The New And Improved GOP

If you have an idea for a new solution to an old problem, you have two ways to promote your new solution. One is you can try to convince people it is a novel solution that is not just a better version of old solutions. It is a compete departure from the old way of addressing the problem. The other option is to disguise the originality of your solution and pitch your new idea as an advance on the old idea. Your new solution is a new and improved way of solving this old problem.

For example, you have come up with a new home cleaning product. Instead of the normal kitchen cleaner that relies about chemicals, your new product relies on microorganisms that eat the typical kitchen grime. You could try to convince people that using an alien life form to keep the stove clean is better than the old way of getting rid of grease and grime. Alternatively, you could skip past the details and focus on the amazing ability of your new product to clean the stovetop.

One approach is about changing minds. In this case, you need to convince people that novel life forms are better than chemicals. The other approach is about positioning your product at largest point of agreement. In this case, most people hate cleaning their kitchen, so you focus on that as your rallying point. The choice comes down to how open minded people will be about the novel idea. If you think people are open to a new approach, then your novel idea is the better option.

It also depends upon your willingness to take risks. You could try and fail to change people’s minds about using invincible critters to clean the kitchen. They could be perfectly safe and better for the environment than the use of caustic chemicals, but people freak out over invisible critters. Your effort to change how people think about the use of microorganisms could fall on deaf ears. Even worse, they could think you are a crazy person promoting dangerous ideas.

This is always the dilemma of politics. The reason the parties sound like two metronomes is they think it is safer to focus on the established market. They eschew novelty because that runs the risk of catastrophic failure. Their donors could be offended, or some large segment of their voting base could oppose  it. The downside of the tried and true is a modest election loss. The downside of embracing a novel set of ideas is turning the party into a fringe party of weirdos.

This framing is what the Republicans now face. Most would like to go back to being the bland shadow of the Democrats. That was easy and fun. It required little risk, as all they had to do is wear little American flag lapel pins and be mean to Democrats. Until the 2016 debacle, being a Republican was simple. You waited for the Democrats to step on a rake, and then you talked about it on Fox News. Come the election you told your voters that they had to vote for you or the Democrats would win.

The one thing the Republicans seem to have figured out is the old approach is not going to work, even if the evil orange menace has been purged from their city. Maybe it is the threat of Trump running in 2024 or their own internal polling, but they seem to have figured out that the old product is not going to sell. They need a new product to take to their voters if they hope to win future elections. This is the gist of this memo circulated by the House GOP leadership last month.

In addition to it being leaked to the public, friendly media was told to promote it to the typical Republican readers. Here is James Pinkerton promoting the working class stuff in the context of British politics. That one off-year election is supposed to be a proof of concept for the new working-class conservative. Here is Fox News “reporting” on the origins of the memo and the person behind it. The “minuscule minority” bit seems to be coded language for the neoconservatives.

Given the timing and the ouster of Liz Cheney, the market testing of the new idea to win elections must have gone well. This summer the Republicans will have their regular meetings and strategy sessions to figure out how to take their new message to the market for the 2022 misterms. At least for now, they think sounding like a kinder gentler Donald Trump is the ticket to success. Look for them to stump in shirt sleeves or maybe blue jeans and flannel shirts this fall.

It is tempting to think they are going for the novel approach as outlined at the beginning, over the tried and true approach. In reality, they are not veering far from their standard approach to politics, which is a pure economic play. That has always been the GOP approach to politics, when you strip away the gingerbread. “Vote for us and you have more money and more cheap stuff.” They are now tailoring that message for the humans their analysists have identified as working class.

The trouble with this approach is the Trump phenomenon was not powered by economic anxiety. Immigration, for example, was never about money but about culture and demographics. Lots of people hate the changes they see in their communities and they were attracted to the TV carny-barker because he mentioned it. The same is true about trade policy. What people see is Walmart and Amazon obliterating small business and they associate it with global trade policy.

The other problem is there is an “own the libs” vibe to it. The people running the Republican Party are just as divorced from the dreaded private sector as the robots running the Democratic Party. Is anyone going to mistake Ben Sasse for a working class guy? Kevin McCarthy? Lyndsey Graham? There is a good chance they look like John Kerry dressed up as a hunter in the 1996 election. These Republicans talking like Huey Long will underscore their otherness to the voters.

On the other hand, homo economicus has always been a homunculus for white middle-class voters to crap into in order to avoid the culture war. In this regard, the Republican message, like the libertarianism on which is rests, has always been a form of political escapism for white people. Reducing everything to money means avoiding the debate about culture items, like race and sex. Reframing Trumpism to be nothing more than an economic play fit the conditioning of the typical white voter.

On the other other hand, the thing that sociopathic grifters always know is there is one last squeeze of even the oldest lemon. This could wring out one more good election for a party that no longer has a reason to exist. Baby Boomers, hoping to buy enough time will flock to the message. The struggling economy and the reality of the Biden administration will suck the life from the Left. The GOP will get one last shot to sucker white people into thinking this time will be different.


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FeinGul
FeinGul
3 years ago

VOTE!! Prediction; all the Election races necessary to the system and the Dems will be won in the 72%~ range, indeed with massive overkill, just like 2020. This will genuinely shock Normie and especially Norma.

It will then repeat complete with genuine shock again in 2024.

So no, the vote doesn’t count and never will again. Indeed your vote is already counted and probably already printed, certainly the software already has counted it totals.

Nothing new here, this is normal one party rule.

FeinGul
FeinGul
3 years ago

Politics is Power. If this is True, then where is the Power? Is it in the elected? I say NO, especially now. So the GOP and talk of elections is all very entertaining and despairing at the same time in the gallows humor way, but as of Jan 20, 2021 Elections are no longer Power, and hence elections are no longer Political. In fairness Z has long recognized this is a show to distract the masses. But this all begs the questions of who has the power, do we want them to continue to having the power, and what do… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
3 years ago

My guess is pist-Trump, small donations dried up and the rubes have closed their pocketbooks. Despicable grifters like McCarthy and McConnell are indeed trying to squeeze the lemon one more time. My suspicion is although a sneeze could flip the House in a free and fair election, it would not be by a huge margin due to Whites exiting the system.
Look at the tepid support for our Greatest Ally and Fox now, subtract some more, and there you have the state of the GOP.

Ripple
Ripple
3 years ago

It was the 2004 election, not 1996, when John Kerry ran and revealed himself to be a complete dork.

We are all Kosh
We are all Kosh
Reply to  Ripple
3 years ago

I think it was 1971, at the Winter Soldier investigation.

Hi - Ya!
Hi - Ya!
3 years ago

Nother awesome fargin’ article, Z. Anybody got their finger on the pulse of politics like Z? You da man, man!

RoBG
RoBG
3 years ago

If the Republicans cared about the Working Class (they don’t) they’d slash immigration and non-immigrant work visas to create a labor market that works for
the benefit of its own citizens. They’d do something about the appalling prices we pay for prescription drugs and healthcare. They’d be bringing critical manufacturing back here so we’re not beholden to China, etc. They hate us. They’re just not as open about it as the Democrats.

JohnWayne
JohnWayne
Reply to  RoBG
3 years ago

I don’t think they hate us, it’s just that they have such low regard for us. They have no respect for us, patriotism, nationalism, or national boundaries. The world is their oyster. The see us as little people. Beneath them. Fungible economic units, to be exploited for their own enrichment. Pay your taxes, shop at Amazon, watch your Netflix and sports, know your place, keep voting, put your mask on, keep your mouth shut!

Feingul
Feingul
Reply to  JohnWayne
3 years ago

They fear and hate us.
The fear, most unfounded drives the hate.

miforest
Member
3 years ago

the nexus of power is in the bureacracy and pressure groups, and their world economic forum paymasters. It looks like things are motion that neither party will be able to get control of .

miforest
Member
Reply to  miforest
3 years ago

the supply chain issues seem to self perpetuating . sooner or later it will get out of hand a

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  miforest
3 years ago

I am starting to believe that the supply chain issues will ultimately serve to collapse this globalist Tower of Babel on itself.

FeinGul
FeinGul
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
3 years ago

No.

Just to starve us out. See Ireland 1847.

Milestone D
Milestone D
3 years ago

I’ve long argued that the Trump phenomenon was a lagging indicator of the wider-GOP base’s final realization of the GOP scam. I started hearing wide-spread skepticism in the GOP leadership in the run-up to the 2014 midterms. I’d hear GOP voters comments like “I got some email from (GOP Congressman) asking me for $ to ‘fight the Obama agenda’ and it’s all BS … they ain’t going to do a damn thing.” Trump’s either genius or dumb luck in 2016 was to figure out that the GOP rank and file were increasingly convinced that their politicians are willing losers. That’s… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Milestone D
3 years ago

Trump was the first salvo in a changing of the guard. Larger political realignment as GOP becomes the ‘white’ party. Somebody (Sailer?) wrote about it.

JohnSmith
JohnSmith
Reply to  Milestone D
3 years ago

McCain wasn’t a “loser”, he was an agent for the Corporatists and was a CFR member for 20 years. Somehow, Trump didn’t bother to point that out. The “McCain Institute” board included CFR members Lynn F. de Rothschild, David Petraeus, and Joe Lieberman.

Marcy Casterline O'Rourke
Reply to  Milestone D
3 years ago

Having worked in TV and watched the networks and cable die, I agree Trump is a lagging indicator. He was the last guy TV made famous. But I went to a Trump rally in Lynden WA, before he was nominated and it was one of the most stunning events I’ve ever witnessed. The energy was off the charts. Of course, the Libs chained themselves across bridges, etc, to stop Trump, which had the exact opposite of their intended effect. When Trump triumphed in spite of the always infuriating liberals, it was all he had to do. No one in the… Read more »

acetone
Member
3 years ago

Off Topic: real life reparations data point. Friend on the west coast who runs a team at an engineering company just had one of his reports leave to go to a professional grad school program at an Ivey. Its a non-STEM program (which means student typically pays) but in this case, since she is black, the grad school is covering 90% of cost. Over the course of the program, the kid will save 250k compared to the other students who pay full price. She is ordinary performer with mediocre undergrad and professional track record. No one thought that she was… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

This is easier said than done of course: If you are a White student, or the parents of a White student, contemplating paying big money (borrow or not) for such a university program, whether undergrad or advanced, STEM or not, based upon what’s just been said, you should think it over very carefully. No matter how good Junior’s actual skills and performance, the once-prestigious value of that diploma is already greatly diminished and liable to become even more dubious in the future. Can Junior possibly find a better use for his time and your money, an alternative career path? The… Read more »

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

Regarding your point #2, do you really think that the grifting bitches in HR are not going to embrace their kindred spirit grifters – unqualified and likely not intelligent enough to actually become qualified – when to do so would surely increase their entrenchment within their organizations?

Come on, man. It’s tribal all the way down, and I do mean DOWN.

Norham Foul
Norham Foul
3 years ago

Beautiful. I would only add one word “The GOP will get one last shot to sucker PUNCH white people into thinking this time will be different.”

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
3 years ago

It’s still a long way from May 2021 to November 2022. We’ll see a lot of things. We’re entering one of those maelstroms that we haven’t seen since the 60’s and 70’s. With big events rocking the country once a month. The economic deterioration will be palpable in Nov 2022. Trump will be charged with criminal tax evasion by then. I see the far left gaining more traction as they get exasperated with the corpse. Keep in mind, with all this infrastructure spending what you’re not seeing from Congress, the holy grail Medicare for All, that the Democrats have been… Read more »

Reziac
Reziac
3 years ago

If Scribd is showing you the same raw binary it’s showing me, there’s a legible copy of the Memo here:

https://www.thethinkingconservative.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/banks-working-class-memo.pdf

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Reziac
3 years ago

Agreed for a different reason. White votes will decline not just due to demographics. You’ll have a large number just not vote, some because of what you wrote, others out of disgust.

I give this much to Trump although irmt was inadvertent: he redpilled many Whites who don’t know tge definition of “redpill.”

Falcone
Falcone
3 years ago

Reminds me of my buddy During our So Cal drought a few years back, everyone had to get “drought tolerant” plants (i.e. succulents and cactus, all the rage, along with “hardscape” which is bricks and pavers in place of grass). Plus the city water/power and state were threatening to impose water rationing, another story for another day But he was up on this newfangled watering system, little black tubes instead of sprinklers which wasted water and let it pour into the street. The tubes were instead specific to the plant and watered it with a tiny jet. Needless to say,… Read more »

trackback
3 years ago

[…] ZMan scans the hype. […]

American Citizen 2.0
American Citizen 2.0
3 years ago

Well said Z Man. Some good comments here too. The Democrats have fought back though in a spectacular fashion, if we are going to look upon it all as outsiders, which I do more and more lately. The thing the Republicans always had going for them with the economics stuff, at least as far I have experienced it in adulthood from the 90s to the present, was the fact that it was always super hard to get a job. Everything packed up and went away and people were desperate. This has happened several times in succession in a way that… Read more »

Carl B.
Carl B.
Reply to  American Citizen 2.0
3 years ago

Quote:

“The Democrats showed that communism works basically…”

You gotta be joking.

American Citizen 2.0
American Citizen 2.0
Reply to  Carl B.
3 years ago

No. I am not joking. In my vibrant megacity, 100% democrat, they seem to think everything is working out fantastically so far as I can tell. Everyone likes the extra unemployment money and stimmy checks. To be honest I love getting my groceries delivered rather than shopping at the store. The Federal government is dumping billions and billions into infrastructure projects for the city and bailing out pensions and so forth. It’s all been a huge boon. Communism works great if you are on the side of the commisars.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  American Citizen 2.0
3 years ago

Communism works great until it doesn’t work. What is happening now, is that such is becoming apparent—even to Wall Street—and stocks are tumbling/stumbling. This was predicted, but was thought to appear in 2022 and stocks continued to rise as it looked like looting could continue for another year. Everything depends upon the dollar as appearing sound.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

Nah, they pumped Google almost 50 points on lame headlines about their shitty new retail gadget store in the dead and rotting city of New York.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  American Citizen 2.0
3 years ago

The current economic policies are insane, but they are not communism.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

The current policies strike me as a Cloward-Piven style exercise in turning the system up to 13 until it implodes so we can Build Back Better.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Ostei, you are technically correct. I used Communism as a poor descriptor of a concept of centralized command and control of the economy and the people within. On the other hand it does seem we are headed to a situation similar to today’s China and the CCP.

JohnWayn
JohnWayn
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Economic corporatism, cultural Marxism.

Gespenst
Gespenst
Reply to  Carl B.
3 years ago

Communism works well for the rulers. For a while anway..

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Carl B.
3 years ago

It works as long as the store isn’t empty. As a wise man once said of socialism: “The problem with socialism (communism, whatever) is eventually you run out of other people’s money (or goods to redistribute.)”

The seed corn makes perfectly good corn bread, as long as there’s still some in the bin.

B125
B125
Reply to  American Citizen 2.0
3 years ago

There’s alot of white Boomer and white middle class money to steal. I’m sure they can fund it for a time.

As I said yesterday, the USA is still the top country in the world for attracting educated talent. Salaries are high and housing is cheap compared to the rest of the Anglosphere.

Doesn’t take many whites to keep things “running”. South Africa is like 7% white and has been creaking along for 20 years.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

SA is slowly collapsing. Just because they keep some of the mines going is not an indication of health or that 7% Whites can keep the corpse animated. Look at the infrastructure. Once great cities without water. Rolling blackouts for the nation. The Rand loses value on the market. SA is returning to Africa.

Those Whites keeping the shitshow running have made a Faustian bargain by agreeing to be the last ones “eaten”.

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

And so you agree on the point B125 makes. Even SA can keep running for decades with a huge parasite class greatly larger than ours, much worse anti-white legal apartheid Jim Snow laws than we have here, and much more extensive socialism. Their level of prosperity is irrelevant and nonresponsive to the point: that antiwhite communist system can trundle on for decades, maybe centuries. “It’ll eventually collapse” is apparently true of every from of government in human history. The question is, will we be able to hold out until that happens naturally? Probably not.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Good ol' Rebel
3 years ago

I guess that depends upon what you mean by “running.” SA is a thoroughly dysfunctional husk of a nation state. The fact that it formally still exists doesn’t mean it’s running by any civilized standard.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Good ol' Rebel
3 years ago

There is “a lot of ruin in a great country” as has been said here. It won’t be centuries, but a few decades at most. First, the SA deal (1995) to end apartheid and turn over the reins of control stipulated a period of guaranteed White representation in the government. That is now over. So we are probably looking at a period of 20 years now that the lunatics have run the asylum. And of course, I disagree with your term “kept running”. As I said before, the infrastructure is badly neglected. The army, once the strongest in sub Saharan… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

By quick Google, South Africa is ranked #3 for crime rate, after Venezuela and Papua New Guinea. Per the map, South America is quite violent. Africa is suspicious as many areas are not “reporting.” Somehow, I doubt that sub-Saharan Africa has rates as low as Greenland 😀
https://www.numbeo.com/crime/rankings_by_country.jsp

JohnSmith
JohnSmith
Reply to  American Citizen 2.0
3 years ago

Call it “corporatism”, not “communism”. It’s a network of interlocking corporate entities, including the various government agencies. The Reps and Dems are a circus act, and only the “team players” are rewarded and retained. “The argument that the two parties should represent opposed ideals and policies, one perhaps of the Right, and the other of the Left, is a foolish idea acceptable only to doctrinaire and academic thinkers. Instead, the two parties should be almost identical, so that the American people can ‘throw the rascals out’ at any election without leading to any profound or extensive shifts in policy…” —… Read more »

Nunya Bidness
Nunya Bidness
Reply to  JohnSmith
3 years ago

Call it by it’s real name – Fascism. Mussolini would be proud of the Democrats. Heck, Hillary! even ran on a Fascist slogan – “Stronger Together”.

American Citizen 2.0
American Citizen 2.0
Reply to  Nunya Bidness
3 years ago

You join the pantheon of names Nunya. Along with Haywood Jablome and Johnny “\Drop Tables;”

nunnya bidnez, jr
nunnya bidnez, jr
Reply to  Nunya Bidness
3 years ago

Dad, is that you??

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Nunya Bidness
3 years ago

Nunya, only fascism will save us in the short term. Perhaps we can evolve to something else later. But if you reject white fascism then you reject white survival.

Bill
Bill
3 years ago

It strikes me that for most people, race is primary; even for those people who don’t realize it. Back when America was 90% White, no one thought about race; no one had to. America was a White country, run by Whites; everyone knew it, or unconsciously accepted it, so there was nothing to think about. Blacks were a minority, in a minority position; they hadn’t yet begun to challenge the predominance of Whites. Then the Civil Rights Movement came along, beginning in 1954 with the Brown vs. Board of Education decision de-segregating schools, and all the legislation that followed, including… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Bill
3 years ago

One of the “evils” of Trumpism is how it let the CivNats hide the racial aspect of their beliefs. “No, I believe in [some crap that doesn’t exist any more] for all peoples no matter what their race!” would be their pithy retort, but then when asked why they disliked immigration they’d get choked since they’d have to list their criteria for immigrants and it’d be apparent that they were only talking about whites (and maybe some other hangers-ons).

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Bill
3 years ago

Good luck with that. Identity forms early in life. You aren’t going to get large numbers of 30 year olds to start thinking in racial terms unless they already think that way. Even when you can get adults to think that way, they do not legitimately internalize race. Christians and other religious people want to get to children because they want to instill a Christian identity in these children so that when they are adults, they will internalize criticism of Christianity as a criticism of them personally. If Christianity is wrong, you and your existence is wrong. (this is also… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
3 years ago

I understand this group’s concerns and impatience, but things *have* changed. Not a day goes by that I do not hear “local” morning talk radio discuss issues specifically wrt race. Always the same general gist, some Black (sometimes Hispanic or other colored) somewhere is blatantly targeting Whites and practicing “reverse” racism. And I live in a solidly democrat, Hispanic city. Of course, you don’t get such from the local TV or newspaper—those are in the employ of the democrats. Word is getting out. A few years ago, simply saying the words “White” or “Black” in the context of conflict between… Read more »

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
3 years ago

I have a different take from “on the ground.” The millenials were raised believing the tabula rasa, all created equal thing up to high school Then we do college prep and applications, and what do you know, it’s all harder for white males, and blatantly so. Then we get out into the job market and see all the “white males need not apply” diversity signs – some of it now explicit. And we all know there’s no recourse for us in the equal hiring laws, white men don’t get to play that game. When we eventually get jobs, we see… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
3 years ago

Pain focuses the mind.

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  Bill
3 years ago

I’m not a racist. I wasn’t raised to.look down on anybody due to their color. Always had friends who today would be termed POC. I just get sick of having my face rubbed in holy negro everywhere I look! If I want to look at joggers being joggers, DirecTV carries BET. Otherwise, I would just rather watch TV series and movies featuring folks.who look like me. Is that such a crime?!?!

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

You are a racist. And there’s not a thing wrong with that.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

Bill Mullins: Translation: I really don’t want to be tagged with the evil super bad rayciss label, and muh best friends are not White, and I judge individually the way all the best people do. But at the same time I want to remain in my comfortable niche where America is always a majority White country and the media reflects this. If you aren’t racist, why are you here? Accepting the reality of HBD means, while you may prefer to judge people individually, racial averages matter and outliers are just that – non exemplars and mere anecdotes. Refusing to judge… Read more »

Gespenst
Gespenst
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

What’s your plan to correct the situation? We need some “action items”.

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Damn, 3g, you psychoanalyse and profile me without ever having met me. If you were even half as intelligent you think you are you could spot Marilyn vos Savant 40 IQ points and still come out ahead!

Please note that I boldly use the name by which I am known and refer to where I live while cravens such yourself hide behind cutesy noms de net. What are you afraid of?

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
3 years ago

The GOP situation is a fascinating experiment posing the hypothesis: Does a national Party actually need a voter base in America today? By “voter base”, I mean actual Americans who support the bulk of a Party’s platform and will vote. It’s clear that the GOP today is just a “consumer brand” used by a Donor Class, as hardly anyone supports the actual GOP platform (open border, empire, capitulation in the Race War etc.). Like the Whigs of old, the GOP has become a loose coalition party fighting for Donor Class issues long after its actual voters have moved on to… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Captain Willard
3 years ago

“t’s clear that the GOP today is just a “consumer brand” used by a Donor Class, as hardly anyone supports the actual GOP platform (open border, empire, capitulation in the Race War etc.). ”

People who say clownworld is a natural outcome of Liberal Democracy need to explain this phenomenon. It is not the dirt-people who are the driving force of clownworld.

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
3 years ago

Because the highest value of liberal democracy is attention-getting public piety. There can be no legitimate opposition to what everyone accepts as morally good. The opposition will always be a coattail-hanging shadow.
Because of the nature of democracy, the electorate will inexorably increase and thus the morality accepted by the public will always decend to the lowest common denominator.
Thus necessarily must result in oppression olympics and gibsmedat due to the altruism, pity, and charity of white culture. Humans will act in accordance with their nature, so this cesspool is the result of that system.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
3 years ago

There were several studies done after the Vietnam War looking into why the working class supported the war with less fervency than the educated class. Credentialed people whose success and prosperity are correlated with the success of ‘the system’ are more likely to have elements of their personal identity composed of ‘system’ culture. The system is their tribe.

If the system is delegitimized, then their success is to some degree delegitimized, and they take it personally. If ‘the system’ slides into clownworld, then will slide into it, too, as long as the rate of change is slow enough. (frog boil)

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Horace
3 years ago

“Credentialed people whose success and prosperity are correlated with the success of ‘the system’ are more likely to have elements of their personal identity composed of ‘system’ culture. The system is their tribe.”

That’s a good point. You criticize the system and they take it, probably rightfully so, as a criticism of them.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
3 years ago

People who say clownworld is a natural outcome of Liberal Democracy need to explain this phenomenon. 1) Liberalism is a pseudo-religious ideology that prioritizes liberating people from some oppressive exogenous thing. Ultimately, it will turn to liberating people from reality and nature. Which is obviously impossible and leads to cultural and personal instability and insanity as it keeps pushing the impossible. 2) Representative democracy has a number of fatal flaws, including: a) an agent- principle problem between the voters and representatives b) trends to mediocrity as elections are mere popularity contests and the skills that lead to popularity are different… Read more »

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Dinothedoxie
3 years ago

Put it altogether and even if you start with a religious self reliant people who exercise a limited franchise – in that only intelligent and successful men vote for a government with limited goals. Within a very short period of time flawed people will seek election for their own purposes, and do so by promising to fix some real or imagined problem. In office they’ll do so to some extent and also take care of themselves. Which leads to the role and size of the government growing a little bit. Lather rinse and repeat for many generations and you wind… Read more »

Leonard E Herr
Member
3 years ago

I doubt the next presidential election will be between milder versions of either Trump of Biden. The oscillation is increasing and we’re now due for Trump on steroids. Whether there will be another swing the other way after that depends on how much ruin is in this nation.

My other prediction, for what it’s worth, is the mid-terms next year will be lit. Buy popcorn futures.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  Leonard E Herr
3 years ago

RE: proposition oscillation is increasing.
There seems to be no end to the canditates on the Dem side who would oscillate further left. As for the GOP side being due for a Trump on steroids to oscillate in the other direction – got anyone in mind?

Spingehra
Spingehra
Reply to  Stranger in a Strange Land
3 years ago

Vlad the impailer.

Melissa
Melissa
3 years ago

Meanwhile, the conservative talk radio pundits in the D.C area are constantly repeating “the republicans are stronger than ever!” and raving about the wise and extraordinary Stefanik. Is it possible that they truly believe this drivel?
It really has become the grift that keeps on grifting, lying and pillaging.

NateG
NateG
3 years ago

Seeing Lindsey Graham dressed in a cowboy outfit or army fatigues would be pretty funny!

Boarwild
Boarwild
Reply to  NateG
3 years ago

Has a definite Village People vibe to it ;<)

NateG
NateG
Reply to  Boarwild
3 years ago

In the Navy
Lindsey can sail the seven seas
In the Navy

KGB
KGB
Reply to  NateG
3 years ago

Lord, he’d make Mike Dukakis appear to be an alpha male.

NateG
NateG
Reply to  KGB
3 years ago

Bruce Jenner was in that Village People movie. There you go! He (she) and Lindsay can sing a duet at the RNC.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
3 years ago

Having money in a crappy overcrowded high crime nation is not happiness. The mayor of Chicago telling us she will not talk to white males should be a eye opener to the GOP goobers like McCarthy and Pence but they will just ignore that warning sign. The Christian Zionists can also be comforted that their politicians like Senator Tom Cotton seems to love Israel more than the citizens of Arkansas.
Arkansas must have a large jewish population?
The disconnect of Christian Zionists is amazing.
The GOP has a long way to go before it comes around and awakens.
If ever.

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
3 years ago

That’s the key. There are very few jews in Arkansas, so the locals have no reason to believe they are any different from other “white” folks.

That’s the way it is here in Oklahoma. Most people are clueless about jews because there aren’t any around to annoy the shit out of everyone with their neurotic and ethonocentric behavior.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
3 years ago

G Lordon Giddy: Key phrase is your first one: “Having money in a crappy overcrowded high crime nation is not happiness.” Not to Whites who are accustomed to something different, or whose ancestors strove to build something different. The whitish upper class of almost all of South America lives behind bars and walls and armed guards and armored cars. They have lots of money to attend parties with one another and buy high-end products. They aren’t particularly bothered that their nations are filled with a variety of brown people living in corrugated metal and cardboard shacks unless it directly affects… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Vastly over-simplifying. I do have a Spanish (Lit) degree, but not so heavy in history. Nonetheless, here goes! Latin America settled mostly by Spanish, adopted the culture of the Romans. This remains, up to the present day, in their systems of law. Economically, the ancient tradition of enormous Roman landowners remains. The main competitor, the Northern European or “English” system, deviated (when? Middle Ages) when changes were made to favor smaller landowners as opposed to giant royal grants. This is the legal/economic tradition that carried over most fruitfully into the English-speaking “New World.” Another distinction: the Latin tradition for wrought… Read more »

American Citizen 2.0
American Citizen 2.0
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

Thanks for the shout out! I like the fact that people write great comments on this blog.

Montefrío
Member
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

“Whitish”? I live in South America, 17 years now, and I can assure you that we have whites who might even qualify by your standards. I’m u-m-c bordering on wealthy for here, and where I live (NOT in a city), we have none of your stereotyped “protection” systems. Not so many “rejas” (wrought iron grill work) in my neck of the woods either. South America is a large place with far more variety than North Am, a very homogenous and insipid place. There are parts where there exist a comfortable middle class and a very comfortable u-m-c, where we “whitish”… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
3 years ago

They aren’t suckering the DR. I’m sure none of us will ever vote for the Gutless ol’ Party again. If you do, you’re really just a warmed over Griller.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Yes but there’s no lack of Pathos in watching my Griller buddies struggle with their existential plight. They worked hard and expected to retire/die in peace in the America in which they grew up. Was that such an unreasonable expectation? Half the duck blinds in America are filled with guys that think the ducks and Reagan will return if we’re just patient enough. I cannot bring myself to have contempt for them, but neither do I bullsh*t them. Some come around, slowly, and only one by one it seems.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Captain Willard
3 years ago

Captain Willard: You seem to share my husband’s more merciful attitude toward your former peers. He, too, watches as those he left behind in one federal agency or another keep track of their 401ks and kids in various elite colleges while lamenting the inroads clownworld makes on their daily lives. They think my husband has gone a bit nuts with his political takes and good-natured ribbing about what will ultimately happen. He, too, does not hold them in contempt but rather pity. I am not nearly so charitable – if we ever get out of DFW and they leave their… Read more »

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

If I can convince one of my hunting buddies, he could end up saving a lot of people. I think it’s a mistake to give up on your friends. As far as barring my door, any friend with ammo will be welcome. My buddies are generally good shots haha..

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

I don’t intend to vote again period. Seems a.major waste of what little time I have left.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

Bill – If I recall correctly, you will be 70 in a few months. I will be 63. I have no intention dying in the short term. Why are you giving up so early? Note I do not refer to voting; that is an utter waste of time. I’m referring to your overall fatalism. Why quit so young?

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

“Why quit so young?” Because my health is failing. If I live to my birthday in ’24 I will have outlived my mother. If I live to Thanksgiving ’28 I will have outlived my dad. There is already more shit going on than I want to live in. It hurts to see the republic to which I devoted a decade of my life going down the shitter. Prior to the founding of the church of Covid the cool-aide drinkers were not evident and so I could pretend I was not such an outlier. Now it is all too easy to… Read more »

Montefrío
Member
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

I’ll be 75 in a couple of months, have lived in my self-designed and custombuilt house for 17 years, the little oak is now mighty (“See the tree/how big it’s grown”), my three grandchildren live 60 yeards away on the same property and I still chase (and sometimes catch!) women considerably younger than I, have Sunday b-b-q (Argentine version) with family and friends, enjoy walks in our peaceful and lovely village…

Trust me, sir, there’s more to do than meets the eye at first glance. Keep on truckin’!

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

Ostei: I stopped voting back in 2012 but regrettably lapsed and voted for Trump in 2016. My husband still thinks voting locally matters, or perhaps it’s just habit. But the guy who was initially our Texas state rep, and who is now our Congresscritter, initially claimed to mostly side with our interests when I challenged him personally when he first ran for state office (that was before he ascended into Congressional immunity from dirt people contact). I just learned he sided with the Dems on the Jan 6 inquiry. I’m going to hammer this home to my husband. Voting locally… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  3g4me
3 years ago

I voted for Trump twice, but ’20 was the last vote I’ll ever cast. I know that Reps and Dems are just different shades of evil. And I also know every single Rep, no matter what he might say, will betray white people when it gets down to the nitty gritty. They are all backstabbing liars. Every single one of them.

tashtego
Member
3 years ago

The message I wish were conveyed to the Republican Party is the threat that unless they start fighting right now, today, in the same partisan manner we see from the most radical white-hating black-supremacists and aliens, for the rights and interests of the white population, whites are going to find people that will. That should be the bar for even having a chance of white voters showing up. Did you introduce a bill and fight for it that counters current anti-white apartheid? Did you fight to get the white political prisoners released? Did you work have reliable partisans installed in… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  tashtego
3 years ago

Whoah there. You’re assuming they actually want to help out whitey, and not just golf, get paid from Israeli representatives, and have gay sex.

Serious question: why would a homosexual like Kevin McCarthy want conservatism? He doesn’t want to go back in the closet. He wants to be a degenerate and feed his sexual desires. Specifically, he wants low taxes so he can keep more of his money to do degenerate stuff.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

“He doesn’t want to go back in the closet. He wants to be a degenerate and feed his sexual desires. Specifically, he wants low taxes so he can keep more of his money to do degenerate stuff.”

Exactly, that way he can counter inflation on butt plugs. And also inflation on inflatable butt plugs.

tashtego
Member
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

I agree, we can assume something like 90% of current Republican elected officials are just parasites, punch-clocks and traitors and would never engage in the kind of attacks I’m envisioning. But it can be demanded and their refusal can be punished. There are enough dissidents now to effect the process I believe. Even if they install pod-person Republicans in districts that demand true white-partisans they just erode the legitimacy and power of the system they are trying to perpetuate. It’s a litmus test that could start before next mid-terms. Did you fight to get political prisons released? Did you fight… Read more »

acetone
Member
Reply to  tashtego
3 years ago

“It’s a litmus test that could start before next mid-terms.” Agree with you. Republican Quislings must go. A good starting point is Republicans who voted for the Democrat Jan 6th Commission. I include list below: Rep. Don Bacon (NE) Rep. Cliff Bentz (OR) Rep. Stephanie Bice (OK) Rep. Liz Cheney (WY) Rep. John Curtis (UT) Rep. Rodney Davis (IL) Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (PA) Rep. Jeff Fortenberry (NE) Rep. Andrew Garbarino (NY). Rep. Carlos Gimenez (FL) Rep. Tony Gonzales (TX) Rep. Anthony Gonzalez (OH) Rep. Michael Guest (MS) Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (WA) Rep. French Hill (AR) Rep. Trey Hollingsworth (IN)… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

Not surprised to see Tom Reed on there. He was angling for a run at the governorship until a story broke about having an affair with a staffer. So now he’s going to hang it up at the end of this term. With no further need to play the game, he’s gone fully lame duck lib.

acetone
Member
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

Response to KGB: Something similar with Dan Newhouse. He is in a conservative central WA district, was anti-Trump and now has people lining up to primary him in 2022. Interesting that the list is heavy with NY Republican representatives. The upstate districts here are rust belt, blue collar, demographically very white. They are mostly swing districts now but should move right as anti-white racism increases and blue collar interests continue to be sacrificed to neoliberal agenda. If the Republicans weren’t cowards, they should be dominating in these districts on cultural and economic issues. An American First type candidate should primary… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  acetone
3 years ago

They could dominate in these districts if they’d just touch the third rail. Outside of Ithaca, Tom Reed’s district is filled with people who would be very receptive to even a watered down DR platform. Hell, just talk about it — it worked for Trump. A politician with the guts to advocate for his constituency, i.e. whites, even in coded terms, would win in a cake walk.

B125
B125
3 years ago

“The trouble with this approach is the Trump phenomenon was not powered by economic anxiety. Immigration, for example, was never about money but about culture and demographics. Lots of people hate the changes they see in their communities” This is a very pertinent point. I am a high earner for my age category and will likely be a true high earner as I enter my 40s and 50s. I do well financially. The point is not to brag, but to show that identity > money. What good is all the money if I can’t walk at night without fear of… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

There is a potential market for a smaller nation that would admit successful, stable Whites (and perhaps other races), people who could prove they were of good character and not savages. Of course, such a nation would be the source of all manner of boycotts by the “good” nations, if not at risk of military invasions.

B125
B125
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Hmm sounds familiar. That sounds exactly like the promises they’ve been making to us for decades. “[Non white]Immigrants are hard workers who want a better life here”. “You’re not being replaced”. “They are the good ones”. “Hispanics are natural conservatives”.

That ‘stable white country’ already existed everywhere.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

False promises. We are destroyed because we believe false promises.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

The ethnostate that is not at least 85% white by its very charter is not a viable ethnostate. And of the 15% that could be non-white, there could be no sub-Saharans, Moslems or Jews.

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
3 years ago

What the HELL are you toking?!?! Ain’t NO WAY such a place could exist today!!!!

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

It can if we make it happen.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

Ben, I used to think like you—but now am not so sure. Has non-white admission of high achievers been shown to be “passed down” to their offspring at the same rate as with Whites. I’ve seen stat’s, at least with lower class working immigrants, that show increased welfare use by their children (2nd generation). This would also seem consistent with HBD concepts of regression towards the mean. I once sat down at a wedding with a pair of real “Africans” admitted to this country as refugees. Both ambitious and highly trained. They had a better “life plan” for themselves than… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

If not their children, their grandchildren will be African-“Americans” with all of the vice and dysfunction that entails.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
3 years ago

It is not the responsibility of Whites to secure a future for the purported outliers of other races who are of ‘good character and not savages.’ That’s the same ‘high IQ’ fallacy all the fence shitters on Sailer like to parrot. And the lolbertarians.

A White ethnostate means a WHITE ethnostate. Exceptions are just that, and should be very very rare, and much, much, much later.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

I’m not totally sold on this theory. I think there are plenty of conservative voters who got screwed by NAFTA or by immigration (try to find a White drywall guy, for instance) or by Obamacare (a disaster for all working Whites).

I’m not dismissive of the strong cultural issues, but neither can we ignore the significant economic dislocations since NAFTA/WTO that got Trump major traction.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Captain Willard
3 years ago

Where I live it’s easy to find white drywall guys. They’re at home. They can’t find a contractor who’ll hire a white laborer. Non-whites hire their own (or whichever one-shade-darker race it’s their custom to abuse) and whites hire non-whites, claiming that whites are too lazy, “entitled,” etc. The great replacement started on your roof. Bush-style conservative anti-whiteness has dominated and distorted the “uneducated” labor market for decades—and it shows no sign of lifting its boot. Read any normie con (even Trumpist) site’s comment section re: states cutting off promised unemployment benefits. Normal Republican voters who benefit not one bit… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Hemid
3 years ago

Hemid: We try hard to hire White, but every company seems to have a White front guy to deal with the consumer. Then their ‘work crew’ comes and it’s all Mestizos. They claim the same garbage – can’t find Whites willing to work, can’t afford White wages and remain competitive, ”their” Mexicans are really great and hard working guys, etc.

If some of us knew where to find those out of work White guys we’d hire them in a heartbeat.

American Citizen 2.0
American Citizen 2.0
Reply to  B125
3 years ago

That’s why I feel like we are sort of being used as a kind of Machine Learning simulation for the Israeli government to test various strategies with integration and colonialism. They create the open borders problem here and the log all the different arguments and strategies people use to defend American culture. Which arguments worked. Which arguments were easily rebutted. And then they recast all of that knowledge into justifications for their own nationalism while at the same time sponsoring opponents to nationalism in other countries. The conversation about immigration has always been about culture and identity but mainstream media… Read more »

TomA
TomA
3 years ago

Or it could be that the conductor for the dance band on the Titanic has noticed that there are very few couples out on the tilting floor, and in his panic he has convened a counsel of the usual suspects to participate in a hand-wringing session over what to do about it. But does it really matter what tune they play next? Either way, the Normies will convulse violently to the pulsing beat of a rousing jitterbug while the Progs laugh hysterically and swill their free champagne. And the wise have already retreated to the aft deck and been hard… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  TomA
3 years ago

It seem like the trot out that Magorie Green Taylor, or whatever her name is, on occasion solely to placate normie-idiots for a news cycle. Instead of her existence providing some cover, it merely stresses the foreignness of the GOP.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
3 years ago

“The trouble with this approach is the Trump phenomenon was not powered by economic anxiety. Immigration, for example, was never about money but about culture and demographics. Lots of people hate the changes they see in their communities and they were attracted to the TV carny-barker because he mentioned it. The same is true about trade policy. What people see is Walmart and Amazon obliterating small business and they associate it with global trade policy.” Pretty much the same with how many English felt about Brexit. But hardly any talking head ever mentioned it. Ever. The reasons that many loathe… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

> is approach is the Trump phenomenon was not powered by economic anxiety. Immigration, for example, was never about money but about culture and demographics. Lots of people hate the changes they see in their communities and they were attracted to the TV carny-barker because he mentioned it. Watched ‘Er ist Weider Da’ last night. One of the focal points of the movie was that the real reincarnated Hitler acting as a comedian was able to use modern media to talk about taboo topics like this and resonate to the masses while in an ironic camouflage. The reason who haven’t… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

Ape historians in the future will denote this age as A.B.- “After Brump”.

karl mchungus
karl mchungus
3 years ago

until one of the major parties dies, or at least suffers a mortal wound in a national election, the current political system can safely be said to be in equilibrium. but the world is evolving away from centralized political control, and that is the model that defines the current political class, so a new political party isn’t really going to solve anything, but it will be a sign of change. the way to solve big problems is to change them into multiple small problems. break all the large countries into much smaller units and there are no more big problems… Read more »

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  karl mchungus
3 years ago

Can’t both parties die?

Appallingly bad as (R) are, I can’t believe team (D) installed a senile old man as President with the most tone deaf woman in politics as VP. #3 will do anything to hold onto power, including using every means at her disposal to convince half the country that an actual insurrection attempt took place.

Both parties are just awful, but if I had to put money on it, Team (D) will get it’s act back together first. In a terrifying direction, but mostly unified.

NoOneImportant
NoOneImportant
3 years ago

The one primary plank of the Trumpism platform that is missing from this Republican memo is ending the forever wars in the Middle East. It seems clear that this is the red line that the “donor class” has drawn. I just can’t put my finger on, why they feel that way…

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  NoOneImportant
3 years ago

Perhaps it is a knee-jerk reaction to 70 years of reflexively siding with Israel. Maybe it is a quid pro quo avarice to receive the monetary beneifits associated with working for the Diaspora. It could even be simple bean counting for the Republicans… continuing to cash in the votes of the suicidally pro-Israel evangelicals and their Scofield bible derangement. In any case, don’t expect the Republicans to change their tune about meddling in the Sandbox. Even with the “Neocons” endlessly quiting and requiting the party. (How many times can Rubin and Krystal quit… my count is at least a dozen… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  NoOneImportant
3 years ago

Have you ever heard that Afghanistan is called the “Graveyard of empires?” I did a quick Wiki read. Ignoring earlier history, the British had a go there during much of the 19th century. But eventually they had to leave. You can choose your favourite date for Great Britain’s peak. I use 1914. Everything after that was very much downhill, and the sun set on the British Empire after all. Next came the Soviets in the 1970s. That didn’t do very well either. The Soviet Union officially dissolved in 1991. 20 years. Since the early 00s, of course, the USA has… Read more »

imbroglio
imbroglio
3 years ago

Why is Tucker picking on Frank Luntz? If I were a Pub strategist, I’d have the Pubs match the Dems’ policies, platforms and election promises word for word and then try for candidates who are more telegenic than the Dem candidates as most folks seem to vote the candidate’s attractiveness not the party. Still, now that elections are unstoppably rigged, the Pubs ate toast anyway. Electoral politics is like pro wrestling, diversionary and sometimes enjoyable, but the day to day well being of most people depends not on voting for parties and candidates but on forging strong, healthy bonds of… Read more »

Bill Mullins
Member
3 years ago

That the GOP would so misinterpret the Trump phenomenon is to be expected. The Bhramins of the modern political class are as divorced from.the reality of life for people.like us as any Bhramins in India were ever divorced from the Dalits. They, for the most part are born, reared, educated and employed in separate, highly insular communities separate and apart from the hoi polloi of “deplorables” like us. While there are the occasional “mustangs” (to use the Navy term for a commissioned former enlisted) such as Willy Jeff or Ted Cruz, for the most part the Bhramin caste – elected… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
3 years ago

“Here is James Pinkerton promoting the working class stuff in the context of British politics.” Heh. I have tuned so thoroughly out of mainstream politics I miss these exciting happenings in my own lands. Funny, the author (Pinkerton) seems to think that there is something fundamentally different between the modern Labour and Conservative parties. That said, getting old Labourites to vote Conservative in some regions is impressive; I still maintain that there are some Tory and Labour older back-benchers who maintain a private grip on reality. I suppose I would care more if it felt as thought I could vote… Read more »

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

I suppose I would care more if it felt as thought I could vote my way out of this.

Very true. The first three boxes have well and truly been rendered useless. Only one left now and I’m not entirely sure that will work. The current standing army is so large and increasingly indoctrinated to trust the chain of command that I no longer trust the 4th box.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

The standing army has a large “tail to tooth”. We had a hell of a time getting the troop strength needed just to invade Iraq and then end the resurgence toward the end of Bush II’s reign. Don’t look at a 1.4M active or .6M reserve as all fighters. I believe it’s about the tail is about 8 or 9 to 1.

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

Still large enough to defeat any but a well organized insurgency.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Compsci
3 years ago

“We had a hell of a time getting the troop strength needed just to invade Iraq, much less Appalachia”

And then the troops kept going native and deserting. My gosh, they were like Prussians in North Dakota.

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
3 years ago

The tip-off comes when the party pundits start yammering on about republicans becoming a “multicultural working class party.”

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Major Hoople
3 years ago

To be fair, over here, the Labour party is now the de-facto party of immigrants; well, at least from my observations in London. Come election time, every single poster for Labour I see fawns over blacks and browns… but mainly blacks. I don’t know what the ‘traditional’ workers party was in the US, but Labour has (had) a solid working class history. In fact, out of my many discussions with oldster Labour voters (55+), almost all have been strong critics of multiculturalism who just liked the unions &c. If any pro-white party wanted to sweep up this support, it just… Read more »

Drew
Drew
3 years ago

And yet, I still see no reason to vote.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Drew
3 years ago

I will accept this on one condition: that you call up your representatives and tell them WHY you aren’t voting. Or why you are voting for someone else. You have to remember: those guys need to play before they get paid. They will take any threat to their place at the trough seriously. If you write or call and foam at the mouth – they’ll just laugh and write you off as crazy. If you speak in calm, measured tones like our esteemed blog host – you will scare the living hell out of them. You can be excused for… Read more »

Drew
Drew
Reply to  Glenfilthie
3 years ago

The onus of communication is on the representative since they’re supposed to, you know, represent the voters. If their default attitude is, “I’m going to do what I want unless a voter screams at me,” then they’ve already failed at their role.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Drew
3 years ago

I have communicated my disgust with various elected Republicans who “represent” me in the past. Sometimes you get a form letter reply and always get added to email newsletter and solicitation lists. Given the nature of my comments the thought that a solicitation for a donation would be successful was comical, but some campaign person is trying to make a living. Simply not voting also has a very limited impact. We recently had a school board election where I live. I did not vote as I quit voting in school board elections about a decade ago when it dawned on… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Barnard
3 years ago

At the rate things are devolving, that group will probably be called the “neighborhood militia.” 🙁

Streets n San
Streets n San
Reply to  Barnard
3 years ago

The group that must rise up is the political donor class. By their necks.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Glenfilthie
3 years ago

A bit of outside the box thinking here. You’d make a better point by getting your community to take down ALL political signs in your area. Non-partisan. They just all come down… since they are the same bifurcated party anyway. That sends a much more sober message. These people in this area don’t even want to play the game anymore. They are openly hostile to TPTB. The parties thrive on manipulation and “incumbant fatigue”. Suckering in the population to “come on, vote one more time.. look how bad the other guys are… we’ve changed and are really going to fight… Read more »

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Glenfilthie
3 years ago

An anecdote of republican apathy. I was registered ‘unaffiliated’. My county leans (R) but is going blue in a hurry. During the election I was hounded by phone, text, doorbells from Democrat agents compelling me to pull for D. I had ZERO contact from any (R). I wrote the R mayor several times over the past year. Nada. The only notable change was that the mayors office “redesigned” the mayors website such that it wad nearly impossible to find the contact point for the mayor. Now you have to register with some third-party service on the site in order to… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Screwtape
3 years ago

Screwtape: Consider yourself upvoted and seconded. Every word.

Member
Reply to  Glenfilthie
3 years ago

Whenever I have expressed my concerns to any elected representative over the past 20 or so years, if I receive a reply at all it is a condescending lecture about why I’m wrong and the representative is going to keep doing whatever he was already set on doing.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Glenfilthie
3 years ago

To say that the next election is going to be a “crap shoot” is to implicitly state your believe in a “fair” election process. I no longer have that belief, nor do I see corrective measures being enacted in my home State—AZ. Indeed, everyday the reports circulate about the current forensic audit of the ballots and process from the 2020 election. The local Maricopa County Board of Supervisors resist this process at every step—even to the point of refusing to turn over subpoena evidence. Such is the case in a “blue” State I guess, but it sure doesn’t incline me… Read more »

George 1
George 1
3 years ago

Not this boomer. At least not in the national arena. After the last decade I see no reason to give a damn or waste my time voting for for any of the satanic aliens on offer from the national GOP.

My money and time goes to our state gun rights organizations. At the state level I vote for verified pro 2A supporters only. That issue is my only litmus test now.

BoomerMCMXLVII
BoomerMCMXLVII
Reply to  George 1
3 years ago

This boomer agrees 100%. But then again being from NJ the decision is pretty easy.

Member
Reply to  BoomerMCMXLVII
3 years ago

I wouldn’t wish New Jersey on anyone, but it’s not better here in flyover country. My current rep is in a safe Republican district, and he uses his position to agitate for bringing more Afghan refugees to the US — those brave translators and other personnel who’ve risked so much to support us. I forgot when Kabul became part of my district. Yeah, I guess it sure sucks to be them. Joining an invading force and taking up arms against your countrymen works out badly so often you wonder why anyone does it. They’ve had 20 years to deal with… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Vizzini
3 years ago

Vizzini – Maybe somewhere there’s a small, rural district where voting for the school board or Sheriff makes a difference, but it’s not here in any city in Texas. I drive by all the campaign signs with all the alien names and I remember, back when I voted a decade ago, standing in line with all the alien people.

Not my people. Not my party. Not my country.

NoOneImportant
NoOneImportant
3 years ago

“McCarthy…emphasized that not a single incumbent Republican lost a House seat in 2020.”
This is what McCarthy is really selling, and it is the only thing people on Capitol Hill actually care about.”

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  NoOneImportant
3 years ago

It isn’t entirely true, Steve King lost his primary, which is what the leadership wanted. He could say, no Republican incumbent we wanted here lost a seat in 2020.

Member
Reply to  Barnard
3 years ago

The only guy in Congress who cared about Americans enough to risk his career to say the truth. Sigh.

nunnya bidnez, jr
nunnya bidnez, jr
3 years ago

There are two opposite personality types,there’s the type of person who always wants something new and exciting, whether it’s a new product, new music, new relationships; then there’s the other type of personality that is only comforted by the old and familiar, whether it’s family and old friends, older unchanging products, childhood memories. Most advertising, even political advertising, is geared towards the first personality type; they’re selling something Fresh! and Exciting!, even when it’s the same old soap or the same old dull politics. I see very little in our culture (not just advertising, all cultural products) dedicated to promoting… Read more »

nunnya bidnez, jr
nunnya bidnez, jr
Reply to  nunnya bidnez, jr
3 years ago

It’s similar to the problem of psychopaths and grifters getting into politics; normal people aren’t interested in lording it over other people. politicians are self selected because of their personality type.
Advertising and marketing people self select for that career because of their personality type.
Once again genetics determines outcomes.

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  nunnya bidnez, jr
3 years ago

There are two opposite personality types,there’s the type of person who always wants something new and exciting, [snip] then there’s the other type of personality that is only comforted by the old and familiar Then there are the outliers like me who have no particular problem with “new” so long as it truly solves a problem. What I cannot abide is change purely for the sake of change. Unless the proposed change genuinely solves a problem.and unless the new “solution” is demonstrably unlikely to induce even more problems down the road, I prefer status quo. I may not know why… Read more »

Scupper
Scupper
3 years ago

Oh vey, “voting.”

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
3 years ago

One…interesting thing I suppose is that the GOP tools haven’t nagged the inner party to let all the dissidents out of the torturous DC dungeon. They can pretend a lot but when there are real people in real prison and not only are they not saying anything, but generally endorsing it, then the incongruity is too much to overcome for even the most deluded boomer.

Moe Noname
Moe Noname
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
3 years ago

Mr. Sandmich,
If the past year is any evidence, Boomers and other US residents have an unlimited ability to pretend. They watch as their children/ grandchildren are tortured in order to BE SAFE ™. They are not waking up.
Republicans will take the House in 2022 because our rulers want to keep up the facade.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Moe Noname
3 years ago

You see this kid?

https://twitter.com/owenbroadcast/status/1394687224025858053

We need to give him a hug, proper respect, and tell him exactly who is doing this to him.

Millions of young recruits like this who just need a little push.

Bill Mullins
Member
Reply to  Chet Rollins
3 years ago

I see children masked in public as prima facie evidence of CHILD ABUSE!!! Unfortunately both their parents and the bureaucrats in Child Protective Services are so filled with Democrat/progressive cool-aide that they cannot see it. The wife and I went out to eat a couple of weeks back and had to wait to be seated. There was a.young couple nearby with two small girls. I, as is my habit since the governor of Texas freed us from lockdown, was bare faced. The girls huddled under their mother’s (over??) protected wing and looked at me as if I were Freddy Kruger.… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

Went into the pharmacy yesterday, maskless of course. Druggist was masked, and given the plexiglass screen, I had a hard time hearing her. So she bent around glass, and removed mask and spoke to me. I noticed she had a runny nose—allergies or a cold I suspected. Took care of business, but couldn’t help but remark: “You have a cold—and you wear a mask all day?” Of course, I said this with a smile. Small talk. She replied: “Yeah, these masks are worthless!”

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Bill Mullins
3 years ago

In California, a new mandate:

You can move back to the office, but employers must report a list to the county.

The unvaccinated must wear masks in the office. That list reports the employees wearing masks.

Mark Auld
Mark Auld
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
3 years ago

E.S.,thank you for making this glaringly obvious point. How can anyone of sound mind ignore this,as well as Ashley Babbitts murder still believe they still. Live in Reagan’s America?

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Mark Auld
3 years ago

I no longer refer to America. I call it “clown world”. It gets folk’s attention and focus. I used to call it “bizarro world”, but that often goes over the heads of folk not of my generation and not weaned on DC Comics.