Systemic Failure

Complexity in human systems often results in properties that have no obvious relationship to the people in the system. The example used when trying to explain complexity is the ant colony. A single ant is not a terribly complicated thing, but the ant colony is highly complex. Further, the actions of a single ant appear to be random, but all of those ants together look like a highly coordinated effort. You cannot learn much about an ant colony by studying a single ant.

Complexity in human systems often results in a disconnect between the user inputs and expected outputs. People who work with large software systems run into this when making changes to the system. If the system has been around for a while, it often has been modified many times by many hands. New changes often result in strange and unexpected downstream consequences. Every new change means the next change will be more costly in testing and error correction.

Ants and software can be interesting, but they are not the best example to use when thinking about the human system known as society. We don’t have the ability to completely stand outside of society, like we do with an ant colony, and objectively observe the emergent properties as a whole. We live in society. Unlike a software system, we don’t have a design spec or documentation. We have to infer the design from the actions we observe, which creates its own complexity.

We have some examples of this over the last year. The great election fraud was not the result of a master plan from grand strategists operating in a secret lair. Like the ant colony, it was the result of thousands of individual actions by people motivated by years of conditioning from the ruling class. For the bulk of the managerial class, down to the entry level clerks, opposing Trump became a religion. Stopping him through any means necessary became part of their collective mindset.

The weird cultural revolution being imposed on the military offers an example in the present to see how this works. The military is a vast, complex machine. Most of what it does is enable a relatively small number of people to wage war. It is a rule based, male dominated system. It is being turned into a chaotic, feminine system. As thousands of men flee that system, the system will change in ways no one can predict. Whatever it becomes, it will not be the world’s most powerful military.

Another example that is still playing out is the Covid panic. Over the last year the main thread of the story has been the political class trying to contend with the unintended consequences of their actions. The reason their story keeps changing is their inputs never have the desired outputs. They have to keep going back and rewriting the story of their actions to fit the present reality. It turns out that throwing wrenches into the gears of human society was not the smartest play on their part.

The big new stimulus bill to try and patch up what they have wrecked is another example of system complexity. The final cost of this relief bill is about $15,000 per household or $6,000 per person. Obviously, everyone is not getting a check for those amounts or anything close to it. Most of the money is going to the kleptocrats who run the uniparty system. People who made less than $75,000 will get a check for $1,400 per person in the household, with some exceptions.

The hope is the money will be spent as soon as it gets into the hands of the people, but that is not a guarantee. That’s not how the first round of checks played out. People used the money to pay down debts. Over the last year, a strange new behavior has emerged with the American people. They are paying down debts and saving money. Instead of rushing out to buy toys with those checks, they paid off bills. There has also been a wave of debt consolidation exploiting artificially low interest rates.

There is a good chance the new round of checks accelerates this trend away from consumerism toward saving. While the propaganda machines are telling the people to spend the free money, the people are hearing concern. The rulers would not be handing out cash if things were solid. They must be very worried about things they are not mentioning in public, so people are preparing for the worst. This is a good example of how complex human system are difficult to manipulate.

There’s also the fact that the rulers radically altered, without any obvious reasons, the habits and customs of society. All of a sudden, we have these new religions requiring people to wear codpieces on their faces and go through struggle sessions over zoom about their privilege. People working from home are not the same people who used to gather around the water cooler or have a drink together after work. This big complex system is suddenly very different. The old rules no longer apply.

This is what makes the revolution imposed from above so dangerous. The people who initiated these changes in American society are not working from a grand plan or a set of ideological goals. There is no point to what they are doing. Instead, our managerial revolutionaries are swept up in forces they do not understand. It is a strange, recursive and reactionary revolution from the top. The best they can muster for an explanation is, “we’ll know where we are going when we get there.”

Just as no one can know what will happen with the latest round of stimulus, no one can know what will happen as a result of the “great reset.” The millions flooding over the border suggests some form of collapse is in the future. Complex systems, however, tend not to collapse. They seize up in one area and the system responds to that failure, which triggers new unexpected failures elsewhere in the system. The result is an increasing level of chaos within the system.

What most likely lies ahead is spasms of disorder, followed by increasingly ham-fisted efforts to impose order. Those efforts to set things right will set off new spasms of disorder elsewhere in the system. The razor wire barricades in Washington are a good example of how this will work. The solution to the problem they created is going to set off a bunch of new problems. The main feature of this age will be men racing from one station to the next, trying to keep the plates spinning.


A new year brings new changes. The same is true for this site as we adjust to the reality of managerial authoritarianism. That means embracing crypto for when the inevitable happens and the traditional outlets are closed. Now more than ever it is important to support the voices that support you. Five bucks a month is not a lot to ask. If you prefer other ways of donating, look at the donate page. Thank you.


Promotions: We have a new addition to the list. Havamal Soap Works is the maker of natural, handmade soap and bath products. If you are looking to reduce the volume of man-made chemicals in your life, all-natural personal products are a good start. If you use this link you get 15% off of your purchase.

The good folks at Alaska Chaga are offering a ten percent discount to readers of this site. You just click on the this link and they take care of the rest. About a year ago they sent me some of their stuff. Up until that point, I had never heard of chaga, but I gave a try and it is very good. It is a tea, but it has a mild flavor. It’s autumn here in Lagos, so it is my daily beverage now.

Minter & Richter Designs makes high-quality, hand-made by one guy in Boston, titanium wedding rings for men and women and they are now offering readers a fifteen percent discount on purchases if you use this link.   If you are headed to Boston, they are also offering my readers 20% off their 5-star rated Airbnb.  Just email them directly to book at sales@minterandrichterdesigns.com.


251 Comments
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Michael Collins
Michael Collins
3 years ago

Just read your article about systemic failure. It really struck a cord. The ruling class is messing with extremely complex systems they don’t understand and with an arrogance that is unbelievable. I am a veteran. I served in different communities as both officer and enlisted. Different communities are varied and distinct, diverse, you might say. The infantry is nothing like the pilot community, subs are different than surface ships, etc. The cultural revolution taking place is purposely rooting out the distinct cultures of the different communities with a bland corporate HR culture. I can’t tell you how this plays out,… Read more »

Linda S Fox
3 years ago

And, what money is spent on new items is often going to prep supplies or guns and ammo.
We aren’t fooled – we KNOW what the Left has in mind for us, and most of us are determined not to go quietly.

L Garou
L Garou
3 years ago

The U.S. of Everything is Rigged, Illegal (or pending).

Tom
Tom
3 years ago

If there is anything we should have learned about the DC Swamp over the last 100 years or more, it’s that they don’t have a clue any more than anyone else. Physical systems are easier to make workable since they can be manipulated with direct applications of rules and objectives. The Swamp is made up of arrogant close-minded robots. Society on the other hand is a non-specific mass of density where control becomes hit or miss and the ONLY method that can be implemented by the control freaks (the systemizers) is FEAR. Think about how so many phases of government… Read more »

trackback
3 years ago

[…] Read the Whole Article […]

Ex-Pralite Monk
Ex-Pralite Monk
3 years ago

The following is from the book “Systemantics” kind of a Bible of systems lore. Systemantics Control is exercised by the element with the greatest variety of behavioral responses. Always act so as to increase your options. If something isn’t working, don’t keep doing it. Do something else instead. Do almost anything else. For maximum success, feel free to switch systems and even to switch goals. The student proficient in the Creative Tack asks such questions as: What can I do right now and succeed at it? For which problem do my current resources promise an elegant solution? Plan to scrap… Read more »

Joe Blow
Joe Blow
3 years ago

These are the problems that Bitcoin was designed to solve. Starve the beast.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

There is a famous landscape painting of Washington DC. I don’t know the date, but it’d have to be early 19th century. A few of the famous Federal buildings are visible in the distance, the Capitol and so on. But most of the landscape is farm country. Well into the 19th century, it was no unusual for the President to walk among picknickers on the grounds on the 4th of July, greeting them. Maybe you’ll call this “ancient history,” and to some degree it is. But it goes to show how much things can change. In my lifetime, I’ve witnessed… Read more »

WCiv...---...
WCiv...---...
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

That is the advantage old people have, Ben. Old people have lived through these times of decline, the shocking changes to the culture, the loss of social capital, the coarsening of our culture, manners, the explosion of media propaganda, gay marriage, FBI scandals, anti-whiteness, the deification of black people, election fairness, immigrant invasions, pornography, the Clintons, evolution of the surveillance state, censorship, loss of patriotism and pride in our country. Ask any old person.

Whiskey
Whiskey
3 years ago

Systemic failure is certainly present in New York State and City. Jacobin Magazine has an account of how Cuomo fell. He was the firewall for hard left lunatic stuff that the left had wanted for decades: rent control which real estate people opposed, defund the police, BLM legalizing black crime, massive minimum wage hikes, all the rest. Cuomo existed as that firewall, and the corporate and other interests had no alternatives. While the hard left organized and beat many of his allies while being unable to unseat him immediately. They then used their organizations to break the Cuomo media blockade… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Whiskey
3 years ago

I can only figure Cuomo made someone really important really, really mad.

The only people that important are Rothschilds, Rockefellers, and maybe Xi.

Herbert Marcuse
Herbert Marcuse
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

I can only figure Cuomo made someone really important really, really mad. There’s only one name you need to know in all of this: (((Douglas Emhoff))). The Tribe will do everything in its power to ensure that (((Douglas Emhoff))) becomes First Lady of the United States during a Kamala-toe Presidency. And since Eggplant Cuomo will present a serious existential challenge to Kamala-toe in the 2024 primaries, Eggplant must be destroyed. The fascinating question here is whether Dr Jill can emerge from behind the shadow of Potato Joe and assume the role of a Lady MacBeth or a Queen Eleanor of… Read more »

Rasqball
Rasqball
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

Patrick Gaspard.
Remember that name: Patrick Gaspard.

Whiskey
Whiskey
3 years ago

All this stuff is hard to predict but Frontpage Mag is trying. They assert there is no Biden Administration, just circles of influence with Pelosi, Schumer, Harris, distantly Obama, and various hard left loonies aligned with Bernie all making their plays in their own spheres. And the least crisis will bring it all down and Putin and Xi know it. Reading through the lines it would seem war is imminent. American Thinker believes that the woke military is being prepped for war upon certain people and Red States that say, don’t go along with a certain people Tax or quotas… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Whiskey
3 years ago

We already know Obama is in his DC bunker relaying orders to Biden:

https://nypost.com/2017/02/11/how-obama-is-scheming-to-sabotage-trumps-presidency/

Strike Three
Strike Three
3 years ago

This is tangentially, kinda sorta related to what you have posted. I am a high school teacher (in a private school, thank goodness). This school year (2020-2021) we have had times where we only had half our students coming physically to school, and the students at home that day were required to log-in to each class via Let’s Meet (on their Chromebooks.) It’s been unbelievably discouraging for me as a teacher this year. I quickly realized that my students at home that day were indeed logging in to the Let’s Meet sessions, but were either muting me, or staring blankly… Read more »

Strike Three
Strike Three
Reply to  Strike Three
3 years ago

Sorry folks, but my comment here was intended as a response to B125, way, way down the thread.

Trust me, it does make sense in the original context. I don’t know what happened. Derp

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Strike Three
3 years ago

On the topic of fucked-up education. In North Baltimore County, less than 10 miles north of the Cockeysville Post Office where the Z-man runs the cash arm of this money laundering scheme, the schools have been running on Zoom. The internet service is so piss-poor – DSL @2 mps if you are lucky, that the Hereford high school parking lot is full of cars with kids in them using the schools Wi-Fi lot get into the meeting run by teachers within the school 50 feet away. My theme for 2021 is Beyond Satire. Last year Congress Appropriated another $30 Billion… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Strike Three
3 years ago

Watch a Twilight Zone episode called “The Changing of the Guard.”

Boris
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

I’ve seen it! About the old school teacher at an all boys school who is being forced to retire. Great episode as many other TZ ones are.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Boris
3 years ago

Donald Pleasance was terrific in it.

Timothy Madden
Reply to  Strike Three
3 years ago

I have a suggestion that may well help to brighten your outlook, but you will need to bring some high school math into it. Here is the situation and problem: There is a reasonably identifiable racial / ethnic group in the U.S., and who are over-represented among the working-poor. The thing is that this particular group pays a minimum of about $50 billion a year ($50,000,000,000) in interest charges to micro-loan and payday-loan companies in the U.S. at an average or typical rate of 30,000% per annum. But that’s impossible, isn’t it? No, not at all, and that is the… Read more »

fenster
fenster
3 years ago

Z; I think you attempt too tidy an explanation of complexity and its possible companion chaos. You seem awfully sure you have a neat, linear explanation for things like the election fiasco. How do you know it was all due to small groups of crazed anti-Trumpers off doing their own things, with the collective result creating odd reverberations? What is the evidence for the lack of choreographed moves aspiring to a high degree of influence over the outcome? Even if such moves were less effective than hoped, or if there existed a fair amount of individual initiative as you posit,… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  fenster
3 years ago

Biden’s dementia admission that they had assembled the worlds biggest vote fraud operation seems to belie the organic grassroots theory.

Frip
Member
3 years ago

Didn’t read Z’s post. I’m sure it was good. Yeah things are complex. Everything is. Putting on a single NFL game is a wonder of organization. Promotion. Accommodations. Travel. Crowd control. Food. Scheduling for venue availability…6 months in advance…while sharing venue with another team…and maybe a baseball club. Anything that happens is kind of amazing and can only be fathomed through the mysteries of IQ. When I was a kid and the news would show office buildings in Zimbabwe, I was all, “man, they really can do stuff. They’re getting their shit together.” Then a few years later I was… Read more »

Reynard
Reynard
Member
Reply to  Frip
3 years ago

“Maybe it was some kind of pill, as we say nowdays. Not sure which color.”
It was probably technicolorrr myannnn

Hal
Hal
3 years ago

“This is what makes the revolution imposed from above so dangerous. The people who initiated these changes in American society are not working from a grand plan or a set of ideological goals. There is no point to what they are doing. Instead, our managerial revolutionaries are swept up in forces they do not understand. It is a strange, recursive and reactionary revolution from the top. The best they can muster for an explanation is, ‘we’ll know where we are going when we get there.’” I think a more accurate way to understand what the ruling class is doing is… Read more »

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
Reply to  Hal
3 years ago

The grand plan is to make you sick/dead, from lab made jewflu and dead babyjuice vaccines, submission by mask and bankruptcy by lockdown is just to make you miserable. They worship Satan for a reason.

3 Pipe problem
3 Pipe problem
3 years ago

Twenty years ago, I was struck by the way various sorts of political “progressives” — Communists, socialists, liberals, “civil libertarians,” “moderates,” “pragmatists” — all spontaneously cooperated with each other. It wasn’t a conspiracy; there was obviously no central direction. But the pattern was too clear to be denied. The word “left” was a dead metaphor; it said nothing interesting about the people it referred to. So I used the metaphor of an insect hive, which captured the way such people moved in harmony and communicated with each other. In a beehive, the worker bees have many specialties. The hive is… Read more »

acetone
Member
Reply to  3 Pipe problem
3 years ago

That’s a great except that backs up Zman’s article. But how do we know that its true? Seems to me that if there is a complex political movement with many sperate elements that acts with a high degree of coordination, this implies some sort of top down leadership. This is especially true if elements within this structure don’t necessary align well with one another (e.g., BLM supporting LGTB rights, labor unions aligned with corporations etc) and would likely fall into conflict without top down discipline. And where else in human affairs do you see things spontaneously coordinated, humans acting like… Read more »

acetone
Member
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

I am responding to my earlier post. Apologies for spelling and grammar mistakes. Here are a few more examples of recent political actions that I think happened only with top down coordination: – CHAZ/CHOP in Seattle. Mayor, Chief of Police, City Council and protestors conspired to occupy multiple city blocks. Simply put, this couldn’t have happened without a high-level secret agreement between multiple parties (e.g., city can’t legally abandon property, police can’t abandon a precinct, crowd that had been violently protesting for weeks doesn’t spontaneously stop protesting). CHAZ/CHOP itself, supposedly an anarchist collective, somehow had a leader (trans person) and… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

There was one instance during the summer where the local cops caught the Budget Rental truck dropping off a pallet of bricks for that nights Antifa riot, they tracked it back to some harridan whose organization had been given $25 (ish) million by Twitter’s Dorsey.
The guy would be in the slammer in a country with any pretense to law and order.

acetone
Member
Reply to  Bilejones
3 years ago

Its maddening that libs can legally donate to domestic terrorists and commit domestic terrorism with impunity (BLM everywhere, Portland riots) while cons have full force of the law thrown at them for self defense (Kenosha kid) and whatever that thing was on capital hill.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

How about recent quips (most recently “leaked” by FBI, I heard) how “White Supremacists” or “Domestic Terrorists” are the biggest national security threat now? I think this predates the Jan. 6 “insurrection” too, but not sure. Surely this is not accidental (new provacative terms appearing in multiple places.) This stuff must be coordinated at some level. I’m sure many more examples can be found, but that one sticks in my mind. It’s as if the media and other actors get a list of talking points or new vocabulary to use.

Abelard Lindsey
Abelard Lindsey
3 years ago

The whole justification for the authoritarian managerial state is the assumption on the part of the management class that regular people are stupid red-necks incapable of functioning without the guidance of the managerial class.

“Over the last year, a strange new behavior has emerged with the American people. They are paying down debts and saving money. ”

This makes clear regular people are not as stupid as the educated pointy-heads think.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Abelard Lindsey
3 years ago

Yes. And one of the most interesting other develops is the supposed intelligentsia in DC has been pantsed. Big time. Can’t unsee their behavior the last four years. Can’t remember where I saw it, but the writer pointed out that five of the nine judges at the Salem Witch Trials were Harvard men.

James J O'Meara
James J O'Meara
3 years ago

“The hope is the money will be spent as soon as it gets into the hands of the people, but that is not a guarantee. That’s not how the first round of checks played out. People used the money to pay down debts. Over the last year, a strange new behavior has emerged with the American people. They are paying down debts and saving money. Instead of rushing out to buy toys with those checks, they paid off bills. There has also been a wave of debt consolidation exploiting artificially low interest rates.” This is exactly how Yang explained that… Read more »

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  James J O'Meara
3 years ago

And then once peoples’ household debt is paid down, it still won’t be inflationary?

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

Anyone who thinks a basic income will be successful needs to spend five years as an urban landlord before being allowed to influence policy.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

I’m hoping that my next home will be in a community where it is illegal (more likely: against HOA covenant) to rent all or part of a home. 100% owner occupied community. They exist, but aren’t common. But my studies continue.

Scott
Scott
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Check Sun Cities if you are 55 or over. Or Las Vegas HOAs.

dad29
3 years ago

The great election fraud was not the result of a master plan from grand strategists operating in a secret lair. Like the ant colony, it was the result of thousands of individual actions by people motivated by years of conditioning from the ruling class. For the bulk of the managerial class, down to the entry level clerks, opposing Trump became a religion. Stopping him through any means necessary became part of their collective mindset. On American Thinker, a writer proposes just that, albeit with a slight ‘shift’–he opines that the industrial-level fraud here was NOT a ‘first-run’ and that actually,… Read more »

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  dad29
3 years ago

I have maintained for many months that one should never attribute to conspiracy what may adequately be explained by flocking behavior.

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

I agree. Most of these fascists and commies have no need to conspire, they already know what they need to do because it’s a tenet of their faith.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

The election theft was a combination of flocking behavior and small conspiracies, the vast majority of them at the local level.

acetone
Member
Reply to  dad29
3 years ago

“The great election fraud was not the result of a master plan from grand strategists operating in a secret lair.” Don’t agree with this. I think political events that occur on the left are coordinated from the top. There is a plan, and the plan is to take power for themselves, remove power from their political enemies and profit from seized power. The way it works is an agenda is planned out in advance and promoted via synthetic moments (e.g., Ferguson, George Floyd, Russia Gate, Stoneman Douglas shooting* etc). Nothing is organic on that side of the political spectrum, and… Read more »

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
3 years ago

As has been stated repeatedly(I think the first comment mentions it), Zman produces another quality piece. I gotta be honest, I don’t know how he is so consistently good. I would labor to produce one, let alone every day. The only thing I can possibly add is instead of keeping the plates spinning, I think it will be like an old phrase a business partner of mine used to say when I asked him what he actually did all day. (We ran a construction company). “I go around putting out small fires so they don’t turn into big ones”. Methinks… Read more »

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  Bartleby the Scrivner
3 years ago

From where I sit they already HAVE!

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
3 years ago

Z Man; Yet another excellent, thought-provoking essay. On a related topic, something the Cloud Folk *could* do is to stop the mindless war on system margin. Maybe they could even ‘nudge’ in the other direction. The increasing system fragility you correctly cite is the direct result of the state’s mindless war on ‘waste and inefficiency’. In a perturbation you *need* excess/idle capacity to keep the situation from becoming an emergency, as the folks in the TX power grid found out last month. Apparently the need to be seen ‘doing something to combat waste and inefficiency’ to distract from the ever-higher… Read more »

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Al from da Nort
3 years ago

The constant grind to achieve perfect efficiency is particularly stupid in the USA given the low population density and how spread out the population is. Redundancies and excess capacity make tons of sense for America, in a way that just doesn’t for nearly all other first world nations (except maybe Russia). It’s a perfect example of playing to one’s weakness.

Sidvic
Sidvic
Member
3 years ago

The myth20th century guys just did an excellent interview with cody Wilson. Supply chain issues were discussed. Cody is a pioneer in 3d printing of guns. Highly recommend.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Sidvic
3 years ago

Glad to hear he’s still free and doing his thing.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
3 years ago

Much of what Z describes here confirms that progress, in the vast majority of human endeavor, is a chimera. He speaks of “spasms of disorder” ham-fistedly handled, which propagate further disorder in other areas of society. It has ever been thus. Solutions to problems generate new problems. Perhaps the most obvious example is cures for epidemiological diseases. Penicillin and other drugs wiped out many contagions, and that certainly appeared to be a great thing. Alas, doing so created a population explosion, which created myriad new problems that still plague–so to speak–us to this very day. You can squeeze a water… Read more »

miforest
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

We have moved so far from sanity in our society that I have little hope that we are going to get a grip on anything . read this and think about all the implications. https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/03/breaking-former-president-drag-queen-story-hour-foundation-childrens-court-judge-charged-seven-counts-child-porn/

nunnya bidnez, jr
nunnya bidnez, jr
Reply to  miforest
3 years ago

The Former President of Cream City Foundation (Drag Queen Story Hour) (he’s also a Children’s Court Judge!) Arrested on Seven Counts of Child Porn Brett Blomme is the President & CEO of Cream City Foundation, which promotes Drag Queen Story Hour; he had also served as a Director of The AIDS Resource Center of Wisconsin. Blomme was previously appointed to be the Chair of the Board of Zoning Appeals,in Milwaukee. [WHO APPOINTED HIM?] Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett advocated for Blomme’s election as Milwaukee County Children’s Court judge. Arrested on Seven Counts of Child Porn, he is not allowed near any… Read more »

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  nunnya bidnez, jr
3 years ago

Arrested on Seven Counts of Child Porn, he is not allowed near any children except the two that he >>adopted with his husband.<<

Crazy that they’d exempt the two kids most at risk.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

And people wonder why “conspiracy theories” about pedophile rings get so much traction.

And a judgeship in Childrens’ Court? Well, you do find the pedophiles where the onjects of their unnatural lusts are to be found. But his judicial position dovetails so nicely with his other project of Drag Queen Story Hours, both giving him an extra little frisson of excitement due to the.added transgression that comes from abuse of the role of trust.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

Allowing pervs to adopt innocent children who had no say in the matter, was one of the first indications “America” had died and been resurrected as a demon-state.

Corinthian Leatherface
Corinthian Leatherface
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

Reminds me of the feminist statement intending to shock listeners that a woman is more at risk at home than in a park at night. Somebody had to point out to the feminist that women do not live in parks.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  miforest
3 years ago

Rachael Levine is a child psychologist just sayin’

Severian
Reply to  Paintersforms
3 years ago

Back in grad school I was, ummm, intimately acquainted with a person in the psych department, which meant I met many psych people, both professionals and trainees. You know all the stuff they say about those folks? It ain’t true – it’s actually so much worse than you can imagine. I’d trust a Ubangi shaman who wanted to treat my head-demons with cow dung and trepanation before I’d go to a shrink, and I’d perforate one if it got within 500 yards of any child of mine. (I’m not saying they ALL need to be locked in their own institutions’… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Severian
3 years ago

When I first moved to Sodom on Hudson, I dated a Jewess psychologist who was plugging away at her PHD. I thought the whole thing was a hoot, she was still pestering my friends 4 years after I’d moved on.
They are deeply, deeply fucked up people.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Antibiotics have also unleashed great damage to the microbiome upon which we rely as the first line of defense against pathogens and other environmental hazards. That alone may be responsible for most of the decline in our ancestral robustness. We are a far more fragile species today than most realize, and modern medicine is a patchwork solution at best. Much like installing a coding patch into leviathan bloatware like Microsoft Windows, the pill that cures your ache also festers and rots the core.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

That is one of many “improvements” that Civilization wrought, that if and when the Big Collapse comes, Nature will correct. At that point there will be an excess, unsupportable human population that will have to be “adjusted” downwards in number, perhaps dramatically. I don’t have any pithy Nietzsche quote ready today, but I will only observe as I often do, that Nature doesn’t give the least damn about our wishes, our standards of right and wrong, and all the other trappings of Man’s civilization. She operates by her own rules and laws which, unlike Man’s “Laws,” are not open to… Read more »

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Every action or choice, large or small has downstream consequences – some barely register on the radar while others are like a mag 10 earthquake. It seems like our managerial class doesn’t put a whole lot of thought into future repercussions. Something has to be done NOW. They used to be more subtle, but these days, it’s just rank hysteria.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
3 years ago

In school, back when I was a kid in The Hive… we were taught that Abraham Lincoln was a visionary and a great leader placed here on earth to free all men. Upon detailed study of the man and the times… I am comvinced he was a bumbling fool, buffetted hither and yon by the winds of the day, bobbing up and down on the tides of history. The idiots we have in charge now make Lincoln look like a whiz kid. The problem is simple in scope but difficult to implement. The lunatics and hysterics are in charge. They… Read more »

Crispin
Crispin
Reply to  miforest
3 years ago

Good Lord!
“…is not allowed near any children except the two that he adopted with his husband.”
And he was (is?) a Child Court judge.
I live less than 50 miles from that creep.

Waiting for that whirlwind they talk about to actually get reaped.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Glenfilthie
3 years ago

Agreed, but first you must have vacancies.

Hamsumnutter
Hamsumnutter
3 years ago

Word of the day, codpieces. Candidate for word of the year .

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
3 years ago

Z might be too young, but “plates spinning” reminded me of this act on the old Ed Sullivan “shoe”:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zhoos1oY404&ab_channel=TheEdSullivanShow

Hamsumnutter
Hamsumnutter
Reply to  Jack Boniface
3 years ago

I got a plate spinning set for Christmas back in the early 70’s.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Hamsumnutter
3 years ago

Sadly, the fame, fortune and recurring guest spot on Lawrence Welk never materialized.

Hamsumnutter
Hamsumnutter
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

I heard that really spun him out…

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
3 years ago

“The solution to the problem they created is going to set off a bunch of new problems”.
That’ll be just fine with the bureaucracy as their paychecks depend on not solving problems, or inventing new problems.

Peabody
Peabody
3 years ago

I’m in the process of building a house and met with my designers yesterday. They are having a lot of trouble getting things done. More often than not they go to order a piece of furniture made from a particular fabric or bathroom tiles or light fixtures and the item has been discontinued (a fancy word for ‘we can’t get the materials to make it’). There are supply chain issues and they are getting worse. I wonder if the geniuses pushing the plandemic anticipated this bit of collapse inducing mayhem? If it feels like we’re living in a wartime economy… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

Peabody, what are the reasons for the supply chain issues? Is it solely Covid? Or some other form of incompetence?

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Combination. Indian programmers.

Nothing works right anymore. The simplest of websites don’t work correctly or don’t do what you want them to do.
I bought a cheap PVR to record a TV show and so now my TV needs to be re-booted occasionally. It starts taking 10-15 seconds to respond to a remote control button press.

My 20 year old computer has no problem playing 11Mb DVDs, but struggles with 3Mb youtube. That’s because nobody has “updated” DVD to make it “better”

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

” Indian programmers”

I am just fixing a problem caused by a Pajeet contractor. How poetic.

Peabody
Peabody
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Materials being diverted for covid-related items (latex and foam) is one reason. The biggest impact may be the decrease in availability of shipping containers to/from China which I assume is also related. There are lumber and metal shortages for reasons they didn’t go into. Unreasonable circumstances creating chaos.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

Yeah, ICE is grabbing all shipping containers available—they are being converted into “housing” for he IA’s swamping the border. I kid you not. Now since we are talking about unexpected consequences, imagine what will happen to those IA’s assigned to a shipping container when the desert temp’s begin to exceed 100 degrees come May.

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

Shipping containers may be in short supply because the DHS has them stuffed with illegal kids and their MS-13 lovers (willfully or not).

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Spotty inflation makes it worse. Places promise to build X for Y price, but then one of the subcomponents goes through the roof in price blowing out the margin on the whole assembly and *poof*, it just can’t get made.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

Supply chain and attention to detail issues are everywhere now.

Hopefully both hit the poison vax makers really hard.

B125
B125
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

I’m amazed the supply chain, manufacturing, or programming companies still function at all… Our increasingly vibrant company is no longer being proactive. It’s all hands on deck just to get through the day. Customers are not happy. But every other company is in the same decline.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

Same in the defense industry.

Everything is a crisis that needs a waiver or special exception, along with reams of paperwork to sign to push things through.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

Peabody: Good point re supply chains. Add in irrational consumer buying (led by panic buying or immigrants buying and then reselling or shipping abroad particular products) and you never know what you’re going to find at the grocery store. This week everyone, for some reason, is out of canned mushrooms. A month or two ago it was red cooking wine. Just seemingly random products will vanish from all the stores’ shelves for 6-8 weeks and then reappear. The plumber is here today (I waited until I thought the worst rush from the frozen pipes debacle was over) but he said… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Is capitalizing “White” now triggering your software’s mods, Zman? I didn’t use any other term I can imagine that could have caused my comment to go to moderation.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Don’t use cooking wine. It’s just wine with salt added. Use a cheap but drinkable wine instead. In Texas, St. Genevieve is a good choice.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Thanks. Will do.

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

There’s really no such thing as “cooking wine”. There’s wine and there’s bottled piss. Never cook with anything you wouldn’t drink at the table. (old Dago saying). Take it from a guy who owned restaurants for 37 years.

Dr. Dre
Dr. Dre
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

I use good quality red (sweet) or white (dry) vermouth; I believe it was Julia Child who suggested this in her famous first cookbook I received as a wedding gift back in 1968;-)

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Yep. I buy $5 to $8 bottles of California wines for my cooking but if I want a deep rustic taste say for rabbit dishes I get a good Piedmont Italian such as a Barolo

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Falcone: I enjoy being a carnivore, but somehow I just can’t get past the visual impact of rabbit meat looking like . . . a rabbit. Maybe if I were to buy it already cut up? I saw it everywhere the years I lived in England, and I have yet to bring myself to try it. If things really were to go bad while we’re still stuck in the ‘burbs, our neighborhood is infested with rabbits, so – what’s your best rabbit recipe?

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

A cook with money to spend! Barolo ain’t cheap, to put it mildly.

Genghis Paleokhan
Genghis Paleokhan
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

I like to cook with wine. sometimes I even put it in the food.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Genghis Paleokhan
3 years ago

Cajun chef Justin Wilson (also a comedian) had a routine along those lines. If I recall, it went: “I like to cook myself. Well, I don’t mean myself, I mean food. But I don’t mind getting half-stewed once in a while.”

Based5.0
Based5.0
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

It is bizarre how random things disappear from the grocery stores for weeks at a time to only suddenly come back with a vengeance where they end up building special displays in the aisles to handle the excess inventory. I’ve taken over the family grocery shopping during the last year and got used to having ay least one item on my shopping list unavailable and several others where I had to substitute a brand or size that I didn’t really want. A month or so ago I went shopping with a pretty big list. As I was reviewing my list… Read more »

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Based5.0
3 years ago

Here is a supply chain glitch I encountered. We like Claussen Kosher Dill Pickles. They are made in Chicago, and are cold processed, and must be refrigerated., being sold in glass, screwtop jars from a refrigerated display. They flat out disappeared from stock for quite a while, despite being generally available in multiple.forms, and being very popular. After some little while, I went searching for why they were not available. Well, as I said, they are sold in glass jars because that is the only way they can be merchandised. But it seems that they relied upon a firm that… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
3 years ago

Claussen’s Hot & Spicy Spears are divine. In fact, I’m munching one right now. If those were to disappear, it might be the final straw. (-;

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

I’ve noticed this in grocery stores and restaurants. Formerly commonplace items such as Italian parsley sometimes vanish and certain menu items suddenly go missing as well. In West Texas a month or so ago we had a wee bitty ice storm. (You probably heard about it. Wildly sensationalized by the enemedia, no doubt.) Well, the US mail didn’t run one day, and Whataburger, a local institution open 24 hours, shut down for a day. Hell, because of that storm Texans don’t have to file their federal taxes until June. These are all signs of systemic breakdown, and their lack of… Read more »

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

“Formerly commonplace items such as Italian parsley sometimes vanish”

Try finding ammunition…

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Xman
3 years ago

Oh, I’ve found ammo, but just not at a price my hubby will pay. My older son and I tried to tell him prices were NOT going to ‘return to normal’ but rather continue to rise, but he refused to buy a year ago, and now he refuses to pay the even higher prices. So we haven’t gone to the range in a while. I wonder when he’s going to realize that the prices will keep rising and our need will not decrease. Stubborn as a rock, but I’ll keep him. . . and keep chipping away.

Moe Noname
Moe Noname
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Use an investing approach to buying ammo:
Dollar cost averaging. Budget $100’250-500-1,000 a month and just buy as many rounds that fit into that dollar amount.
Cancel your cable/netflix/other recurrening expense to pay for it.
And/or buy .22 adapters/ barrels for your firearms.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

What value is assignable to your lives should that ammunition become critical to your family’s wellbeing or survival? There’s a question to ponder.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Xman
3 years ago

And at reasonable prices…

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Xman
3 years ago

On another forum, I wryly (?) observed that, in a crisis or breakdown situation, ammunition would make an excellent barter medium of exchange. You will be able to exchange ammo with your neighbor for needed goods, either in voluntary trade, or at 2200 ft/sec muzzle velocity.

Compci
Compci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Worked for cigarettes I’m Germany after WWII.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

I had a clever reply with photos of trees, a chainsaw, a hammer and nails, but that was way too many links for the spam filter. 😉

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Peabody
3 years ago

With respect to building materials, last year,2020, by summer, there was zero AC2 treated lumber in the Midwest. I had 9 decks scheduled for construction and built…1.
Everyone got their deposit refunded. If you went to a Menards or Home Depot, the racks were empty.
The reason I was given was that the mills in Canada that turn out the product were shut down. Seeing as how crazy Canada has been regarding the Chinese Flu, it makes sense.
Lumber is available now, but my hearts not in it. Time to plant more fruit trees.

Leonard E Herr
Member
3 years ago

I liken it to the analogy of the pebble starting the avalanche. The avalanche slope is a highly complex set of interactions providing a seemingly stable environment, and individual pebbles can roll down for a long time until that one particular pebble (the black swan?) starts the avalanche. If you are at the head of the avalanche you can stop it from growing by intercepting those pebbles, until there are too many then the event horizon is crossed and what follows will happen until the energy potential is used up, and whoa to those in its path. The trick is… Read more »

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Leonard E Herr
3 years ago

I have long preached that getting the Hell out of the city is about basic survival and not just a discretionary escape to a better neighborhood. When the crazy comes, it will grow exponentially in urban areas first. Police protection will collapse within days, and imposition of martial law by NGs will be slightly more effective until food riots begin, but then marauding gangs and chaotic diaspora will become the norm. Trying to make a last stand with a shotgun on your front porch is not as fun or noble as it may seem in the movies.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
3 years ago

“There is no point to what they are doing.”

After decades of hearing whatever excuses were proffered for seasonal time changes the only thing I can figure as to why do they play around with Daylight Savings Time? Because they can.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
3 years ago

Eh, I’d argue that Orwell was right that power is the point of power.

These people are loving forcing us to play the biggest, dumbest game of, “Simon Says,” ever.

Epaminondas
Member
3 years ago

We can only hope. A stasis of chaos is never a good place to be.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
3 years ago

This was in response to another comment. I have no idea why it popped up here.

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  Epaminondas
3 years ago

“This was in response to another comment. I have no idea why it popped up here.”

Because of the stasis of chaos.

sentry
sentry
3 years ago

“The millions flooding over the border suggests some form of collapse is in the future. Complex systems, however, tend not to collapse…What most likely lies ahead is spasms of disorder, followed by increasingly ham-fisted efforts to impose order.” that’s pretty much the hope of the elites, to use the chaos to reorganize the system into their wet dream, just like byzantium was turned ottoman. i actually believe some countries will collapse, others won’t, each needs to be looked at case by case. the reality is most countries are indebted to corporations, which means we the people are either going to… Read more »

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  sentry
3 years ago

When the state with their monopoly on violence owes money to a corporation, with no ability to commit violence, I’m betting on the state. The more debt pushed into corporations the better. China borrowed a lot of American dollars during the 2nd world war. They still owe us that money. They have never repudiated or paid it. The US will very likely do one of two things. First, they will try to inflate the debt away. If that doesn’t work for some reason, they will repudiate it, especially if it is not held by powerful sovereign nations. Besides, no matter… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

It’s interesting because we have a situation in the US where, at minimum, corporations are closely aligned with the state apparatus, or they may have co-opted it entirely.

Just look at the difference in how DC and Beijing treat Big Tech.

Guest
Guest
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

A large majority of our nukes probably don’t work anyway. The Plutonium triggers have a design lifespan of twenty years, and most of them are well past that lifespan. After closing the Rocky Flats facility we no longer have the capacity to make an adequate number of triggers to keep the arsenal up-to-date.

The reality is that nobody knows whether most of our nuclear arsenal will explode if they are deployed, and every year the problem gets worse as the triggers age.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Guest
3 years ago

Tritium in the triggers has a half-life of 12 years.

I know they were cannibalizing some triggers to keep certain nukes active while they scrambled for a new tritium supply.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

Tritium triggers—really yield increasers—were not used in the first nukes, like on Japan. The plutonium has a half life of what, 10k years? And part of the trillion dollar nuke upgrade Obama signed was to find tritium substitutes.

There may be a problem with smallish, light, nukes for missile delivery, but I can’t imagine a shortage of old style nukes of the 40’s era—which should be easily assembled given our current knowledge and stock piles of plutonium.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Guest
3 years ago

And that’s fine by me. “America” no longer has the moral authority to possess functional nukes.

Gunner Q
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

“When the state with their monopoly on violence owes money to a corporation, with no ability to commit violence, I’m betting on the state. The more debt pushed into corporations the better.”

That’s old school thinking. The new thinking is that the corporation the politicians owe vast amounts of money to, also have detailed records of the politicians’ kiddie porn habits and bribe transactions.

And just like that, a military solution is off the table.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Gunner Q
3 years ago

It might explain the rush to normalize the worst sorts of degeneracy. When the kiddie diddlers suddenly have the approbation of the established culture they’ll be beholden to no one’s USB drive of compromising material.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

Shut up you hateful pedophobe!

KGB
KGB
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

Much like every other degeneracy of the last generation, we mock “hateful pedophope” today, only to be tarred with it tomorrow.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Gunner Q
3 years ago

You don’t ever try to blackmail a dirty cop, lest he might find 4 pounds of meth in your car. When push comes to shove, they will find out the difference between influence and power. When the corporate types say “don’t do this or we will release the blackmail material,” the response will be, “it’s kind of hard to release blackmail material when you’re dead or in solitary in a secret prison” Even if they have a ‘dead man trigger’ release of said blackmail material, how hard does anyone think it would be to make the press not cover it?… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

Look at the trail of bodies behind the Clintons.

Those are the real reasons no one will cover the server or Seth Rich.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Gunner Q
3 years ago

Corps and people don’t blackmail pols who can pick up the phone and order a wet works team to shut down the extortionists permanently.

Look at Epstein – dead. Ghislaine will be rotting in prison for a long time. Why? Because the blackmail angle stopped working. Same with the D.C. madame who was found hanging in her garage.

See it’s hard to make blackmail work when the MSM won’t play along. Epstein failed to notice that 20 years ago the press had become stenographers for the ruling class..

sentry
sentry
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

politicians are whores, foreign states and corporations are their clients, don’t see a conflict between state and corporations. usa is a different animal, poorer countries will have to sell their natural resources when they go broke. most of africa is basically indebted to usa through the imf & usa is indebted to china. usa pays it debt to china by letting the chinese get their fill from africa, americans also use the borrowed money to buy from china. This agreement seems stable. The way i see it Usa’s problems come from welfare(most of the american budget is wasted on welfare),… Read more »

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  sentry
3 years ago

Welfare is a comparatively tiny problem. Welfare is vastly preferable to the rackets the people of color are engaged in right now. At least welfare is just an ongoing expense. Non-DPW “welfare” is far worse and imposes enormous costs on us besides the direct payment. The direct cost of all these academics is trivial compared to the indirect costs they impose on the rest of us. Corporate HR and diversity programs as well as all the diversity infrastructure within corporations is far larger than the actual money we give to academics. But they create these monsters that go out there… Read more »

sentry
sentry
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

i agree with you

to make it short, the point was there’s too many useless creatures living in america, many of whom are predatory and destructive, they’ll erode the system

and let us not forget there’s new waves of migrants who are coming, they’ll demand/require expensive government spending as well, bureaucracy will get even bigger etc

miforest
Member
Reply to  sentry
3 years ago
Dr. Dre
Dr. Dre
Reply to  miforest
3 years ago

I say bring back a good public horse-whipping/flogging in the court house square of such horrors as Brett Blomme. Foul deeds like this need to have a severe example set in public, no hiding in the county lock-up with 3 squares a day til all is forgotten. Also, make the people in the community understand the full horror of what was done to the children, and force them to beg forgiveness from the Almighty.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  tarstarkas
3 years ago

I live walking distance to what once was probably a secondary strategic nuclear target. I’ve no idea if such would be the case thirty years after the “official” end of the Cold War.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  sentry
3 years ago

Sentry: If you want a good fictional depiction of being corporate slaves versus dissident ‘independents,’ may I suggest a new book by W.J. Lundy, “The Occupation: A Thriller.” Set in circa 2030-2035 America.

Moe Noname
Moe Noname
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

“Flashback” by Dan Simmons

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

A failing system needs scapegoats. Those ham-fisted efforts to restore order will increasingly be directed at yours truly.

Look at the administrations obsession with White nationalists and domestic terrorists. They’re laying the groundwork for blaming us for everything that goes wrong.

B125
B125
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

“white nationalists” – aka any normal white person who doesn’t kneel down to blacks or other minorities – are the new “wreckers” (soviet union), or the new Taliban (2000s usa), or the new witches.

The scary thing is that good whites and non whites actually believe that cletus in the hills of kentucky or bob the plumber with a maga sticker on his truck are the real oppressors or “systematic racists” or whatever. Certainly a good play on the elites’ part.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

What’s scary is that legislation is getting drafted at both the state and federal level to allow our betters to convict any White who doesn’t grovel as a domestic terrorist.

They will hire dozens and dozens of FBI or Homeland Security agents to do nothing but monitor Whites for badthink. They will convict those Whites and destroy their lives. They will take not only their guns but the guns of anyone who was a part of any group that the convicted White belonged to.

The kulak phase is a couple of votes away from starting.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

The more white lives destroyed, the less taxes

It will be like the cigarette tax. Whites are the cigarettes, and they want us punished out of existence for the good of society but then they need the money

I guess we will soon see whites hanging outside the doors to a building like smokers

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

They don’t care.

As long as they have a printing press, reserve currency, and the Fed they can print up any tax shortfalls.

YT will still need to pay up though. Gruesome examples will be made.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Wild Geese is right. They don’t care. They really believe that mean White men are holding back society, that the world will be far better if we were gone.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

Indeed, just a few days ago in a nearby town of Santa Clarita CA, a retired cop had a fender bender with a nogger whom he cussed out. Sadly someone captured it on video. Now it’s become a county wide story in the local news. The chief of police is promising investigations, every thug he arrested is going to have to their case reviewed.

it’s clear the Noggers have super protected status now. And it’s open season on whites.

B125
B125
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

Or jones in animal farm

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

Good point. I already noted as much in an earlier post, about the new apparent focus on “domestic terrorists.”

Bible trivia: actually being a scapegoat was not such a bad thing originally. It was actually the “escape” goat, allowed to wander off freely. Another goat wasn’t so lucky, and was butchered for the sacrifice. (Leviticus 16)

Hi - Ya!
Hi - Ya!
3 years ago

I had a conversation with an intelligent black back during the early Obama years. I expressed concern about the economy or finances, and he replied, “oh, we have some smart people in there now, some smart people.’

I now know this guy completely trusted the a new executive administration to manage 350 million peoples lives! And now with Covid, we know many many people totally trust that someone else, with power, is really looking out for them.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Hi - Ya!
3 years ago

The amount of trust people still have in the system, even people who are nominal enemies of it, is simply mind boggling at this point.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
3 years ago

The biggest enemy we have right now is the white Fudd, usually a Boomer, who still believes that he lives in the “freest country in the world,” the troops “fought for our freedom,” cops are “heroes,” and that blacks won’t stab him to death and rape his wife because he “isn’t a racist.”

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Xman
3 years ago

Yep and Gab is full of them now. These clowns actually the believe the military will step in and save them. That voting harder will fix the GOP, etc.

They failed to note that Bush got rid of a lot of old school generals and replaced them with Neocon loons. Obama finished the job by purging any general with conservative leanings and made sure the academies are PC/MC.

Just look how they attacked Tucker for mocking their focus on flight suits for preggers. This is response you’d normally get from snowflakes, not soldiers.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Hi - Ya!
3 years ago

The key thing to remember about the economy is that nobody has any idea what is going on. There do seem to be a few good economic truths that generally apply, but the central banks don’t care a jot for those.

“I now know this guy completely trusted the a new executive administration to manage 350 million peoples lives!”

This is the problem of scale. It’ll never go away, and for the power/control hungry, the key to it’s optimal management is centralize, centralize, centralize.

This is why small, discreet, distributed, white communities are an important part of the fight back.

nunnya bidnez, jr
nunnya bidnez, jr
3 years ago

If people are paying down debts and saving,
that is less likely to lead to hyperinflation,
more likely to lead to a recession/depression.
If consumerism is declining, that also means likely recession.

what would the gov’t response be?
MOAR STIMULUS!
people will sense that the govt is scared,
cut back their spending even more.
death spiral.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  nunnya bidnez, jr
3 years ago

Money velocity, which had been declining for decades, fell off a cliff with Covid and has only marginally recovered. People are scared. And you’re right, more stimulus checks have the reverse effect. People recognize them for what they are, signs that the economy isn’t recovering as expected. Debt is currency so paying down debt reduces the amount of money in the system. The system relies on expanding credit, so if people reduce debt, the economy shirks, at least in the short term. Debt consolidation with lower interest rates works similarly. Unless people start spending, the economy won’t recover in the… Read more »

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  nunnya bidnez, jr
3 years ago

When things like NFT’s (Non Fungible Tokens) become a “thing”, there’s something fundamentally wrong with money.

Crypto at least has some academic arguments for it (still think no sane government will allow it to challenge their sovereign coinage rights…and their guns beat your server farms).

NFT’s are just…ridiculous.

There’s so much sloshing around the people who have it don’t know what else to buy with it. Investing it is a dubious proposition when all assets are in a bubble.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  nunnya bidnez, jr
3 years ago

It’s hard to tell how much debt repayment is due to lack of confidence in government and how much is due to lack of opportunity to spend. The work from home crowd in the early part of the shutdown basically stopped buying gas and going to restaurants because of government fiat. Kids’ sports and social clubs shut down for months, and the fees associated with them were put on hold. Thus, there was a pretty decent chunk of spending cut off while enjoying an influx of cash, so for a decent amount of people, they literally had nothing better to… Read more »

nunnya bidnez, jr
nunnya bidnez, jr
Reply to  Drew
3 years ago

“once all the lockdowns are completely lifted.”

Ha Ha ha ha!
ha ha ha.
[guffaw]

good one.

Falcone
Falcone
3 years ago

I had to look up the word recursive

Perfect word for what’s going on.

Severian
3 years ago

We really need a better word than “revolution.” I’m not trying to be pedantic – “revolution” implies a coherent ideology or at least an identifiable set of goals, and the low-IQ lunatics in charge have neither. Revolutions follow predictable patterns because of those ideas and goals, and while we’ll see some of that — e.g. the Night of the Long Knives that’s already coming for Cuomo — that’s just human nature, not part of the historical pattern. This is something new, and calling it a “revolution” obscures more than it clarifies. (As for what to call it, my best suggestion… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Severian
3 years ago

Regression is what we have

A great unwinding

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Falcone: I think that’s very accurate and descriptive. It’s the Great Unraveling.

Recursive-Fein
Recursive-Fein
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

Recursive is a word understood by anyone in programming, networks, techs, or who has math. Its not that bad a word, using it will not be that unfamiliar given the level of tech use in our society. What you want to modify using recursive is up to you, it just means a rule that keeps being applied.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Recursive-Fein
3 years ago

The image that came to mind when I learned its meaning was Fauci shoveling the same loads of horse shit over and over into a wood chipper and hoping for a different result

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  Recursive-Fein
3 years ago

Problem I always had using recursion was getting the stop case right. Otherwise the thing either wouldn’t compile or the OS would issue an error message about too many somethings being created. Our current mess is a.clear example of a poorly constructed/absent stop case. No end in sight!

Severian
Reply to  thezman
3 years ago

A closer analogy, one that you’ve mentioned a lot, is the Crisis of the Third Century. The Collective Elagabalus on the throne right now is busy making his horse a consul (manfully resisting the obvious AOC joke), setting up idols to xzer bizarre new god, etc., just because. They might actually be literally, clinically insane. One almost begins to hope there are still some students of Roman history among the soon to be purged line officer corps…. (So for lack of a better term, and at the risk of sounding like a Rosenberg, in going with “the crisis of the… Read more »

Severian
Reply to  Severian
3 years ago

PS I know you know this, but comments have been really buggy lately. This got held in moderation, in case it’s a keyword thing.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Severian
3 years ago

Elag was the tranny emperor, and a perfect precursor for our present.

Caligula made his horse a senator.

Severian
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

Right, but you take my point. 😁 The same fate befell both, IIRC, but the Empire had a competent member of the ruling class waiting in the wings post Caligula. The guys who followed Elagabalus were called “the Barracks Emperors” and, well, make of that what you will.

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

Caligula made his horse a senator

Yes but he was only 28 and had only reigned for 4 years when the Praetorians terminated his reign – WITH PREJUDICE!

I give us till Labor Day at the latest before Kameltoe stages a 25th Amendment coup on his ass and he goes back to skinnydipping in his own pool.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

The swishy Alcibiades is another good historical analogue.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

Alcibiades the Swishy

LOL

We need some for today’s clowns

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Severian
3 years ago

As an historian myself, I’m quite convinced future historians of America will view the period of 1965 to 2021 as the period of the nation’s collapse, and 2021 as its terminal date. For that reason, any term for what happened to the country will have to encompass that entire period. Now because we are at the sharp end of the stick, we tend to think that the madness simply descended upon us over the course of the last couple of years or so, when in fact, it has been accreting for over half a century. I don’t think historians will… Read more »

Severian
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

You can always tell a real historian, because he calls himself “an historian”.

(I’m just busting your balls, brother. We actually had a discussion of the proper indefinite article back in grad school orientation, because the people in second-tier programs like mine was, think they can get to the Ivy League if they’re just absurdly pedantic and humorless about everything. It was a hoot… but woe to the poor first year grad student who proclaimed himself A historian).

Recursive Fein
Recursive Fein
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

@Ostei, Whoah there on Alcibiades sir. He was a warrior, and got more pussy than Roosh. Yes, boys too but he was Greek. Seriously, we could use an Alcibiades. But hey he could lose his job…so nah.. You are correct our fall began in 1965 when we tried to share voting with the Blacks and ended up with the Jews taking power and burning the place down for the insurance money. They can’t of course run the place except for fraud, but we damn sure knew that all along. Wreckers and Saboteurs turns out to be a correct charge, Stalin… Read more »

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Severian
3 years ago

At first I thought there were just insane and evil. And maybe they are. But the more I look at their actions it looks to be a mix of nihilism and Lysenkoism. A very deadly stew indeed. Deadly? Think of that experimental gene therapy called a vaccine for covid. Never mind we don’t need a “vaccine” that doesn’t kill 99.9% of the people. This has not been done on people before, no long term studies. People mysteriously dying after taking it, mass refusal from medical personnel, Europe is banning Astra-Zenaca;s because it’s causing blood clots, etc. Worse it’s not a… Read more »

Hi - Ya!
Hi - Ya!
3 years ago

I’m reminded of the delightful, and politically incorrect, story of the tar baby!

Drake
Drake
3 years ago

The military is going to become a woke jobs program focused on recruiting from the inner cities (as opposed to the traditional small-town recruiting). Actual war-fighting will be with drones and similar technology. Any enemy that can defeat the drones and get through to the personnel will win easily.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

The military was already mostly a jobs machine for blacks and Hispanics. Without the military and civilian government jobs, the black middle class collapses.

Personally, the more woke and diverse the military and law enforcement, the better.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

Agree – although if that military is turned on you, it will be with the drones first.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

Well, someone need to control those drones, and those people go to the store or out for beers or to the gym just like everyone else.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

Of necessity, those drones and other high-tech weapons and surveilance will tend to be operated by the more intelligent, better educated soliders. They are likely to have more culturally in common with you and I than Pablo or D’Jontzeel will. Now, I know they are supposed to follow orders. But, I just have a sneaking suspicion that many (not to say all, or even maybe most) servicemembers would probably begin to have grave misgivings if ordered to apply deadly force, or perhaps even just force, on American civilians. The sillier things get, I suspect the more likely mutinies are in… Read more »

Federalist
Federalist
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

“The military was already mostly a jobs machine for blacks and Hispanics.”

True. But the actual trigger-pullers, infantrymen and special operations types, are very white. As masculine young white men stop enlisting, it will be interesting to see if or how the woke, gay/tranny POC military will actually do combat.

I guess like others have said, it will be a lot of drones and high-tech stuff.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Federalist
3 years ago

Yes. When I went through Parris Island in ’89, most of the black and hispanics had signed up for trade type jobs if they scored high enough on the ASVAB to qualify. It was the crazy white kids (like me) who volunteered for infantry, recon, and similar tip of the spear jobs.

Pickle Rick
Pickle Rick
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

That’s because we enlisted to be combat Marines. They enlisted for pogue gibs. I was a fire direction controlman in an artillery battery. Not one Negro in any FDC I ever saw.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Federalist
3 years ago

Maybe, but probably not for long. Drones are fairly fragile and easy to interfere with, so if the government started using drones against people, it wouldn’t take long to fight back. Shotguns can easily disable small drones flying close to the ground. Drones carrying nets can be directed to interfere and ruin other drones. They can also be jammed. If this sort of state action is carried out and resisted, it will probably be a relatively short-lived war of attrition, since destroying drones is cheaper than building them.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Drew
3 years ago

We really, really gotta promote Pajeet and Sh’equanisha
in drone production.

Recursive Fein
Recursive Fein
Reply to  Federalist
3 years ago

It’s all Bluff. They can’t count on the military below the Flag officers [Generals, Admirals] including the minorities. And of course the legions of suits and pantsuits war profiteers, but no one is going to follow the Kagan’s into battle, or follow their orders. The reason you hear the shrieking about the wahman and maternity* uniforms is they are as frightened as everyone else in DC. Every challenge or inconvenient fact or tweet has them all in panic. You’re seeing fear, the city is rank with it. Any challenge they’ll flee, and their men won’t shoot. They don’t have the… Read more »

Recursive Fein
Recursive Fein
Reply to  Recursive Fein
3 years ago

* Maternity uniforms have been around for more than a decade, thanks for checking in America.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

Makes me wonder, only because I try to see all angles even if I miss some, whether the wokeness and the females in the military isn’t a feint or deception of some kind,

As if we have another trick up our sleeve. We could be inviting an adversary to think we’re weak and full of pozz and women then once they’ve made their move we hit them with something big and unexpected. A robot army? Bionic soldiers? Who knows

But the reality is likely nothing like this and we are just stupid

Gunner Q
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

“Makes me wonder, only because I try to see all angles even if I miss some, whether the wokeness and the females in the military isn’t a feint or deception of some kind,”

I originally assumed that the Special Forces would be kept unWoke so the Elites would retain their enforcer squads, but then Eddie Gallagher and related scandals happened.

This is a religious war. God made us male and female, so the Elites are trying to make us anything and everything except that. Consequences and reality be damned!

Moss
Member
Reply to  Gunner Q
3 years ago

Nailed it, Gunner. This is all nihilist’s hatred of themselves. Traced deep enough, it’s the evil in their souls lashing out at God. It’s all spiritual warfare.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Moss
3 years ago

Moss – Cannot tell you how many times my husband and I will be discussing some outrage of the day, and we both cut the conversation short with the same word: Satanic.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Gunner Q
3 years ago

Even a group of sadists and criminals would retain a competent enforcement arm just in case. The fact that our rulers are busy wrecking it shows just how inhuman they are. You can see it with Gates and the Techno literati who are intent on destroying any avenues for the lower classes to move upwards and educate themselves. Then we have the global elites all pushing a vaccination program that is based on a untested gene therapy that no one knows what the long term side effects are. Oh yeah China won’t touch it. This scares me. These are not… Read more »

Recursive Fein
Recursive Fein
Reply to  Gunner Q
3 years ago

Severian is right: this ends with 3 outcomes. 1. They kill us all, before they kill themselves. 2. They kill themselves. 3. Some combination of the above. Severian didn’t say this on his blog, but I will: We’re being ruled by Jonestown in terms of the believers and by oligarchs just stealing as much as possible before they have to run. But DC is Jonestown, with an Alzheimer’s patient trotted out as the Rev Jim Jones. For you younger folks DC is basically a version of Koresh’s Waco, or Heaven’s Gate. A city under siege and fear, waiting for pretty… Read more »

Recursive Fein
Recursive Fein
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

You’re right, it’s nothing.
It’s all Bluff.

I was there, it’s bluff.
JAG made it more clear than they normally do that anyone who fires is done, will be investigated, whole nine yards, ruined. They hammered it home for hours, biggest part of the briefing. Strangely I don’t recall any threat briefings…no, S2 seems to have been absent.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

That would seem to be a good plan.

The problem is that vibrants are unable to perform the maintenance, troubleshoot, and repair required to keep those systems in the field.

I’m not sure there are enough woke whites to do it either.

Al from da Nort
Al from da Nort
Reply to  Drake
3 years ago

Drake; There is no ‘going to’ in the US military becoming an AA jobs machine. Began under Clinton just as soon as the USSR collapsed. Not for nothing were the various Support Services (aka REMF’s) known from then on as ‘the home for unwed (mostly black) mothers’. This last few months there were a spate of articles in the various service-linked magazines re 30 year anniversary of Gulf War I entitled ‘Could we do it again_?’ Short answer: NFW, GI. We have won no wars since then, even assuming we won that one. AA Gen. C. Powell halted the advance… Read more »

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Al from da Nort
3 years ago

Further, the US has never single-handedly defeated a peer in war in this industrial age. Our victories are few, ancient and underwhelming.

usNthem
usNthem
3 years ago

The problem is there will be fewer and fewer competent men racing from station to station to keep the plates spinning. As the denigration of White males and importation of various shades of worthless mud creatures along with the elevation of females and other assorted freaks continues apace, the long awaited implosion can’t be that far down the road.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  usNthem
3 years ago

We can only hope. A stasis of chaos is never a good place to be.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  usNthem
3 years ago

The botched covid thing could be telling us the implosion has already arrived I’m in Florida for the moment. Supposedly the most open and most free state during the covid. But even so, most people WANT to be wearing masks, and every restaurant and store I’ve been to still has the signs on the doors requiring masks for entry (the signs are often simply old and you don’t have to wear masks but most do) Even when all restrictions are lifted, half the people if not more are not going to be giving up their masks. Not for some time.… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

Falcone: Although worthless Abbott has technically lifted the state-wide mask ‘mandate’ in Texas (that he, of course, had no legal authority to impose), he’s left it up to individual counties and cities and corporations to make their own rules. All the gyms still require masks. All the grocery stores. Although yesterday I did noticed all the signs requiring a mask were removed from the local small Walmart market, but everyone was still wearing one. As so many here have said for so long, there is no returning to ‘normal.’ They will continually reinvent the “new normal” and it will be… Read more »

Xman
Xman
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

I went to my grocery store a couple of days ago and got threatened with arrest if I came back again without a mask.

I haven’t worn one there for a year. A whole fucking year and they’re not giving up on this shit, they’re doubling down.

Strike Three
Strike Three
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Here in Mississippi our governor has done the same thing. But the results are the same as they are in Texas; the local mayors and even local businesses are free to prolong the mask wearing, indefinitely. From a political standpoint it makes governor Reeves look like a brave red-pilled guy for removing the mask mandate, and yet he has forced the mayors to take the truly (politically) risky step of removing the local mask requirement. And the mayors won’t do that. What I’m foreseeing is a perpetual problem. Just as we may not go into Wal-Mart without wearing pants, so… Read more »

Moss
Member
Reply to  Strike Three
3 years ago

“Just as we may not go into Wal-Mart without wearing pants…”

Clearly you’ve got an upscale Wal-Mart. I’m jealous.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Strike Three
3 years ago

Heh, Wal-Mart has decided to begin pushing vaxports.

B125
B125
Reply to  usNthem
3 years ago

I’m not so sure it’ll be an implosion. More like a steady decline into shit. Look at brazil, california, even mexico. They never really “collapsed”. They have some infrastructure. They have some kind of incompetent and corrupt government and legal system. They still have a certain number of white guys. They have some nice areas, but mostly slums. The legacy white political and physical things can last a long time in a diminished form. We already saw this in the usa with voter fraud. We see it with the covid restrictions. Most people, especially non whites don’t follow them at… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

To be honest, I agree that the odds are that we’ll just slowly head down the path to a crappy 2nd world country. As you mentioned, California, Texas, New Mexico all went from White majority states to White minority states. There was no collapse, no White uprising. The states just became more and more 2nd world like. Lots of poverty amid a smaller middle class and a very wealth elite. Private schools, gated communities, private clubs replaced public ones. Whites just withdrew into their smaller worlds or moved away. The only thing that I see messing with that scenario is… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
3 years ago

Yeah there’s a few things that are different. Latin America has few Han, dot indians, muslims. They generally don’t have anti white hatred and propaganda. They at least pretend to believe in civic nationalism, “we are all brazilians” and share a common language and religion. They did the same transformation in Canada (ethnic restaurants! Hard working immigrants here for a better life! Merit based system! Assimilation!) And now it’s way too late and completely out of control. It’s hard to know what they’ll do but given the strong negative identity it wouldn’t surprise me if they over reach. Karens are… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

Z has pointed out a possible issue with this: Brazil evolved to become Brazil, is it possible for the U.S. do “devolve” into Brazil cleanly? For instance, Brazil wouldn’t be able to build a dam or nuclear reactor in the first place if they lacked the skills to maintain it, but huge tracts of the U.S. are inheriting first world infrastructure with only third world people to maintain it. Could it still work out? Maybe.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
3 years ago

Embraer small jets are an impressive Brazilian product.

Very competitive with the Canadian Bombardier.

B125
B125
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

Southern brazil is much whiter than canada these days. As long as you’re not too picky (mostly meds with 10-15% african/indio blood).

Plus Brazil strongly encourages it’s top (white) minds to step up and contribute to companies like Embraer. The usa shuts out its top minds and then hires foreign indian labour.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
3 years ago

The test of your hypothesis is now being played out in South Africa. That third world people can maintain a first world technology does not seem likely from my readings of over there. For example, running water in Cape Town was awhile back limited to a few running spigots in the town center that the people brought plastic containers to obtain—this is different from a clay pot and a running stream, how? Rolling blackouts throughout SA are now common. SA, once a food exporter, now imports. And so forth. Perhaps a USA populated with 50% Hispanics, 13% Blacks, and the… Read more »

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

South Africa isn’t a great point of reference because the race ratios are unlikely to ever be in play in America, if for no other reason than the mere presence of Hispanics. They’re social M.O. seems to be working to be civic enough to enjoy the benefits of industrial life without risking reprisals or alienation for general parasitism.

B125
B125
3 years ago

Working from home has certainly changed behaviour wrt to diversity seminars. Sitting at home there’s no more social pressure to pretend to be interested in whatever magic negro is on the screen talking about xerself. When diversity came up at the company wide Zoom meetings, I just put it on mute and went to the kitchen to make a snack. I know pretty much every white guy did the same. The Karens seem to be suffering from a lack of validation too. The annoying busybodies that you made polite small talk with before, now just go on mute. I only… Read more »

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

I’d probably mind the diversity theater less if it were magic negroes lecturing me- virtually all the diversity training I’ve had was led by whites.

Actually, I’m lying- I don’t care much for the magic negroes hectoring me either.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Ganderson
3 years ago

Listen you. Just be grateful for all the inventions your sorry white arse has had because of the magic negro: IC engines, aeroplanes, mobile phones, properly cambered roads, decent street signage, functional drainage systems, microchips…

And as if it was not enough, you want them to lecture you. Where on Earth will Professor Shiniquanessor get the time? In between designing a easily produced hypersonic aircraft and curing cancer. The nerve!

Reynard
Reynard
Member
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

“Working from home has certainly changed behaviour wrt to diversity seminars.” It still shocks me how this exists in the private sector. My GF has to sit through these horrid zoom meetings once a week. She refuses to participate. The entire company is spiraling into an inefficient mess due to AA policy, but she’s taking advantage of it for the time being. Competency becomes a rarity that you can exploit to your advantage as the ship first takes on water. I honestly don’t think I could have even sat through these seminars and meetings though. I worked in law (and… Read more »

Pete
Pete
Reply to  Reynard
3 years ago

The company president knows the Zoom meeting is being recorded – or he has to assume it’s being recorded. If he doesn’t show the requisite devotion to Holy Negritude, the video goes on Twitter as evidence that he’s a raciss white soopremaciss Nazi.

Thus he has to swoon with awe at every pronouncement of the fat sheboons he hired. Great decision, huh? Karma’s a bitch, boomer.

Reynard
Reynard
Member
Reply to  Pete
3 years ago

“the requisite devotion to Holy Negritude”
lmao
You painted the exact picture of the scenario, honestly. I told the GF not to mention these meetings to me anymore, it just pisses me off.

You are undoubtedly correct. But she complained that the President in question as well as her own Xer boss seemed at times eager to contribute to the discussion. I don’t know just how much they are conscientiously gritting their teeth, and how much they have subconsciously agreed to the whole sham for their own benefit.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Reynard
3 years ago

The prez knows if he says the wrong thing he gets sued and gets a visit from the EEOC, also he will get doxed. One of the things that has made wokism so dangerous is the legal profession whom the snowflakes run to any time they have a issue. I saw that over 20 years ago working for a defense contractor, the females and Noggers would run to a lawyer anytime they had a issue. So management treated them with kid gloves. The sickening thing is they wouldn’t lift a finger for a white guy being destroyed by the company… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

“Most of us realized we are just monkeys there for a paycheque (and this is a decent white collar company).”

This very simple fact, formerly a well known truth to many, is now more of an unbelievable revelation to most. Know this, and having a job just gets that bit easier. As a mate of mine said to me yesterday when I ask how work is going:

Work sucks balls but I don’t bring it home, so fuck it

Sage advice. The career women would do well to heed it.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Why I never understood women who wanted to work Men tried telling them work sucks, but they didn’t listen My wife ain’t perfect, but there are two things I love about her. One, she hates work and doesn’t mind saying it and looking at career women like they’re crazy. It’s always funny to watch the interplay between her and working women. She loves being a housewife (I.e. watching tv all day and shooting the breeze with family and friends). The other thing is she hates fags and trannies and will tell them to their faces “until you shit a watermelon,… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  Falcone
3 years ago

I can practically smell the anti depressants and boxed wine and cat litter coming out of their pores.

I’ve noticed a sharp uptick in pajeet career women lately too. I can’t tell if they’re better or worse than the white ones.

The women who work but kind of realize they’re just working to pay the mortgage / support the kids are much nicer to be around.

Your wife sounds pretty based.

Strike Three
Strike Three
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

This is tangentially, kinda sorta related to what you have posted. I am a high school teacher (in a private school, thank goodness). This school year (2020-2021) we have had times where we only had half our students coming physically to school, and the students at home that day were required to log-in to each class via Let’s Meet (on their Chromebooks.) It’s been unbelievably discouraging for me as a teacher this year. I quickly realized that my students at home that day were indeed logging in to the Let’s Meet sessions, but were either muting me, or staring blankly… Read more »

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Strike Three
3 years ago

Social media from all accounts has been nothing but sheer poison to young people’s intellectual and emotional development. It essentially stunts their development or even regresses it. They become like the monkey in the experiment who is wired to get a serotonin hit for pressing a button. So the monkey does to the exclusion of everything else. This is the young person of today raised on the internet. But most parents love it because it functions as a baby sitter so they let ruin their kids. The Silicon Valley titans know this and keep their kids away from Ipads and… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Rwc1963
3 years ago

I still have the educational wooden toys I bought for my firstborn while overseas so many years ago. Child-safe paint on wooden disks to thread onto a spindle; various half spheres of different colors and sizes to do the same, a wooden sort-of erector set from New Zealand. That’s what my grandson (due in Sep) is getting. Nothing electronic for years, at least not from me.

Moss
Member
3 years ago

I’ll admit to being perplexed by Our People’s general response to the smell of something wicked this way coming. When do behaviors change from financial / consumption to projection, recognizing that the shit storm is man made? Man-made suggests man-fixed.
Clutching the purse strings will not keep us out of the boxcars.

B125
B125
Reply to  Moss
3 years ago

It’s in the air. I don’t need to say a word to certain white guys to know what they’re thinking.

For most normies the response is either confusion or depression. “Why do all these minorities still scowl at me *even though I’m such a good anti-racist*?” “Wow all of the sudden I’m a stranger in my own neighborhood.” “This is hopeless, whites are finished.”

The winds are being picked up by white people and it’s producing various responses, oftentimes not helpful. But it’s a start.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

No doubt. I have been able to say many more things to whites since the shamdemic began than ever before. Something is definitely different. And these things aren’t just virus related, they can be race related too.

Moe Noname
Moe Noname
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Them: “You’re racist!”
2020 me: “no I’m not! I judge people base on their character, MLK, blah, blah, blah…”
2021 me: “and?”

Epaminondas
Member
3 years ago

“The main feature of this age will be men racing from one station to the next, trying to keep the plates spinning.”

Sounds like the late Roman Empire. And that process went on for several centuries. Oy!

Nathan Cleburne
Nathan Cleburne
Reply to  Epaminondas
3 years ago

Empires seem to rise and fall faster these days than 1600 years ago. Maybe due to the speed of communication/travel. I don’t know. I suspect that the Globohomo empire may not last very much longer. 20 years? 10? Next week? Who knows?

B125
B125
Reply to  Nathan Cleburne
3 years ago

Ironically globohomo only works with white people who buy into the whole system at large. They can do their whole degenerate schtick but generally latinos or arabs just get kinda concerned and confused and then ignore them. When you walk away and create your own communities Globohomo is kind of inconsequential. It’s only white people who pay taxes, white people who play all the right roles, ie. liberal trailblazer or dutiful conservative loser. White people follow laws even if they’re stupid. etc. The future of the west at the current rate is not globohomo but it’s not particularly nice either.… Read more »

sentry
sentry
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

“It’s only white people who pay taxes, white people who play all the right roles, ie. liberal trailblazer or dutiful conservative loser. White people follow laws even if they’re stupid. etc.”

cause it’s their country, the subspecies are just tourists

B125
B125
Reply to  sentry
3 years ago

Was* our country.

I still act with white thoughtfulness and kindness to my fellow whites.

With non-whites and anti white institutions I act like a parasitical third worlder.

Our new nation is based around our skin colour.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

At least the food will be good. Mexican food. Perhaps a Shawarma stand from the sand, er, the Levant types. I can’t speak for Mideasterners, but certainly the Hispanic popuation manages “normal” community, more or less. They own and operate shops, stores and probably large companies. In contrast, Blacks are 13% of the population and how many businesses do they run? Beyond the local hair weave shop or occasional other small business, damned little. Here in my niche of rural FL, we are blessed with only about 1/2 the national average. The only local “colored” business I’m aware of, beyond… Read more »

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

Whites are mostly clueless f**ks, especially as you go up the social-economic ladder. I used to read Sailer and his posters were always whining about the state of education and how it damaged their kids Yet when I pointed out WTF are you doing then by sending your kids to public schools and colleges that brainwash them into Leftist trash? All I got was crickets, These men were incapable of saving their own children because it would mean acknowledging the country they grew up in was gone. There is probably a special place in hell for fathers who lack the… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Rwc1963
3 years ago

Yes, I see this all the time. Most people protest that they could not educate their children themselves – assuming that teachers are somehow miracle workers. They’re not. Occasionally they make sensible financial arguments, but when pushed admit that they could get by without two holidays a year.

My wife and I are already gearing up to homeschool our son, even though he is a year or to away from that stage. We’ll happily make do for if it means having a chance to teach our child how to be like us: unashamed and competent whites.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Rwc1963
3 years ago

Just snarked yesterday at Sailer re a commenter saying he couldn’t possibly restrict cellphone/social media access from his preteens or they’d be awkward social outcasts. And in response I got called monstrous. I go to Sailer to snark and attack the idiots there. He’s not a gateway but a gatekeeper.

David Wright
Member
3 years ago

After reading this I understand I may have acted somewhat rashly with my stimulus money. Cancelled my online order of new rims for the car.

Hi - Ya!
Hi - Ya!
Reply to  David Wright
3 years ago

Crisis averted!

B125
B125
Reply to  David Wright
3 years ago

Sheeit.

Alexa, cancel ma grape soda, rimz n fried chicken order

TomA
TomA
3 years ago

A New Tomorrow (cont) To each his own. Everyone is unique, as is their ability to aid in righting the ship in which we all sail. At some point, whining & voting will be revealed as useless distractions and there will likely be a slow emergence of tangible folk remedies. For many, withdrawing their support & sanction for a corrupt government is the best that they can do. Still others will join ad hoc militias, which nonetheless keeps the Stasi & its Jackboots occupied plugging holes in the dike. And evolution demands that fewer still will find novel & successful… Read more »

Hi - Ya!
Hi - Ya!
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

Dude, stay focused!

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Hi - Ya!
3 years ago

Tom is one the most focused guys on this blog outside of Lineman.

We are fast approaching the time when whining and being snarky will have to be set aside for more practical preparations. and measures to ensure our survival.

Historically there is no precedent for the rapid disintegration of a world empire we are witnessing. It’s literally dying from attacks by it’s ruling class that has decided destroy their homeland for reasons that are right out of a insane asylum. All in the space of 30 years and counting.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

Sounds focused to me. The salient point I took was the recognition that each individual would/could/should uniquely resist in the manner best suited to his situation. Some would succeed—be more effective—than others and that would lead to success, of a sort, and be promoted/expanded in coming generations.

A long term look with a Darwinian perspective. Typical TomA posting. Well done.

Ripple
Ripple
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

Stasi and the Jackboots would be a good name for an industrial-metal band.