The Real Supply Chain Crisis

Note: Behind the green door is a long post on the Star Trek franchise. I have been watching these off and on for a couple of years and have some thoughts on how the series evolved foreshadowing today’s events.


A popular plot in science fiction shows is that the human stars of the show discover technology from an ancient race. In trying to figure out how it works, they set off a reaction that puts them at risk. They realize they have to figure out the ancient alien technology in order to save the day. Usually, the moral of the story is that humans are infants in the universe. They may have conquered interstellar travel, but they are nowhere near ready to handle the complex stuff.

It is a popular storyline in science fiction shows because it allows the writers to cook up exotic technology without thinking about how it works. The technology can operate like magic to make the plot happen. It also lets the writers do some finger wagging at the enemies of Hollywood. The white cast members are humbled to learn that they are not at the top of the humanoid hierarchy. Mostly it is just an easy way to grind out a script for a television series like the Stargate franchise.

This concept is not without some parallels in this world. There were people in the early Middle Ages confronted with the same issue. They inherited things like aqueducts from the Romans but lacked the social capital to keep them going. The ancient Greeks assumed the Mycenean ruins were built by a race of giants. They could look at the ruins and imagine what they were at their peak, but they had no idea how they were built or who had built them. It was beyond their knowledge.

America may be entering a similar period. One of the growing complaints in the dreaded private sector is the lack of talent. The mass media notices the labor shortage in things like retail and hospitality, but the real scarcity is upstream. Finding people with the cognitive ability and work ethic to fill important roles is not easy. Often the choice is one or the other. The person has the talent but is unreliable or they are reliable but maybe a click below what the position demands.

The main driver is demographics. The Baby Boomer swan song is upon us, and it is showing up in the payroll registers of American companies. The first wave Boomers are in the prime retirement range. Covid has led many to clock out early. The second wave is in their early sixties, so they are planning to wrap things up. Generation-X is a much smaller cohort, and the Millennials are not ready for prime time. The talent – work ethic dichotomy is very obvious with Millennials.

Of course, it is with Millennials where the glories of diversity appear. They are the second least white generation. The Zoomers are mostly nonwhite. That talent – work ethic dichotomy is exacerbated by “the tax”. The cost, in terms of human capital, in hiring the younger generation is much higher, which means the talent for other things is decreased even further. Basically the private sector is facing a smart fraction problem that promises to get much worse in the near future.

This talent shortage is showing up in strange places. College football coaches are not considered super-smart guys, but it is a challenging job. They run what amounts to a mid-sized business with hundreds of employees. They also have to master the complexity of a game that has reached its peak in complexity. Here is an example of one part of a college football playbook. Finding men with the required skillset to run a college football program is becoming increasingly difficult.

The solution in sports like football is to simplify things. This is the new trend in the game to reflect the demographic reality. Instead of complex passing plays the offense just gives the ball to a fast guy and lets him run around with it. One of the top young quarterbacks in the NFL is Lamar Jackson. He scored a 13 on the Wonderlic test, which is what you would expect from a janitor. Lamar is not working a Rubik’s cube in his off hours nor is he studying a complex offensive system.

The dreaded private sector is going the same way. Automation is the way to reduce the need for talent. Using robots is one way to do this in manufacturing. Another way is software systems to atomize and control the required tasks. In the office, software is doing more of the analysis and decision making. Dispatchers, for example, are being replaced by software that routes field personnel. Those people in the field have mobile devices that fill in the blanks of their knowledge.

Part of what is driving the ruling class is the belief that technology can replace those retiring white Baby Boomers. The dream of the multicultural paradise, free of white power structures, assumes the robots will take over from the white people. No one thinks much about who is going to code, operate and maintain the AI. That is the fatal flaw in the plan. There will never be a time when the machines become self-sufficient and anything but super-racist.

The fact is, there is no escaping the ramifications of the cognitive decline. We have created a society that requires an average IQ of about 97. The distribution of smarts provided sufficient talent at each layer of society. The smart fraction was large enough to carry the rest. Now that IQ has dipped below that threshold, we are starting to see problems like the supply chain issues. This is just the beginning of a systemic collapse brought on by the lack of social capital.

That is the real supply chain crisis. Each generation is supposed to build on the next but starting in the middle of the last century this system started to break. The Baby Boomers did not create enough replacements. Worse yet, they did not train them to take up their positions. The waves of immigration have watered down the system further, creating shortages that will only get worse. Soon, Americans will be like those humans in the sci-fi shows, unable to operate ancient technology.


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Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
2 years ago

I just finished re-reading the often-recommended science fiction short story “The Marching Morons” from ca. 1950. (Public domain, freely available). It’s typical of the epoch — campy humor, whiz-bang tech (rocket travel, of course), a far-fetched plot: a real estate investor who becomes an unwitting time traveller. But the story line is worthwhile, perhaps even if you don’t like the genre. The most salient (to this essay) aspect is one plot device: Imagine a future where the elite and intelligent have effectively been enslaved by the lumpenproletariat.

Hokkoda
Member
2 years ago

The Ask Delphi thing gave me an honest to goodness laugh. Thanks for that.

David
David
2 years ago

“They also have to master the complexity of a game that has reached its peak in complexity. Here is an example of one part of a college football playbook. Finding men with the required skillset to run a college football program…”

How about the required “skillset” required to run an English sentence or hire a copy editor? The playbook passage you pointed to is not so much an illustration of a complex nuance of the game as of ungrammatical sludge.

JR Ewing
JR Ewing
Member
2 years ago

I have thought something similar about politics. Many people making the rules don’t understand or appreciate what got us to the standard of living. They think the economy is a golden goose that churns along intrinsically and throwing more and more sand into the gears doesn’t hurt it. You see this with mandates put on employers, and taxes on businesses, and workplace regulations. They don’t understand how or why value is ever created, they just think it will always be there for them to extract. There is no appreciation of the conditions required for economic growth, in fact there is… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
2 years ago

Fortunately the supply chain shortage hasn’t impacted the positioning of bricks for the upcoming rioting if Rittenhouse is acquitted.

https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2020/06/must-see-exclusive-mysterious-stacks-bricks-delivered-numerous-us-cities-evidence-riots-organized/

Any pretense that the Feds couldn’t track down who did this is a lie.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Bilejones
2 years ago
c matt
c matt
Reply to  Bilejones
2 years ago

Was thinking of re-bricking my patio. Wonder if I could just back up the truck and load them on? Would save me a bundle of $$$.

Anon
Anon
2 years ago

Amazing as usual. One addition. The baby boomers created enough kid. But they murdered one third of Gen Z.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Anon
2 years ago

Boomers will be long gone and you’ll still run into the “fuck you dad!” mentality directed towards them.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Anon
2 years ago

Did you mean Gen X? The US total fertility rate dropped below replacement in 1972. So looking at the figures, Gen X had good fertility for six years (1965-1971) and than another 9 years of low fertility. That low TFR stayed around but only large scale immigration pushed the Gen Y and Z larger. Now as to the “supply chain” our host mentioned. Its already here. California is ground zero. Mass retirement and mass flight of skilled labor has made it impossible to get a lot of work done properly. I know a large company, name redacted that lost essentially… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  A.B Prosper
2 years ago

I have blood relatives in CA, both sides of family. Some rarely-seen, I don’t know them very well. But two are lifelong suburban DC residents whom I’d known much of my life, stereotypical liberals raised in indifferent suburban affluence, who relocated to LA area relatively late in their lives. I love them, but honestly don’t know I’ll ever visit them again. It’s worth mentioning that their now-deceased forebears had “hard science” degrees and lifelong work in demanding fields. Of the kids who got diplomas, pretty sure nothing harder than fine arts 😀 At least they’ll have a nicer climate in… Read more »

David
David
2 years ago

Im watching my company fall apart because white women insist on cramming black women into all of our marketing and our white customers are not buying it.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Everyone relax…the US Air Force has our top thotties all over the F35:

https://twitter.com/jlippincott_/status/1457438156983345163

Nevermind that the Royal Navy just lost an F35 in the Med, thankfully the pilot was unharmed:

https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/uk-f-35-stealth-jet-crashes-mediterranean-while-operating-carrier

The ZH commenters are in fine form, as usual:

“Now it’s even more stealthy.”

mmack
mmack
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Loved the tart shaking it like a stripper working a dive bar near the AFB.

Reminds me of what the late Bobby Unser (RIP Uncle Bobby) said in response to Janet Guthrie showing up to attempt qualifying for the Indianapolis 500 in the mid-late 1970s:

“You know what this means? These cars are too damned easy to drive!” 😒

One wonders how long Ms. Thang would survive in air-to-air combat.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  mmack
2 years ago

Spoiler alert;
Not long.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

An just to piss off the French, they plan to sell the submarine version of the F35 to Australia.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
2 years ago

Funny, but in year 2 of running a turnaround for a division of a F-500. When I went shopping for key lieutenants to run different work streams, ended up with a bunch of 50+ folks. Only ones with the heuristics necessary to get things done quickly. Younger folks substitute quantitative modeling and assume if the model has enough inputs the answer will magically appear. It doesn’t. Then don’t have the willingness to implement hard decisions.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
2 years ago

Maybe the ape historians will remember us as we remember 3 generations of Greeks:
Socrates, Plato, Aristotle.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

I’d pick Prodicus, Anaximander, and Heraclitus.

If thinking apes still exist they’ll remember us as we “remember” the weirder pre-Socratics: almost not at all and mostly through others’ lies. That’s how Nietzsche and Marx already inhabit our minds & philosophies—and Foucault too, who still has living disciples (betrayers, mostly) but no one seems to understand at all.

The books are still in the stores! Even the out-of-print ones are on torrents for free. And who reads them? Not us apes—and we’re probably the best apes ever…depending how much we’ve forgotten about the Neanderthals.

David
David
Reply to  Hemid
2 years ago

“I’d pick Prodicus, Anaximander, and Heraclitus.”

Over Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle? Sure.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

The comments on this ZH article about Boeing echo many sentiments here:

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/boeing-worst-company-planet

My favorite?

“My friend is an engineer at Boeing. One day he called me and told me to never fly again.”

Allen
Allen
2 years ago

With regards to the “Ask Delphi” bot; the bot is accurate. You ask a question, it gives a straight response based on the script of that question and nothing else. The author has a problem with this, because the bot is too honest/unambiguous about morality.

The author is essentially complaining that the bot doesn’t give the answer teacher wants, it keeps giving the answer that IS. And that comes perilously close to puncturing the self-image and social-image the author wishes to signal.

“Accuracy is bad, untruth is good.” should be the author’s tagline.

SidV
SidV
Reply to  Allen
2 years ago

Yeah, it turns out the AI is racist as all hell. Uncle Jared had nice little video on this.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  SidV
2 years ago

I don’t follow every development in AI, but my recent favorite racism alarm was the AI x-ray imaging app that was trained to read x-rays so well that it predicted race of patients with a very high degree of accuracy, reportedly being able to see features invisible to human experts. Why this is “racist” I don’t know. Although whitewashing (sorry, bad word choice, perhaps “airbrushing” is better?) science is nothing new, it is plumbing new depths. There actually are calls in the medical profession to suppress “racist” knowledge, even when there are clear impacts on matters of health. An example… Read more »

SidV
SidV
Member
Reply to  Allen
2 years ago

Yeah, it turns out the AI is racist as all hell. Uncle Jared had nice little video on this.

Sid
Sid
Reply to  Allen
2 years ago

Nah, they like accuracy. A tight pattern around the untruth.

Sid
Sid
Reply to  Sid
2 years ago

A test. Low accuracy high precision is what they desire. If you follow my logic, you’re qualified to coach.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
2 years ago

Working with millennials reminds me of sitting on my grandparent’s vinyl covered furniture from the 70’s. I just want to get the hell off and walk out of the room.

Disruptor
Disruptor
2 years ago

We deserve to exist because of IQ, attractiveness, industry, and You’ve lost the plot. There is no deserve, no justification by attributes or works. “Boy! are they going to be sorry after they wipe us out!,” and F. U. and No, they won’t.

We are family, and we choose to support family. Would you ditch a 99.9 IQ son for a tenth of a point? No. We choose to survive, to flourish, mutual continuity.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
2 years ago

I’m absolutely seeing all of this as a late Xer in the workplace. I probably post the most terrible opinions on here about boomers, and all their shortcomings (they have so many). One thing I’ve never gone after them for is that they actually showed up and did their jobs, some in a a driven, manic, Hillary Clinton like way (many were mercurial, narcissistic tyrants, but their knowledge was top notch). They received a better foundational education. One that allows for math and writing skills. The Xers that went to private schools in the 80’s and 90’s, also have much… Read more »

Max M Wiley
Max M Wiley
Reply to  JR Wirth
2 years ago

I’m one of the private school gen X’rs from the 80’s. During my 20 year career in a highly technical field, I have dealt with the Boomers above me in the hierarchy and increasingly of late, the Millennials below me. I always end up effectively running every project, whether I’m officially in charge or not. The problem is, the Boomers don’t want to pay. Most of the companies I worked for had an entire office full of Boomers sitting behind desks, of which at least half were dead weight. It got to the point where I was making perhaps 5%… Read more »

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Max M Wiley
2 years ago

Good for you!

I’m installing a few pads with hook ups on my farm for people such as yourself.

The freedom of retirement was like being on a boat for the first time, but one quickly gets their sea legs.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  Bartleby the Scrivner
2 years ago

I’m sorry, I just can’t do the RV. I feel like one of those players in Squid Game that actually voted to come back. I keep looking at the big piggy bank above my head. Almost there.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Max M Wiley
2 years ago

where is the RV located; in a park?

M
M
Reply to  JR Wirth
2 years ago

Your observations are probably skewed by selection bias (minus the hard work thing, that probably isn’t impacted). The boomers you interact with made it, the younger millennials are still being selected out of the upper echelons of corporate america. So your observation could certainly be accurate, but make sure you are thinking about the populations of each generation your interacting with.

Krustykurmudgeon
Krustykurmudgeon
2 years ago

Its hard to know if people are less talented or if there isn’t as much of an incentive to use your talent. Like if Ed Sheeran was born in 1951 instead of 1991 he might probably be Christopher cross. Likewise john mayer could have been robin trower. The problem is that type of stuff doesn’t sell anymore

Memebro
Memebro
2 years ago

I’ve worked for over 2 decades in a very challenging technical field that requires a firm grasp of mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic, electrical and electronic technologies, as well as the physics and chemistry that make them all work. I’m at a place now where I’m starting to train a new guy, aka “the future” for my area of expertise, so that I can move on to something more management related in my waning years. It is a 30something black man. He’s been to school for this, but even the most basic concepts like “quarter amplitude decay” are lost on him. Yet,… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Memebro
2 years ago

This is code for, “Don’t ever board an airliner again,” right?

You could’ve just blinked twice or something.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Memebro

First rule of survival; avoid crowds.

Second rule; avoid Joe.

I will pray for you.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  Memebro
2 years ago

Quarter Amplitude Decay. That’s what happens when your amp goes to 11, instead of just making 10 the loudest. Progress loves decay. Its how you know its working!

Good luck with the dark future.

My Comment
Member
Reply to  Memebro
2 years ago

I feel for you in your attempt to train a black replacement. I am a boomer who worked for decades in the tech industry. I couldn’t train a replacement because they felt they didn’t need training. I was just an old accomplished guy who was in their way. This was the norm. Thre is a belief sponsored by all the “gurus” in the industry that nothing in the past is relevant to the present. Knowing how things have been done, what worked, and what didn’t work makes you stuck in the past. Every day is a brand new world. This… Read more »

Random Person
Random Person
2 years ago

I am in a capstone course for my degree program and the entire class is structured around working in randomly assigned groups. One of my group members has an obviously arab name (never seen him, all virtual) and literally can not write competent english. His work is just a mishmash of “intelligent” corporate-esque words with terrible phrasing and punctuation. He doesn’t even follow assignment guidelines. Here’s a taste: “Our mission is to serve by equipping world class energy efficient transports being fastest, most comfortable and innovative business in the world” We let him turn in a paper separately and the… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Random Person
2 years ago

My entire life, when the instructor said, “We’re going to be working groups,” I groaned and wondered whom I will be carrying.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  LineInTheSand
2 years ago

In the late ’90s I split from my partner Mwanza on a capstone project in a STEM course because she repeatedly failed to show up for prescheduled study/work/status review sessions.

I doubt I could do that now.

Strike Three
Strike Three
Reply to  LineInTheSand
2 years ago

I am a 56 year old high school teacher (private school). I am in year 17 of my teaching career. Two years ago we had a first year teacher who was still taking some of his teacher’s-ed classes. He was actually told in his training courses that ALL viable high school assignments are to be done corporately. This “kid” (he was 25) would give an assignment as a sort of objective to be conquered. The theory was that once the group got some sort of magical “feel” for the objective they would spontaneously gravitate to the part of the project… Read more »

Severian
Reply to  Strike Three
2 years ago

I was told the same thing in my college teaching career. And the sad part is, kids these days ™ love love looooooove them some group work. Back in my high school / undergrad days I would’ve crawled over broken glass to avoid it, but the new generation craves it. So much so that I had to put it in big blinking neon font on all my syllabuses: There is no group work allowed in this class. [Did they listen? Of course not. How do I know? Because I always had a control group question in all my exams. I… Read more »

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

I had a prof. who gave multiple choice exams. Each question had so many options (e.g., a-o with ” all of the above” and “none of the above” as well as various combinations) that you really had to know the material. At the start of the semester class met in a huge lecture hall. By the end there were maybe 20 of us left.

Maus
Maus
Reply to  Strike Three
2 years ago

Schools use group projects to benefit the weak and stupid. Public schools resort to them frequently to game performance stats and socialize their attendees to the Hive. Private schools use them sparingly to teach their better-than-average charges what to expect in the “real” world. TPTB know that the reality Zman writes about here exists. It’s why the usefulness of standardized tests like the SAT and the ACT are being denigrated to the point of rejection. The Hive can’t tolerate >1 sigma right-of-mean outliers ala A Confederacy of Dunces.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  Maus
2 years ago

Kudos on the Confederacy of Dunces reference.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Maus
2 years ago

And don’t forget;
“Didn’t have enough collective brains to open a jar of pickles”.
Kudos to Strike Three.
There are always gems in a Zman comment thread.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Random Person
2 years ago

If you can, work for small firms. MegaCorp will grind you into the ground and promote less competent or incompetent non-whites.

Smaller firms either hate that shit or can’t afford it.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Correct. When I am sizing up a potential employer, the first thing I look at is their level of diversity. If some fuggin woman or vibrant is to be my boss, I take a hard pass. Not only will you have to do your own job, you will have to cover for them and pretend to like it, and be responsible for them when they screw up. No thanks.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

One would think so. However, in some fields (software) small firms are just as full of H1s and idiot leaders as everywhere else. Possibly more so.

Gauss
Gauss
Reply to  Random Person
2 years ago

Group projects were virtually unknown when I was a student. They’ve grown in popularity over the years as part of the feminization of education, along with everything else. Women like to engage in social activity, which is why group projects are popular with them. Real innovation rarely comes from people working in groups. “Designed by committee” is a common way to characterize a poor product.

Ex-Pralite Monk
Ex-Pralite Monk
Reply to  Gauss
2 years ago

Solutions usually come from people who see in the problem only an interesting puzzle, and whose qualifications would never satisfy a select committee. – Systemantics: How Systems Work and Especially How They Fail

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Ex-Pralite Monk
2 years ago

One of the best books ever written.

Ebian
Ebian
Reply to  Gauss
2 years ago

born 1964. Group projects were a rarity in school, and I always assumed the purpose was to let the smart kids know just how useless the dumb kids (who didn’t get called on much anyway) really were.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Random Person
2 years ago

I had the same issue doing a Computer Science Master’s a few years back. Every group project included Arabs or East Asians with little to no English skills. Chinese students were frequently unintelligible in conversation, let alone in writing, and every single written component of a project I either had to do myself or rewrite if they did it. But even worse, they frequently didn’t actually understand any of the actual computer science and relied on coasting in group projects and cheating on tests and homework. I would claim to have benefited more having actually learned the material, but when… Read more »

Observer
Observer
Reply to  Random Person
2 years ago

I am a school teacher. Lunchroom: Group work is clearly the superior pedagogical approach but we just don’t have time for it. Me: Tell me about your experience doing group projects at uni. Lunchroom: It was horrific! I did nothing and the Asian girl had to carry the lot/nobody else did anything so I had to do everything. Me: How come everyone here had an awful experience trying it, and have no time to “do it properly” ourselves in our classes, yet remain convinced it’s the best way to teach? Lunchroom: shhhh mate don’t let that get out or your… Read more »

Milestone D
Milestone D
Reply to  Observer
2 years ago

I mean this nicely…what career progression is possible as a teacher? Merit distribution of the good classrooms? My mom was a teacher and the only pay raises possible were for longevity. So unless all these teachers are gunning for Asst Principal, what’s the point of worrying about “progression.” ? In other words, I never understood why my mom worried about her annual assessments because the results were the same, regardless if she got “meets standards” or “exceeds.”

Observer
Observer
Reply to  Milestone D
2 years ago

Hey Milestone, I’m writing from Australia, and I work in a private school, which means 30% of our money comes from parents and the rest is chipped in by State and Federal governments. The heirarchy is as follows. Garden variety teachers. Team leaders. This is a way to give a little bit of cash for an area of responsibility, and testing for willingness to do more and interest in leadership. You might be the “Camps” team leader, or P-1 team leader. Head. You might be Head of Primary (P-6) or Head of Middle (7-9) etc. You are def on leadership… Read more »

Melissa
Melissa
2 years ago

The good old days of solid, self reliance have been over for a while. That essential knowledge was somehow lost between the silent generation and the boomers. Those important skills of gardening, hunting, canning, preserving are mostly lost.
Modern society has been far too interested in seeking a life of ease, leisure, and temporary pleasure.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Melissa
2 years ago

A lot of people are re-learning those skills, but it remains to be seen if it’s more than a fad. Possibly cause for optimism, at any rate.

Melissa
Melissa
Reply to  Paintersforms
2 years ago

It’s quite possible that those skills will be required for self preservation within 2-3 generations.

We should all read Little House on the Prairie books to our kids and prepare accordingly.

BerndV
BerndV
Reply to  Melissa
2 years ago

A couple of years ago, my daughter’s boyfriend needed a jump start at the high school parking lot. My daughter called me and I drove over to the school to give him a jump. When I arrived, he had just finished watching a YouTube video explaining how to open the hood of his car. He was a good kid and a straight A student. At his age, I could have disassembled and reassembled the entire car. Young males appear to have zero interest in practical skills these days.

mmack
mmack
Reply to  BerndV
2 years ago

“When I arrived, he had just finished watching a YouTube video explaining how to open the hood of his car.” So much for those engineers putting a lever marked “HOOD RELEASE” or a tab with a silhouette of a car with a hood up on the drivers side of the dashboard, eh? 🤦🏻‍♂️ “He was a good kid and a straight A student. At his age, I could have disassembled and reassembled the entire car. Young males appear to have zero interest in practical skills these days.” Well let’s call back to a post Z put up last week. At… Read more »

BerndV
BerndV
Reply to  mmack
2 years ago

When I was very young and not playing outside in the woods with friends, my entertainment consisted of reading, building models, erector set, Estes rockets, RC planes, a Lionel train set, etc. These activities primed my young mind for the aeronautical engineering degree I would obtain as an adult. Children today spend nearly all their free time staring at screens. This can’t bode well for the quality of future scientists and engineers.

mmack
mmack
Reply to  BerndV
2 years ago

Nerd 🤓 alert 🚨:

I still build models, even if the smell of the paint and thinner drives The Lovely 😊 Mrs. to madness.

I tell her I could:
– Buy and build models
– Drink the cash away at a brewery or distillery (or, um, drink MORE of it away)
– Stuff the cash down a dancer’s G-string

Airplane models it is. 👍🏻

Amazingly, skills learned in scratch building, painting, and fixing kits comes in handy around the house too.

I too wonder what comes next from a generation staring at screens.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  BerndV
2 years ago

models are made for burning.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  mmack
2 years ago

(2001 Honda here.) But I’m not sure about the rest. Getting into our local Aggie-Vo-Tech HS is like getting into an Ivy. You have to have top grades, perfect attendance, no disciplinary infractions, etc. (Needless to say the usual suspects want to change all that because diversity.) So they may not be a majority, but those kids are still out there.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  RoBG
2 years ago

208 F150 4×4 with a little over 400,000 miles. Been to every state except Alaska and Hawaii. I’ve probably replaced every replaceable part on it.
The alternative?

If you can find one, 2021 F150, same configuration,
$120,000.00

Un frikin believable.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  mmack
2 years ago

Some of us never got past the model airplane glue and the paper bag 😀

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  BerndV
2 years ago

It’s not as much zero interest as *there is nobody to teach them*. Literally. Their parents are clueless too. Just because *you* know how does not mean the vast majority do.

This is one of the biggest failures of the silent and boomer generations – they failed to pass on the skills by *teaching*, AND they outsourced all much of the work that teaches those skills to china, or brought in mexicans to do it, instead of teaching their own kids.

Codex
Codex
Reply to  BerndV
2 years ago

Hang out with homeschooled kids.

Even (small town) public school kids who really want to *make* something and trust that you’ll be a proper elder for them and not screw them over.

Ca ira.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  BerndV
2 years ago

No excuse for not finding the hood release (this thing called an owner’s manual helps). However, once you open the hood, compare the crap under the hood of a 2019 model car to that of a 1980 model. I recall being able to see the ground beneath the car back then. Not sure if water can even get to the ground in the newer models. Plus it’s all so cramped you need ring size 2 fingers to get to anything.

mmack
mmack
Reply to  Melissa
2 years ago

“The good old days of solid, self reliance have been over for a while. That essential knowledge was somehow lost between the silent generation and the boomers. ” I’ll posit that the days of solid self reliance started dying off when people who worked with their hands were looked on disdainfully (“No son / daughter of MINE is going to get their hands dirty!”). I think being literally “Hands On” in your work conditions you to seek out and practice those hands on skills you list, and others. Also, folks in the past were a little tighter with their cash… Read more »

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
2 years ago

You’ve just touched on the tip of the ice burg. Imagine when the 88% of the white commercial pilots* drops below 50%. Followed by doctors, engineers and other STEM majors. Without civil engineers and people willing to do the work, you can kiss all of FJB’s infrastructure programs good-bye. A colleague once showed me the US Occupational Job Outlook** which described US jobs in demand. Back in the 80’s, every type of engineer was listed in the top 10 if not top 20. Today, they don’t even exist under most new jobs or fastest growing occupations. Almost none of the… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
2 years ago

I wonder if, 75 years from now, human flight will even be possible except for jumping from a decaying skyscraper. Maybe the Chinks will be able to sustain the technology.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
2 years ago

Uh, the, “infrastructure,” bills are just looting operations to fund new and existing NGOs tasked with further undermining the US.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

I beg to differ. We have high-speed rail in California! I can still see the half-completed column that blocks the road from my house.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

From what I’ve gleaned, the amount designated for bridges, roads, sidewalks, waste disposal, even lefty-loved public transportation–you know, actual infrastructure–is below ten percent. You are absolutely right about where the money is going, although some of the skim goes into the pockets of senators and MoC’s. GOP’ers “reached across the aisle” and got a fist full of dollars.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
2 years ago

i don’t think anything to do with movie theaters is growing…

Gunner Q
2 years ago

We aren’t facing a dearth of intelligence. We’re facing a society that is dying of late-stage cancer, its organs turned against themselves. Its schools thwart education; its factories consume, not produce; its hospitals want to make people sick; its armies welcome the invader; its banks are thieves; the prisons are emptied of criminals and refilled with innocents; and the government obeys its rulers. Coming soon, trucks will not be allowed on roads.

Talent and demographics cannot make that end well.

Allen
Allen
2 years ago

The biggest problem is that you have lower intelligence people in charge. They don’t even see the problem. When you have people running the show who, A. think people are interchangable the blank slate and, B. think lowering standards to achieve parity won’t affect quality, you’re lashed to the wheel of doom. A healthy forward leaning society requires that all manner of niches in the system are filled. The niches cannot be filled with different people chosen at random. Think of it as an ecosystem, you can’t fill a predator’s role with a prey species. Similarly you can’t fill a… Read more »

Meme Doctor
Meme Doctor
Reply to  Allen
2 years ago

“When you have people running the show who, A. think people are interchangable the blank slate and, B. think lowering standards to achieve parity won’t affect quality, you’re lashed to the wheel of doom.” Right! But the notion that that people can be randomly assigned to perform any function isn’t just found among “equity” theorists. It’s almost as widespread on the political right … including, if you’ll forgive me for saying so, the dissident right. A cliché on “our” side is that anyone should be able to do home repairs, fix their own cars, pull their food from the garden,… Read more »

Sand Wasp
Sand Wasp
Reply to  Meme Doctor
2 years ago

Yes, and the phrase I hate the most is “go start your own small business.”

The number of people who have the talent for that is very small.

A vastly greater number of people are better suiting to fulfilling their potential as a part of an organization that respects and values their contribution

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Meme Doctor
2 years ago

You have just described in great part what one 80s author called “The White Collar Hoax.” Dating at least back to my parents (WW II generation), it was still worthwhile to “work your way through college.” The problem is, that over a couple generations, the degree has been watered down to the point of near-worthlessness, in many cases. As we all know, the value of higher education was democratized. To some extent, this was to the good: the GI Bill. But as our society liberalized postwar, there was the inevitable slip in quality. First, grants for bright but penniless students.… Read more »

The Greek
The Greek
2 years ago

So a few things: Firstly, no where is this decline seen more than in the trades. We used to have white kids that were smart with their hands pushed into these trades. Not only are kids discouraged from “demanding” manual labor, but there are fewer white kids to boot. The average age of a plumber in my area is late 50s. I work as a carpenter/general contractor (my second job), and you wouldn’t believe how many hack jobs we fix from illegals that had no idea what building codes are. My favorite was a recent set of stairs that had… Read more »

Panzernutter
Panzernutter
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

Kids that come from the LAUSD to our union apprenticeship program can’t do simple math. We spend the first year teaching high school math grades 9 to 12 to them. They have a diploma that says they can. But that’s ok because the companies have come up with apps in the smartphone that tells them how to fix the machine once they plug it into the motherboard.( AI)?. Occasionally I have to test fire systems in commercial and residential building. The last few test I had to witness were conducted by little brown men from Home Depot’s outer perimeter. Before… Read more »

Occam's Chainsaw
Occam's Chainsaw
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

Interesting, they went from Cam to Mac. And success came back.

Totally OT, I’m a Greek-American too. Any Greek restaurant suggestions in Beantown metro? By the way, huge Habs fan, but I always loved the Bruins as rivals, actually rooted for them over Vancouver in ’11, loved Timmy besides. Alas the league is not what it used to be.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Occam's Chainsaw
2 years ago

At least half of *all* restaurants in MA are owned/operated by Greeks (except perhaps Asian ones, although I wouldn’t be surprised.)

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

I didn’t get the Aaron Rodgers thing mention by a black guy, the only vaccine-hesitant person in the room. All the others gobbled at him like turkeys, black, brown, and white.

I just saw a pic. Now I get it.
The unvaccinated Mr. Rodgers is white, and rather redneck looking.

(I heard not one thing, not ONE, about the science of immunology or virology. It was all social pressure, like outraged hens.)

UKer
UKer
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

‘Outraged hens’ is my new go-to phrase for social media. Thank you!

Zorost
Zorost
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

I’ve heard IQ was the real problem with Kaepernick. He was a hot-shit athlete, but they needed to use a super-simple playbook for him. After a season or 3, all opponents had reverse-engineered that playbook and could predict exactly which plays were going to be run.

Ben
Ben
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

The problem to me is that the normie gets hack work and doesn’t understand why. That’s the part that boggles the mind.

ShrinkWrapped
ShrinkWrapped
2 years ago

Extremely insightful. My fields of Psychiatry and Psychoanalysis, derivatives of Medicine, are already showing the effects of diversity, ie dumbing down of young doctors. It does not bode well.

Brandon Lasko
Brandon Lasko
Reply to  ShrinkWrapped
2 years ago

Are you the Shrinkwrapped who had a blog under that name in the 00’s?

3g4me
3g4me
2 years ago

Very well written blackpill, and on topic for today: https://themannerbund.com/2021/11/09/all-rats-must-swim/

Oh, and Zman, that you’ve been writing stellar posts for quite some time now goes without saying. I try to show my financial appreciation for your work even if I do correct your diction!

miforest
miforest
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

this perfectly explains “gop victory ” in the Virginia governors race.

Abelard Lindsey
Abelard Lindsey
2 years ago

So, are we to become “Brazil del Norte”?

Having any of you spent time in Brazil? It might be worth spending some time there to get a taste of what it will be like here, say, 2040-2050. I’ve never been to Brazil and never have had any interest in going there.

I’ve noticed that Brazil has become a punch-line in terms of those videos you see on Flyheight and WorldStarHipHop in terms of its social dysfunction.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Abelard Lindsey
2 years ago

There are a couple of Brazalians on Gab who post in English, and despite the many, many issues with the country it does have one thing going for it: it is a country. Brazil has been Brazil for hundreds of years, it’s not like they woke up one day and discovered the place was completely different.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Abelard Lindsey
2 years ago

In my previous life as a Bankster I spent a decade as a Private Banker in NYC catering to the Latins. I spent a material amount of time in Brazil. By definition it was the top end of the 1% and their life was comparable to the rich in Paris, Geneva, Singapore and Sydney. In Brazil a fair number had, as the ultimate source of their money, some bent deal with Government- same as Mexico, Argentina etc. Interestingly we stopped doing business in Venezuela when Chavez was elected, the middle class on up of Grifters had their grip on the… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
2 years ago

Here’s a little going away party i attended…going away from society :P: https://youtu.be/_c6gDKsPQDM?t=14

i’m playing the jug…

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

Karl, that’s a pretty intruguing statement. Can you give us any more info on your imminent departure?

Will they still have electric guitars and amplified vocals where you are going?

miforest
miforest
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

how fun. good job on the jug

tashtego
Member
2 years ago

Is it safe to assume that there are layers of the military insulated from the effects of imposing diversity quotas and anti-white activism? Not the sub fleet apparently. But is there at last some layer that can be relied upon to act with at least as much rationality, intelligence and foresight as was had up through the 90’s? I know it isn’t saying all that much but at least they didn’t actually initiate a nuclear exchange. The only reason that’s true is that the elite wouldn’t be insulated from the effects but still, at least they were able to grasp… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  tashtego
2 years ago

Our future is probably some East Indian-type military where unreliable gear is laid up in the hanger waiting to be repaired by crews who don’t know how to fix it, so that they can eventually be manned by crews who don’t know how to use it.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
2 years ago

Maybe they will become like mascots or old time statues of Gods.

Each side will tow their rusting hardware to the battlefield by hand on a cart to display to the other side their technical superiority.

The have at each other with hand axes. The winner gets to tow away the losers technology to set up as spoils of war
and to add to their own ancient magic.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
2 years ago

The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047, by Lionel Shriver, seems to me to a pretty good forecast of what’s up next.

It’s not pretty, the finance side looks about perfect.

I highly recommend it.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  tashtego
2 years ago

The Capitol Hill cop who shot Ashli Babbitt, Michael Byrd, is your layered military in a civilian context. Byrd actually is a tad bit better than his military counterparts. Random drug screening of the JCOS would yield some troubling but horribly surprising results.

Zorost
Zorost
Reply to  tashtego
2 years ago

I would guess if there is any group where diversity reqs will be waived it would be the nuclear forces, since nukes guarantee that no matter how retarded the rest of your military, your nations’ borders won’t be invaded. We had far more reason to invade Pakistan than Afghanistan, yet we gave them billions instead.

In all other branches, the #1 issue is loyalty to the Left, not competence. By that metric, our military is getting better and better due to diversity reqs, and so those reqs won’t change.

Bob Smith
Member
2 years ago

Pre-Boomer here. Watched the Boomers wreck the company I worked in. The only smart guy in the bunch died in harness and it took the rest of the tools five years to destroy the business. It was like watching willful children.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
2 years ago

Love the concept of “the tax”.

For example, when standing in line and a Hispanic girl (with pronouns on her name tag) is struggling to explain to the 80 yr old Laotian man why his expired coupons won’t work for an item he doesn’t even have in his cart, and the “manager” is a frumpy 40 something single mom (college degree, natch) is too busy stocking the shelves to help because no one else will do it, the white guy in line looks at his watch and thinks:

“Diversity is truly our strength. Diversity is truly our strength.”

KGB
KGB
Reply to  ProZNoV
2 years ago

This happened to me a year ago, trying to pick up a pizza at Domino’s on the day of a local sportsball game. The entire operation went so haywire that nobody was getting their pizzas. A large, angry mob congregated in the pickup area watching the meltdown occur, the staff being a melange of vibrancy. At one point, I calmly said to all within earshot, “this is our future.” I saw a lot of furrowed brows and nodding heads.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  ProZNoV
2 years ago

I was travelling this weekend. The voices over the intercomm at the airport were hard to understand. Do they purposefully select the employee with the poorest English skills to make announcements?

Riding the shuttle to the airport. The driver is clearly from South Asia. He is trying to explain to a waiting crowd that the bus is full and another bus will be following him. His audience cannot understand him.

I shake my head with a bitter expression on my face.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  LineInTheSand
2 years ago

Has anybody started a book yet on what year we’ll start to hear; “Press two for English?”

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  ProZNoV
2 years ago

fucking asians and their weird coupons and their weird credit cards, holding up every checkout line with their one item on a saturday morning. old white people are only a little better…

Compsci
Compsci
2 years ago

Well, it took a few years, but I finally am one ahead of a Z-man missive. 😉 Son works in a large company’s engineering section. He heads up a group and we often talk about new hires. This of course leads to discussion of the decline in available talent in engineering applicants. Last discussion was concerning two recent hires and their “performance” in the position. Unacceptably subpar. So much so, they are resented by their peers and have been nicknamed: “can not do” and “will not do”. :-). Yes, they are known by these monikers—better than their first names—in discussions.… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
2 years ago

Exacerbating the IQ deficit at the higher levels of the economic structure is so-called “affirmative action.” The vast majority of corporations and institutions would rather hire a Hutessa with an IQ of 100 to run the show than a Blue-Eyed Ice Devil with an IQ of 125. The problem, therefore, is not just sociological but ideological. The West is simultaneously dying a natural death and committing suicide.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

Yep. AA hiring is the “barnacles” on the economic ship of state. You need to hire so many of such, and then hire competent workers in addition to handle their work! Then you pray that you can keep them “busy” while not engendering a discrimination lawsuit.

The pool of workers from the “talented tenth” was used up long ago, while the decline in IQ of the general population proceeded unabated—and indeed exasperated by turd-world immigration. As Dutton recently put it, “the difference in population IQ means that today’s typical college professor would have been yesterday’s high school science teacher.” 😉

Bill
Bill
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

And as diversity-seeking western companies syphon-off so many of the brightest Africans, the sub-Saharan IQ declines even faster.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Bill
2 years ago

The diversity gluttons are creating a brain drain that will ensure that so-called “developing countries” never will. And this gets to the heart of what these people are all about; they care far less about helping PoC than they do about harming whitey by killing his civilization.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

In 1994, the film Stargate showed based White men taking out vibrant kangz and a tranny in their flying pyramid with 9mm pistols, MP5 submachine guns, and a nuke:

https://youtu.be/_q36_9BaH4g

Later, the series Stargate SG-1 showed less based men allied with some kangz, though they did point out firearms did just fine versus vibrant raygunz:

https://youtu.be/NjlCVW_ouL8

Yeah, stronk womyn, and all that, but watch her flinch when MacGyver sweeps her with the P90 barrel at 2:36.

Seems like a keeper to me…

3g4me
3g4me
2 years ago

As is usual with links from Western Rifle Shooters, here is a column that notices part of the problem but completely omits the critical factor of race from the equation. Yes, people are fed up; yes, people are underpaid; but a lot of the problem is moderately intelligent Whites trying to communicate with incredibly dull and intransigent non-Whites on a daily basis. Anyhow, here’s the civic nationalist’s version of today’s excellent post: https://wilderwealthywise.com/the-take-this-job-and-shove-it-economy/

Abelard Lindsey
Abelard Lindsey
2 years ago

I’m an automation and control systems engineer, and I can tell you business is booming in my field.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Abelard Lindsey
2 years ago

Their was a big automation project at one of out facilities a decade ago and, I think because it was time critical, they brought in the only available guy they could find, from the U.K. (plant was in the U.S. Midwest).

This gets to the point raised by Z that I see on a constant basis: yes these magic machines built by the Japanese can do wonders, but finding someone to program them is difficult to say the least (and just forget about trying to find a full-hire employee to fix them).

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
2 years ago

1/3 of the boomers’ successors were contracepted and aborted.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Jack Boniface
2 years ago

yes, and most of those were black.

Bill
Bill
2 years ago

And we shouldn’t forget the “welfare safety net”: which enables the least intelligent to not just survive, but to thrive: to out-reproduce the rest of us.

When the smarter a person is, the fewer kids they’re likely to have, cognitive decline is inevitable.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Bill
2 years ago

When EBT cards and paper gibs cannot purchase or obtain food and hard goods, the welfare state will be meaningless.

Bill
Bill
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

That’s all it would take to trigger massive race-riots: someone hacking the system so that EBT cards suddenly don’t work.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Bill
2 years ago

Due to political realities, scarcity rather than loss of the EBT cards will likely lead to food and hard goods being unavailable. These will not be like the Astroturfed BLM/Antifa riots, either.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  Bill
2 years ago

Happened in Georgia 10-12 years ago. Welfare money drops were postponed from a Friday to the following Monday (if I remember it was caused by a glitch) and the usual suspects howled. News reporters flocked to the scene to record black moms angrily demanding “my money!” and lamenting how their children were going to starve. Two days delay. Their money. Where to start on how many ways this is a powder keg of stupidity, hubris, and ineptitude?

Bill
Bill
Reply to  Penitent Man
2 years ago

They’ve become “entitlements”: which is why no politician has the guts to vote for their removal

Zorost
Zorost
Reply to  Penitent Man
2 years ago

Oh laws, how I gon feed all muh chirrens!?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ufk7IXdxc-c

Be Responsible
Be Responsible
Reply to  Jack Dobson
2 years ago

“Where my check at?!!!”

The Greek
The Greek
Reply to  Bill
2 years ago

I brought this up in a post on Friday, but it’s relevant here as well. The welfare safety net is certainly a piece of the puzzle driving high breeding of low IQ and low breeding of high IQ, but it’s not the whole thing. The western idea of strict protection of intergenerational property rights has a built in bug, which is a declining fertility rate, especially amongst the wealthy (a suitable proxy for intelligence). Sparta faced the same issue with no welfare state. If you have a lot of wealth, you want to leave your heirs as well off as… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

Another “fix” batted around is that all the estate loot always passes to the first born (and I think as they were pitching, the first born son at that).

The Greek
The Greek
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
2 years ago

An interesting fix. The monarchy rule so to speak. The problem is if your first born is a dipshit.

KP
KP
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
2 years ago

Bring back primogeniture???

Sand Wasp
Sand Wasp
Reply to  The Greek
2 years ago

Oh Please.

Of all the reasons people aren’t having children.

“I want my child to inherit my domain undivided”

Is not one of those reasons

KP
KP
Reply to  Sand Wasp
2 years ago

Yeah I found that a bit dubious, too.

However instituting (or re-instituting, for those places like Britain who used to have it) primogeniture wouldn’t reduce the amount of money available to the Trust Fund contingent, but it would reduce their numbers somewhat. Could one clueless heir with a net worth of $500 million do as much damage at 2 @ $250 million? It’s worth a try…

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
Reply to  Bill
2 years ago

All living organisms, including you, have two necessary duties, to eat and to reproduce. Anything else is just a complication. Failure to eat of course means imminent death. Failure to reproduce means a biological death farther down the line. If every member of the species fails to reproduce there soon is no member of that species. There’s nothing intelligent about failing to reproduce, in fact it smacks entirely of selfishness: When the ordinary thought of a highly cultivated people begins to regard “having children” as a question of pro’s and con’s, the great turning-point has come. For Nature knows nothing… Read more »

The Greek
The Greek
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

How wrong you are. We can see from statistics in every western society (and increasingly in Asian societies as well) that the more wealthy an individual, the fewer children they have. Primitive people, as you put it, have litters of kids because they barely have a pot to piss in. Heirs are getting zero money anyway. In fact, their hope is that one of their 10 kids becomes rich and becomes their retirement plan. The wealthy and intelligent want to leave more to their heirs so they can continue to build wealth. This is a fact today, and it’s been… Read more »

AntiDem
AntiDem
2 years ago

There’s an anime series called “Girls’ Last Tour”, set in a far future (sometime around the year 3200), in which a long war devastated mankind’s ability to produce and maintain new technology, leading them to eventually turn to ancient (by their standards) weapon designs because those were the only things they were still capable of building. Thus the war started using futuristic giant robots armed with laser cannons, and ended with them using new-build P-51 Mustangs, Kettenkrads, and bolt-action rifles, because mid-20th century technology was all they could keep going. It’s an interesting take on this theme. Generally, as civilizations… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  AntiDem
2 years ago

The Arthur C. Clarke short story is a slightly different take on the theme of technological advancement/decline in weapons of war:

http://www.mayofamily.com/RLM/txt_Clarke_Superiority.html

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Hadn’t read that one in decades. Rings more true now than ever.

Lathechuck
Lathechuck
Reply to  AntiDem
2 years ago

I’ve read, IIRC, that Romans operated glass factories in Britain. Then the Romans left, and the locals stopped making glass. (I suspect that they exhausted the firewood supply, but that’s just a hunch.) Then they forgot how to make glass. Then they forgot that glass could be made; they forgot that it ever existed. Modern scientists look at some of the “jewels” of antiquity, and say “hah! It’s just colored glass.” In doing so, they ignore the sophisticated supply chain need to produce clear, colored, glass! Wheeled transport requires smooth roads, which require maintenance, which requires organized labor, and a… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Lathechuck
2 years ago

one of the natural assets of colonial america was all the timber here. they (britain) would make glass here (fueled by all that nearby timber) and ship that to the uk.

Anonymous White Male
Anonymous White Male
2 years ago

“Soon, Americans will be like those humans in the sci-fi shows, unable to operate ancient technology.” If there was a flaw in the “documentary” Idiocracy, it was the fact that the people of that time were so stupid they would be unable to maintain the technology that had been created for them and would have been in caves instead of buildings. The ruins of the buildings would have collapsed long before. But, we don’t have to worry about that. Da black man will have created new and greater technology by then. Honest! They just need to be patted on the… Read more »

mmack
mmack
Reply to  Anonymous White Male
2 years ago

“Idiocracy” was based on the Cyril Kornbluth story “The Marching Morons”. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/51233/51233-h/51233-h.htm

The flaw in Idiocracy was Mike Judge completely removed the concept Kornbluth had: the society the 20th/21st Century man awoke to in “The Marching Morons” was underpinned by a small, overwhelmed group of geniuses who took on multiple roles to keep society going. In Judge’s story, those geniuses would’ve died off generations ago before Joe thawed out.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Anonymous White Male
2 years ago

Along with the reinforced concrete succumbing to moisture within a century, all that computer technology they still have in the movie would have been lost due to blown caps in the power supplies and electric motors in fans and disks wearing out.

Bill
Bill
2 years ago

I’m thinking that the en-stupid-ization of America is part of the plan: Part of denigrating Whiteness, is denigrating the higher intelligence which characterizes Whites as a group. Part of celebrating “diversity” is implicitly downplaying the importance of intelligence. The deliberate dumbing-down of America is happening on many fronts: abolishing advanced-placement classes and schools; bringing in more and more lower-intelligence immigrants; encouraging mixed-race coupling, which lowers the intelligence of the kids they produce; encouraging ignorant Blacks to disparage educational achievement as “acting White”; encouraging the hiring of Black school teachers in order to address the gap in Black-White educational achievement; diminishing… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Bill
2 years ago

Bill: All true, and yet . . . don’t fetishize IQ (that’s Sailer’s job). Per numerous studies, East Asians have higher average IQs than Whites, but they tend to lack the independence, curiosity, risk taking, and individualism of Whites. These are cultural factors that stem from genetic factors, and not easily altered by international migration patterns. Whites may be more intelligent than blacks and browns, but self confidence and community have been criminalized and/or bred out of much of the gene pool. Without the natural instinct to defend oneself and one’s people, let alone the natural desire to dominate and… Read more »

Holy mammoth
Holy mammoth
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

This is an important point. Man is not measured by IQ alone and the attack on culture has had a devastating effect on the heritage population. We are the first cohort that experienced total ideological war. We were evolved to respond to a hybrid of physical and psychological warfare, with a heavy emphasis on physical warfare. The ‘dinosaur’ taunt may be exasperating when it comes from populations who haven’t been dealt our hand, but if we don’t evolve to the new environment, we die. On the other hand, collapse of our society re-selects for the hybrid model, so there’s that.

Bill
Bill
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

I agree: There’s more to survival than just being smart. And those factors you mention explain why— despite not having the highest average IQ— pretty much all of the achievements which collectively enable and inform civilization as we know it— in exploration, science, technology, government, philosophy, the arts— have been accomplished by Europeans. And surely that’s why taking pride in being White, and identifying with our White heritage, is demonized as “White supremacy”, and why GoodWhites are encouraged to kneel in humble self-abnegation to sacred Blacks like Floyd and Kendi: to destroy our confidence, and make us guilty for our… Read more »

Bill
Bill
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

3g4me,

And yes: we can recognize what’s happening as psychological warfare aimed at Whites, with the deliberate intention of destroying our confidence and shared sense of community and identity.

They know they won’t be able to succeed with many of us, so they’re making a special effort to inculcate ‘White guilt’ in upcoming generations.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

One thing that I have tracked over the years of my noticing is the decline in general curiosity. Its a tangent of both IQ and culture. While it is innate it also needs to be cultivated. Modernity, with its answers to everything in your hand, seems to have dropped the virtues of curiosity along the way. Curiosity is now “Googling”. In the same way, community is now used for everything from yoga studios to sodomites to entire populations of joggers. Everything but our people is a community. Kids gathering around an ant-hill or watching a butterfly hatch or taking apart… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Screwtape
2 years ago

Screwtape: I was browsing various homesteading videos on youtube, and there’s a couple who moved from Las Vegas to rural western Arkansas. I don’t particularly like or watch their channel, but scanning through a recent episode was illuminating. Their only child, a son, used to spend all day either at public school or home alone playing video games. Now he’s outdoors almost all the time, playing with others, and he’s a much happier child. This speaks to so many different things – the need human children have for social structures, the need for physical as well as mental development, the… Read more »

SubAtomic
SubAtomic
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

IQ Fetishization has a few more adherents, including Scott Adams. He recently opined on that frickin’ genius Mayo Pete, who is so much smarter and better trained. No mention of how bad direction can offset misdirected IQ, leading to a Faster Ruination metric.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
2 years ago

I see this in my job field, it’s going to be a disaster.
The corporate rulers of my company assume automation will fill the gap left by retiring baby boomers and in some cases that works but as the Z says who programs the software and who knows what to do when things go wrong?
Aswan the Afghan or Latisha the African?
Maybe Karen the Branch Covidian?
Don’t think so.
It’s going to be a slow downtrend into third world pockets all over the West.

B125
B125
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
2 years ago

“Machine learning and AI will solve it”, says manager Karen with a BA in sociology as she waves as her hand to dismiss the concerns.

The South Asian people around her in the boardroom grin and clap, praising her originality and creativity.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  B125
2 years ago

I see this a lot with extremely stupid people. When faced with a problem outside their capacity to understand they assert a technology they also do not understand (that may not even exist) will solve the problem. Other similar stupid people then accept this as a now fact, as they can’t understand either. The other side of this is that a problem that is proving difficult to solve will be replaced with a goal that is significantly more complex in order to try and induce a more complex solution, which in their mind will somehow be easier to achieve. This… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  trumpton
2 years ago

trumpton: Excellent point. Spot on re stupid people seeing intelligence in the unnecessarily complex. For example, standard untalented tenth word salad, or pajeet programmers.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
2 years ago

They’re overestimating the capability of automation.

In my plant they’ve tried to use robots to assemble the complex mechanical packages of our products and it’s been an expensive failure every time.

Now, they’re trying to set up this very expensive semi-automated camera tracking system to keep the bottom-dollar, six-month contract mestbots in line.

Yeah, good luck with that.

TomA
TomA
2 years ago

Outstanding post on the perils of species-wide cognitive decline. Now address the seminal issue and connect the dots. Why is “brain power” in decline? Modern technology and affluence has replaced our ancestral natural environment with an artificial man-made variant in which real hardship and existential threats have now become extinct. IOW, the evolutionary culling mechanism for elimination of the stupid & weak is now kaput. And if this pathology continues unabated, idiocracy will increase until a colony collapse occurs and natural fitness selection is reborn. Or, our betters will simply try to “solve” this problem via artificial genetic manipulation; which… Read more »

Bill
Bill
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

TomA,

Indeed! Western welfare-state democracies have succeeded in reversing the upward trend of evolution: for the first time in human history, the least capable are not only surviving, they’re thriving: out-reproducing the rest of us.

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

Interesting comment that seems to refute the general opinion in this neighborhood. You’re saying that cognitive decline is most evident in the most advanced societies, because natural selection no longer applies to the chances for reproduction. Any idiot can survive, maybe even prosper, in a modern, pseudo-capitalist market economy. No wonder the dopey next-door neighbor drives a Mercedes and sends his kids to a private school. Wouldn’t that seem to indicate that the future belongs, at least in some way, to a society and its progeny that has been faced with adversity and managed to overcome it? Actually, if one… Read more »

Pete
Pete
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

“if one believes that white, northern Europeans are the intellectual apex of the human race, and you are one, what’s the problem? Isn’t it best to be the one-eyed man in the land of the blind?”

Whites would indeed have the advantage – if our governments weren’t taking our money and resources and giving them to vibrants to help them breed.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Pete
2 years ago

Then there is the aesthetic question. Even if being the one-eyed men confers advantages, do we really want to dwell amid the ugliness concomitant with large numbers of PoC? I certainly don’t. Being bombarded with rap, tatts, and piercings is more than far enough down that road.

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
2 years ago

So true. Whites of northern European descent are never criminals, can’t be found in prisons, don’t sport tattoos, play or listen to obnoxious music, are always safe drivers and never engage in burglaries, always graduate from high school and never use marijuana, meth or other intellectual stimulants.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

Thoroughly overcoming adversity produces the affluence, comfort and security that breeds cognitive decline. The smart cease reproducing, through democracy they create policies that subsidize the reproduction of the Very Dumbs, and the Very Dumbs do, indeed, reproduce. Then, once cognitive decline passes through a threshold, civilization collapses, the subsequent attendant misery selects for intelligence, the intelligent reproduce, the Very Dumbs die en masse, and civilization blossoms again. It’s a cycle, and there is no known method to arrest it before the next collapse.

Zorost
Zorost
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

Whites are at the apex precisely because we overcame adversity; the last ice age. And we also survived each other, as 2k+ years of almost constant war selected for a people that would cohere into a high producing society.

Being surrounded by mentally defective coloreds was an advantage, as we were able to take their resources and put them to work (as some would call it, ‘colonialism’.) The problem now is that we aren’t surrounded by them, we are infiltrated by them, thanks to our traitorous (((elites))).

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
2 years ago

America is on a crash diet. We’re cutting dead weight, whether or not that’s the plan.

Fine with me. I’d rather rebuild than continue this beast system anyway. Plenty of talent out there that simply was of no use, because making things better wasn’t the point.

Severian
2 years ago

Paging Joseph Tainter. Joseph Tainter, please pick up the white courtesy phone. Joseph Tainter, the white courtesy phone… For those who haven’t read The Collapse of Complex Societies (Z Man has mentioned it a few times before), I can’t really recommend it, unless you’re a professional archaeologist (I’m not, and therefore a lot of it went over my head). The “for dummies” version, though, is essential reading. He says that the “collapse” of a complex society like the Western Roman Empire in many ways represents a rational choice on the part of people in it, as the cost : benefit… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

Or an unconscious choice. If you think of a nation or a civilization as an organism, survival is instinctual.

Gespenst
Gespenst
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

“as the cost : benefit ratio of maintaining the existing structures was negative….”

That was the case with the British Empire, it was a money-losing proposition long before the Brits pretended magnanimity and shut it down.

3 Pipe Problem
3 Pipe Problem
Reply to  Severian
2 years ago

Since I’ve been beating Tainter’s dead horse at every chance, I refrained from posting in this vein, but glad you took up the whip!

Astralturf
Astralturf
2 years ago

I never got into football but when I have watched it I was able to admire the skill and talent it must take to quarterback. Those guys remind me of starship captains. When I heard about the need for more black quarterbacks I knew it was over!

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Astralturf
2 years ago

Running QBs are on their way to becoming interchangeable cogs, similar to the how running backs have become commodities during the past few years.

NFL defensive players are simply too large, strong, and fast for any NFL backfield players to endure that level of defensive punishment for more than a few years.

I tend to agree we’ve probably seen peak white QB. Notice how the NFL altered its rules to improve QB protection and extend the longetivity of guys like Brady…

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Funny, the running QB is more like what the position originally was, i.e., a running back who can throw accurately. It’s only since the 80s, really, that the passing game was honed scalpel-sharp. And even then, Peyton Manning would’ve been a freak. It’s the RPO that’s made the position less intellectually demanding by keeping defenses guessing. I predict you’ll see more undersized fronts who can overcome the element of surprise with speed and athleticism, which will cause offenses to adopt a power running game, which will cause defenses to beef up their fronts, which will eventually bring the game back… Read more »

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
2 years ago

Now that IQ has dipped below that threshold, we are starting to see problems like the supply chain issues. This is just the beginning of a systemic collapse brought on by the lack of social capital. Causation-correlation.The supply chain issue could be explained easily by Taleb or anybody else that spends some time thinking about it. It’s a system so complex that it’s particularly vulnerable to unanticipated problems, not the average intelligence of the society in which it operates. A lack of intelligence, however that might be defined or measured, isn’t what kept the medievals from using the plumbing techniques… Read more »

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

The entire Harvard faculty couldn’t solve my bathroom re-plumbing.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

In the early 90s, Denver built a new $2B mega airport and the “smart people” decided that it needed a high-tech automated baggage handling system. In theory, this system would use robot carts to move bags from the plane to the correct pickup carousel with little-to-no human involvement. Tens of millions were spent on an elaborate infrastructure and new-fangled software to run the system. It failed miserably, and twice more they attempted to “fix” it at an additional expense of tens of millions. Each time, it failed more miserably. Finally, after another expenditure of tens of millions, they switched back… Read more »

Shelbyville
Shelbyville
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

My biggest worry is what happens to infrastructure where the breakdowns won’t be limited to just cost overruns and aggravation (which are bad enough) but also in potentially catastrophic loss of life and limb. What happens when the population can’t maintain a nuclear power plant?

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
Reply to  Shelbyville
2 years ago

The design, construction, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of nuclear power plants in the US is under the direct control of the Nuclear Regulatory Agency, much of the manning of which is veterans of the Navy, major users of nuclear power. The actual hands-on labor is provided by low-bid contractors with a “normal” work force.

All of that activity is enmeshed in a web of rules and regulations that make it perhaps three times as expensive as work on a fossil fuel plant. Most of the work is the same except for fuel rod changes.

Screwtape
Screwtape
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

That is a good case study of engineering gone wrong. IIRC the problem ended up being, as per usual, a small issue, but the complexity of the system amplified it into a massive failure point. Part of the problem as I see it is that the environmental constraints that correct for these kinds of errors resides not just in the top-heavy brains vs brawns, but the top-heavy budget. These public works often birth these errors because the environment of free money does not incentivize or force a bottom-up brawny model of efficiency but rather a model of poky political contract… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Screwtape
2 years ago

Screwtape: My friend described and showed me photos of that airport and it’s absolutely bizarre. My husband then had to travel there on business and found the photos true to life. Add in the various ‘ceremonies’ the European Union has conducted and even if one thinks they’re merely taking the piss, Satanic is the only definition that suffices.

Zorost
Zorost
Reply to  TomA
2 years ago

The real problems of the Denver Airport are all due to being built on an ancient Indian burial ground. It’s not chaos theory, it’s angry spirits.

mcleod
mcleod
2 years ago

The old man (silent generation) is/was a super structural engineer in the aerospace/defense industry. He retired 20+ years ago. EVERY year he (and his work friends from his generation) gets calls from a companies to help fix one screw up or another. He started out asking for outrageous money, thinking they would leave him alone, and they’d pay it. Now he tells them no, and they still call.

His group is dying off, and there won’t be anyone to fix their screw ups.

3 Pipe Problem
3 Pipe Problem
Reply to  mcleod
2 years ago

But,, but but…wait, I thought there were legions of black women, sharp as whips, ready willing and able to step in to perform those complex calculations. I mean, didn’t you watch Hidden Figures? They built that, lol.

SubAtomic
SubAtomic
Reply to  mcleod
2 years ago

Construction guys get those calls, too. Newer hires can’t or won’t do the work so older and more skilled guys are begged to come sort things out. Some younger workers stick with it, so the smarter ones with drive have bright futures. You can see the same dynamic play out in other skilled trades. Young guys in their 20’s pulling down six figures, not sharing fleabag apartments, not sweating out student loan repayments. That is often because they listened to dads, older brothers, uncles and others who thought for themselves, counseled against the fads and got them into legitimate endeavors.… Read more »

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
Reply to  SubAtomic
2 years ago

The average gross annual pay for a journeyman union pipefitter is in the neighborhood of $80K. This is after 4 or 5 years of apprenticeship. Projects like a nuclear shutdown require more workers than most companies normally carry on their payroll. More men are hired specifically for that project and when it’s over they are laid off. Companies know that these redundant workers, subsidized by unemployment benefits, will be available for the next contract. Imagine if Microsoft or some other big tech company had a couple of slow days and management decided to lay off a couple hundred employees. When… Read more »

3 Pipe Problem
3 Pipe Problem
2 years ago

Triumph of the Will isn’t just a great propaganda film by Leni Riefenstahl but a commentary on the happy marriage of brute force, early 20th century tech., and the desire to do great things. Those dams were built in less time than it takes nowadays to write, let alone approve, the environmental impact statement such an undertaking would entail. We stand on the shoulders of giants; unfortunately, the continued effects of downward social mobility has reduced those giants to mere mortals, and the multitude to pygmies. Without a cause, without a frontier to conquer, intellectual, physical, and spiritual vigor stultifies.… Read more »

Pozymandias
Reply to  3 Pipe Problem
2 years ago

There’s a lot of talk here on a regular basis about this “cycle”. AINO will keep degenerating intellectually and culturally and the other White nations will continue imitating its every foolish decision making appropriate substitutions where the recipe calls for ingredients they don’t have. I’m told the Swedes make a delicious Detroit Frosted Shitcake using Somalis instead of American blacks. They just call it a Malmo Mud Pie. Eventually it will all break down into mass starvation and genocide and then the few survivors will rebuild something like what we have/had. The problem I see is that technological society may… Read more »

I.M.
I.M.
Reply to  Pozymandias
2 years ago

“The problem I see is that technological society may have been a one-shot deal. (…)” I suspect that you are correct. Barring a significant nuclear energy breakthrough, our era of cheap, plentiful energy resources will come to an end, and with it, all of the technology that said cheap, plentiful energy has been able to provide. I first had thoughts along these lines, oh, a decade or so ago – that we were already at, or at least very near, the technological peak of human civilization. The babies born in the last decade or two, and perhaps this one, MAY… Read more »

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Pozymandias
2 years ago

Sure favellas suck but only proles and animals are free.

Living on Mars will be worse than slavery . 100% of mandatory Neuro Link brain implant and if possible computer control.

That or you could always you know learn about this mysterious thing called organizing to a common purpose and simply taking what you want.

Member
2 years ago

We are approaching a tipping point where we no longer have enough people who are productive and creative to offset the ditch diggers and retail clerks. What is worse, we are seeing the watering down in professions that once were mostly immune from this. The current cohort of medical school students is a poor imitation of the classes from decades ago, no longer is it the best and brightest that get into the “best” medical schools but now being diverse and meeting the very minimal qualifications is what gets you into Harvard Med.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  Arthur Sido
2 years ago

Which provokes one to ask the age old question: what could possibly go rong?

Zorost
Zorost
Reply to  Stranger in a Strange Land
2 years ago

Do not forget the corollary to that age old question: “what, me worry?”

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Arthur Sido
2 years ago

Arthur, the last time I saw it reported (which must mean something in itself) more Suffolk U. Law grads passed the Bar Exam on the 1st try than Harvard Law grads. (Suffolk used to be a commuter school that now caters to rich foreigners.)

Zorost
Zorost
Reply to  RoBG
2 years ago

For a long time Harvard grads have been notorious for failing the bar. It was a common joke when I was in law school 12 years ago, I’m assuming it’s still a thing based on what you wrote.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

I don’t see the brain drain in the top positions so much. It’s the middle and even upper-middle tier where you see the issue, which isn’t surprising because those positions are far much numerous. It’s the district manager, project manager, hell even the guy running the local AutoZone. In my little world, the firms are most definitely having trouble finding entry level talent. These jobs aren’t for the top 20 college grads who are on the fast track. These are jobs that would be handled by reasonably bright but not superstar grads from decent state university business schools. (I’m one… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Citizen: Those guys are the only reason South Africa has yet to totally collapse into utter mayhem (although it’s not far off). The question is just how much self interest versus community spirit will motivate that cohort of Whites? Thus far experience seems to indicate that they will take the money and protection offered by their non-White rulers and live as fairly contented kept men. At least in South America they generally live and work and socialize among their own, and even so ever so gradually that upper class is degrading as well (plenty of “white” South Americans with 10-20%… Read more »

B125
B125
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

The first problem is that there are simply not enough white people to fill those jobs. The second problem is that white guys in those entry level jobs get screwed over. Constant diversity training, screeching and stupid white females above them, dull and lazy third world coworkers. The white females will keep promoting other females at the expense of white males. Trying to climb the corporate ladder as a white male these days is either pointless or not worth the headache. Alot of the white guys with skills seem to be oriented towards trades, or working at smaller family owned… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  B125
2 years ago

There’s absolutely a move by white guys to work for smaller firms where they can avoid the diversity crap. I see it all the time.

They’re not stupid. They know that they have no future at megacorp and that, even if they did, it would be a nightmare day in and day out.

Professor Alfred Sharpton
Professor Alfred Sharpton
Reply to  B125
2 years ago

You bring up some excellent points that I am living in my everyday life. I also work for “MegaCorp USA” as I call it, and am currently putting off our mandatory Inclusion and Diversity Training course as long as I can (25% of my annual review is weighted simply on attending this White-people-are-Evil class). Currently have feelers out there to smaller, privately held companies. My boss, a feminized white Gen X’er, is fully on board with the indoctrination. I know the Director of HR (white woman, of course) and I can’t even get out of this going thru her. I’m… Read more »

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Professor Alfred Sharpton
2 years ago

It happens all the time in the businesses that I deal with. Guys start out at the big firms and get to their late 20s or early 30s and they’re out.

Some are just entrepreneurs, but it’s happening at a much higher rate than I remember. The move is always to their own business or a small business.

Now, the very top guys stick around like in the past, but I suspect that they get to avoid a lot of diversity crap.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

The problem with South America is that it illustrates the level/stage of dysfunction Z-man described where there is a small pool of “talent” to keep some of the stuff functional, but not enough to develop anything new. What they get technologically, they buy from the first world. When the first world goes, they sink a step lower on the evolutionary rung. Of course, there is always China…

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Problem is the rich are insane and evil. I don’t think anyone with any skills would want to live in the hive . Its not even pleasant for enforcers which means warlords have a batter than average chance of having control You may own that factory on paper, even run it but you are paying off cartels or militias or whoever you only keep it while they think its more profitable Rich people in the current era don’t make much of anything useful. Its quite possible no one will want cyrpto or anything else they peddle . I don’t think… Read more »