Sowell but I also regret him. His very existence persuades so many conservatives, incorrectly in my opinion, that this multi-racial thing can work. Boy, is life complex.

I guess I would suggest thinking about the meaning of “outlier” and “regression to the mean.”

No disrespect to Tom. Great comment.

3g4me
3g4me
3 years ago

I realize there are a zillion ‘preparedness’ or ‘self defense’ or ‘survival’ websites, but lately I’ve been enjoying this one – easy to navigate and with succinct reviews, so just thought I’d share it (I started on this part with water storage so that’s what I’m linking rather than the home page): https://theprepared.com/homestead/reviews/large-water-barrels-tanks/

Drake
Drake
3 years ago

While we have more data than ever before, we do a far worse job than ever in educating people on how to handle data. Math is now dumbed down to nothing in high schools and statistics is only taught to math, science, and business majors in college. The media hype was able to scare people into a panic because they have no desire or ability to analyze data, translate it into information, and judge the relative risk of the virus.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

It’s not only the dummies. I’ve had debates about Covid with a person who claimed to be an MD and bemoaned all the Covid deaths he’d seen. My reply was my standard critique: He was a victim of selection and other biases. Look at broader statistics (like an entire population) and that 1% fataility rate drops to (in my example) 0.16% or even lower for a broader population. Nobody expects an MD to have advanced mathematical knowledge, but surely they would be expected to know about incidence of disease in the general population vs. what you’d see in a speciality?… Read more »

Hamsumnutter
Hamsumnutter
3 years ago

A lot of what we’re dealing with here are the people that came the the states after 1965 from low trust high suspicious communities. Often I’m in Korean or Chinese buildings working. When the building manager changes the access codes to the front door or garage, and I ask them for the new codes, they’ll never say it out loud. They might whisper it ( pre COVID), in me ear. They almost always find a paper scrap and write it on that, look around ,and then hand it to me like it was a top secret document. I forgot to… Read more »

Peabody
Peabody
3 years ago

One possible benefit of having a potato as president will be the potential for him blurting out some actual truth if he ever accidentally escapes his leash. Back in 2017 he was speaking on some panel about immigration and stated that Whites were already an absolute minority in the US. We’re being told Whites are currently around 63% of the population, which is bad enough, but already under 50% 5 years ago is a catastrophe. I would say the 2020 census will be an eye opener but who can trust that it won’t be filled with misinformation so as to… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

Does it matter…when we pretty much agree that half of the Whites—whatever their number—are race traitors? Sorry for the downer, but it seems salvation in the near term is not in having babies, but consolidating the split White race.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

My hope is that many of our white enemies are mostly conformists who take what the media says as gospel. Once we have the media, many of them will be on our side. Once the conflict becomes explicit, those that can’t be saved will be obvious. That is my hope, but I’m prepared for the worst.

Ed Dutton did a book that demonstrated that whites have the lowest ethnocentrism.

B125
B125
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

I think the canadian stats are false. Ontario was supposedly 69% white in 2016 but walking around the toronto area says otherwise. Even if ontario does reach 69% white counting up all the remote noks and crannies, the money, power, and future is in the ever growing toronto area. There are some white areas in the core but the expanses of alien suburbs are vast. These are spreading to smaller, whiter cities like cancer too. What’s worse is that white people cannot seem to form any resistance to it, white areas/suburbs are just sitting waiting to be paved over for… Read more »

TomA
TomA
3 years ago

The Road Back (cont) The revolt of the LEOs. Most LEO recruits start out as honest men willing to do a difficult job that no one else wants; and once upon a time, that job actually involved stopping the bad guys. Then we started electing shit for mayors and the whole thing went to Hell in a hurry. Now, most PDs consist of about 1/3 small minority men & hefty women, 1/3 geezers waiting on retirement, and 1/3 hard men who shoulder the load for everyone else but only kick it into gear when absolutely necessary. They know it’s a… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

Anecdotal reports on ZeroHedge suggest police in places like Rapid City, SD are standing down and allowing Antifa and BLM to do their thing.

It’s going to be a long road.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

Unfortunately for the other side, as long as there is still a functional Federal government, any Whites who “get involved” will be hunted and punished to the maximum extent of the law, including violating the “civil rights” of a “protected class.” I’m sure you can find cases where someone was exonerated in a State trial but still faced Federal charges. If you’re a fatalist, at some point one may as well say “f**k it” or as the old English saying has it, “You may as well hang for sheep as for a lamb.” In other words, if you’re going to… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

You’re a bit naive. All the historical evidence (to my English Biased eye- Peel being the forerunner) indicates that the police were marginally better than those they policed, if at all.

Early American city police forces were filled with the otherwise unemployable Irish.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Bilejones
3 years ago

Yes. Certainly in England, when the formation of the police occurred in around 1829, they were known to be drunkards and quite incompetent. I think that it took around forty years for them to morph into a respected outfit.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

“The police at all times should maintain a relationship with the public that gives reality to the historic tradition that the police are the public and that the public are the police; the police are the only members of the public who are paid to give full-time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interest of community welfare.” – Sir Robert Peel / Founder, London Metropolitan Police, 1829

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

Heh. Good luck getting a citizen to step in for someone else these days. Most people, and it is hard not to blame them, have compleat faith in the police. I guess the law has taken so many powers of defence away from citizens as well, so there is that.

Peel’s quote is suggests a good relationship – the ideal relationship – between the police and the public. Mark you, those were tougher times I’d imagine.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Bilejones
3 years ago

The best cops are extremely tough sons of bitches who can stop most crime with sheer intimidation, but will knock heads with gusto when the situation demands it. It’s not pretty, but it works very efficiently and we could sorely use a return to those days. The 1920s immigrant Irish made great cops because they possessed these traits naturally due to their history of repression by the English. Hard times make for hard steel.

Falcone
Falcone
3 years ago

So much of the outrage of the week on the internet is getting so ridiculous only a matter of time before AI is being used to generate it

Drake
Drake
3 years ago

I have spent a lot of my career teasing information out of raw data. I’ve developed an eye for spotting lies with data. Where you start your chart, what data you include and exclude, scaling, etc… For instance the global warming crowd all like to start their charts around 1973. Setting it further back would just reveal any current warming trend as normal variation and nothing out of the ordinary.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

Drake. If I recall correctly, the French had the first ‘full time’ meteorological office from around 1850. The dirty, racist, colonial English followed suit from around 1860. All told, the data that we have to play with seems small potatoes compared to the grand predictions that are made almost weekly regarding this climate change business. For a long while I would hear a climate change champion (CCC) ululate about a ‘rise in Earth’s average temperature’. And this was the phrase duly repeated by CCC clones (CCCC). I had not and have not viewed the data in any detail, but the… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

Like I used to say, we have more data on Major League Baseball than we do on the climate And how can we trust a temp reading from 1920, say? Old thermometer, guy might squint to see if it’s 55 or 56 but goes with 56, maybe one day he forgets and back fills it, has no idea this data in 100 years will be used for something as important as a gauge of the life and death of the planet. Maybe one thermometer brand is less reliable than another but all they could find for that location. Were they… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Actually, it’s much worse than thermometer variances. Tree rings are used for periods before thermometers existed. The amount of data on global temperatures is so small, that no real scientist could reach any actionable conclusions. Yet we have 100 year predictions down to tenths of degrees.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  DLS
3 years ago

Tree rings?

LOLOLOL

I believe it

What. A. Sham.

And what makes it worse, is supposedly everyone has gotten so educated, yet no one does the normal due diligence and homework that we used to expect of some with even a basic education. The main thing for me is did these guys writing down temps take their jobs all that seriously? That’s a job like being the watchman at a secluded outpost. Did they sometimes goof off? I mean, it wasn’t like it was a matter of life and death…..

Oops. Now it is according to the crazies

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

It is all so tiresome – this crap, covid crap – the latest hysterias. The damned planet has been warming and cooling for its entire existence. There have been warm/dry periods, warm/wet periods, cold/dry periods and cold/wet periods. BFD. The idea that we have to DO something or we’re all going to die is just another example of laughably ludicrous BS. I swear, the hand wringing, panty twisting insanity from the left must at some point be dealt with in a severe fashion.

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

We’ve now been conditioned to a global pandemic and now there’s a real push against eating meat. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a real problem and is starting to gain more public attention not only in North America, but in Scandinavian countries and South Korea. How much would it take to convince the world we’re about to encounter a massive resurgence of Mad Cow disease on a global scale so Bill Gates can now force everyone to give up meat in order to protect themselves from yet another pandemic? It didn’t take much for the CDC and WHO to convince… Read more »

Moe Noname
Moe Noname
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

The US propaganda machine spent a lot of time in 2020 gravely warning of the danger to the meat supply chain (with the inevitable hoarding / shortages).

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

Good point. There are currently in effect, several responsible solutions to CWD. Those are sufficient and have been for decades. For example, in wild game harvesting, we are instruct *not* to take any central nervous system (brain, spinal cord) meat—nor to contaminate our tools with such. All CNS goes into the gut pile an is buried.

But I’m sure the MSM could scare folk silly who are ignorant or simple anti-hunter—which is a greater share of the population than pro-hunters.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

As I’ve said, I don’t think it’s a coincidence at all that the anti-red meat crusade in the west coincides with a massive surge in demand for red meat from a burgeoning Chinese middle class

Same goes for the vegan propaganda and promotion and how it interestingly coincided with the rise of the Chinese middle class.

Hmm, How convenient, noted the church lady

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
3 years ago

To paraphrase Braveheart, you can take my freedom, but you will never take my bacon!

3g4me
3g4me
3 years ago

After not watching tv for years, working out again at a small gym with hard to avoid tvs has been quite trying (I have to consciously and repeatedly force myself to look down, not straight ahead or slightly up when doing hated cardio). I don’t listen, of course, but just glimpses of the scrolling headlines is enough to make me want to laugh, cry, or rage. It’s utter derangement, and yet everyone else (not merely at the gym, but throughout society) routinely watches this for hours a day and incorporates this flood of lying into their lives. I’ve said before… Read more »

Drake
Drake
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

I have the same experience in the cardio room at my gym in New Jersey – people repeating wild lies on TV screens. I have a number of friends at the gym and they are all aware of the lies now. Five years ago they were conservative and accepted that the media was biased. Now they are red-pilled and accept that the media is their absolute enemy.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Your posts are always good ones that I enjoy reading. And I find this one to be a succinct critique and a good old hearty endorsement of living life the correct way. I too feel absolutely alienated by many people regarding the virus overreaction. But on the plus side, I have already began family formation, I’ll home school and we’ll be out of the city in a year. The realization of how many unthinking simpletons there are surrounding me has made me keenly focused on my family and immediate community. I no longer care to lose ‘friends’ – this people… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

The virus over-reaction is a sad reminder that humanity, like pretty much everything else, declines in quality the more you get of it

Simply an over-supply of people. And with it you get lan over-supply of lousy product and lemons

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Thank you for the compliment. I, too, enjoy reading your comments. Best of luck to you and your wife re “wiping arses.” I don’t know that I could handle that for the elderly (babies/children of course), although my friend has done so for her parents. I suppose it depends on the parents – glad yours are ones you want to keep around!

dls
dls
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

“I’ve even told the parents, you’re not going into a retirement home. Both the wife and I have said we don’t mind wiping arses. It is the family that is key.” Good for you! I am taking care of my elderly father with dementia, and it is damn hard. But if we had put him in a nursing home when it got hard, he would have been dead a year ago. I tell my grateful Mom that they took care of me for 18 years, so they still have a large credit balance left. But if I had not been… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

My parents are dead. I have told my wife I’d be happy to have her 89 year old mother live with us when her 95 year old boyfriend dies.
She had 8 kids and at least three are in the bidding.
She’s bone something right.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Yes. The notion of “goodwill” is a trap, a siren song. We have been coasting (submitting) by nature of our good natures for far too long. Its part of how our desire to be “polite” and “tolerant” allowed political correctness and progress to gut and skinsuit our very language; the meaning of words now arbitrary to some story being told by a neurotic or psychotic that we must indulge lest we be racist or sexist or just ist. We often get lost in the debates over the various levers of power. But what we suffer is a thousand cuts from… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Screwtape
3 years ago

Weak people are dangerous. A lifeguard learns early on that a drowning man will try his best to extinguish his rescuer for two more minutes of air before the inevitable. I’m reminded of a line from the book Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis, father of Martin. One man tries to warn another man away from a high-maintenance female by telling him something along the lines of “Never throw a girl like that a lifeline. She’ll just pull you in.” Lifeguards are taught to approach a panicked swimmer from behind and grasp them tightly before they can grasp you. That and… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

Very well stated. I was going to use the O2 mask example too. In my teens I took a life saving course, but didn’t keep with it. I do recall the lesson about beware the drowning man. They panic. They will take the unawares with them. Nietzsche has much to say about civilization, the domestication of man, until he is a sheep. Mostly unfavorable Pity, mercy, providing (too much?) support to the weak, all go contrary to what Nature intends. These may have a place in civilization, but carried too far they weaken everyone.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Screwtape
3 years ago

A lifeguard learns early on that a drowning man will try his best to extinguish his rescuer for two more minutes of air before the inevitable. I’m reminded of a quote from the novel Lucky Jim, by Kingsley Amis. One man is trying to warn another man about getting involved with a high maintenance female and tells him something along the lines of, “Never throw a girl like that a lifeline. She’ll just pull you in.” Lifeguards are taught to approach a panicked swimmer from behind and grasp them tightly before the tables can turn. That rule and “put the… Read more »

Ripple
Ripple
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

Or to put it another way, never stick your d#ck in crazy.

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
3 years ago

“Put another way, the new phase of the misinformation/disinformation tsunami is the managerial state **crying out in pain as it strikes the society over which it rules**.” I see what ya did there… comical. Amazing how much of the pathos and neuroticism of the tiny hats have spilled into the top ranks of the rulers, or perhaps not that amazing when you consider the gross overrepresentation they have in those same said ranks. Combine that with the absurd feminization and hysterical overreaction to everything and you are hitting levels of Clown World never thought possible. As an adjunct to the… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  Apex Predator
3 years ago

We are being set up for a hell far worse than what Solzehnitsyn described. The Gulag labour was tough and many died, but the camps were pretty ethnically homogenous. Majority russian, mixed with some ukrainians/baltics etc. They were almost all Christian and formed a brotherhood despite the harshest conditions. The low paid guards, also fellow Russians, though gruff, did not necessarily have any personal animosity towards the prisoners – a “just doing my job” attitude was prevalent from both the prisoners and the guards. The gulags of the west in the future will be more like how the Turner Diaries… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Apex Predator
3 years ago

Thanks for the link. I shall start referring to the ‘vaccine’ as the ‘experimental vaccine’ right away. That’s a little propaganda win right there.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

My MD took exception to “experimental” during my visit yesterday (recouhted above.) Rather than debate the issue with him, I just said I was reluctant to try the jabs and we left it at that.
Since I can be argumentative here, we can debate whether the COVID jabs are “experimental” but, to the best of my knowledge, without exception, all of them have been approved on “emergency use” or “waiver” or similar. That’s close enough to “experimental” for me to NOT want to try them.

Herbert Marcuse
Herbert Marcuse
Reply to  Apex Predator
3 years ago

Jay, if you see this, cum on over to PA’s World and comment on ostensible Alpha Chad State Police Officer vacationing in Las Vegas.

We need ur insight.

PS: Have you seen (((trav777))) lately?

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
3 years ago

Just watched a tv commercial for the US Army showing a competent Latisha loading a rocket launcher.
Boy when all this non reality gets tested it’s going to get really interesting
Once the Latishas go up against competent Chinese or Russians or our Federal Reserve has one quantitative easing too many…..
Reality will return with a vengeance to this world of ours
We need to seek to live as sane men in a insane world until such day arrives.
And it will.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
3 years ago

“And that after this is accomplished, and the brave new world begins
When all men are paid for existing and no man must pay for his sins,
As surely as Water will wet us, as surely as Fire will burn,
The Gods of the Copybook Headings with terror and slaughter return!”

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  LineInTheSand
3 years ago

I also like the preceeding stanza:
As it will be in the future, it was at the birth of Man —
There are only four things certain since Social Progress began: — That the Dog returns to his Vomit and the Sow returns to her Mire, And the burnt Fool’s bandaged finger goes wabbling back to the Fire;

Pratt
Pratt
Reply to  Stranger in a Strange Land
3 years ago

Call me dense, but aren’t that just three things?

Nick
Nick
Reply to  Pratt
3 years ago

The fourth thing is the Gods of the copybook headings returning.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Stranger in a Strange Land
3 years ago

Ah yes, recalls the bible quote (Proverbs?) “As a dog returneth to his vomit, a fool returneth to his folly.”

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
3 years ago

Watching the newly Woke US military go up against the Red Army or PLA in a serious conflict is going to be hilarious for all the wrong reasons.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
3 years ago

You sir are correct, with the exception of one item and that is unless we are with them on the front lines and witness their screw ups ourselves, no one will ever be the wiser. Do you honestly believe that after all of the effort they have invested in their god of diversity that they could publicly admit they were completely wrong? Absolutely not. Instead we will get treated to stories of how it was actually the gynocracy that valiantly fought against impossible odds, only to be undone by racist white males – products of the patriarchy all – who… Read more »

MS D
MS D
Reply to  Steve
3 years ago

“ These people would rather lose a super carrier than admit they were wrong about something.”

I’m been in the navy 23+ years … you are absolutely correct.

Leonard E Herr
Member
3 years ago

I read somewhere that if suddenly people could read each others minds the human race would come to an end lickity split because we’d promptly start killing each other. Sometimes knowing the truth is not a good thing (“you can’t handle the truth!”). Perhaps that’s the answer to the Fermi paradox: the reason there seems to be no advanced life in the universe is because once an intelligent species truly knows what’s’ really going on they quickly commit suicide.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

That’s what happened to the Krell on Altair IV.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  David Wright
3 years ago

Another blast from the past. I love these references. Yes, Forbidden Planet is a classic. And I think I got my first movie-induced erection from Anne Francis.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

Childhood crush also.

B125
B125
Reply to  Leonard E Herr
3 years ago

The most intelligent human races are doing just fine killing themselves off. south korea has reached extinction level fertility rates of 0.84 children per woman. Singapore (except for muslims), taiwan, Hong Kong are not much better, and china seems to be dropping drastically too. Here in the west the supposedly more intelligent and higher iq white liberals are also contracepting themselves to death while the lower human capital whites have no problem reproducing. Meanwhile in Niger with a whopping average iq of 65, an average woman produces 7 children per lifetime. Nihilism and existential considerations are a high iq pastime,… Read more »

Moe Noname
Moe Noname
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

“Idiocracy” is better as a documentary, not a work of fiction.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Moe Noname
3 years ago

Always struck me how brown the future is in spite of Clevon’s fertility. Based Mike Judge? I’m amazed the film got made.

sentry
sentry
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

“The most intelligent human races are doing just fine killing themselves off…
Meanwhile in Niger with a whopping average iq of 65, an average woman produces 7 children per lifetime.”

even if the brown plague spreads all over europe, the worthy caucasian survivors will return to their place of origin(Siberia), where the shamanic warrior roots of our people will be reignited along with our birth rates.

Based on my recollections of Conan stories, Robert e Howard portrayed cimmerians as survivors of Atlantis, there’s truth to that concept and the current ordeal of our civilization.

Hoagie
Hoagie
3 years ago

In America today there is no Truth. The government lies, the educational establishment lies, the media and social media lies, Hollywood and Madison Ave. lie, Wall Street and Silicon Valley lie and every politician alive lies.

We used to have the choice of the lesser of two evils. Now we have the choice of the more believable lie, but a lie nonetheless. Information, misinformation, disinformation and data are just the subjects of those lies, and we are the designated victims.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Hoagie
3 years ago

One is never quite cynical enough these days.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
3 years ago

From The Verge article:

“ Donovan said she hoped the trailer was a hoax, and that the actual film will show people speaking about how believing in QAnon ruined their relationships with their families and friends, but she wasn’t optimistic. “Somehow I doubt that will be the case,” she said.”

Hmpffffff. I’d say that homosexuality, feminism, Marxism, and shitlib politics ruined my family… but I am old, white and male so whadda I know…

Eloi
Eloi
3 years ago

A few thoughts came to mind here: First, Thomas Hardy (one of my favorites) “Well: what we gain by science is, after all, sadness, as the Preacher saith. The more we know of the laws and nature of the Universe the more ghastly a business we perceive it all to be—and the non-necessity of it.” Two, Hume’s fork for those interested in his ‘bachelors are unmarried’ reference. Three, the subversion of logic, which, against Mr. Hume, I do believe is naturally derived through induction (thus becoming a valid deductive premise) and is reliable for approximating the world, is only possible… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Eloi
3 years ago

“the subversion of logic, which, against Mr. Hume, I do believe is naturally derived through induction (thus becoming a valid deductive premise) and is reliable for approximating the world, is only possible in this age where reality is the trap most are trying to escape. ” Yes. It used to be that it was important to at least try and make a go of life. Gain more experiences, actually relish a challenge… make the best of yourself. But now it seems to be a virtue to lock yourself in a room playing video games, scared of the China Virus and… Read more »

Eloi
Eloi
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

I cannot agree more. My work allows me to see firsthand how little self-esteem most have. They are self-centered, certainly, but the moment a challenge occurs, all interest is lost. If it isn’t stimulating in a bombastic, Michael Bay movie way, it is dumb and boring. Thus, any real challenge is to be avoided at any cost.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Eloi
3 years ago

Do you work around people within a certain age range? Is the self-esteem thing a younger issue, do you think? Or it is general?

Eloi
Eloi
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Young adults/ late teens, but also then a wide variety of others, just not in such concentration. And I can only speak on what I see, but it is certainly worse with younger folks. However, most adults are now addicts as well. The cellphone and media addiction is poisonous, and much like any addiction, it will destroy your will regardless of age, but the earlier you start, the more pernicious. Kids now basically come out the womb with a dopamine feedback loop device in their face. Just like cocaine addiction, flooding your brain with dopamine long terms results in a… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
3 years ago

“One cannot be an expert at doing something unless you are actually doing that thing.” Even then, the answer is ‘it depends’. My wife and I have seen this very regularly with doctors. The layperson views the doctor as a medical expert. When they visit the doctor, they take what they say seriously. But a problem arises if the patient has a condition unknown to the doctor. The doctor may say ‘get some rest’ or ‘take paracetamol’ but in truth xzhir doesn’t know. However, the layperson still believes this to be the advice of an expert. Because they have the… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Whatever “JEB” writes wrt COVID-19 is thoroughly debunked by his track record of being wrong (by following the “experts” unquesionably) and should be logically discounted (as you’ve pointed out).

JEB is a good example of a well meaning person that completely lacks critical thinking skills. He continues to follow the experts, when the experts contradict—and therefore impugn—themselves time and again. Yet, because the “experts” are credentialed, JEB continues to insist they have more insight and knowledge than we, and therefore must be followed unquestionably.

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

Glad I took the time to go and find this discussion I missed from yesterday. “Jeb!” is a more accurate description it seems.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

In the US there’s two vectors of flawed accounting for CoVid deaths. The first is that a person presenting with symptoms consistent with Covid at a hospital emergency room and subsequently die are presumed to be deaths from CoVid and recorded as such. Which seams reasonable except for the fact that pneumonia is the primary condition presumed to be COVID and that has been a proximate cause of death for very old people basically forever. The second is automated systems that compare names on death certificates with names reported as positive COVID tests – which is how deaths from traffic… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
3 years ago

There is a way to disentangle Covid deaths from non-Covid—one looks at the death rates from all causes in prior years. This is crude for fine detail, but the differences are large. For example, this year we are asked to believe that typical deaths by the common flu virus has been essentially *zero* whereas in prior (non-Covid) years, typically account for 30-50 thousand persons—in good years. What we have now is not just misdiagnosis, but a conflation of dying *from* COVID-19 to dying *with* COVID-19. This is somewhat analogous to a phenomenon found with prostate cancer in men, where something… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

This is the right idea. You can find aggregate death figures in many places along with handy graphs such as this one https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid19/excess_deaths.htm. In this graph you can see that 2020 was indeed unusual with several major spikes in deaths while a normal year has only one (in winter). What would be VERY interesting (it’s on my ever growing TODO list) is to attempt to break down deaths by each specific cause and track the numbers of those. We already know that the flu magically and implausibly vanished so some of the winter spike was undoubtedly flu. How much of… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
3 years ago

I’ve been content to say covid is real but the plague is fake, while never completely dismissing the possibility that covid itself is fake. Real covid, fake plague has been and still is my position BUT the more a body digs into the numbers, talks to healthcare workers, takes stock of all the breathless and fake reporting, watches ‘experts’ flail and flipflop under political pressure… I wouldn’t be shocked if it turns out the whole thing was made up.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  Paintersforms
3 years ago

My assessment: 1/3-1/3-1/3 ratio of actual disease, politics, and economics (with the economic grift trending higher by the day)

3 Pipe Problem
3 Pipe Problem
Reply to  Stranger in a Strange Land
3 years ago

As always, asking, “cui bono?” or, in the vernacular, follow the money and everything seems to sort itself out.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Paintersforms
3 years ago

Back in July (13th IIRC) the CDC admitted it did not have the isolated virus and the RT-PCR test was designed to find anti-bodies presumed to have been produced by it.
I do not know of anybody who says they have the isolated virus.
The media is full of people claiming that they know somebody who has it.

Fairly basic logic tells you there’s a problem with this.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
3 years ago

Well said.
How can one take “Covid death numbers” seriously when;
You fall off a ladder, break your neck,
Get shot in The head,
Drown,
Get killed in a car accident,

But if all the individuals test “positive” for the virus, they are Covid deaths.

There was a black female health official in Illinois who did a press conference at the outset of the madness, who related quite clearly, that even if a person died of something other than Covid, but they were positive, they would be counted as a Covid death. She made no bones about it.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

That’s the million dollar question, isn’t it? The figure that seems least open to manipulation is All Causes Mortality, and even William Briggs accepts that 2020 was a few hundred thousand over the previous year. But once you get beyond that, I have no trust in anything. I’ve read enough obituaries of octogenarians that discussed how they died of the Wuflu, “after a lengthy illness”. In other words, they were old and had a long-standing medical issue, possibly cancer to have plenty of skepticism over what’s caused all these deaths. The dry tinder theory is possible, and we’ve surely killed… Read more »

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Orange; Re COVID over-reporting: In the US providers get paid more for COVID cases* than for regular treatment of similar nature. That’s all you really need to know. Early on, in the US at least, this was justified because it costs more to properly treat an actual COVID case, what with the required isolation, negative pressure wings, non-recirculating, high-filtration HVAC, etc. But we all know how it is with Govt. programs: They never die, only metastasize. One of the few good filters of information is that, if you want to know how an organization will perform, find out its incentive… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Al from da Nort
3 years ago

Al, and all respondents to my query. Many thanks for the informative answers. I hadn’t even considered the incentive angle – foolish, as it is usually the first place one looks.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Al from da Nort
3 years ago

You’ve nailed it – Covid has now become too big to cure because it has been racketized into being a major part of the US and Western economies.

Flu Industrial Complex, indeed.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

Flu Industrial Complex – I intend to make use of that. Thank you.
(FluInCo for short???)

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Al from da Nort
3 years ago

One of the early clues that this one was going to run and run was when the WHO declared that Covid deaths could be expanded to include section 1 and 2 mentions of a covid infection being ASSUMED.
The WHO has pretty much standardized death certificates (Something I did not know) and section 1 is where the proximate cause of death is recorded. Section 2 is other conditions- Ingrown toenails, Priapism etc.

Heart attack deaths pretty much vanished in London thereafter.

The list goes on.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Today I had a routine follow-up with my pulmonist. In the waiting room, I was bemused when the receptionist gave me a “normal” disposable face mask. Apparently my default (a bandanna) was not good enough. I didn’t debate it (and free stuff!). I’m not a vehement anti-masker, and I’d hope even you hard-asses would concede perhaps they are medically indicated in a health setting that deals with people with chronic lung diseases? Well, anyway, the visit with the Doc went ok. At one point he asked me if I intended to get the Covid shot. I gave some awkward response… Read more »

Raymond R
Member
3 years ago

An example of the lack of social trust is the issue of gun control. The advocates of laws restricting gun ownership don’t trust ordinary people (who they see as slack jawed yahoos) with guns. As a result, they push for laws to ban this or that piece machined steel; can’t trust those people with those things. Of course, the denizens of the administrative state use this to increase their power. On the other hand, many people who want to buy guns also don’t trust their neighbours, many of whom have demonstrable criminal tendencies. It doesn’t help that the criminal class… Read more »

Kentucky Headhunter
Reply to  Raymond R
3 years ago

I think you have it backwards.

TPTB don’t want citizens to have have guns that they could then use to resist TPTB, so they promote/push narratives to frighten the Karens and other sheeple who then agitate for TPTB to control guns.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Kentucky Headhunter
3 years ago

I don’t think they give 2 craps about the 2nd amendment people or the 3%ers or any of those people. They don’t want blacks and browns to have the guns, but they can’t say that. That would be racist. Groups of white guys aren’t doing drive-by shootings in densely populated cities and killing children in the process. That is why the blacker an area is, the more they support making guns illegal.

Pete
Pete
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

Wrong. The blacks and browns are the Left’s government-sponsored intimidation squads. Of course the government wants their foot soldiers to have guns. Didn’t you notice how all last year the coloreds were allowed to run riot through our cities while police stood and watched? The police only swung into action if a white man tried to defend his home or business with a gun. And if some blacks kill each other as a side effect, so what? The rich puppetmasters in their gated communities don’t have to see it, so they don’t care. It’s a small price to pay for… Read more »

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Pete
3 years ago

Governments arm young men when it is in their advantage to do so. That does not mean they want 20 year old men running around their society with guns at all times. You will remember those mobs were largely not using guns.

Guns have broad support even with TPTB out in rural White America.

Roberto
Roberto
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

They want to outlaw semi auto rifles. Thats not the usual weapon for the blacks and browns.

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

They could give two shits about gun control with blacks and browns beyond the local department occasionally jerking it publicly for finding a ghost gun on some gang banger.

Its about whites who actually know how to use rifles.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

Wrong. If you were correct the endless bullshit from the gun-grabbers would be directed at hand-guns not long guns. White people are ones most capable of overthrowing the current political filth and they know it.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Bilejones
3 years ago

Truth. If you look at gun homicides, long guns are a small fraction of it. Also, statistically, about 2/3 of gun deaths are suicide. Of the remaining ones that are homicides, about 80% of them are young black and brown boys/men shooting each other 🙁 Actually, that’s a good way to shut down a gun-grabber. Just say they’ll reduce their chances of dying from a gun by 2/3 just by not owning one! Only add the 2nd statistics if you specifically wish to pour salt onto the wound 😀

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Raymond R
3 years ago

Social trust is broken. So what then? The problem isnt that “they” dont trust jus to be good slaves but its that “we” dont trust them at all but still continue to pretend as if “they” and “we” are parts of the same thing that needs to be preserved. The chickens inside the wire are content with being free range as long as they are getting fat. A nation that doesnt trust its citizens with guns but will send its daughters with guns into distant wars has no standing. A nation that abuses and neglects its children so its aged… Read more »

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Screwtape
3 years ago

You make a powerful case that the problem really is that big and remaining on the sidelines is just suicide in slow motion. Now go a step farther. The mercenaries protecting the Citadel of Tyranny are numerous, formidable, and have vast resources at their disposal. That is no trivial thing. To beat that, you need a winning strategy; one that maximizes your strengths and takes advantage of their weaknesses. It’s a modern high-tech world and that means a new paradigm is necessary.

JustaProle
JustaProle
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

I would say Lineman, who posts here pretty regularly, is part of a good working model on how to deal with this. And of those who post here, he is one I’d like to meet IRL to pick his brain on how he found like minded folks.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Screwtape
3 years ago

I support the future rights of Blacks to own firearms in their own country 🙂

usNthem
usNthem
3 years ago

I’m in the financial services bus and I well remember the one day crash of 1987. Even though it was historic, most people didn’t even learn about it until they got home from work and saw it on the news. When the internet started expanding, I figured more people with access to the same info in real time would make for calmer, more calculated decision making – WRONG. All it did was create more chaos and foster panic. Of course you don’t want the string pullers in the background having sole access to relevant info, so it’s kind of a… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  usNthem
3 years ago

Yeah, well, that’s just, like, your opinion, man 🙂

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Paintersforms
3 years ago

new shit has come to light

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

The dog ate some light sticks yesterday 😀

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
3 years ago

Mencken’s classic 1917 Bathtub Hoax was a sendup of the government and press’ war propaganda of the day: https://www.independent.org/news/article.asp?id=333

Joey Jünger
Joey Jünger
3 years ago

During the vetting process for being interviewed on cable news as an expert, you are automatically disqualified if you say either of the following statements or some variation thereof: “I don’t know” or “I don’t care.” The problem of course is that “I don’t know” and “I don’t care” are very good answers to many questions. It’s no accident that the best book about the neocons is called “They Knew they were Right.” The bastards destroyed large swaths of the West and the Middle East because they couldn’t admit they didn’t know lots of things, up to and including that… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Joey Jünger
3 years ago

Far away problems serve two purposes that local problems do not: they are far away and are not readily amenable to solutions, but are never the less distractive to Joe Normie, so accountability for success is lessened. This has been going on for as long as I’ve been alive.

Member
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

It’s surprising that it took the ruling class as long as it did to realize that the absolute best kind of problems to focus on are those that are A) insoluble barring godlike powers, and B) so vast in scale that it’s impossible to correlate policy changes with results. This is the real meaning of “think globally, act locally” which in practice means “harp on global problems while making a big show of pretending to address real local ones”. Climate change is a case in point. Unlike many of you here I actually accept the basic concept of anthropogenic global… Read more »

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Joey Jünger
3 years ago

The first thing that everyone needs to keep in mind about cable news shows is that they are “shows” in the true sense of the word. Fictional productions loosely based on reality. Meant to entertain, not provide useful or important information.

All of the people on them are actors – in that context. Some scripted, others allowed to ad lib to a limited extent. But all are supposed to be advancing the narrative, story, of the show at all times.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
3 years ago

Yes to all of this. TV is a prime vector for introducing mental disease and the insidious rot that turns your natural cognitive abilities into reflex emotions originating in the amygdala. The wise have already killed their TVs, but the vast sheeple herd are addicted and will not refrain until they are dead or near death. That is the sad truth.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Joey Jünger
3 years ago

This is one of the problems with “globalism,” You end up ignoring real problems you were elected to address, like water distribution while virtue signalling about a coup in a country you know absolutely nothing about and could not find on a map unaided. I question how much lead is really in that water though. I saw some special about it and a woman doing the investigation said she had the children allegedly drinking the leaded water IQ tested and the overall average for the children was 85. Flint is mostly African American from what I know. 85 is the… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

Dovetails with the wanting to save and adopt the poor kid in Africa rather than the poor kid in the next neighborhood over

Judge Smails
Judge Smails
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

During the Obama Administration I saw a news story about a charity in Kansas City resettling an African refugee and her six kids in a modern 4 bedroom 2 bath house. I remember commenting to my wife that there are likely many American born children and their families living in their cars just blocks from that charity’s office but they looked to help a foreign family instead. I am sure that they were part of the lucrative refugee resetlement “industry”.

Hi - Ya!
Hi - Ya!
Reply to  Judge Smails
3 years ago

I’d like to know more about this resettlement racket. I’ve heard “bishops” of the Novus Ordo “USCCB” are making 40k for every fugee they reel in.

Since the topic is misinformation, I suppose I could be wrong…

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Judge Smails
3 years ago

Helping the poor schlub down the road does nothing to advance the demographic destruction of the US.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

Just a layman here. I know that lead is poisonous to humans. But counter-argument: why is there lead in the water? It could be from pollution. But it could also be from old lead pipes. Question: why wasn’t this lead in pipes a problem decades ago, before non-lead pipes came into use? If lead was/is such a problem, you’d expect generations of Americans to be brain damaged or other health problems. Lead poisoning is an ancient problem. At one point, the Romans used copper cookware, which imparted an unpleasant taste with some foods. Some genius learnt that if you lead… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

By the way, the Flint story may be a replay of the original ‘lead’ story. Great Society “Model Cities”- a real estate racket benefitting politically connected owners- quickly became the notorious Projects, crime ridden slums, because they were cattle corrals for Negroes. Propaganda was produced declaring that hungry black children were desperately snacking on lead paint chips, making them violent thugs. A further canard was that white people were originally at fault: Rome fell to violence and decay because of lead poisoning. This media junk science led to “the lead octopus”, as it’s known in the legal industry, and the… Read more »

WCiv...---...
WCiv...---...
Reply to  Joey Jünger
3 years ago

The level of distrust is way out of balance. If you are on the Left, you actually believe most of what you hear and you have more trust because your pre-existing beliefs get confirmed. Could all these nice, charming people be lying to me? If you are on the right you distrust almost everything you hear.

When I try to tell my daughter that most of her “news” is propaganda, she will charge Fox news and (formerly) Rush Limbaugh do the same thing, ignoring the fact that the Leftist propaganda is much more powerful and omnipresent.

3 Pipe problem
3 Pipe problem
Reply to  Joey Jünger
3 years ago

All things being equal, getting the lead out of the water in Flint Michigan is much easier than getting it out of black bodies.
Sorry, couldn’t resist. ; ))