The Managerial Borg

Note: The Taki post is up. I find the whole anti-Nazi thing interesting as it seems to be a subculture now, rather than just ham-fisted sloganeering. It is becoming an anti-religion in which the believers are defined by their opposition to the imaginary. For something lighter, I have some posts behind the green door about pop culture. Over Christmas I watched The French Connection, Star Trek: Diversity and The Expanse.


Most people on this side of the great divide have little interest in sports entertainment, as it is seen as part of the head game the system plays on people. Instead of investing in things that are important to their community and family, men invest their energy in rooting for the local corporate sports team. For most on this side of the divide, there is something unseemly about seeing a man wearing a sports team jersey in public or putting his favorite sports team in his social media profile.

That is, however, what makes sports entertainment a useful window into the psychology of the managerial state. Sports entertainment is a microcosm of what is happening in more subtle ways across the culture. College sports are particularly useful as that is where the ideology of this age slams into reality. On the one hand, players are supposed to be “scholar-athletes” and on the other hand college sports is a great celebration of diversity. None of it, of course, makes sense.

An example is this announcement from the Atlantic Coast Conference about a corporate program called “the coach’s academy” that is “an eight-week virtual and immersive development program that equips coaches with information, tools, and skills of a humanistic approach to better support the needs of the student-athlete.” Anyone who has worked in corporate America recognizes the creepy bureaucratic language that defines modern managerialism.

The hallmark of the modern managerial class is the creepy, dehumanized language they inflict on us. How does one “equip a coach with information, tools, and skills of a humanistic approach”? A normal way of saying this is “train coaches to be more empathetic to their players” but that is too direct and it lacks the signaling that is so important in the managerial class. The word salad says that the writer has been to graduate school and has the appropriate credentials.

The proof of that is the third paragraph. ” ‘The response to the ACC Coaches’ Academy has been terrific,’ said ACC Commissioner Jim Phillips, Ph.D.” A normal person would wonder why that academic credential is listed, but inside the world of the managerial class, credentials are everything. This is why they are so cheap. Phillips earned a Ph.D. in education administration from the University of Tennessee, a master’s degree in education from Arizona State University.

Another thing you see in managerial language is the appropriation of terms and concepts from business and science. These are fields in which there is a right answer and accomplishment can be objectively measured. College presidents now call themselves CEO’s, for example. In this announcement they use the term “cohort” rather than group, suggesting things about the first group of coaches forced into this seminar that are certainly not true, but the word “cohort” sounds cool.

Later on, we learn that the coaches learn “emotional intelligence competencies to enhance trust and connection.” A normal person would wonder what exactly is an “emotional intelligence competency” and the long answer is nothing. There is no such thing as emotional intelligence. It is another racket where “experts” on “emotional intelligence” sell their services to corporate trainers. The idea is to train staff to control their emotions like a sociopath.

Also note the word competency. This is a very popular word in the managerial class, because it implies that all knowledge is acquirable. You just have to sit quietly in the class, repeat what you heard and get the credentials. Now you have that competency, which you can put in your trophy case. This is a product of the blank slate, which assumes anyone can learn anything. The strivers festooned with credentials are not naturally better. They just want it more.

Perhaps the most amusing bit of language in this press release is the phrase “transformational leadership approach.” This is another example of how the managerial class loves neologism, especially those that borrow words and phrases from the productive sector of society. They also love the idea that natural ability, like leadership, can be acquired, like a new car or a new couch. They also need to feel like they are leaders, even if they sit in a cubicle all day.

Like emotional intelligence, transformational leadership is popular in the corporate space, mostly because it is a good way to avoid reality. That reality is there are people good at the things needed in a corporation and there is a finite number of them, which means there is never enough of these people. Consultants make a nice living telling senior managers that there is a way to spin the straw they can afford into the gold that will make the company successful.

This line is typical. “Through personal reflection, peer discussion and interactive activities such as role play and case studies, coaches developed an action plan for practical implementation of new strategies within their teams and integrated program concepts to evolve their coaching philosophy.” The action plan is the proof that the employee attended the seminar. Usually, they end up in the trash or maybe in a drawer with the other nonsense credentials.

Since the dawn of the industrial revolution, people have complained about the dehumanizing aspects of large corporate entities. Marxism was driven in large part by the dehumanizing aspects of large scale manufacturing. Writers and comedians have mocked corporate culture. The corporation is a creepy form of fascism in that the people in charge imagine themselves to be something other than autocrats and they demand their employees play along with the charade.

The social phenomenon of managerialism is the application of corporate self-delusion to society as a whole. The administrative state embraces the same bizarre language and internal activities as the modern corporation. Popular culture spreads the language and concepts, normalizing this stuff in areas like sports, of all places. Managerialism seeks to turn society into an integrated corporate entity. The only thing missing from that press release is the phrase “resistance is futile.”


The crackdown by the oligarchs on dissidents has had the happy result of a proliferation of new ways to support your favorite creator. If you like my work and wish to kick in a few bucks, you can buy me a beer. You can sign up for a SubscribeStar subscription and get some extra content. You can donate via PayPal. My crypto addresses are here for those who prefer that option. You can send gold bars to: Z Media LLC P.O. Box 432 Cockeysville, MD 21030-0432. Thank you for your support!


Promotions: We have a new addition to the list. Havamal Soap Works is the maker of natural, handmade soap and bath products. If you are looking to reduce the volume of man-made chemicals in your life, all-natural personal products are a good start. If you use this link you get 15% off of your purchase.

The good folks at Alaska Chaga are offering a ten percent discount to readers of this site. You just click on the this link and they take care of the rest. About a year ago they sent me some of their stuff. Up until that point, I had never heard of chaga, but I gave a try and it is very good. It is a tea, but it has a mild flavor. It’s autumn here in Lagos, so it is my daily beverage now.

Minter & Richter Designs makes high-quality, hand-made by one guy in Boston, titanium wedding rings for men and women and they are now offering readers a fifteen percent discount on purchases if you use this link. If you are headed to Boston, they are also offering my readers 20% off their 5-star rated Airbnb.  Just email them directly to book at sales@minterandrichterdesigns.com.


175 Comments
Most Voted
Newest Oldest
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
David Spence
David Spence
2 years ago

I remember a local enterprise, a tire store, with the name “Tire Concepts.” I often wondered if they were selling tires of different shapes, such as rectangles or octagons.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
2 years ago

surprised no one has mentioned how sports are becoming “corporate” because that is who their real audience is, especially for in-stadium revenues. now corporate drones can imagine they are on the team too! it all reminds me of Rollerball (the original) in so many ways.

Steve (retired/recovering lawyer)
Steve (retired/recovering lawyer)
2 years ago

A short trip through the BS to English transmogrifier yields the insight that coaches are now required to think and act like the immature, coddled, unintelligent, uneducated and violent feral “youths” who are recruited to play sportsball in what are laughably and incongruously called “institutions of higher learning.” All things in society have now been, or are actively being reduced to the lowest common denominator. “Equality” means that we all must act like the most ignorant, violent, stupid and sociopathic members of our society, rather than institutionalizing/imprisoning them if they refuse to become civilized. Congratulations, America; you have attained peak… Read more »

TomA
TomA

The erudite, entertaining, and accurate essence of this comment belies the seriousness of the problem. Idiocy is indeed an epidemic malady, but the end-state is not a hilarious guffaw at the neighborhood pub. It’s a rapid descent into collapse and chaos. And it won’t be very funny when roving gangs of hungry hooligans break down the front door looking for food and something to fuck. Best to have more than wit when that reality shows up.

Wang Wei Lin
Wang Wei Lin
2 years ago

The managerial class is generally stupid. Their virtue signaling word salads and committees are for themselves while the smart productive people find value in accomplishments great and small. When the managers notice we are indifferent or have cold contempt for them their world is threatened. Then the paramilitary departments called HR are called in to do battle.

Gman
Gman
Member
2 years ago

Such delicious irony … if these low-wit ‘managers’ would (could!) simply write with directness, clarity, and the rhetorical 2X-knockout blow of concision and precision, and would just write *without* condescension, then DOCTOR Z, who *does* write like this….would not have to. This sort of silly pseudo-intellectual patois rises to the greatest crescendo in the academic world, which loves detaching itself (sorry—‘eroticizes the decoupling of theyself’) from the Real, and is utterly numbing to directness/clarity/concision/precision…academics nearly all visualize themselves and their impenetrable, content-free prose as Neo bullet-dodging at the end of The Matrix. Then bedding down with Trinity and making lots… Read more »

Last of the Big-Time Pinhead Engravers
Last of the Big-Time Pinhead Engravers
2 years ago

“Life journeys” is good for a laugh, but my favorite bit of managerialized speech is “passionate.” To wit:

Job announcement: “Are you passionate about potato chips? Do they migrate through your brain all night?”

CV: “I am truly passionate about formulating car waxes.” … “I have spent time in recent years working on cancer cures, but my real passion is for writing terrifying Covid warnings. I want to join this biggest team!”

The Infant Phenomenon
The Infant Phenomenon

Now that right there is what I’d hafta call “deathless prose.”

Tumescent
Tumescent

Also funny are companies that describe what they do, no matter how mundane, as a “solution”. So an ice cream company might say something like “we provide cool tasty treat solutions to meet your summertime need for nutritional snacks”.

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
Reply to  Tumescent
2 years ago

And when they absolutely cannot think of any other slogan, they fall back on this: “We deliver!”

370H55V
370H55V
2 years ago

There was once a time when the job of a coach was to get his team to win games. I guess that’s considered way passe now.

The cuntefaction of America continues and accelerates. How long will it take for us to realize that this is an existential threat?

Humdeedee
Humdeedee
Reply to  370H55V
2 years ago

It’s been going on for far too long.

“The whole generation is womanized; the masculine tone is passing out of the world; it’s a feminine, a nervous, hysterical, chattering, canting age, an age of hollow phrases and false delicacy and exaggerated solicitudes and coddled sensibilities, which, if we don’t soon look out, will usher in the reign of mediocrity” ~ Henry James

The Infant Phenomenon
The Infant Phenomenon
Reply to  Humdeedee
2 years ago

Oops! Too late.

Disruptor
Disruptor
2 years ago

A decade plus ago, I noticed “equip” used this way in writing directed to the Christian “community.” Ditto “provision.” And others. It seems to tangible-ize intangibles.

If one reads attentively without the need to satisfy confirmation bias, many analogs can be noticed.

usNthem
usNthem
2 years ago

In many ways all the corporate etc. gobbledygook seems like a way to keep from talking directly about what needs to be done and how, as much as to show how “smart, erudite & emotive” one can be. When you’re having to hire dead wood vibrancy left, right and center, you just can’t order da’jizz or quaqueeba to get his/her shit together ASAP and get the job done or else. No sir. It takes gobbledygook word salads and beating around the bush to really get things taken care of quick, fast and in a hurry – LOL. “Dear da’jizz, I’m… Read more »

Chazz
Chazz
2 years ago

Folks, what we are seeing here is world class bullshit. Whoever spawned that booklet just obsoleted all of the on-line bull shit generators; “emotional intelligence competency” WOW.

orca
2 years ago

“……..seeing a man wearing a sports team jersey WITH ANOTHER MAN’S NAME EMBLAZONED ON THE BACK……” That’s the red-line for me. Wearing a Kobe Bryant Laker jersey is fine….if you’re 11. Not when you are 31.

WhereAreTheVikings
WhereAreTheVikings
Reply to  orca
2 years ago

It’s not even good at 11. Imbuing young men with athlete worship is not working out very well.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
2 years ago

Understandable though not good as there aren’t many in the way of heroes these days and arguably in terms of living national ones , none at all.

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  orca
2 years ago

I give a guy a pass if it’s his own kid. I’ve been a sportsball guy my whole life- and I get the criticisms of it as an institution if one can say that. I still follow some sportsball- college hockey a lot, and college lacrosse. Anyone see what those two sports have in common? As for the coaching aspect- there is a lot of gobbledegook out there, but there are a number of organizations out there that are trying to improve the quality of coaching especially at the youth and high school levels. There are still coaches that just… Read more »

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  Ganderson
2 years ago

The sloppiness of my prose is entirely due to posting while watching the Sweden – Slovakia World Junior hockey game… damned sportsball.

The real Bill
The real Bill
2 years ago

Role play: “Christopher, you’re a 350-pound, 5’2″ Black woman named Gen’Orea. You’re angry, because of all the the things you’ve been learning about how racist society has kept you down. You can’t quite put your finger on it, but you suspect that your White male boss is looking down at you. Though there’s nothing particular you can point to, you also suspect that he’s a racist. OTOH, you’re afraid to confront him, since your job is your only source of support for you and your five children; none of whose four biological fathers are contributing anything, not even the two… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  The real Bill
2 years ago

I call BS. Gen’Orea has kids to support herself 🙂

mderpelding
mderpelding
2 years ago

If you have the time, look up the writings of Richard Mitchell, who published a newsletter titled “The Underground Grammarian.” He also wrote a few excellent books. The obtuse language that permeates the managerial class has its’ origins in schools of education. We’re being haunted by the verbal gobbledygook of Thorstein Veblen.
Regards,
Mike

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
Reply to  mderpelding
2 years ago

The pile of shit we’re in has its origin in “education”. Brainfuckem young….kill creatitvity and common sense. Now we’re talkin baby, they’ll march themselves to the deathcamp.

The Infant Phenomenon
The Infant Phenomenon
Reply to  Dennis Roe
2 years ago

The reason for schools of “education” that grant “degrees” in “education” is that the monstrous idea gained currency that EVERYBODY should “get” a “college education.” It’s the fault of social democracy. Of believing our own bullshit propaganda. So we have degrees in “education” where one learns something known as “teaching methods” even though you don’t know a GD thing about the subject that you are eventually hired to teach.

Guest
Guest
Member
Reply to  mderpelding
2 years ago

who’s all these new guys..
nice to see

Coalclinker
Coalclinker
2 years ago

It seems today that anytime someone in post-secondary education has something to say about “Muh” institution, no normal people really care about what they have to say. It’s automatically like, ” Yeah, whatever in the f#@k you want!” Young white men also are so turned off by this, that for the last 20 years an ever increasing number don’t even want to bother with college. It’s simply not an option for those wanting to make a real living without going into debt to “learn” something. The pointy-head people of the Borg are always left-wing Democrats, and they still can’t fathom… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Coalclinker
2 years ago

It’s astonishing how arrogant they are these days. Pride goeth before destruction. I’ve seen it before in others, in myself to a degree, in retrospect.

What I’ve never been able to figure out is if it’s madness, or if it conceals a creeping desperation. I go back and forth.

The Infant Phenomenon
The Infant Phenomenon
Reply to  Paintersforms
2 years ago

No, I think it’s just pure self-delusion. These people BELIEVE this BS.

Tired Citizen
Tired Citizen
Reply to  Coalclinker
2 years ago

The thing with college is that once it’s accessible to “everyone”, then it loses the very essence that makes it something worthwhile. Just like the equity bullshit has done. Now they’ll be trying to push through blacks with 75 IQs through college and eventually all of corporate America too. It’s really embarrassing to see joggers who can’t even speak proper english getting hired into positions they have absolutely no ability to fill. If you thought America got a lot dumber when the millennials took over, the joggers are here to tell you “hold muh 40″…

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
Reply to  Coalclinker
2 years ago

“… weaping, wailing, and knashing their teeth.”

I live just for the chance to see this happen.

Memebro
Memebro
2 years ago

I’m going to go a little against the grain on this managerial sloganeering stuff. Just a little. I really hate it. All of the non-offensive mealy-mouthed language. It makes me want to puke. I served in the military back when they didn’t have safe spaces to crawl into. I think there’s a lot to be said for developing a thick skin and learning to take criticism and hard leadership. Having said that, I spent the last 2 decades under the thumb of a fucking asshole who came across as “old school”. The only thing he understood about management was his… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Memebro
2 years ago

In my experience, finding a corporate platitude-spouting manager who will actually “go to bat for you” is as likely as finding a chicken with teeth. They got into their position precisely because they avoid the risks that come with going to bat for their employees. The only way to go higher in the food chain is to continually defer to those above them.

There might be times when it appears that they’ve gone to bat for you, but that’s only when there’s been a confluence, coincidental no doubt, of your desires and their direct report’s.

Outdoorspro
Outdoorspro
Reply to  Memebro
2 years ago

To be fair, any young person coming up in the world these days is likely to talk like that, as that is just the language of the present day. Ideally, they will eventually see through the platitudes and get to the point, but they may not. I agree that it’s the motivation that counts. Current HR departments are so much larger than they ever need to be, that they have to constantly create busy work to give themselves something to do (and put on their annual evaluations), but also to give the rest of the company the illusion that they… Read more »

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  Outdoorspro
2 years ago

To add to my comment (“I don’t think you have to be a dick to be tough”. ) upthread, I’d also observe that not all managers who yell are dicks. As a classroom teacher I’d yell about once a semester- it got the kiddies attention! If one yells all the time one is likely to lose the class/room/division, whatever.

And as for the comments above about Ed school- you guys don’t know the half of it- complete waste of time, but most teachers have to take the stupid classes to get certified.

3g4me
3g4me
2 years ago

Mr. Generic: The richness of English vocabulary allows for extraordinary precision, and some of the signifiers of good writing are precision and clarity – i.e. word choice. Even as an English major who thought herself fairly well read, I frequently come across words whose meaning I’m not absolutely certain of, or new ones from other fields. Plus I’m old and not quite as sharp as I once was. And I still make frequent use of my father’s used 1948 “The American College Dictionary.”

SidVic
SidVic
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Pusillanimous is my favorite word. Fancy way of calling someone a pussy. Niggardly, comes in a close 2nd.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  SidVic
2 years ago

I’ve been finding a use for “Waxing prolix” of like.

Sounds like some genital hair removal technique.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Bilejones
2 years ago

Late not like,

gibberish for the comment approver.

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  Bilejones
2 years ago

Wish there was an editing feature.

vmax71
Reply to  SidVic
2 years ago

Personally, I am partial towards obtuse

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  vmax71
2 years ago

I don’t get it…

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
Reply to  SidVic
2 years ago

Prescient. Prescience. Try using both words in a single sentence.

Gman
Gman
Member
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Ah. I figured you for an English major like me. Hope you went through before it went totally bat-guano ….

TomA
TomA
2 years ago

This post is yet another example of the enormous and ever-growing body of deadweight that currently afflicts our society, and evermore so at the upper levels of decision-making. And this deadweight can only exist in an environment of extreme affluence in which government can print money at will, distribute it to parasites to purchase their loyalty & vote, and then spread this cost onto the productive via taxation or inflation. It’s a viscous cycle that must inevitably end in collapse, which is nature’s cure for all dysfunctional species. And this collapse can only be delayed, not prevented; no matter how… Read more »

Anonymous Whie Male
Anonymous Whie Male
2 years ago

“There is no such thing as emotional intelligence. It is another racket where “experts” on “emotional intelligence” sell their services to corporate trainers.” I was discussing intelligence with someone online several years ago. It turned out that he was black and could not admit that blacks have a statistically lower intelligence than Whites or Asians. He threw out a number of reasons for black shortcomings, based on the apologetics that liberals have promoted for negroes. But, the one excuse he used that I thought most hilarious was that blacks have a higher “kinetic intelligence” than other races. Meaning, of course,… Read more »

orca
Reply to  Anonymous Whie Male
2 years ago

SPRINTIN’ and jumpin’.

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  Anonymous Whie Male
2 years ago

In one of this season’s episodes Leon, the amazingly stereotypical black man character on Curb Your Enthusiasm, can’t eat watermelon in front of white people.

The Booby
The Booby
2 years ago

It amazes me how seriously so many people take education as a qualification for a job. Education tells us nothing about what kind of individual we are dealing with. In my former field, the position usually required a technical diploma, which I obtained many moons ago (when modern technology was at such an early stage as to render it meaningless in today’s world). To even apply for such a position one needed this diploma; those without it will not even be considered. Those who have these precious diplomas cling to them like grim death, insisting that those not possessing them… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  The Booby
2 years ago

It’s all about labor costs. Hire some MBA for less than it costs to train and raise somebody from within for a decade or two. Get the rubes to bear the cost of training. And if every company has the same generic culture you can plug and play these people well enough to get along in business. But you have to prove you’re good and disposable to get in the game lol.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  The Booby
2 years ago

Not sure I completely agree, but in essence you are correct. Bryan Caplan in “ The Case Against Education ” lays out a pretty good argument of your point, however he contends employers are not dumb and do have a (subtle) purpose in selecting college grad’s over non-grads. Basically, as a college grad, you’ve shown an ability to sit through years of mind numbing boredom and repeat/do complacently what you’ve been told by your superiors (professors). 😉 It’s a type of “signaling”. Whatever you fail to bring to the table knowledge-wise, as you’ve forgotten most of the dribble you’ve been… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Booby
2 years ago

Males form militaries. Females form religions. When men were the primary breadwinners: The laws defended that role, often giving women the short end of the stick. Education had clear goals. Companies had clear missions; scoring was verifiable because physical inventory was the mission. Labor unions had ranks. Class “uniforms” were the norm. Even government had strictly delineated roles. Society had a clearly defined hierarchy of authority and role. Men form hunting bands, pecking orders from chief hunter to spearmaker, to do a clear job- get the mammoth Now that women are the primary breadwinners: Men: short end of the stick… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

Edit: Oops, maybe women form church groups would be better

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

Crystal clarity about the situation writ large across the entire society. Great summation. 👍

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  The Booby
2 years ago

If it wasn’t for the Supreme Courts ban on employer IQ tests because of “disparate impact” none of this bullshit would exist.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  The Booby
2 years ago

Peter Thiel or Elon Musk had a good quote about how a college degree demonstrated that you could” hand you assignment on time, but not much else.”

Ganderson
Ganderson
Reply to  The Booby
2 years ago

The guy over at the old Rotten Chestnuts site talks about how our society blurs, perhaps obliterates the distinction between process and outcome. Makes sense to me.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
2 years ago

Oh gawd. The other one is “team building”. Grown adults are supposed to play childish games and pretend to enjoy it. Then there’s the role playing: they talk about certain work scenarios, do a little play to show how it works and then you have to do it. Finally, after the torture, you have to write a little paragraph about how this invaluable course will help you do your job better. I wrote mine: a complete waste of time and energy! The Karen running the course was not happy. I got a semi-formal reprimand from my manager for it and… Read more »

Brian Turner
Brian Turner
Reply to  Glenfilthie
2 years ago

You threw the reprimand in the trash? I would have framed it.

Outdoorspro
Outdoorspro
Reply to  Glenfilthie
2 years ago

“…emptied my desk and walked out without notice.”

I did that once and have fantasized about doing it again ever since. It is one of the very best feelings a modern man can have. There are few things more liberating. I highly recommend everyone do it at least once in their lifetime.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Outdoorspro
2 years ago

I don’t know if this counts, but a few months ago, I got a call from a repeat customer who had a broken garage door spring.(torsion) I arrived her house on time on a Saturday morning. Mind you, the door is not going up without that spring. You can try with the assistance of a door opener, but that tends to burn up the small plastic gear in the head. I had to walk through the house to get inside the garage. I was asked if I was vaxed and I said “Heavens no”. I was then asked to put… Read more »

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Bartleby the Scrivner
2 years ago

This right here is the most important comment of the day. They need us more than we need them, and as we begin to realize that, a sleeping giant awakens.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

Given that we’re evolving into a fascist state, I suppose it makes sense to bring corporate culture and language to society as a whole.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

I would almost agree with that, C, if it weren’t for the fact these guys are too damned stupid to run a fascist state even if they wanted to! When Joe Biden was saying “let’s go Brandon” on TV … suffice it to say I don’t think they will do fascism any better than capitalism…
😂👍

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Glenfilthie
2 years ago

Well, people always think that a fascist state is well organized because they always associate it with the Germans, who are, by their nature, well organized. Fascism won’t save this clown show. Socialism works in Denmark because of the Danes, not socialism. Our leaders, being the buffoons that they are, will run this society into the ground regardless of the system they choose. Our leaders are Bolsheviks at heart but have figured out that they need to cooperation – and the money – of corporations. Our Bolsheviks like nice things. AOC isn’t going to wear the same drab dress every… Read more »

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

This is what I don’t get, C: the fascists supposedly killed 6 million of them. The Russians, historically speaking – were even LESS fond of them and has even hunted them for fun and sport in the past… yet somehow…they maintained a place in the ruling Bolshevik hierarchy…? It doesn’t make sense? Did I miss something…?

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Glenfilthie
2 years ago

Yes.
Its all a lie.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Glenfilthie
2 years ago

You don’t think the trains will run on time?

Hahahahahahahahaha

Wind Tunnel
Wind Tunnel
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
2 years ago

I suppose it makes sense to bring corporate culture and language to society as a whole. All the self-improvement fads people latch onto are analogous to one side of the corporate culture: the demand that you must not be satisfied with your skills and accomplishments. “Re-inventing” yourself is a key part of the Goals hierarchy. You already demonstrate competence, even creativity, in your role in the organization? Forget it, that’s not enough. You’re a rubber band — expand, expand, expand. It never occurs to the corporate masters that pride in a job well done and recognition for it is a… Read more »

Quintus
Quintus
2 years ago

This is an excellent expansion of Theodore Dalrymple’s observations about bureaucratic language. Well done, Z Man! For those interested on Dalrymple’s take, here is a like to the TakiMag article:
https://www.takimag.com/article/speaking_bureaucratically_theodore_dalrymple/

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Quintus
2 years ago

Some discussion here about language and the use of language and vocabulary. No modern writer that I know has more command and style in the English language than Dalrymple. He can talk about taking out the trash and make it a fun read–hell, he actually wrote a book on the topic. Check out his works.

Felix Krull
Member
2 years ago

College presidents now call themselves CEO’s, for example.

And students go “on strike” rather than skip classes.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
2 years ago

Big vs small. Big means more complex organization, which requires more specialization, more efficiency. It’s dehumanizing by nature. I think most people would prefer small but the necessity of efficiency precludes it. Or maybe not, idk. Misanthropy is a thing in modern life. Anyway, I get the culling, if it’s real. Darth Vader still has a beating heart that wants released from its hell. Supposing that scenario, I wonder if the people executing it realize that destroying the system that made them will destroy them too. Sort of like how the old world committed suicide with industrial war. Maybe their… Read more »

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  Paintersforms
2 years ago

Why the hell would any sane person watch gamers on Twitch? Whatever Twitch is.

norham foul
norham foul
Reply to  Hoagie
2 years ago

Twitch is this incels manifestation of what I did in the 70’s and ’80s sans screen, on the beach, and the street. I guess it could be called Twatch.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Hoagie
2 years ago

Twitch is what you do if you grew up gaming instead of sporting.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Hoagie
2 years ago

The thirst is real:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PejXtgawaXg

I only made it through about a minute.

I think I lost about 20, maybe 30 IQ points.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
2 years ago

Yeah, the next 36 compilation videos were way better

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
2 years ago

Solzhenitsyn’s “In the First Circle” includes a chapter where all the employees have to attend a seminar on the current Marxist theories. They’re bored but have to go through with it. It’s 1949 and Stalin would get mad if they didn’t. The gibberish from the presenter is like what you quoted.

3g4me
3g4me
2 years ago

While not ignoring earlier business theorists (Bentham, Taylor, etc.), modern managerial language strikes me as a symptom of the unequal yoking of feminism and multiculturalism to Western profit-seeking business practices. Industrialists have always sought to mold their workforce to conform to their preferences, of course, and in many ways those preferences laid the foundation for ‘public’ education in America. A way to train the unwashed masses to follow the rules and the clock, perform repetitive tasks for extended lengths of time, and to maintain a modicum of quality and efficiency. A little knowledge is a dangerous thing in more ways… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Brilliant analysis, truly. Someone, here I think, pointed out recently that this unnatural inclusion of women and other outgroups has started now to tank the tech sector. No matter what we think of them, the original innovators have started to retire and die off, and women and minorities have started to replace them with the predictable, calamitous results. I can attest corporations have been forced to have their own equivalent of the Deep State, which runs thinks independently of the CEO and Board ’cause reasons that do with profit. The same has happened within Leviathan’s bureaucracy. While the federal law… Read more »

KGB
KGB
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Bravo, 3g4me. I gave a thumbs up but I wanted to put it in words, too. That’s a very incisive post. We can’t lose sight of the underlying goal: (peaceful) separation. Putting the gyno-genie back into the bottle will be a chore under the best of circumstances, but it will never be possible until we’ve cleansed the culturally alien contamination from the white man’s world.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  KGB
2 years ago

Ditto. 3g4me’s comment is perhaps one of the best I’ve read. Should not even be a comment, but a blog posting standing by itself.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

Compsci: You and Jack and KGB grant me too much honor. Truly, I am merely fortunate in recognizing patterns and, at times, being able to see how all the parts fit into the bigger picture. At other times regarding other subjects I might as well be blind. And I’ve learned from all of you as well. Love all you gentlemen – good thinking, good company, and good humor!

Gman
Gman
Member
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Yeah that was nailer.

WhereAreTheVikings
WhereAreTheVikings
Reply to  KGB
2 years ago

So . . . what do you men plan on doing about this? The teenagers wrecked the car, so you need to take away the keys, more or less permanently. Instead, I see an awful lot of going gentle into that good night. For God’s sake, Trump is even playing into the Democrats and Mitch McConnell’s hands (again), preening about the vaccines, as they set him up to take the fall when the fallout starts.

WhereAreTheVikings
WhereAreTheVikings
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
2 years ago

By the way, 3g4me, great comment.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
2 years ago

The primary function of men in any functioning society
is to determine what order should be, impose it and maintain it. This applies to the whole society, corporations, social groups and families. Without this framework everything else collapses.

Drew
Drew
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Honestly, the problem is simpler than that. Every business that succeeds devolves into an increasingly unresponsive bureaucracy. Jargon exists to reinforce process, whereas direct language reinforces results. The fundamental problem with the undying corporation is that it outlives it’s founder (who is it’s driving force). The most obvious example is probably Walmart, which became vastly worse at customer service and somewhat worse at pricing once Sam Walton died. Apple is following the same path now that Jobs is dead. Bureaucracies exist to reinforce a decision-making paradigm, which provides consistency, but is largely unresponsive to changes in operating conditions. In contrast,… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

What KGB said, great post!

Though, while women may preach group effort, the group efficacy, to use corporate language, drops dramatically and scheming and backstabbing (rather than frontstabbing) rises.

Putting the gyno-genie back into the bottle will be a chore under the best of circumstances

Girls and boys should be separated at 7 years of age only to mix again in late puberty. Girls mature faster than boys so they dominate in school imposing the girl group culture they want boys to adopt.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Outstanding comment. Two hundred thousand years of evolution resulted in patriarchy being the dominant social model because it worked and consequently our species rose to the top of the organic pyramid. Casting that model aside has started a death spiral that must inevitably end in collapse. No real man wants to be a pussy, and no real woman wants to mate with a pussifed man. And that means no babies, hence no future.

AuJus69
AuJus69
Member
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

Brilliant post…well said

ArthurinCali
ArthurinCali
2 years ago

This obsession with credentials can be seen all over the place in my field, with many openly bragging about how they basically paid for a degree.

Positions are not commensurate to ability or experience, merely educational check in the blocks will suffice.

Having to show an “MBA” grad how to use pivot tables in Excel is quite entertaining.

Tumescent
Tumescent
2 years ago

I recently retired from a large bank. In my 27 years there, I saw this managerial language bullshit and the dehumanizing Marxist managerial philosophy grow exponentially. It was like watching a river of sludge slowly devouring a town. You could see it coming but couldn’t do anything about it other than pack up and leave. I now get a kick out of reading posts in Linked-In. People with administrative duties in a cubical now describe their jobs as “life journeys” and when they get fed it and quit or get fired, they move on to their next journey. It’s a… Read more »

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
2 years ago

Sports is a business, period. Even at the college level, “coaches” are basically managers to whom the Borg must teach its approved “coaching methods”. Coaching as we knew it allowed too much room for individual interpretation and personal styles. With Athletic Directors and “football coaches” making literally millions of dollars even at crappy sports schools, the racket must be protected. The AD making $2 million isn’t going to let some rogue tennis coach mess things up for him/her. Meanwhile, the same academics who mocked Taylorism and six-sigma training have no problem installing their own brand of indoctrination. It’s all about… Read more »

bob sykes
bob sykes
2 years ago

As to coaching, wins is what counts. So we have Rockne, Hayes, Bryant, Lombardi, Belechick, Saban, Meyer, … everyone an a$$hole.

SidVic
SidVic
Member
2 years ago

Emotional Intelligence? Is this what highly manipulative sociopaths have? Wherever would such a obviously fraudulent concept arise? From the wiki page of President of Yale: Peter Salovey (/ˈsæləveɪ/; born February 21, 1958) is an American social psychologist and current President of Yale University. He previously served as Yale’s Provost, Dean of Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, and Dean of Yale College. Salovey is one of the early pioneers and leading researchers in emotional intelligence. More…. Salovey’s grandparents’ families originally came from Poland, Jerusalem, and Austria.[4] The Saloveys are descendants of the Soloveitchik rabbinic family.[5] His paternal grandfather, Yitzchak… Read more »

Whitney
Member
Reply to  SidVic
2 years ago

I’ve got it. I can use the right language and push the right buttons to get people to do or respond how I need them to.. I can also explain to other people what they need to do to get the responses they need. I don’t do that very often because I kind of freaks people out when I can lay it out so clearly. It’s never anything terrible I just need particular responses on my job so I’ll do what I need to do to get it. But I do joke with people that I would have made an… Read more »

mannecan
mannecan
Reply to  SidVic
2 years ago

I will admit that the guy was a decent psychology professor back in the day. Ironically, most of the students at Yale today would score extremely low on the original scale of “emotional intelligence” pioneered by Salovey which is measured in terms of EQ (as opposed to IQ). They have no self-awareness or emotional restraint. I’m sure someone has revised this scale so as not to penalize the labile emotions as long as they are in the name of progressive politics.

Anna
Anna
Reply to  SidVic
2 years ago

Next logical step: notice a trend in Nobel Prizes in sciences and medicine.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Anna
2 years ago

Anna: Sounds crazy, I know, but it really isn’t always all about you or your people. I think you made a wrong turn on your keyboard – Unz is the other way, where people are obsessed with purportedly high IQ Juice or Orientals instead of caring about their own people and overall White society.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Anna
2 years ago

Bringing up the JQ is problematic. It defeats the sale- one has to jump over the obstacle brought up by oneself before finding agreement and making the pitch. If one brings up one’s own issues first, by that time one’s lost the customer.

I think it might be better to think of the JQ as just another demographic. They have criminal mafias hiding behind their own people.

Everybody does. We can’t deport the Bushes and Clintons, for example, so have to learn to put up with anticipating the “over-achievers” in any group.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

Edit: I was going to say, “anticipate scorpions to act like scorpions”, but am trying to be polite. Screw it, somebody has got to depopulate the world, so let the blood be on their hands. To their credit, they’re trying to do it without the carnage this time leaving more goodies for their eternal rule. Still, it’s got to happen, and will be ugly no matter what. Our own generosity and goodwill backfired- wanting to ease the suffering (or “bring souls to the Lord” for fookin’ brownie points), we gave the primitives too much, too fast, too freely- they weren’t… Read more »

Sid
Sid
Reply to  Anna
2 years ago

I will grant your pt. However, becoming a top upper echelon science guy is 70% politics. Attracting funding etc… The higher average IQ of the Ashcanazi in no way explains the vast over representation of them in admissions and leadership in our formerly wasp institutions. Maniacal tribal nepotism, does explain the phenomenon. I eagerly await the blossoming of science originating in Israel. So far we’ve gotten spy software and mysterious ….

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Anna
2 years ago

I notice that trend went to vaccine rackets. Your boy Kessler banned all medical devices for 9 years so yours could get a bigger grip on the medical market. Now we have advanced disease bioweapons (after how many tries), media-led pandemics, and a medical tyranny. Just like the USSR, you lead the advance and set the rules, and THEN native opportunists follow your lead. The problem is, once in motion, systems tend to stay in motion. It always starts with a certain bunch saying, “we can do a better job than they can!”, and always ends in the destruction of… Read more »

WhereAreTheVikings
WhereAreTheVikings
Reply to  SidVic
2 years ago

The Golden Rule used to work just fine . . .

SidVic
SidVic
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
2 years ago

The golden rule is for suckers. Sorry to say.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  SidVic
2 years ago

Another White standard that’s been abused. We used to enforce that.

No, it’s for White people- and let the others follow where we lead…in their own places.

Joey Jünger
Joey Jünger
2 years ago

I went to grad school for the same reason I went to college, just to get the MGIB living allowance. I accidentally got my MA in Germanistik just by treading water so long. Language has some rigor to it, but nowhere near as much as math or science, so there were a lot of crazy females in the program. I remember at one point some weird corporate empathy lady came in (I don’t know what the hell her title was) and told us to form a circle and that we were going to perform some kind of trust transfer dance.… Read more »

Mow Noname
Mow Noname
Reply to  Joey Jünger
2 years ago

“Wear your mask.”

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Mow Noname
2 years ago

I think it may have been you from whom I heard this little nugget; “Socially” distance, take the jab, get in the boxcar.

Thanks…

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
2 years ago

JJ-

It’s all just for the greater good:

https://www.bitchute.com/video/GrkS1jAsckDd/

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
2 years ago

Competitive sports have always been a part of the human experience. They occupy the attentions of otherwise destructive teen-age boys and have been training for war activity for millennia. Probably even more important is the fact that they are a significant component in gambling. No doubt Genghiz Khan’s horsemen placed bets on the speed of their mounts. The American NFL is now in bed with organized gambling after years of watching that mania without being able to financially tap into it. Nevertheless, it seems odd that if you see in public a man wearing a green and yellow football sweater… Read more »

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

Furthermore, unlike the opaque world of government, politics, business, finance and academia, sports by their nature are open and transparent. The activities of the Federal Reserve are a mystery to the man in the cul de sac but the plays that led to the Giants defeating the Cardinals are visible to anyone.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

nailheadtom: Plays are not necessarily clear to everyone. I don’t follow sportsball but I am sufficiently aware to know that American football can include some fairly complex plays, almost like various chess stratagems. I’ve also read that certain diverse players have had a difficult time memorizing the playbook, let alone extemporizing within its forms. That requires a certain type of intelligence which they are traditionally lacking – visualizing and planning a future abstraction.

nailheadtom
nailheadtom
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

American football can include some fairly complex plays

That’s what the sports ball promoters would like you to believe. How can it actually be all that complex if it takes place in a very small physical space and involves a very limited number of players regulated by an arcane set of rules set in a very short period of time?

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  nailheadtom
2 years ago

It’s paper-rock-scissor writ large, with the added complication of all 11 guys having to remember and properly carry out the paper-rock-scissor order.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
2 years ago

Almost as if immortal, limited-liability legal fictions directed by outsiders are our greatest mistake.

I use this argument when thinking about what I call the “gods”, composite memory processing pools etched into eddies of the local magnetic field (commonly called Spirit): they aren’t actually sentient, and they aren’t individual entities- yet they perform action that affects us.

Simply put, calling “God” intelligent is like saying a corporation is intelligent.

Not so, any more than an avalanche needs intelligence to perform action- yet how to defend ourselves from its weight?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

(PS- I understand that putting a face and a name on the ineffable acts as a kind of transformer, stepping something quite real down to a voltage we can actually use. Family stories are our operating system, our OS or guideline to perceive the world.

A ‘Heavenly Father’, a.k.a. “awe”, is one thing when understanding that each people have their own fathers- but I see monotheism, a Supreme Being, as not only an inaccuracy, but as the most dangerous concept ever invented.

Modern corporations, the Blob or Borg, are certainly a runner up.)

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

Well, shoot. Here I go again down the rabbit hole.

You envision a Mover outside the movement.

Not so. Your God has a creator.

It is the movement that creates the mover, that makes the Maker.

btp
Member
2 years ago

It’s everywhere. Couple year back, I went to a seminar offered by the FBI to train various houses of worship to deal with active shooters in their churches. Now, you might have thought that the FBI would have useful information for these guys to think through: how would you select people that you are going to ask to carry guns in your church, what makes you think these guys can make a shot in a crowded room, this is a big investment in a very low-probability event, can you keep it up for a decade? All that sort of thing.… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  btp
2 years ago

At our Church we had a parishioner with experience dealing with people who were about to go off the deep end. Went through a reasonable escalation process that included just asking him to discuss the issue outside if he’s screaming at the Priest but has not brandished the weapon yet, all the way up to big guys in the parish tackling or shooting the guy if everything else fails. He had no PhD or counterterrorism credentials, and the most he had was a basic credential that allowed him to talk about the subject without legal liability to him or the… Read more »

fakeemail
fakeemail
Reply to  btp
2 years ago

Those “big binders” are everywhere! They turn simple tasks into baffling monstrosities that any decent person becomes disgusted with. That’s why so many institutions wind up weeding out the decent, competent, and of course geniuses. People of good faith and honest thinkers cannot abide or survive in this kind of stuff. Honest people want to get to the point and get going! But school and work is mostly endless jumping through hoops where often the most compliant, not the brightest, win. Humanity is hopeless. Most are fools, the law of the jungle/force dictates that psychopaths will get on top, and… Read more »

doggedly defiant
doggedly defiant
Reply to  fakeemail
2 years ago

Having the binder with periodic updates is no guarantee that you will have time to find the binder, open the binder to the right page and execute the instructions, while the building is burning down around you. Practice practice practice muscle memory. On a side note, I have come to the conclusion that free will is a bad combination of desire and ambition, I would much rather that God had given us common sense, even though common sense would dictate that we not even try to reach the stars but we would have streetlights and sidewalks. Do we think we… Read more »

Drew
Drew
Reply to  fakeemail
2 years ago

If the Amish living a quarter mile up the road are indicative of the rest, their homogeneity has devolved into inbreeding, their Christianity is a veneer, and their technological limitation is a joke.

Fakeemai
Fakeemai
Reply to  Drew
2 years ago

You may be right. There may well be no real good “solution” for man as we understand it.

Hi -Ya!
Hi -Ya!
2 years ago

Taki blog. I though man was a surviving machine? Evolutionists need to put survival first, no?

bob sykes
bob sykes
Reply to  Hi -Ya!
2 years ago

No. Reproduction is all.

SidVic
SidVic
Reply to  bob sykes
2 years ago

To be fair, one tends to follow the other. Carrion produces few offspring.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Hi -Ya!
2 years ago

Hi-Ya, you asked a question that was honest, yet ignored. Your question is why this discussion of credentials has me spinning off track (as usual) into religious philosophy. (First, let me thank you for asking it, it was important to me.) You asked, “but doesn’t a religion need a God to be a religion?” In answer, “no, half the world doesn’t have a God or Creator, look at the Chinese, Japanese, or Amerindians.” The idea of a Supreme Creator is an Abrahamic twist (on archaic Aryan cosmology, all of which they got wrong as usual.) In other words, God, the… Read more »

imbroglio
imbroglio
2 years ago

You can extrude this language in your sleep. I have. It comes from a random word generator similar to a random number generator. After a phrase or two, people stop reading. Their eyes merely scan the words. The concept of “emotional intelligence” was popularized by Daniel Goleman’s book of that title. Emotional intelligence, according to the author, though he doesn’t put it this way, is the ability to sit back, suss out the situation, determine who’s got the power/influence and then how to tailor your thouight and conduct in the way most advantageous to your goals and agenda relative to… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  imbroglio
2 years ago

Pardonnez, je ne parle pas.

What is ““honi soit qui mal y pense”, please?

Angarrack
Angarrack
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

“Evil to those who think ill of it.”

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  imbroglio
2 years ago

Oh, then I agree with the idea of “emotional intelligence”.

Think like a predator. Blacks and women do- the words mean nothing, they look for what’s behind the words.

They use the social brain, not the informational one- thus the monkey barking. “Word salad” is display.

Milestone D
Milestone D
Reply to  imbroglio
2 years ago

“shame on him who thinks evil of it“

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
2 years ago

If one wants to look at the corporate hive-mind, take a look at the Linkedin news feed. Person after person with the same vapid profile pic, spouting the same old nonsense that is either a woke bowing to current trends or a word salad of jargon that says nothing. Then the comments are somehow even more banal. Reminds me of Solzhenitsyn’s comment about communists in Soviet Russia who congregated and spouted nothing but marxist platitudes at one another. Saw this at my own company when my boss kept asking me to be a part of his “Leadership Book CLub”. First… Read more »

SidV
SidV
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

In one of my daughter’s classes they came up with end-of-world scenario and asked the kids who they pick as a survival partner among themselves, and why. My kid picked the most portly girl. You can probably guess why. Harlan Ellison is definitely a subversive influence.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  SidV
2 years ago

This smacks of Solzhenitsyn IIRC. I believe he wrote of the use of a “sandwich” when escaping the Gulag. Two strong prisoners would entice a very weak one to escape with them. The weak one being eaten when he succumbed to the rigor of the environment being traversed. 🙁

SidVic
SidVic
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

My kids are a mixture Vlad-the-impaler 50, anglo 25, portuguese 20 and small amount of SW native 5. They scare me at times. I’ve designated the daughter in the example above as our long-term care giver. She is the sweetest.

mmack
mmack
Reply to  thezman
2 years ago

“OK, this “Z Man” from Baltimore. Evaluation Susan?”
“Not A Team Player, Frank.”

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
2 years ago

“Through personal reflection…evolve their coaching philosophy”.

I’m pretty sure teaching blocking schemes and defensive assignments are more important than the drivel in the seminars. I’m surprised coaches put up with it.

That said, I find a grown man wearing a shirt with another grown man’s name on it, sorta, gay.

Outdoorspro
Outdoorspro
Reply to  Bartleby the Scrivner
2 years ago

When you get paid what so many of those coaches get paid, you’ll put up with a lot of BS to keep the lifestyle maintained. Can’t imagine the trophy wife would be very keen on downsizing to a cheap condo near the local junior college.

Come to think of it, if I was getting paid that much, I’d probably put up with it too.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Outdoorspro
2 years ago

You can’t serve both God and Mammon. Make yourself a slave to Mammon and that’s what you are, a slave.

Gobsmack
Gobsmack
2 years ago

“The long answer is nothing.” Another keyboard bites the dust.

Grumpy
Grumpy
2 years ago

Hey Z, I really like your stuff. I usually don’t bother to comment as I have little to add. Your insights are thought provoking and many times put meat on the bones of vague ideas of my own. One thing that bugs me about your writing is your language sometimes strikes me as a bit, shall we say, pompous. For instance, “This is another example of how the managerial class loves neologism, especially those that borrow words and phrases from the productive sector of society.” By using the term neologism, didn’t you just do what you are accusing them of?… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Grumpy
2 years ago

maybe improve your vocabulary? seriously. just look up the words you don’t know.

BeAprepper
BeAprepper
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

Yeah, just look it up. Learning is good.

Mr. Generic
Mr. Generic
Reply to  Grumpy
2 years ago

Grumpy, The difference is that Z is using uncommon but precise language. We might not have encountered a word he uses before, but his usage of that word (obscure as it may be) is correct. The midwits use words either improperly (or use made-up words that have no meaning) but they choose to use words that they have seen other midwits using in order to maintain their status in that social group. Simply put: Z uses uncommon words correctly to accurately make a point, while these status-striving midwits use the same commonly-repeated words incorrectly (or meaninglessly) in order to gain/maintain… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Mr. Generic
2 years ago

Mr. Generic: The richness of English vocabulary allows for extraordinary precision, and some of the signifiers of good writing are precision and clarity – i.e. word choice. Even as an English major who thought herself fairly well read, I frequently come across words whose meaning I’m not absolutely certain of, or new ones from other fields. Plus I’m old and not quite as sharp as I once was. And I still make frequent use of my father’s used 1948 “The American College Dictionary.”

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  3g4me
2 years ago

It would be interesting—but I’m not going to do it—to evaluate reading level of the comments posted here.

Reading level of general writing, and it’s degeneration over the years, was a big thing when I was in school as an undergrad—waaay long ago. At that time, IIRC, we were looking at general publishing at an 8th grade level for public consumption.

There is an association with the general decline in the population intellect and their ability to write and communicate. Not seeing it here, but in other media attracting a different readership, it’s depressing.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

seems like humanity is heading back towards pictographic languages (textual languages being “hard” and “making brains hurty”).

Norham Foul
Norham Foul
Reply to  Grumpy
2 years ago

Zman just got the modern leadership Shit Sandwich Review ( I wonder if this commenter writes several posts a week along with a few podcasts) 1) The delicious Top of the buttered Bun-You are great: “I really like your stuff. I usually don’t bother to comment as I have little to add. Your insights are thought provoking” 2) The filling: ….but “One thing that bugs me about your writing is your language sometimes strikes me as a bit, shall we say, pompous” 3) The bottom bun: self-effacing “Gee whiz but what do I know”: “Humbly submitted” Brings back some tortuous… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Grumpy
2 years ago

Learn to Google, Mr. Reddit. Even my geriatric ass can highlight words on my phone and tap “define” or “translate”.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
2 years ago

maybe the business schools should teach its (future) leaders not to tear down the walls of society that allow the corporation to function and exist; i.e. wokeness. honestly, i don’t see large corporations surviving – anywhere on the planet. largeness depends on very particular conditions, and once those conditions are not present, largeness disappears; just ask the brontosaurus :). in a poor world — which is what the modern world is becoming — there is no market for insurance companies, or car companies, etc etc. and without cheap energy you aren’t going to have any business that involves shipping things… Read more »

Mr. Generic
Mr. Generic
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

Large corporations will survive precisely because they are multi-nationals and the current favorite vehicles of the global elite for money laundering, propaganda pushing, general oppression of the people, and many other satanic enterprises.

The large corporations are replacing what you think of as a nation state.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Mr. Generic
2 years ago

who will they sell their wares to? there is no more mass consumption, the mass of people are living at subsistence level.

technology and manufacturing depend on an entire ecosystem of support and personnel. mass consumption society support this model. once the middle class disappears, so will large corporations, because again, who will their customers be, how do all levels of the corporate hierarchy survive in a collapsed world?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

You sayin’ Soylent isn’t a corporation?

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Alzaebo
2 years ago

oh it’s a corporation,, they just lie about the main ingredient of their product 🙂

WhereAreTheVikings
WhereAreTheVikings
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

This is what I have been asking eversince globohomo drew a bead on the middle class – who is going to buy all its stuff once Main Street is gone?

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
2 years ago

Gooberment employees. The swollen tick of the State.

Mr. Generic
Mr. Generic
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

Their customers are governments and staggeringly-large hedge funds. They don’t depend on you or me for cashflow. Blackrock and other Globohomo entities can buy their debt or their stock infinitely (due to their direct access to Fed money printing) and then once they own each corp’s debt, that corporation forever becomes their slaves.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Mr. Generic
2 years ago

haha right, they are going to build a few thousand cars a year and be massive at the same time. you are talking about a perpetual motion machine. and no, the elite won’t have their own separate advanced world, they will be living in the muck with all of us, just wearing fancier clothes (hand made) – when/if they completely crash the current system, prematurely.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Mr. Generic
2 years ago

cities are replacing the nation state, not corporations.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

Welcome (back) to 500BC!

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Compsci
2 years ago

with the concomitant population levels.

Carl B.
Carl B.
2 years ago

Re The Taki piece:
The old line Christian Church may be dead or dying, but Christianity itself is far from dead.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Carl B.
2 years ago

and far fro those churches and their membership.

funny, people treat their “religion” like a sports team. never saw that before. they aren’t Christians, like they aren’t athletes. they just like rooting for a particular church, and being associated with it tangentially. religion as a form of grilling.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  karl von hungus
2 years ago

Idea! Church gladiator teams- might come in awfully handy.

It’s a transformational leadership approach and immersive development program for practical implementation of new strategies within their cohort to better support the needs of the student-athlete.

With an eye to the near future, that is.

WhereAreTheVikings
WhereAreTheVikings
Reply to  Carl B.
2 years ago

Where do you find Christianity now? Surely not In the non-denominational, really bad rock concerts/pep talks that pass for services.

Where one or two are gathered together
Where one or two are gathered together
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
2 years ago

It’s found in the places no one looks – not with the proud and vainglorious, but with the humble and obscure. Where it began is where it will end.

acetone
Member
Reply to  WhereAreTheVikings
2 years ago

If you are interested in Catholicism attend mass at a few different parishes. Some are liberal, some are conservative, some are lively, some less so; there can be big differences in parishes located in close proximity. If you aren’t a Catholic but find a parish you like, look into taking the classes to convert. And look into joining a few groups (in my area there are Catholic men’s groups, fitness groups, couples prayer groups, choir etc). These smaller groups are a good way to meet interesting people and develop friendships and spirituality beyond Sunday mass. My protestant friends are mostly… Read more »