The Test Of Strategy

In sports, the final test is the game or the match in which the two sides compete with one side coming out victorious. All the practice and preparation are finally tested on the field against a real opponent. Similarly, war is the final test between nations competing with one another on the world stage. All the theory and strategy that each side was sure would work is put to the test.

This is what we are seeing in the Ukraine. Since 2014, NATO counties have been arming and equipping the Ukrainian army for a war with Russia. For about the same time, the Russians have been thinking about war with the West. Preparation for fighting Ukraine started only a few years ago, but it has been clear to Russian leaders that conflict with the West was coming at some point.

Getting back to the sports analogy, NATO, which is America for all practical purposes, has been the reigning champion. Since the Cold War it has been assumed that no military could challenge the US military. The combination of technology, experience and economic resources made it possible for American to take the fight to any place on the planet and fight in the enemy’s backyard.

That last bit is an important part of the formula. If you have to fight a war on your home territory, winning comes with a fair bit of losing. Even before industrial war, defending your own lands meant disruption to your economy and culture. Fighting on the other guy’s turf is always preferred. Winning is all upside and you can mitigate the cost of losing by withdrawing before total defeat.

This was the formula for destroying Russia. The West, which again is the Global American Empire, would wage a proxy war on the borders of Russia. This would force the Russians to exhaust themselves defending the border. Eventually, the war would move onto Russian territory. Of course, economic war in this age is presumed to be one way to bring the war home to the civilian population.

From the very start, the collective West has operated under the assumption that the Russians could not sustain combat activity in the Ukraine for long. According to all the analysis, the Russians lacked the manpower, the money and the supplies to fight for more than a few months. Many analysts claimed that the war would last but a few weeks before the Russians ran out of material to fight.

Here we are five months into the war and that last bit of analysis has proved to be completely wrong. A study by the Royal United Services Institute, a venerable British institution, finds that the Russians have more than enough industrial capacity to maintain this war for as long as it takes. In fact, the evidence suggests that they have much more capacity than is currently being used.

Last weekend, the Russian army along with militia forces took control of the cities of Sievierodonetsk and Lysychansk in the Luhansk region of the Donbas. This ensures the quick end to the Ukrainian occupation of that region. There will be some cleaning up before the final push to destroy the rest of the Ukrainian army currently hunkered down in the towns of Sloviansk and Kramatorsk.

Getting back to the sports analogy, the much smaller force taking the fight to the larger force in this war is like the smaller man going on the offensive against the bigger champion in a boxing match. The Russian expeditionary force is less that two hundred thousand men, while the Ukrainian army is half a million. Then there is the fact that the Ukrainians were armed and trained by the collective West.

There is a lot to be said about the technical aspects of the war and how the Russians have been able to defeat the Ukrainians. There is no question that the Russians, after some early missteps, have been better tactically than the West. The Ukrainians have been doing what American commanders have instructed, but the Russians seem to have done their homework and anticipated these moves.

All of the particulars are interesting on their own and will get analyzed in due time, but the larger issue is what matters now. The West went into this fight, in fact they precipitated the fight, sure that their strategy was superior. The war in Ukraine was going to be the proof of concept. The forces of democracy, trained by the heroes of democracy, would triumph over the opponents of democracy.

Right now, the going is slow for the Russians due to the fact they are meticulously removing an army from industrial areas in large population zones. In the next month, the battle will move to the open country where Russians air power and mobile units will come into their own. Instead of artillery battles, it will be one army demolishing the remnant of another army in the open field.

In other words, to get back to the sports analogy, we are about to enter the part of the fight where it is clear the champion is in serious trouble. This is when the announcers say something about how the champion was not prepared for the fight or that the opponent came in with a better strategy. Barring some miracle, the underrated challenger is going to score a huge upset over the champion.

This is not a boxing match. What the summer and autumn will bring is a flood of refugees from Ukraine into the West. The Germans are already facing a Turnip Winter thanks to energy shortages. The Poles are running out of money and patience with regards to the refugee situation. The collective West is facing a severe economic crisis as a result of the war against Russia.

Getting back to where we started, this war is the great test of the New World Order that Western elites have been boasting about at swanky conferences. It is not about Ukraine, but about the new way of running society. This was supposed to be the great leap forward into international managerialism, rule by the global best. Instead, it is looking like a global disaster caused by the West.

In sports, coaches, trainers and strategists whose teams and athletes fail in competition get fired from their jobs. It remains to be seen whether the people behind this debacle will get fired. History says they will learn nothing from this debacle. Like the restored Bourbons, Western elites forget nothing and learn nothing. On the other hand, if things get bad enough, they may not have a choice in the matter.


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LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
1 year ago

Total breakdown with my family. I told them that they all think of themselves as fearless independent thinkers and yet they all agree 100% with NPR. What an amazing coincidence.

I love them as my family but I don’t know if this wound can be healed.

BUT I MEAN IT!I love them, but fuck off.

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 year ago

Be aware they may be resentful and if you are more accomplished than the lot of them then they may try to undermine you by spreading gossip casting you as a deplorable heretic and all that.

BeAprepper
BeAprepper
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 year ago

Dittoes for us, the Mrs. & I.

The university.

Is what happens when people are educated beyond their critical thinking capacity. Propaganda works.

“I have all these degrees, I must be smart. I sound like my college sociology professor when I use my smooth, sophisticated NPR voice.”

Disruptor
Disruptor
1 year ago

And now, Prime minster Shmyhal of the ukraine is arranging many billion of reconstruction money from the IMF.

If the usual takes place, the money will disappear into Their pockets, the loans won’t get repaid, the ukraine will default, and then the money will come back out of Their pockets and buy up the assets cheap.

Just another day in the neighborhood.

Bartleby the Scrivner
Bartleby the Scrivner
Reply to  Disruptor
1 year ago

And the Big Guy gets 10%

Vxxc
Vxxc
1 year ago

Z – this is correct as far as it goes but not all the analysis was fantasy land. The US MIL that fights (as opposed to our TV actor Generals) have been analyzing the conflict for years, up close for some. Pick this up at 25 minutes if you want. Dr. Anthony Kharber at Modern War Institute West Point 2018. https://youtu.be/_CMby_WPjk4 We 🇺🇸 couldn’t beat the Russians with even numbers. Yes, 🇺🇸. The BTG is 1:1 artillery, we are 3:1 infantry or armor to artillery. It is dubious in contested airspace that an American BCT of 4400 could defeat a… Read more »

Vxxc
Vxxc
Reply to  Vxxc
1 year ago

Oh and yes we the military that fights knows, and has warned for years.

trackback
1 year ago

[…] The Test Of Strategy […]

Dennis Roe
Dennis Roe
1 year ago

Schlomo controls and runs every aspect of our gooberment, pounding the narrative with his satanic tv. He still hates Russia and white people in general for kicking him out of Khazaria. They want us dead, broke, starving. Fuck them. We’ll see who the fuck is left standing at the end of this planned nightmare.

Chazz
Chazz
1 year ago

Russia’s historically best ally, Mr. Winter, will, as always have something to say about all of this. How do you say in German: “OK, OK, go ahead take Odessa, just turn on the gas”?

Götterdamn-it-all
Götterdamn-it-all
Reply to  Chazz
1 year ago

“Ja, ja! Fahren Sie fort, nehmen Sie Odessa, drehen Sie einfach das Gas auf!!!”

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Götterdamn-it-all
1 year ago

Danke Mein Freund

Vajynabush
Vajynabush
1 year ago

Not entirely OT: I attended the Marin County (CA) Fair yesterday. Despite being a wealthy and overwhelmingly liberal area the fair is a decidedly downscale affair. Much more mixed-income Alameda County has much nicer fairgrounds and exhibits. Marin has a sizable Latino population and I would estimate 75% of the attendees were Latino. I saw maybe two blacks all day out of the attendees, with four times that number on stage as part of the New Orleans band Dumpstaphunk. The audience for the band inside the pavilion was all white, naturally. There was a very impressive fireworks display with patriotic… Read more »

James J. O'Meara
James J. O'Meara
1 year ago

In what sense is the US the “champ” anywhere but in its own mind, and its own propaganda? Going back to the Expeditionary Force that invaded the Soviet Union right after the revolution, it seems that every time the US goes up against a “Godless communist” nation it gets its ass kicked: Korea, Vietnam, Syria, now the Ukraine. (Contrary to Hollywood, WWII in Europe was won by the Soviets; America won the Pacific war by nuking civilians, which makes its huffing and puffing about “nuclear proliferation” and “human rights” a ghastly joke). Let’s not forget Cuba, another victory over war… Read more »

BeAprepper
BeAprepper
Reply to  James J. O'Meara
1 year ago

Come now James, don’t over state your case.

“We won the Pacific war by nuking civilians…”

The greatest generation, made tough by the depression, won the Pacific war in many hard fought battles. The Bomb saved American lives and forced Japan to surrender sooner than it would have otherwise.

Brandon Lasko
Brandon Lasko
Reply to  BeAprepper
1 year ago

And don’t forget D-Day, the retaking of Italy, and the North African campaign.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Brandon Lasko
1 year ago

The Battle of the Atlantic was no picnic, nor was the run up the Norwegian oast to Archangelsk, and certainly not for the merchant seamen manning the cargo-carrying convoys. Yes, these were nowhere near on the scale of continental warfare between the Axis and their allies, and the Russians, but the provision of vehicles, tanks, and munitions, not to mention the Allied bombing campaigns were still contributory toward the outcome of the war. What was done after the war itself is, of course, another story. I am of mixed mind about whether Patton’s view on which side we allied with… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Brandon Lasko
1 year ago

The war in Italy is an interesting study for us. Unlike the Germans, it seems the Italians (or a significant portion of them) did not have the same level of devotion to the national cause, and therefore it was much easier going for the Allies.

Makes one think.

mikey
mikey
Reply to  BeAprepper
1 year ago

There was no reason to drop nuclear bombs on Japanese teen-age girls walking to school, unless the US was worried about them giving birth to boys that would eventually become aircraft-less kamikaze pilots. No lives were saved since there was no need to invade Japan, they had been reduced to rubble by LeMay and no longer had a real army or air force and their fleet had left port without fuel to return.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  mikey
1 year ago

Tough call. Fighting was already too bitter and costly for armistice. Japanese had proven they’d fight to the last. VE meant everybody was looking to end the war. Nuke or order 100k more flags and caskets? I don’t envy Truman.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Paintersforms
1 year ago

Years ago I was of a mind that the japs started it and if they weren’t going to surrender after getting their asses kicked across the pacific, tough s***. In retrospect, after learning about the US enforced oil embargo, I’m not so sure. I’d say the double nuke drop was definite overkill, especially after we’d been bombing the hell out of them anyway. They were mean, cruel bastards none the less, so, I still kind of wonder.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  mikey
1 year ago

The bomb was more to signal the American dominance over the Pacific to the Soviets; Japanese surrender was arguably secondary. Popular history meant to wank off boomers neglects the Soviets were rampaging through China and were demanding Japan be divided with them like Germany.

Spingehra
Spingehra
Reply to  mikey
1 year ago

B.S. You should actually research the pacific war, The origins of the conflict are definitely debatable however the fanaticism, barbarity and ruthlessness of the Japanese forces and the civilian population were proven. There is no doubt that the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki while horrific, did in fact save lives on both sides. Another fact, the low altitude fire bombing campaign of Tokio killed more people & destroyed more area than both atomic attacks. Probably didn’t tell you that in WW2 101 at evergreen. The talking point you are repeating has been just one of the lies widely disseminated… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  mikey
1 year ago

It was a tough call, but we should not whitewash the fact that it was an intended terrorist act. The intended purpose of the bombings was to instill fear and terror on the general populace to such an extent that surrender was the only option. That comes from Truman’s own mouth. Right or wrong, by any reasonable definition of terrorism, it fits.

Among other precedents, its ends justifies the means reasoning opens up attacks on enemy non-combatants as legitimate. Not that it matters much – the victor gets to do what the hell it wants, moral reasoning be damned.

Whitney
Member
1 year ago

This appears to me to be a fight to the death on both sides. Our leaders have made it clear that the destruction of Russia is the goal which is unified the Russian people behind Putin because they also recognize that this is an existential threat to them. And if Putin wins it’s an existential threat to our leaders and their hegemony of world domination. Nobody can give an inch. We are all just cannon fodder. Or maybe nuclear dust. I don’t know. I do know not to fear those that can destroy the body, only those that can destroy… Read more »

pyrrhus
Reply to  Whitney
1 year ago

Yes…and although fighting on someone else’s territory prevents domestic damage, it is also much more expensive and causes logistic problems..Most such expeditions are disastrous, like the Athenian Syracuse expedition, unless you have a powerful local ally..

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  Whitney
1 year ago

It would help if we did not torture to death the leaders (and their families) of the target countries of our empirial execises. “If you lose we rape you to death with power tools” is not condusive to negotiations. No one wants to be the next Ghadaffi.

A.B Prosper
A.B Prosper
Reply to  Good ol' Rebel
1 year ago

This is why 100% of we invade Russia, CONUS gets nuked.

Problem is that a lot of people at the top are outright psychopaths and figure well “We lose 40% , they lose 100%, totally worth it.”

Its like either the Joker or Eobard Thrawn the Reverse Flash from Flashpoint is in charge of the US.

I suspect there are enough sane people even among the Woke who fear death not to allow it though.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Whitney
1 year ago

It is existential on the Russian side; it is a loss of modern conveniences/standard of living on ours. Fighting for your life strikes me as a little more unifying and motivating than fighting for reasonably priced lattes.

James J. O'Meara
James J. O'Meara
1 year ago

“Sievierodonetsk and Lysychansk in the Luhansk region of the Donbas”

Is there a rule is Slavic languages that words become shorter and easier to pronounce as one moves up the geographic hierarchy?

PASARAN
PASARAN
Reply to  James J. O'Meara
1 year ago

It’s a general case (here, Paris, Marseille, Nice, Brest vs Saint-Léonard-de-Noblat, Montmorillon, Saint-Georges-lès-Ancizes, Plonevez-Porzay, Plan-de-Cuques).

USA, as often, are an exception. But maybe it’s because, as Oscar Wilde noticed, your places have all the same boring names (Jefferson, Clinton, Madison, Shelbyville, Springfield) repeted a million time.

(as compare to pretty cute english places names, like Silverstone, Stretton-under-Fosse, Market Lavington, Berwick St. James…)

Disruptor
Disruptor
1 year ago

American Global Empire, like Nuland Blitzer Blinken Boot Kagan Mayorkas Yellen Garland Zelenskyy, etc. You know, American.

America is a yolk sac being consumed to advance the ambition of the
Ashkenazi Global Empire.

Without honesty, Our chances remain slim.

Alex
Alex
1 year ago

There are fuel and food riots in Ecuador, Bangladesh, Gambia, and other locations. Dutch farmers are protesting the new EU driven rules for farms, and getting into fist fights with the police. Things are cracking and by the end of this summer things will get very tense across the board.

Its like watching one of those Roman Empire history videos, but sped up 5x…

c matt
c matt
1 year ago

I get what you’re saying although I see it as more a preseason game or under-card match-up

Alex
Alex
1 year ago

Looks like Germany will be rationing hot water here in a bit:

https://www.yahoo.com/news/germanys-second-largest-city-preparing-110622392.html

Jens Kerstan, environment senator for Germany’s second biggest city, told German newspaper Welt am Sonntag on Saturday that Hamburg could restrict availability of hot water to certain times of days “in an acute gas shortage.”

“We are in a much worse crisis than most people realize,” Kerstan said in a separate interview with the Hamburger Abendblatt on Sunday. He urged people to take shorter showers, avoid full baths, and install modern thermostats and water-saving shower heads.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Alex
1 year ago

The richest country in Europe can’t even run hot water.

Safe and effective sanctions.

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

I mean, what kind of elite nobility has smelly peasants that dont even smell? You let the publius get used to being clean, and next thing you know they want silly things like “rights” and “not to starve to death.”

simpleton
simpleton
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

This “richest country in Europe” thing is a myth. First, it tends to be done on aggregates, not on a per capita basis, so inevitably G comes out first since its 80 million compete with sixty million in F, I, or GB. On a per capita basis by contrast, many German parameters are below the Netherlands, the Scandinavian countries (incl. Finland) and Austria, not to mention Switzerland and Luxemburg. Second, it’s the German state than normally is the focus in such comparisons, not the individual citizen. Yes, the German state is comparatively rich, since it milks its citizens to no… Read more »

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  simpleton
1 year ago

However you cut it you are going to struggle for hot water, as we all are in Europe in the coming months.

1st world industrial power to non-functioning indoor plumbing in 6 months.

Bet you are glad the Greens got so much support.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
1 year ago

We need to focus less on the Ukes and more on ourselves now. The US military is going into cardiac arrest. Terrance Popp just put one out on JewTube: recruitments are at record lows. Retirement and resignation are at all time highs. The guys mustering out with the experience, drive and competence are boiling off. They are being replaced with queers, menstrual young women, and vibrant diversity flunkies.

I’m surprised we stand around while all this is happening. We are in huge trouble.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

It’ll be an interesting winter in Central Europe. No doubt they’ll outlaw the burning of wood for heat as well.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  usNthem
1 year ago

usNthem: https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2022/07/not-laughing-now-wood-burning-stoves-firewood-short-supply-germany-citizens-fear-freezing-death-due-gas-shortages/

They’ve also moved to outlaw them in NY state – all those people up in the Catskills and Adirondacks are not happy.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

I would hate to be a policeman trying to enforce such a braindead regulation when it is -10-20° up there.

Good ol' Rebel
Good ol' Rebel
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
1 year ago

Its not police, its building department and its everywhere. You can only install new chimneys/fireplaces if you have an EPA approved $4000+ stove insert; open hearths are banned by the Clean Air Act in most inhabited areas.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

3g – wood burning stoves are great – as long as you’ve got something to burn. They heat the main room well, but the rest of the rooms, not so much. And you have to keep feeding it. So it’s hard to believe the (lapdog) Germans are letting it come to this…

Abelard Lindsey
Abelard Lindsey
Reply to  usNthem
1 year ago

Guys, they will end up cutting a deal with the Russians before it gets that bad. David Goldman wrote a few weeks ago that both the Biden administration and the Eu are looking for the “off ramp” that allows them to end this without having to face too much humiliation.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  usNthem
1 year ago

In one of the nice twists of the English Language Faggot has a couple of meanings in England; both a bundle of sticks used for fuel and a homosexual. It warms my heart that the oh so politically woke Germans will be burning faggots to keep warm this winter.

Desert Flower
Desert Flower
Reply to  Bilejones
1 year ago

Hahaha
This made my day. Thank you.

Gman
Gman
Member
Reply to  Bilejones
1 year ago

Ya, we’re not gonna see *that* one on the TweeterBird are we???

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

Crippling the US military by degrading its human capital is one of the main goals to ensure other actors are able make their moves.

It’s all one huge Zersetzung op.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

I’m not standing around. I’m cheering it on. The worse, the better.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Glenfilthie
1 year ago

for me, the weaker the US military is, the less harm it can do here in AINO.

PASARAN
PASARAN
1 year ago

please, what mean “GN” ??

Even urban dictionary can’t help me.

orsotoro2011
orsotoro2011
Reply to  PASARAN
1 year ago

The term GN refers to the Global North.

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
Reply to  orsotoro2011
1 year ago

AKA “Where the White People Live”

Global South is home to the Mud Races with the exception of Australia.

Mycale
Mycale
1 year ago

The bottom line is that the people who equipped and trained the Ukrainians are the same ones who equipped and trained the Afghans, Syrian rebels, Iraqis, etc. The people who did the analysis on Russia’s strength or lack thereof were the same people who claimed the Afghan government was strong enough to hold up to the Taliban. And of course, the people who passed on all this analysis and did the “reporting” were the same ones who have been parroting the government’s lies and narrative about its wars of choice for two decades. I have not believed a single word… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Mycale
1 year ago

I’ve been around some of the MIC trainers.

Quality varies wildly. Some are very sharp, experienced, and thorough.

Others have no experience, read from the manual and answer most questions with, “You don’t need to know that.”

I’ve had to deliver training myself to meet bullet points in contracts. The most frustrating of those was getting zero notice to deliver Associate’s degree level electronics training to mostly non-English speaking military personnel.

Majorian
Majorian
1 year ago

The Severodonetsk (Sievierodonetsk with added ‘i’s is the unpronounceable Ukrainian transliteration, much like Kyiv) – Lisichansk siege lasted about two months, the Mariupol one for comparison nearly three. I was expecting a more dogged resistance from the Ukrainians given they had the industrial fortress (Azot plant) much like they had in Mariupol, but this time they decided to pull out most of troops and materiel until there was still time to do so. Probably here there were far less fanatical Nazis involved, plus Russians could bomb the whole spread of the twin cities with artillery from three sides and that’s… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
1 year ago

OT: severian had a very interesting post (on his blog) about how he would verify claims for a historical event actually occurring (or not) via documentary evidence. on more than one occasion Zman has dismissed out of hand, the existence of a ‘deep state’. would love love love to see this issue analyzed along the lines of severians hypothetical….

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

To deny the existence of the deep-state is akin to denying your fingers exist, at least with any reasonable definition of deep-state. There are people with a very unreasonable definition of the term deep-state and I would agree with criticism of these definitions. To me, the way I have always understood the term, the “deep state” refers to the people who run the government and its aims outside of the elected leaders. They are the people who never leave. Take the executive branch of government as an example. Every 4 years we pretend to make meaningful changes to the executive… Read more »

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

How about the spoil system? Do you think Big Government is controlled by Global Corporations and International Finance? Or is it Global Corporations and International Finance that have to appease Big Government? I lean towards the former, although my understanding is that Zman and this blog preach the latter. My reasoning is that Permanent Bureaucrats lording in the backstage can be removed by Transient elected Politicians (controlled by International Banking ie the Cloud People network). Also Bureaucrats don’t control the flow of money, which is created by Banks and regulated by the FED (controlled by Banks). Money is power because… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Majorian
1 year ago

I don’t think the money aspect is as one sided as it appears. The bureaucrats cannot authorize more money for itself, but it can propose new and larger budgets, new responsibilities (aka, more money) and lobby for it. IOW, the EPA can go out and claim to the public and to the congress that we’re all gonna cook unless they are granted new policing powers and the budget to fund all this new policing powers. They legislate via policy. Many, many of our laws are not laws, they are policies with the power of law, including the criminal law. The… Read more »

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

I don’t dispute the power of the State, just who really is in control of it. I don’t think top people at CIA, or even the neo-Cons gang encysted all over the Apparatus can call the shots autonomously. How would have they grown into such power out of simple political appointments? They probably hold considerable clout in the Cloud people network, and there may be some sort of emergent behavior coming from the interaction of multiple nodes of power in the Cathedral, but in the end my guess is that the almighty Elite can be identified with Old Money. In… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

I’m in agreement with the point that the government has vast discretionary powers (rule making) also called administrative law. Obviously, much potential exists for abuse, whether accidental or with deliberate intent.

That said, you are incorrect on some points. For instance, no way can the DEA wake up one day and say “Hey, let’s make Marijuana legal!” This drug, and many others, are specifically listed in various “Schedules” in the Controlled Substances Act, and probably others. Ultimate power resides in Congress, not in the agencies. (At least in theory.)

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Majorian
1 year ago

The two are fairly interlocking and codependent that the answer doesn’t matter much. Six of one . . . .

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  c matt
1 year ago

Rothschild >>> Karl Rove

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Majorian
1 year ago

At least in the US Federal government, you’re partially wrong. The spoils system, for the most part, hasn’t existed since the 19th century. The executive branch was fortified with the intent of making it as independent as possible from outside influence. Most employees (bureaucrats) are about as immune to political interference as it’s possible to be. With the exception of a tiny number of appointed positions, no one, not even the President, can fire someone just because he wants to. Now what is more commonly done is to reassign people. This is the traditional way to “get rid” of a… Read more »

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

I am in agreement with you, if I understand you correctly I don’t think there was anything confusing with what I wrote, my comment was as straightforward as I could possibly make it. I tend to believe Old Money are in charge of the Cloud Network: they are the cool kids at Davos, that all other 1% Cloud People try to emulate, or directly follow orders from them. The Money Supply I was referring to was that of society at large, which is determined by the credit creation (out of thin air, limited only by regulations against excessive leverage) of… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

defining the deep state – at least informally – is the first step. IMO.

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

The set of high level bureaucrats with permanent positions in governmental agencies, influential enough to be able to pursue consistent policies through fairly long periods of time, regardless of the party in charge of the alternating political administrations.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Majorian
1 year ago

Was it Napoleon who said “I don’t rule France, a thousand bureaucrats rule France. “

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

While the factors you cite are important, you are solely considering the actual government employees that exist at any given period. But the true power, I would argue, rests in the hands of a tiny group of super-rich individuals and corporations. Some domestic, some international. You could even make an argument for foreign nations (Israel being a prime suspect.) None of these necessarily has total control, of course, but they and many more have their factions. The intelligence services are prime suspects so since so much of what they do is not subject to any outside review much less control.… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

Anybody who doesn’t address the work of Peter Dale Scott on the topic of the Deep State isn’t worth bothering with.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Dale_Scott

Alex
Alex
1 year ago

Here’s the other half of a very big problem for GloboHomo: “NBC News said it obtained an internal Defense Department survey showing 9% of young Americans eligible to serve have an inclination to do so — the lowest figure since 2007. More than half of young Americans who answered the survey — about 57% — believe they would have emotional or psychological problems after military service, NBC reported, while nearly half think they would have physical problems. Few had someone at home who could dispel such fears or explain the benefits of service. Only 13% of the surveyed had parents… Read more »

Mycale
Mycale
Reply to  Alex
1 year ago

Why would this younger generation, of which a huge proportion are made up of people whose parents came here to leech off the country, care about serving it? They have no loyalty to it, especially when they are taught at their schools and in their media that this country is evil and unworthy of their immigrant parents. The Romans learned this lesson very harshly as they started to lean more and more on non- and paper-Romans to fill the ranks of the armies. Of course this is not even getting into obesity, drug dependency (both prescription and not), etc. While… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Mycale
1 year ago

It is astonishing that “heritage ” Americans are being brought up to believe that the military “Serve their Country”.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Mycale
1 year ago

About 20-25% of young adults are also too stupid to meet the minimum (ASVAB or equivalent) standard. Not even for the Army or Marines! In some demographics, up to 40%. And, as I like to say, anyone who has ever served in the military knows that that hurdle is not a particularly high one. 🙁

Maniac
Maniac
Reply to  Alex
1 year ago

Can you imagine your average soy-boy faggot being yelled at by a Marine sergeant, or going through Ranger school? They’d be reduced to quivering mounds in seconds.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Alex
1 year ago

In the 60s, the hippies used to say, “What if they threw a war and no one came?”

We may be about to find out.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

No one showing up: fantastic. One side showing up: problem.

Compsci
Compsci
1 year ago

“Barring some miracle, the underrated challenger is going to score a huge upset over the champion.” Although I personally agree with Z-man’s description, such a narrative is not what has been painted, nor I believe is thought true by the majority of the public. Russia will indeed win, but they will be presented by the MSM as a Goliath kicking David’s butt. Indeed, that’s always been how Ukraine is portrayed—as the underdog. I would also note that Russia prepared, wisely, for the “paper tiger” the West (NATO) and Ukraine have been proven to be. It was said here long ago,… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Russia initially thought they were going to win a quick victory with blitzkrieg style tactics.

Those bogged down due to the prepared defenses in Ukraine.

It was impressive how quickly the Russians realized tactical plan A wasn’t working, resulting in a pivot to tactical plan B. That plan is built around massed artillery assault to flatten strongpoints.

Not allowing their forces to get sucked into mass urban combat, a la Stalingrad, is also smart tactics.

Surrounding the Azovstal in Mariupol and starving the defenders out was absolutely the correct decision.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

Some actually do learn from history. Imagine that.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Stranger in a Strange Land
1 year ago

But only those who understand the uses of historical knowledge, primarily in developing an understanding of human nature in its multivalent manifestations across a wide variety of situations and circumstances is profitable. In its highest manifestation, it is equivalent to the strategic sense of an expert wrestler, alert to the exact correct time to execute a tactical manuever, likely at the culmination of a series of exploratory exploits closely observed as to their effects, both physical as well as emotional. And not merely in reference to the antagonist, but also to one’s own capabilities and propensities Think of Sun Tzu’s… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

“Russia initially thought they were going to win a quick victory with blitzkrieg style tactics.”

What evidence, if any, do you have for this astonishing assertion?

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Bilejones
1 year ago

It’s buried in this story, where the Russians talk about dropping multiple lines of attack to focus on the Donbass:

https://www.cnbc.com/2022/03/28/russias-ukraine-strategy-has-shifted-heres-what-you-need-to-know.html

Of course, it is surrounded by all the MSM spin about enormous Russian failure and massive casualties.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

Against my better judgement I read the piece, It consists almost entirely of the usual liars cutting and pasting.It reminded me why I don’t watch or read MSM nonsense. They believe a thing comes into being merely by their wishing it was so. It seems to me that Russia has largely succeeded in two of the three stated goals, Liberation of the Donbass. Destruction of the Banderite militias. Demilitarization of Ukraine may take months into a year- I don’t doubt the West’s appetite for pissing money into Ukraine won’t survive the Winter. Russia is undoubtedly hampered in the short term… Read more »

William Middleton
William Middleton
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Yup. Anatoly Karlin commented on this a few months. Putin wants the impact on domestic life within Russia to be a minimal as possible. That’s why he has not mobilized the population for war. It’s slowly killing off for Ukrainian army as thoroughly as possible.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

“… feared a longer war would bode ill for Russian military prestige.” The lasting prestige they will earn will be from what occurs after the liberation: the rebuilding and reintegration of people who prefer to be part of the Rus civilizational realm back into it. The world will judge the contrast of fates of those to their west. Many of the latter had ancestors who used to be part of Poland and hated and murdered the Poles. Will they, with their muscular nationalism, actually be allowed (by GAE) their own state to join NATO and the EU? I can’t see… Read more »

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  Horace
1 year ago

Yours is a great take on Banderites, however their fanaticism might have uniquely been fostered by GAE agents for purposes of anti-Russian suppression, at the risk of spurring other nationalists across Europe.
The moment these Banderistas won’t be useful anymore, they’ll be told their ancestors were Turkish and Mongolian and thrown in the multicultural grinder like elsewhere in Europe.

Mike
Mike
Reply to  Horace
1 year ago

Remember, the CIA and other agencies have been fanning the flames of Ukrainian nationalism since 1945. They’ve had over 70 years to marinate the weak minded in a sick stew of Ukrainian as a master race and Russians as inferiors. Ukrainians seem to have a unique ability along with Poles and another group to remember every slight real or imagined forever. Funny, but they all spring from the same area in central Europe.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Mike
1 year ago

I agree. The Banderites were at the heart, and mat well have been the inspiration, for the CIA’s Operation Gladio.

Puszczyk
Puszczyk
Reply to  Mike
1 year ago

Ukrainian nationalism was supported by the Austrian Empire against the Russian Empire before the Great War.
Roman Dmowski (one of the founding thinkers of Polish nationalism) correctly surmised that “independent Ukraine” would have become revolving doors for all kinds of foreign interests.

Mycale
Mycale
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

The US has spent the last 40 years claiming it is the greatest military ever created on the basis of knocking down tin can opponents in a week, pay no attention to what happened after. I think this is what globohomo was using as a frame early on in the conflict to declare Russia a failure. The fact that the Russians adjusted their tactics quickly and started making up ground says far more about their military than, say, Grenada said about the US military. The media is implanting this idea that Russia is now achieving objectives that are “more limited”… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Speed of victory was always GAE gaslighting. It was GAE that said anything less than total victory in a month was “failure,” hoping to impose its timetable on the Ruskies. Only stupid western rubes fell for it.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  c matt
1 year ago

Agree. The rule of thumb: if the MSM says it, assume the opposite., seems to be particularly true in this case.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
1 year ago

You don’t even have to take Econ 101 to know that commodities are fungible. A country with a commodity based economy, like oil and gas, will always find a buyer. Like India for instance. Or China. When sanctioning a commodity based country, it only changes who gets a delivery from where, and barely effects the global price. This is the perk of selling commodities. These people in the Biden Administration likely thought they were shutting in Russian production. How anyone can be that stupid and be where they are is unfathomable. Which is why so many conspiracy theories are floating… Read more »

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 year ago

JR Wirth – as I recall from Econ 101 – the statement about fungible commodities is especially true when demand is also very inelastic – like it is for, oh…say….oil and gas.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 year ago

” How anyone can be that stupid and be where they are is unfathomable.”

As Z-man says, they live in a bubble totally insulated from the real world. In their world, the wishing in and of itself, calls the thing wished for into existence.

Alexander Dugin has an insightful look at the progressive mind in this article .
https://katehon.com/en/article/united-states-court-against-ideology-progress

The Katehon.com site is well worth adding to the regular visits list.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Bilejones
1 year ago

I recall from, perhaps a world history class: In 1971, the Russian Czar and his family were kept in a similar bubble, told a very filtered account of outside events. It was speculated that the family wasn’t even aware that anything untoward was happening until just shortly before they were massacred.

Living in a pleasant fantasy bubble as isolated as possible from that mean and nasty outer world is not the sole province of modern liberal democracies or their purported leader elite.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

1917, not 1971. Editor function needed, please.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
1 year ago

No one in NATO, and especially DC circles will be fired. On the contrary, they’ll be promoted, and write white papers, after the fact, that “they knew this would happen, it only they were listened to on X date.” Of course, total fabrications… Anyone in power will remain blameless. How many people even remember the Afghanistan withdrawal? Who was fired? Chickens only come home to roost when the people themselves can’t afford their Dominos Pizza because their cards were declined. The people have to see real hardship. Western Europe is galloping down that road. The ensconced greens are using this… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 year ago

This is why they usually write both pro and con articles to everything, though not in equal proportions. That way they can cheer-lead with dozens of articles doing evil and when it fails, they can point back to the 1 con article they wrote and say they knew all along it was a bad idea.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 year ago

The odds that the people behind this latest debacle are promoted are infinitely greater than any single one of them is criticized, let alone sacked.

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

“If you have to fight a war on your home territory, winning comes with a fair bit of losing” All wars come with a lot of losing. All involve dead young people. We dump enormous sums of money into young people before they are even old enough to produce anything. Everyone involved in the war effort is no longer producing anything society needs, be it food or widgets, yet still need a lot of the same things they needed before the war effort, like food and uniforms. All of these people have to be paid. Many/most need to be armed.… Read more »

PASARAN
PASARAN
1 year ago

please, what mean “GN” ??

Even urban dictionary can’t help me.

PASARAN
PASARAN
1 year ago

as could have said Pierre Laval : “I stand with Russia because without her, Wokism tomorrow would settle everywhere”. This war is a gift of God to deliver western world from Evil/Idio-cracy, and it’s procession of absurdities (lockdown, masks, “vaccine”, “we can be rich without industries”, extreme free-trade, huge deficits, anti-white politics, awful transgenderism, schools in ruins, globalism, scientific obscurantism, social barbary, and so on). I know that Russia had lockdown too, but it’s still a masculine white society, something “normal”. And the fall of the petrodollar, the “sanctions” will ruin western economies, and so make the end for our… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  PASARAN
1 year ago

There’s a Russian who posts on Fedi and it’s mostly depressing as A) living in Russia kinda sucks, B) It’s probably the best Russians can do, and C) It’s in many ways better than what we could do, certainly better than what we’ll be able to do when the credit card comes back declined.

usNthem
usNthem
1 year ago

The people directly and even indirectly behind this and other debacles will be “fired” alright, as in from a cannon…

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
1 year ago

The neocons bullied weaker opponents in the Bush years. It was a debacle, so they were checked to an extent in the Obama (some credit due) and Trump years. They’re back. Thing is, they never scored a knockout. I don’t know where they get the reputation from. Now they’re fighting a stronger opponent by proxy with a weaker military than the American one from the ‘00s. Fighters mean it. Neocons don’t fight; they demoralize, subvert, and invert. War is a LARP in their hands. It’s a tragic farce, as will be their eventual defeat and fall from power. At some… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Paintersforms
1 year ago

War is a LARP in their hands. Yes. When the combined chiefs presented their plan for the second Iraq War, Rumsfeld allegedly threw them out of his office: too much logistics, too many transport ships, too many men and materiel involved and waaay to expensive. We don’t want to always fight the last war, do we? Instead, it would be a cheap and quick war of stealth bombers, special operators and a few armored divisions carrying on like it was 1939 all over again. It took the necons about four weeks to concede that maybe the military planners knew what… Read more »

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Paintersforms
1 year ago

The US military should be feared.

While it may not “win”, it can do enormous damage to a country when operating.

It can’t be stopped, or surrendered to either; the US military is all over the planet bombing the crap out of goat herders and assassinating people in the dark with minimal or no oversight from the legislative branch (arguably the executive branch as well).

It’s a bureaucracy in search of a mission, and it WILL find mission. Best hope it’s not your nation.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

Here’s a perfect example of the true impotence of GAE oligarchs as Bezos’ megayacht is stranded in Rotterdam:

https://www.zerohedge.com/markets/bezos-500-million-superyacht-trapped-dutch-shipyard

Also note the thing doesn’t appear to be worth $500 million.

We shouldn’t be surprised since this is the same guy who paid $40 or $50 billion to leave his wife for some used up roastie.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

I expect he thought there would be no problem in just dismantling the historic landmark just for him.

Don’t you know who I am?

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

yeah, you’re the short roided up dork that paid $50+B so you could bang a 49 y.o. mudshark

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

Typical US billionaire.

Knows the cost of everything and the value of nothing.

Desert Flower
Desert Flower
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 year ago

He’s not an American. He is a Jew with U.S. citizenship.

Kykey McHebe
Kykey McHebe
Reply to  Desert Flower
1 year ago

To you and the other Jew-haters who see the evil Jews behind everything negative, I have news for you: Jeffrey Preston Jorgensen was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on January 12, 1964,[15] the son of Jacklyn (née Gise) and Theodore Jørgensen.[16] At the time of Jeffrey’s birth, his mother was a 17-year-old high school student and his father was 19 years old.[17] Theodore Jorgensen had ancestry from Denmark and was born in Chicago to a family of Baptists.[18] After completing high school despite challenging conditions, Jacklyn attended night school while bringing Jeffrey along as a baby.[19] After his parents divorced,… Read more »

Tribeswoman
Tribeswoman
Reply to  Desert Flower
1 year ago

To you and the other Jew-haters who see the evil Jews behind everything negative, I have news for you: Jeffrey Preston Jorgensen was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on January 12, 1964,[15] the son of Jacklyn (née Gise) and Theodore Jørgensen.[16] At the time of Jeffrey’s birth, his mother was a 17-year-old high school student and his father was 19 years old.[17] Theodore Jorgensen had ancestry from Denmark and was born in Chicago to a family of Baptists.[18] After completing high school despite challenging conditions, Jacklyn attended night school while bringing Jeffrey along as a baby.[19] After his parents divorced,… Read more »

Tribeswoman
Tribeswoman
Reply to  Desert Flower
1 year ago

To you and the other Jiu-haters who see the evil Jouze behind everything negative, I have news for you: Jeffrey Preston Jorgensen was born in Albuquerque, New Mexico, on January 12, 1964,[15] the son of Jacklyn (née Gise) and Theodore Jørgensen.[16] At the time of Jeffrey’s birth, his mother was a 17-year-old high school student and his father was 19 years old.[17] Theodore Jorgensen had ancestry from Denmark and was born in Chicago to a family of Baptists.[18] After completing high school despite challenging conditions, Jacklyn attended night school while bringing Jeffrey along as a baby.[19] After his parents divorced,… Read more »

Desert Flower
Desert Flower
Reply to  Desert Flower
1 year ago

I may be incorrect about his (Bezos’) not having biological paternal Jewish ancestry. But neither his biological (Danish) mother nor his (Cuban) stepfather are heritage (aka real) Americans. Annoys people when I say that, but it’s true. As for knee-jerk “Jew haters” – no, it’s actually a mighty strong dislike for them which was cultivated after 30+ years of working and living around them and observing their values and behaviors up close and personal–Jews from all walks of life and on both sides of the political spectrum. They have come out of the closet and gotten quite emboldened in the… Read more »

mikey
mikey
1 year ago

Two aspects of the sports analogy present themselves. In general, the longer an athletic contest goes on, the more likely it is that superior team or individual will win. That’s what games are all about, finding the best performers in a particular instance. The longer the competition, the more likely the inferior contestant is to make a fatal error or respond poorly to an opponents move. Secondly, it’s possible for the inferior to claim victory through serendipity, an unexpected stroke of good fortune that is ultimately the difference between winning and losing. That’s why Pirate fans actually show up to… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  mikey
1 year ago

how many games do you see what looks like an even match, blow open in the last quarter?

OT: if you haven’t seen the first Ali vs Frazier bout, do yourself a favor and watch. jeebus those guys were going at it!

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

The last sentence, perhaps the ultimate two, are the most important in this essay. To use a substance abuse analogy: No one, ever, anywhere, upon trying an addictive substance (alcohol, drug, illicit sex, etc.) said “Boy, I really enjoy this! I’d better stop now, before I face the inevitable bad consequences of continuing this illicit activity.” Our brains are simply not wired that way. Quite the contrary: few addicts ever give up their wont before they have paid a fearsome price usually with much collateral damage to innocent parties. And it’s only a small fraction of those who successfully enter… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

i always wonder about that, with regards to cigarette smokers: why did you choose to become an addict for *that*??

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

Our addictions choose us, not the other way around.

Heck, everyone here is a borderline internet addict.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

aka the Indian’s revenge

for the Scots-Irish secret, distilled liquor

firewater heap big medicine

RealityRules
RealityRules
1 year ago

Now come on! I just saw that a rainbow coalition of Jet fighters led by women led America to glory. Oh wait! That was a remake of a sequel to a C-Movie starring an A-Actor that was made 40 years ago. What a perfect metaphor. What you need to realize Z-Man is that this is the managerial’s plan working to perfection. You see, after the failed war it will create refugees. Those refugees will be imported into America and settled around the country, after being given Google tablets, Apple phones, Starbucks cards, scholarships, jobs and other branded goodies that will… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  RealityRules
1 year ago

Yes. I don’t know how orchestrated the whole thing is, but flooding the country with more hard-working, salt-of-the-earth sons of Afghanistan is definitely a win for TPTB. But… It seems to be a two way street. One thing I can’t figure – and admittedly I’ve not thought too hard about it – it the squaring of the following circle: Liberal democracy’s debauchery with hosts of foreigners from countries where they kill gays and trannies. Will the offspring of these Nu-Americans be assimilated by The Borg? Or will they retain traditional disgust at our debauched ways. I’m glad to say I’m… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 year ago

Admittedly based on an article I’ve read here and there, I vote for failure to assimilate. At least in the case of [North] Africans in nations like the UK and especially France, there is a substantial portion of now citizens, going on three and four generations. For the most part, these folk have not turned into good Britons or Frenchmen. Instructive was the terrorism case a few years ago in England: not an immigrant, but native born descendant of “BAME” as they call them. The analogy is not perfect, but consider the case of America: the Negro has been here… Read more »

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

Are you retarded?

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

why do you say that? do you think the 2nd gen africans/ME’rs *will* assimilate?

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

“these folk have not turned into good Britons or Frenchmen”

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

Ben I misread the sentence and missed the “not”. I only noticed after I reread my ow response to Karl. Doh.

I take back my comment and the downvote.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

i misread it too, that’s why i asked you to clarify. i blame Ben for our mistakes!

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

Apology accepted. If I can’t be a race realist here, then we have problems! 🙂

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

The talented tenth have not assimilated either. They have integrated. They have successfully embedded themselves into the wealth extraction system. They have not only not absorbed real American cultural or political values, but they hate America on average far more than the less perceptive 90%.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Horace
1 year ago

Horace: This. The fabled IKAGO will happily stand by and watch while his ghetto cousins stomp on your head.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

Ben: Assimilation was always a hype, at best. The Ellis Island immigrants and their children only began the process via public schooling (which heavily pushed the civic nationalist lie along with founding fathers’ mythos), and the ‘shared’ deprivation of the Great Depression and then mass military service during WWII). Not to mention, with the exception of the Juice, these were all White, European Christians with a genetic and cultural link back through to ancient Greece and Rome. While there are millions who later spread out and intermarried with those of other European roots, certain ethnic enclaves remain even today, although… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

All good points. Probably “integrate” would have been a better term than “assimilate.” I’m not advocating race mixing, quite the opposite. I was thinking mostly in terms of shared morality and legal observance. As much as many of us dislike Jews, I’m not aware of too many news reports of them pushing people in front of subway trains, throwing a small child off a balcony, selling drugs, robbing stores at gunpoint or emptying the magazine out the window as they drive by. Similar observations could be made for Chinese, Japanese and many other groups in the USA.

jethro
jethro
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

There is not a substantial portion of non-whites in the UK who have been there 3 or 4 generations.

The vast majority of enrichment occurred from the late 1990s.

Since 1997 every year has seen more immigration in that year than the sum total of immigration of all the years from 1066 to 1950.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  jethro
1 year ago

jethro: When I lived in Leeds in 1980-1981, there were already tons of subcontinentals. Or at least far more than I had ever seen here in the US at that time. When I read of the numbers settled in the UK since then it’s mind boggling. Meanwhile, the post ’65 immigration act beneficiaries didn’t really arrive in AINO en masse until 1975 and onwards. There are now triumphalist dot-Indians who have US born grandchildren who consider themselves ‘heritage ‘murricans.’ Madness.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  jethro
1 year ago

3g4me. When I was in London in the 60’s, I already saw “tribal” Africans in the “tube”. I was struck by these men in business suites/attire with tribal scarification lines adorning their face. It could have been a Monty Python skit.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  jethro
1 year ago

Enoch Powell would have a word with you. I will concede the point on my 3 or 4 generations claim, but it certainly applies to France. Many of the migrants Powell decried were British subjects from former colonies but non-Whites. Are you exempting them from consideration as “immigrants?” In fact, I could argue that even when they lived in Jamaica, Uganda, Keyna or wherever, that they were British subjects. The same reasoning applies to France or any other colonial power. Alas, genetics change not at all, and culture or socialization only slightly less stubbornly, no matter what country’s name is… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 year ago

It’s called a Standard F__k Party, or at least it should be.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  RealityRules
1 year ago

Look on the bright side; at least most of the refugees will be Caucasians. Alas and alack, even this upside has its downside. All those sexy young Ukraine women? They will not be highly represented. Any minx from Minsk (hey, not a bad pun!) who could, has had three decades to get the hell out of Dodge. She found, or at least sought, a better life as a model, an escort, perhaps the wife or at least girlfriend of any wealthy male in the West. What’s left behind are at best the homely girls, at worst the fat ugly Babushkas.

jethro
jethro
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

Because all the women were born in the exact same year?!

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  jethro
1 year ago

Point well made, but it doesn’t change the gist of what I was asserting one iota: that since ~ 1990, anyone who knew a better life was awaiting them further west, would leave if they could. Also I was wrong about them being femme fatale gold diggers. Many would be happy with even a regular job in the West, where the per capita standard of living was, and I suspect still is, some multiple better than it is the former USSR.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

That’s what I was thinking, then I thought of how we’ve imported millions of third worlders, but never Whites—from anywhere, e.g., SA. I’d say it’s a good bet they don’t import any significant number of Ukrainians—unless there’s some repository over there of non-Whites to pull from.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  RealityRules
1 year ago

RR: “What you need to realize Z-Man is that this is the managerial’s plan working to perfection. You see, after the failed war it will create refugees. Those refugees will be imported into America and settled around the country, after being given Google tablets, Apple phones, Starbucks cards, scholarships, jobs and other branded goodies that will make them good consumers.” A fellow from the UK Guardian was making a similar point recently: RENTERS ARE BEING FLEECED WITH HUGE RENT HIKES AND EVICTIONS – AND IT’S ONLY GETTING WORSE https://therealnews.com/renters-are-being-fleeced-with-huge-rent-hikes-and-evictions-and-its-only-getting-worse Once you get past all whining from the landlords [in the… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

i wonder if the little hebe realizes he is tony montana?

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

Bourbon: Hey, don’t forget Joe and Hunter need to get their share first. What’s left will be split between Zelensky and his sponsor Kolomoisky, and other friends in Tel Aviv.

TomA
TomA
1 year ago

The USA has not yet come to terms with how far we have fallen as a country and a people. The Comfort First Imperative has been around for too long and is now an addiction. This means that reality will not be recognized until 2×4 meets forehead. Our leadership is not just incompetent, but wholly corrupt and villainous. Joe Normie still believes that redemption can happen on Nov 8th and is committed to this belief because his fat ass and flabby muscles make him unsuited to do real work or real fighting. And nothing will change until the collapse becomes… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  TomA
1 year ago

For the lazy or squeamish, of which I confess to being a member, there’s some hope. Of course, no one can predict such events in detail, but I suspect that once things truly go south, a lot of the initial dirty work will be done by and within the active duty military and other armed services. Or not that much different, the Woke Hive tried to purge the potential troublemakers these past many years. But they can never be certain of the loyalties of some of the remaining, especially if a true crisis arrives. If one makes the decision to… Read more »

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  TomA
1 year ago

The best we can do is withdraw and make them come after us

That or we move en masse into and around DC and do so very quietly so they have no idea. I like this idea tbh. I know that California for example is doing its best to avoid this type of scenario by making life uncomfortable or impossible for their opposition so they leave the state. But I doubt Virginia or Maryland would even have a clue before it’s too late.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Falcone
1 year ago

If you wait for them, you get 911. If you fight them in the open field, you get Afghanistan. If you drone their ringleaders, you send a message that everyone understands. Let them do the fleeing and hiding.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  TomA
1 year ago

TomA: Correct. Everyone knows someone who works for or is connected to the borg. Everyone can make even a cursory study of said individual’s slogans, bumper stickers, neighborhood messaging, daily patterns, etc. We all ought to have a ‘little list.’ I know, I know, fedpoasting. But taking notice is the absolutely necessarily preliminary to taking putative future action. The other side has been doing this for years, already – they have people whose entire lives are spent sussing out names and addresses of those who oppose their causes. We ought to at least begin to make a mental counterpart.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

The Fifth Gen warrior is the nobody that nobody ever notices. The mechanic, delivery driver, food server, repairman, office cubicle nerd, little old lady with a gleam in her eye, executive assistant, and on and on. The modeling is clear. It only takes of few instances of the bolt from the blue to trigger the exodus stampede. And the Stasis cannot entrap nobodies that don’t join anything and remain in the fog until the time is right.

imbroglio
imbroglio
1 year ago

“Don’t bomb that warehouse, tovarish, soon it will be ours.” If, as seems likely, this will be the Pan-Asian Century, from Japan to Johannesburg, led by the Russo-Chinese BRI with Indian brains to work the switches and Arab oil to grease the skids, what’s the point of Nato-izing Europe or waging these unwinnable potlatches, especially when our rulers are Cninese satraps while the U.S. falls apart? Tom Luongo thinks that Davos is about to have it’s come to Jesus moment with the EU going belly up economically as Ms. Lagarde declares bankruptcy and welches on jillions of global American debt.… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  imbroglio
1 year ago

The plan for saving the Euro is to make “core debt” just as expensive as “peripheral debt”. Yes that’s their whole plan, making French and German bonds just as risky as Italian and Spanish bonds.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
1 year ago

Given its all pretend and the ECB buys most of the debt anyway in what amounts to a money printing scam, what difference does it make?

The FT pointed out that the ECB has bought €4.9tn of bonds in total since 2014.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
1 year ago

i see the GAE factions engaging in internecine battles, with ‘splintering’ unavoidable. the MSM is currently trying to report on the vaxx death rate, while not letting on it is actually vaxx related. this is fooling no one (well maybe the ultra-normies are blind to it). the same thing is happening with the ukraine situation; they are trying to report loss of territory without giving credit to the russians for taking it. it just isn’t possible to hide the manifest failures of TPTG – completely – and it isn’t possible to report them without people knowing what/who is really responsible.… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

“ultra-normies”

I see what you did there.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

hehe i wondered if anyone would pick up on that 😛

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

karl von hungus: I confess I didn’t until Jack mentioned it. Clever men, both of you.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

The Covid Comedy – whilst in fact a direction manifestation of Evil – does keep giving. Countless people who were all-in with the Shamdemic, now don’t seem to care. The reason? It appears the papers do not care that much, so the drones re-program themselves. My personal favourite has been the nth boosted ‘tard getting Scary Covid again, and again… but don’t worry, he’ll still be lining up for that sweet n+1th booster. Yes, TPTB’s Evil is now obvious as are their failings. But we’ve still got a whole host of NPCs out and about just itching to keep their… Read more »

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 year ago

In my neck of the woods the masks are out and about again in numbers. Despite every single one of them having 3 shots.

Even 3 years on the NPCs just respond to the media direction as if its day 0 all over again.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

It’s a shame their is not a dissident film maker who could satirize all of this in some sort of mockumentary. Then again, we may be beyond satire: In my North East city, the lampposts have little stickers on them, with a telephone number. The stickers – official from the state – say that if you’re afraid of the dark, please don’t worry! Call this number, and they’ll be switched back on again. In other news, a fellow I worked with reasoned his way into Bad Think by questioning official ‘inflation’ figures… good lad. “It cannot possibly be what they… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 year ago

i thought the stickers on the lampposts would say “maximum deadweight hanging is xxxKG”

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

While I’m cautious about my exposure to the legacy media, usually just headlines because I don’t have an account don’t want to read the article, or both, I’ve noted the same curious phrasing too at times.

I’m reminded of the old joke about the braggart putting his recent fist fight in the best possible light: “I smashed my face into his fist, and then when he was distracted, I struck his knee with my groin.” 🙂

Coalclinker
Coalclinker
1 year ago

I think that soon the question will be “What does NATO do after the collapse of the Ukrainian army?”. Either they tuck their tails between their legs and scurry away, or they move it up to another level. If they are the fools we know they are, they will find another way to keep conflict going. The candidate for being the bit@h of the U.S.A. is Poland. I figure they have been told that it will soon be time to make a grab for Galicia, and that we have them covered. Poland is still sore over losing that piece of… Read more »

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

Poland seems very likely. However, they are already trying to step up confrontation in Moldova, Georgia and Lithuania as well as in the stans.

They will also use Finland and Sweden to try and block off the Baltic sea.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

They will also use Finland and Sweden to try and block off the Baltic sea. And to block the access to Archangel, their other big naval base with Atlantic access. If you look at a map, you’ll see a long, thin strip of land running from Petersburg to Archangel with one single railroad/highway running right next to the Finnish border. That road could be cut in an instant if an attack was mounted from Finland. Their Baltic ports are only good as long as they can get through the Danish straits, all of which can be blocked by demolishing the… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

ok, the seven dwarfs are lined up, who plays Snow White? the UK or Germany?

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

“I think that soon the question will be “What does NATO do after the collapse of the Ukrainian army?”.”

Won’t they just blame the (formerly) ‘plucky’ Ukrainians and then move onto some other conflict? Who knows, there could always be another Covid around the corner.

Just… keep… cranking… up… the hysteria.

mikey
mikey
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 year ago

One thing that they’re almost sure to do will be this or a variation.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  mikey
1 year ago

To be fair, blaming a missing/non-responsive submarine on Ivan is plausible. Especially when one considers the possibility that the tranny captain thought the depth gauge was a speedometer, and wanted to take her to 240 knots, is quite likely the real cause.

No way Captain Trans gets the blame!

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

The Ruling Class will do exactly nothing that puts themselves or their wealth personally at risk. That’s the big takeaway from this madness. Like all bullies they are cowards.

Thank God.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

I wish what you said was true. Those in power might do well to evaluate what what a one-megaton hydrogen bomb detonated above their Manhattan or Los Angeles real estate will likely to do property values.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

I think it is true still, Ben, at least for a while. In time, someone like AOC will be elected and that person would love to take selfies with mushroom clouds in the background. Even then, some Cloud will have her assassinated or otherwise removed. Eventually the Cloud also will be deranged and it will happen.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

The continual doubling down of the GAE is the scariest part of their ideology. They literally can not fathom a world where they lose. It’s a strength when they are ascendant, but it’s suicidal when they are weak, and the willingness to see the whole world burn if they don’t get what they want is the mindset of a psychopath, not a cool and calculated person.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 year ago

Talking of doubling down and being psychopaths:

” Canadians will be required to get a Covid shot every nine months for the foreseeable future, says Health Minister Jean-Yves Duclos. Previous definitions of “fully vaccinated” made no sense, he told reporters.

“Nine months is very clear and will help people understand why ‘up to date’ is the right way to think about vaccination now,” said Duclos.

“‘Fully vaccinated’ makes no sense now. It’s about ‘up to date.’ So am I up to date in my vaccination? Have I received a vaccination in the last nine months?””

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

This is literally just a big middle finger to the Truckers. Moral is, if you shoot at the king, you better not miss.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

Why nine months?

The only major thing I can think of that runs on a nine month cycle is human reproduction.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

Exactly. 1 B dead, 2 B wounded by 2028, true-

But the real strike against overpopulation has been already won:
4 B sterilized.

For the southern tier, Gaia’s breeders, the Climate Change War:

cutting off their energy (which they did not build) will be far faster, exaggerating the loss of food, medicine, and clean water.

Expect a rush to the north.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

I’m just pleasantly surprised we didn’t get a major false flag mimicking a Russian attack on the US yesterday.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

Just this, on Gab:

“When the shooter (an antifa) conveniently used a rifle they want banned with attachments they also want banned and was “known to law enforcement” to conveniently justify red flag laws. How convenient.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

To be fair to Poland, they’ve been getting it in the shorts from both Russia and Germany for hundreds of years, caught between the hammer and the anvil of geopolitics.

And as they never tire of pointing out, Poles are the only people who fought both the Nazis and the Commies in WWII.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Felix Krull
1 year ago

Felix: I can’t help but sympathize will all sides in European conflicts. The history and borders are so convoluted and the populations so mixed and moved over the centuries and empires that I simultaneously want to acknowledge the existence and history of both Gdansk and Danzig or Konigsberg and Kaliningrad. Each with its own valid history. It’s why I always bought books on historic cities before I visited (such as one on historic Berlin) – seeing the ghost of what used to be superimposed on the present. The people and their achievements, now gone. So many European cities are bittersweet… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

I thought Galicia was a region (“Autonomia” is the legal term) of Spain? Of course, I don’t know everything about geography. Imagine my surprise, for example, when I learnt that Georgia is a nation in Eurasia, a onetime republic of the Soviet Union. And silly me, here I was under the impression it was a State nestled between Florida and South Carolina on the east coast of North America. 😀

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

I had the same problem with astronomy when my teacher asked me to point to Uranus.

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

Galicia, Wallachia, Wallonia, Wales, Cornwall: all come from Old German and mean ‘stranger’, referred to Latin-speaking people. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walhaz
Gaul, Galatia are probably cognate and are Latin words for Celt-speaking people or nations, so there is probably a deeper Indoeuropean origin to this term.

PASARAN
PASARAN
Reply to  Majorian
1 year ago

latin ???

Not at all. It refer to Gaulish people, aka french people (yes, French came from german “frank” but the Franks were the most “gaulished” german tribe.

“Celt” mean “Gaulish”, it’s the same people. But modern historiography refuse to recognize this was a nation, not a vague “group of people”. By exemple, in Turkey, Gaulish conquiered Galatia, and a roman historian noticed than, 2 centuries after, they still spoke gaulish.

PASARAN
PASARAN
Reply to  PASARAN
1 year ago

To make short : France, we are not a latin, nor a german nation. We are gaulish. Ethnically.
Unfortunatly, French hates ethnonationalism and from left to right, they believe in a nonsensical civic nationalism which had never existed.
Ethnically speaking, we were the same blood from the indo-european invasion untill late 1970′. Then the barbaric invasion arrived… With complicity of french electors.

Majorian
Majorian
Reply to  PASARAN
1 year ago

As I already specified – Wallachia, Wallonia, Wales, Cornwall and possibly Galicia (Ukraine) come from Old Germanic “Walhaz”, meaning stranger. This word started to be used after the fall of the Roman Empire, at the latest in the Middle Ages for Galicia(Ukraine). In all those places Latin or a Latin-derived language were spoken. – Gaul, Galatia, Galicia(Spain) were used by the Romans to refer to places inhabited by people speaking Celtic tongues, from before the birth of Christ. So Walhaz and Gallus gave rise to similar toponyms for lands relatively close to each other, where at different times either a… Read more »

Getaclue
Getaclue
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

“Poland is still sore over losing that piece of real estate in 1945, and unless they are completely broke and tired, do not underestimate their hubris and stupidity.” That’s right. Despite the lies, er, “history” written by the victors, the Polacks thought they had a strong military and could handle the Germans. They had, after all, won them some wars after the end of the Great War. And since history rhymes, how fun it is that Lithuania ‘decided’, on its own no doubt, to cut off the corridor to Kaliningrad. Yes, Virginia, there was one this thing called “Santa”, as… Read more »

mr mittens
mr mittens
Reply to  Coalclinker
1 year ago

“but only slightly less well known is this-never get involved in a land war in Asia”, from The Princess Bride

Mcleod
Mcleod
1 year ago

The military action pales in comparison to Russia’s economic response to the West. Saudi Arabia exploring joining BRIC. India buying coal from Russia, and paying for in Yuan. Pipelines, bridges, rail, and roads connecting Russia, China, and India. Two thirds of the world ignoring the West’s call to isolate Russia. Most importantly, the $ as the world reserve currency is under pressure. The half a century plus of printing dollars and selling them to other countries to support profligate congressional spending and companies that neither produce a product or make a profit are coming to an end. The Sterling lasted… Read more »

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

I’d like to meet the genius who thought the Indians were going to starve a large portion of their population in the dark for the sake of a cousin war in Eastern Europe that could have been resolved diplomatically months ago.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  SamlAdams
1 year ago

The same genius that got the entire EU to collapse its industry and starve itself to death to support a corrupt jewish govt and graft machine put in place by a coup.

DavidTheGnome
DavidTheGnome
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

Also America’s soft power kind of sucks now. I imagine a very large portion of America is basically alienated from the dominant culture at this point.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Mcleod
1 year ago

Russia has done very little of direct economic war.

They could have cut the entire energy and food and other supplies to Europe overnight as soon as the sanctions kicked in.

I assume they thought with enough provocation Russia would have done this to then move to the total war from Europe narrative to stop the “blackmail of the aggressor”.

Must be a bit frustrating that Russia has not done this, so they have had to do it to themselves.

Some of the retard population have even noticed this.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

Russia probably couldn’t have come up with this half-boycott scheme in their wildest dreams, with Europe buying half as much for four times the price.

Bilejones
Member
1 year ago

” Instead, it is looking like a global disaster caused by the West.”

But it is not regretted by those causing it. It is a necessary prequel to The Great Reset.
War
Pestilence
Famine
Death.

They’re checking all the boxes. No?

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Bilejones
1 year ago

I’m doubtful. That certainly was the plan, but the delusional bastards thought China would stay on the sidelines if not outright get on board. You kept hearing “China had better do X, or…” The part after “or” never got penciled in. The Ruling Class will not put itself or its money at risk, although the latter may have inadvertently happened.

I had even toyed with the idea that maybe China was down with this and engaged in kabuki, but, nah.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

Monkey sits on mountain

Watches two tigers tear each other apart

Arshad Ali
Arshad Ali
1 year ago

“The combination of technology, experience and economic resources made it possible for American to take the fight to any place on the planet and fight in the enemy’s backyard.” True. But they haven’t been able to prevail in any place that put up a fight — not in Korea, not in Vietnam, nowhere except in USA’s own backyard (Grenada, Panama). “Here we are five months into the war and that last bit of analysis has proved to be completely wrong.” The US establishment violated Rule #1: “Don’t get high on your own supply.” They actually believed the manure propaganda they… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
1 year ago

Ah, excellent… more refugees from ‘plucky’ Ukraine. More dilution – that said, I’m speaking like a man whose country hasn’t already been ravaged by diversity. I’d be rather interested to hear from the elites quite how they plan to execute their great leap forward into industrial managerialism; doubly so seeing that the appear to be destroying quite a lot of what a highly technical society seems to rest on. Turns out you can’t replace whites with Africans and Indians and expect America 2.0 or UK 2.0 – rather, it appears that it is likely to be a downgrade. GAE’s military… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 year ago

The Ruling Class actually would have skin in the game if there were a total war against Russia. Nukes do not discriminate. Hence, the proxy war will end with a whimper and Zelensky and Co. will be barraged with criticism. The takeaway is the potential of weapons of mass destruction stay the hands of the cowardly murderers. To be candid, I had feared the Ruling Class would go balls to the wall and risk nuclear war, but these are the same craven buffoons who feared a relatively minor virus to the point of economic catastrophe. In hindsight the fear was… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

To be honest, Jack, whilst I’m glad for the fact these buffoons still realize the awfulness of nukes, your fear, in the moment and in hindsight is fully justified.

Just remember the Godless reaction to the Shamdemic to always recall the full scale of retardation on display.

You still might have your nuclear war, ‘coz trannies’, when CoC AOC has her ‘hand on the button’.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 year ago

I totally could see AOC taking a selfie while a mushroom cloud billows in the background. It is likely the Ruling Class will engineer a coup if she ever gets into such a position, and even that assumes the unlikelihood they would not rig any election where she could be put in such a position.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

“…the same craven buffoons who feared a relatively minor virus…”

“Feared” or “used”? The question is still being debated.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

Our rulers will learn nothing. You can see it on Twitter. They believe the Russians are gaining ground due to overwhelming numbers against a rag tag Uke army of citizen-soldiers.

I’m quite certain that our rulers believe that NATO technological superiority would wipe the floor with the Russians. They believe that we’d have complete control of the air and that our planes, drones and missiles would simply destroy the Russians long before they got near NATO troops.

Our rulers will blame this on the Ukrainians.

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

If they believed that NATO would have invaded already.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

Well, They are just trying to “bleed the Russians” first so that Their eventual Triumph will be a walkover, a real laugher.

Except the ones being bled are, in actual fact, the Europeans now and in the foreseeable future, and later on, the Anglosphere, and other assorted hangers on; i.e., every element of the GAE. The Strategery on display is simply awesome.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

“Our rulers will blame this on the Ukrainians.”

Biden started to do so about two weeks ago. Zelensky soon will assume kulak status as will the Ukrainian people.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
1 year ago

Perhaps a way to view this is what happens when a historically autarkic society faces off against a complex, intricate supply chain driven economy. The Russian economy, however small, produces real stuff that matters. Just watching how the economic “blockade” has flipped back onto the West. Turns out you can survive without Tik-Tok influencers, but can’t without energy, fertilizer and food. And Heaven knows, the Russians are good at suffering. Germany and rest of Western Europe, not so much. Only saving grace is the Russians are not so good at expeditionary warfighting. Hence Mannerheim’s “FU” to Hitler and refusal to… Read more »

btp
Member
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Talked with a friend who is very knowledgeable in the region, having spent a long time there in service to GAE. He is absolutely convinced that Putin is attempting to re-create the Russian empire. The idea that Russia would have been fine with a Ukraine as you describe is emphatically rejected.

And this guy is very conservative, down on globalism, thinks the US is heading for civil war, etc. I think it might be that half of the people running the US hear hoofbeats when they think of Russia and the other half just can’t forget the Cold War.

PeriheliusLux
PeriheliusLux
Reply to  btp
1 year ago

Is it possible that this guy gets reports that amount to hysterical propaganda that is from the same print run as that intended for Boobus? Is it possible that to get people to fight against an enemy even those who are supposed to be making critical decisions are also being gaslit? Russia has been doing a crap job of re-creating its Empire, given how nearly every Warsaw Pact country is at the beck and call of the GAE. Is it more likely that Ukraine was the last straw that could not be allowed to directly encircle Russia at its border… Read more »

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  btp
1 year ago

In what manner is he knowledgeable if he can’t even work out something so glaringly obvious my dog could work it out?

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

Back in my day every motormouth had a cousin or older brother who was somewhere doing the right thing to cite authority on anything being argued. Always anon. Same thing, but some friended sperg on the internet works. Based on my experience with bodyguard work, expats aren’t the worst sources to get local information from, but they’re aren’t wholly reliable to get a complete picture of the area you’d be working in.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  trumpton
1 year ago

I’ve encountered that where someone, nominally on our side, will exclaim “I can’t believe how Russia wants to forcefully call the shots in countries that are on it’s borders!”

The incongruity is jarring, all I can do is stare and say “Wut?”

DLS
DLS
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

“The real lunacy at the heart of this is the refusal of the West to recognize the lack of territorial ambition by Russia.”

The only ambition Russia has shown in recent memory was in Afghanistan, and that was not even territorial. And they learned their lesson good and hard. The US has not learned a lesson since Vietnam, despite having spent trillions of dollars and thousands of lives, to accomplish absolutely nothing in the middle east.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  SamlAdams
1 year ago

The Russian economy is not that small. To think so is to misunderstand the dynamics of a largely autarkic economy, linked with elements of a planned economy when under threat, that hews to a prioritized industrial policy overtly crafted against the attacks from the GAE. Never Again is their credo, particularly as they had a such a terrifying near death experience during the Gorbachev/Yeltsin era. The economy of the GAE is crafted to facilitate wasteful behaviors in order to support the greatest number of rent-extracting parasites; a lean, mean machine it is not, and in truth, was never intended to… Read more »

trumpton
trumpton
Reply to  JerseyJeffersonian
1 year ago

Yep a big miscalculation. Its pretty obvious that Europe in its current form, despite its notional GDP, just could not fight a war at the level of Ukraine for more than a couple of months. That is even when Russia has not mobilized more than 250k troops. They just do not have the industry, and even Germany as we can see would be out of energy to run such a thing very quickly. The US could perhaps retool itself and supply its own energy, but would have to industrialize around simpler weapon platforms. I wonder how long that would take?… Read more »

David Wright
Member
1 year ago

Wasn’t the debacle in Afghanistan a good tip off of what the West (America) is capable of now. You can run your last rook and few pawns around the chess board for a little while but eventually you will concede or defeated. America and to a lesser extent it’s Nato allies got high on their own supply and thought things were going swimmingly with their overwhelming military toys and infrastructure. That can hold at bay or even dominate for a while a country like Iraq or Afghanistan, or even Vietnam. Now they are corrupted, run by ideological retards and have… Read more »

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  David Wright
1 year ago

The previous debacle in Libya, where NATO literally ran out of bombs should have been a clue about the tempo of modern warfare. We’re now talking about being 3-4 years in arrears on basic anti-armor munition supply. Industrialized vs Industrialized seems to be something that escaped our planners.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  SamlAdams
1 year ago

“Industrialized vs Industrialized seems to be something that escaped our planners.”

Well, those ‘Diversity is our Strength’ posters won’t print themselves. That’s where the real work is at: changing lives, changing the world!

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  SamlAdams
1 year ago

Oh, that’s not good. Logistics is king in any war, as fundamental as blood carries oxygen.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Forever Templar
1 year ago

Why I listened closely to Doug MacGregor early on in the conflict. Probably the last guy around with any hands on experience in large scale maneuver warfare (and the attendant logistical requirements). Of course when he proposed a plan to better organize the US forces to sustain these sort of operations, he was frozen at Colonel and forced out of the Army.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  SamlAdams
1 year ago

A clipped eagle; that’s sad. I remember reading during the run-up to the second Iraq War a general or two had their careers shut down because they weren’t low-balling troop requirements like all the other war planners. Seems the military goes through this cycle of doing this every 20-25 years or so. The Carter years had the same dismal atmosphere.

the road worrier
the road worrier
Reply to  SamlAdams
1 year ago

“running on fumes” seems to be the general take.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
1 year ago

” History says they (the “brains”) will learn nothing from this debacle.” Yep. That’s a safe bet. But will Western subjects learn anything about their leadership? Will the parts of the West that suffer the most learn anything about the United States? Will the majority of the world learn anything about Western incompetence? Maybe, maybe, yes. The last is important but sort of known already, but if those first two answers move from “maybe” to “yes,” this will forever reconfigure the world. The United States will emerge far weaker and far more distrusted. That’s baked into the cake. Whether it… Read more »

Heartlander
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

Well, then we’re screwed and it’s hopeless, since we have all seen since February 2020 the power of propaganda to instantly and simultaneously mass-hypnotize the whole entire planet. Including most of the “smart” people.

Hokkoda
Member
1 year ago

Nothing will change until the politicians and bureaucrats swing from trees in sufficient numbers to ensure they DO learn. They failed on another front as well: getting the Russians to attack the West militarily. The Russians know that war with them carries, at best, 15-20% public support in the US. And that’s before the forced conscription and body counts. All they had to do was beat the Ukrainian army, and let the West continue to bankrupt itself. As the inflation, gas prices, and food shortages mount, the Russians know that people in “the West” have a long history of killing… Read more »

PeriheliusLux
PeriheliusLux
Reply to  Hokkoda
1 year ago

Great comment. I just saw some clip where Fox has that guy who can barely speak English introduce 3 new former Navy Seals as congressional candidates. Their message was, “Relax. America is still great. We just need to get rid of Biden.” Not a single policy was discussed. Listen. I admire the war fighting capabilities of these elite special ops guys. They are truly amazing, lethal warriors. However, what did they fight for? What was the end result of any of those missions in terms of making Americans better off? I see the same thing for them in civilian life.… Read more »

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  PeriheliusLux
1 year ago

This is because actually becoming a proper dissident, and espousing dissident talking points will get you harassed, ‘cancelled’, attacked and the target of dubious legal challenges. I’m actually seriously surprised that somebody like Jared Taylor is still alive, really. At least when those boys were in the forces, if they made it home with minimal trauma, they could look forward to a reasonably pleasant life. The full weight of the state and it’s goons wouldn’t be ranged against them. This cannot be said for anybody who even tiptoes the line of dissident commentary. They will never leave you be, and… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  OrangeFrog
1 year ago

The elite military (SEALs and similar) current or former, may have been indoctrinated or “brainwashed” to some extent. However, what these (mostly) men certainly have in common is that they are of above, probably well above average intelligence, and of course far about the norm in physical and mental ability. Again, their political leanings may be hard to predict, but I would bet my life that most of them know the true state of affairs, the political alliances, of those who do or did claim to lord it over them. They will not be deceived, unless they chose willful blindness.… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

The test comes when it’s a fight pitting American against American. Then sides must be taken and decisions made. While it remains American against non-American, the elite forces will do as they are told, and as you observed, these guys are looking for a good fight.

PeriheliusLux
PeriheliusLux
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

OrangeFrog and Ben make good points I didn’t take into account. I’ve scoured the Internet looking for signs of where our warriors’ are leaning. It seems overwhelming that they are patriots and very pissed off about what is going on. Our best strategy is to stop whining and be the men of quality in whatever vocation and profession we inhabit. Rise as far as we can, and be indispensable. It means biting our lips, and letting them misbehave while the phones record brazen racism, sexism and massive degeneracy. Perhaps I judged too soon. Perhaps those 3 warriors are playing the… Read more »

Nick Nolte's Mugshot
Nick Nolte's Mugshot
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
1 year ago

How many of the FBI SWAT team members kicking in doors at 3 am and dragging grandma and grandpa out on the front lawn in their underwear for attending the January 6th rally are former special ops guys? The just following orders excuse does not cut it for this abuse of power.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  PeriheliusLux
1 year ago

all military are tax eaters, start from that as a first principle.

Brandon Lasko
Brandon Lasko
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

Response to PeriheliusLux: Dickie Levine has nothing to do with the armed forces. The Health and Human Services department uses military titles for some pretentious reason

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
1 year ago

We’re starting to see bleak assessments like this from mainstream sources, which means we’re probably close to mass desertions. https://twitter.com/DisInfo_Kills/status/1544051774155329543 One could argue if the west gave its fighter aircraft to Ukraine they wouldn’t be such sitting ducks, but then the question arises of if the western powers would be able to handle the possibility of a significant amount of their air force being shot down in a real war against a real enemy. Given the ability of the West in the last couple of decades to have the industrial capacity to actually replace fighter aircraft, the answer would probably… Read more »

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 year ago

Scott Ritter reckons an Air War would cost the US somewhere north of 200 aircraft.

My assumption is that Russia would respond to direct American involvement by sinking a couple of Aircraft Carriers in say the Persian Gulf and South China sea. I have no doubt they have the capability.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Bilejones
1 year ago

There are some pretty damning studies about the US’ inability to defend against cruise missiles.

Here’s one from Congress showing how vulnerable the US itself is to such threats:

https://www.cbo.gov/publication/56950

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Chet Rollins
1 year ago

Aerospace isn’t really my bag, but how hard is it to replace a fifth generation combat jet? Is losing one a significant loss? I remember reading the F-22 was a wonderful plane technologically, but was a bit of a PITA for it too.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Forever Templar
1 year ago

Very hard, unless you go to “war footing” economy and divert civilian aerospace resources away. But then question how quickly the electronics supply chain could be diverted to the requirements of these aircraft—given global sourcing. It ain’t the days of Willow Run, where a finished B-24 rolled off the line every hour.

Carl B.
Carl B.
Reply to  SamlAdams
1 year ago

Not to mention plenty of young, smart, well-adjusted White males to crew those B-24’s.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Forever Templar
1 year ago

F-22s are irreplaceable at this point since their production line has been shut for a decade.

That means all the custom tooling and tribal knowledge required to build them is long gone.

This, and the lackluster performance of the F-35 is why a modernized version of the F-15 is being fielded.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

A-a-and, our genius mosleaders have bought the Turkish assent to the admittance of Sweden and Finland into NATO through agreeing to supply Turkey with a large number of fighter aircraft, as welk as upgrade kits for their currently owned fighters. So, not only will production capacity be dedicated to supplying Turkey (for God only knows what self-serving projects devised by neo-Ottoman Erdogan has in mind), but that capacity will be diverted from US supply (while the F-22 line is closed, and the F-35 appears to be a basket case). All so that some panicked Swedes and Finns will join NATO,… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

…and a large portion of the Stateside contractors who would be tasked to design and manufacture a replacement will likely be first-generation Chinese, Indian or other naturalized American citizens, some of whom were granted Top Secret and “Codeword” clearances merely based upon them being newly minted citizens. Such blase granting of accesses to such people would have vexed and baffled US security services 60 or 80 years ago. Although I’ve never followed the high tech industry, especially at this late date, I doubt that America could source half the parts it needs domestically any more, no matter whom they had… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

If the f-22 line were in production today, they’d still not be able to replace f-22’s at the rate they need in a war. We just don’t produce about anything more than bullets at a rate they’d be consumed in a real war.

I’m not a military expert—nor claim to be, but since Reagan the story I’ve heard is that the thinking/strategy is that major conflicts are considered to be over quickly and fought/won/lost with the supplies on hand. The thinking was that any protracted conflict would be too costly and escalate to nukes.

But what do I know?

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Well, they got it partially correct – it will be lost with the supplies on hand.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

“This, and the lackluster performance of the F-35”

You shouldn’t be too hard on the F-35. Developing the first semi-submersible jet fighter was bound to have its problems.

(((They))) Live
(((They))) Live
Reply to  Forever Templar
1 year ago

The West seems to be building ever more expensive Jets, $100 million each, the Russians are trying to keep costs down, the new SU 75 will cost $30 million, are 3 SU 75s better than 1 F-22, I don’t know, I hope we never find out

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  (((They))) Live
1 year ago

Most of the analysis at Ausairpower is a decade old, but they convincingly argued that the performance Russian aircraft had mostly closed the gap on Western designs and even exceeded them in some respects.

What I could never figure out about that website is how a couple guys in Australia were getting so many detailed, high-quality images of all the Russian gear. Just didn’t make sense.

Mike
Mike
Reply to  Forever Templar
1 year ago

The problem is twofold, replacement of the plane and replacement of the aircrew. Some of the planes (F-22) may not be replaceable so we would have to take older planes out of mothballs and try to upgrade them on the fly.

The aircrew problem is much worse, training properly is a long process and poorly trained becomes dead in combat. There will be huge problems with the diversity in combat arms now too. Any sort of mobilization will likely set off desertions and avoidance not seen since Vietnam or maybe the Civil War.

Mike
Mike
Reply to  Mike
1 year ago

I replied too quickly, most of the points I covered had already been covered very well. I should have scrolled down before I replied.