The Internal Monologue

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The looming presidential primary season is about to be a good test case for the claim that the system is inward looking. That is, what we get in the national media with regards to politics is for internal consumption by the political bubble. They are not trying to sway public opinion, but rather signal things to one another. Like fireflies at dusk, the various nodes of the system use the media to blink to one another. Those outside just happen to see it but are not the intended audience.

This post in Breitbart covering CPAC is an interesting example. Mike Pompeo is running for president, so he shows up to give a speech. In his speech, he promises to throw old people off the Social Security and Medicare system. The reason he wants to do this is he says these systems cost too much. You see, with all the baby boomers retiring, the costs are starting to rise quickly. Therefore, the logical solution is to start throwing old people off the programs. Problem solved!

To a normal person, this sounds as sensible as coming out in favor of slapping children of killing puppies. There is no constituency in favor of cutting Social Security or Medicare funding or even limiting access. Further, old people are the biggest voting block in the Republican Party. Look around at CPAC and you see more gray hair than gray hoodies. He would have been better off giving the speech in Klingon. A reasonable person may think Mike Pompeo is insane.

He is not insane. He is simply a man who has lived his entire adult life inside the system, so he has no idea how normal people sound. He is used to chatting with friends in the system about the need to reduce spending on Americans in order to spend much more on Ukrainians or illegal aliens. For him, this is perfectly normal. He would probably be shocked to learn that there is no constituency for this. After all, everyone he knows thinks something must be done.

Now, Mike Pompeo is a ridiculous person by the standards of normal people, but he is typical of the political class. He is what passes for serious in that world. You see it in the media that serves the people in the system. Real Clear Politics gives him a big thumbs up for being courageous in his call to throw old people into the streets. Time Magazine says he is just the man the Republican Party needs. They are signaling to the system that this is what is good and proper.

If our mass media cared at all about the hoi polloi, the headline in the Washington Post would be, “Jobless Rando Shows Up At CPAC, Rants About Old People.” The New York Times would ask, “Why did CPAC let this weirdo speak?” No serious person, not even the people in the system, thinks Mike Pompeo should be president. No one thinks he has chance to register in the polls. That is not the point. The point is to participate in a debate among the political class.

Speaking of jobless randos, Nikki Haley also showed up at the event to give a speech in favor of killing white people and sending their stuff to Ukraine. She was not quite that explicit, but like Pompeo, she is deeply concerned about people on the other side of the world, but not so much about people in America. Even though she must know this is a losing hand with the voters, she knows it is a winning hand in Washington. Like Pompeo, her campaign is about internal politics.

Of course, CPAC itself is part of the same system. It bills itself as the convention for conservative activists, but in reality it is mostly a tradeshow for the grifters and confidence men who populate the conservative ecosystem. They decorated the event with yokels from flyover country in order to give the impression that they have genuine support among the hoi polloi. In reality the point has always been to promote internal dialogue and signal to the rest of the political system.

The curious thing about all of this, and it jumps out at you with CPAC, is that Trump did the system a huge favor in 2016. CPAC would have gone bust by now without the Trump victory and populist surge. Even with Trump running in 2024, CPAC struggled for an audience this year. The speakers talked to more empty chairs than people, judging from some of the pics people have posted. Without Trump, they are left with zombies like Mike Pompeo to sell tickets.

The same can be said for the entire system. Imagine how insulated and cutoff they would be at this point if Trump never came down the escalator. The Republicans would have selected a goofball like Jeb Bush. Maybe he beats Hillary, maybe not, but the result would have been the same. Large swaths of voters would be wondering what in the hell is going on, but with no way to tell the system. Without Trump, national politics would be even more bizarre than it is now.

That said, the persistence of this internal monologue that is presented to us as democratic politics says nothing really changed. The internal monologue has been more shouty and angry since 2015, but it remains an internal monologue. Once the door is shut on Trump and his voters this election, the internal monologue will return to sounding like an opioid laced talk show on National Public Radio. The people inside it will drift off into the dream world of their own making.

It may already be happening. Chris “Thanks Dad” Sununnu went on the far-left chat show Meet the Press to announce that Trump will not be the nominee. Maybe he was telling tales out of school, but most likely he is stating the general consensus within Washington with regards to the primaries. It brings to mind what Talleyrand famously said about the Bourbons after they were restored to power, “They have learned nothing and they have forgotten nothing”.

What the Republican primary is going to be this time is an argument between the party establishment and the rest of Washington. The former will be insisting that all the Trump stuff is over and it is time to get back to looting the white middle class, while the later keeps pointing to Trump saying, “He’s still here.” Put another way, the voters are now a guest that refuses to leave the party. The political class is debating how best to make them leave and go home.


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1 year ago

[…] AMERICA:  “THE VOTERS ARE NOW A GUEST THAT REFUSES TO LEAVE THE PARTY. THE POLITICAL CLASS IS DEBATING HOW BEST TO MAKE THEM LEAVE AND GO […]

Pozymandias
1 year ago

In a humane and reasonable society there could be a discussion about how funding needs to be set aside for people when they get old and can’t work. There could be serious talk about how maybe FDR’s old Ponzi scheme wasn’t the best way to do this and how, with longer lifespans, people need to consider limiting the government funded retirement program for those who truly need it and perhaps encouraging people to set up elder-care funds for their parents and themselves. Perhaps tax incentives could be used to encourage funding this. At this point though I’m not even angry… Read more »

cg2
cg2
Reply to  Pozymandias
1 year ago

That was awesome. 🙂

Arshad Ali
Arshad Ali
Reply to  Pozymandias
1 year ago

If you know Biden you know that he never takes responsibility for anything. It’s always someone else’s fault. Often he gets furious at having his mistakes pointed out. This p.o.s. is a nasty piece of work.

Spingerah
Spingerah
Reply to  Arshad Ali
1 year ago

Where is Lee Harvey when you need him?

Tired Citizen
Tired Citizen
Reply to  Pozymandias
1 year ago

Maybe, just as long as no one called them racist.

Memebro
Memebro
1 year ago

You know, it’s always been a little hard for me to swallow the idea that the GOP is just there only to play the “foil” in a carefully scripted drama, but yes, calls to eliminate social security sure do pull back the curtain on Oz’s inner workings. I’ll be the first to say that Social Security is a broken system, and that they probably could have done better way back when at creating it. But what percentage of voters are in favor of eliminating it at this point? 5%? Less? Even most people in the 100k-200k/year earning category have factored… Read more »

Spingerah
Spingerah
Reply to  Memebro
1 year ago

1-200k that seems like a lot & it used to be at least upper middle class. It ain’t what it used to be. My wife and I worked 24-7 since we were teens. Took calculated risks & opportunities when we were able to recognize them. Never bought anything new if used would do. Road or camping trips when we were able to take a rare vacation. Avoided all the usual pitfalls drugs alcohol gambling etc.. Up until a few years ago were starting to feel a little secure and imagined a light at the end of the tunnel. Now… not… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Spingerah
1 year ago

The total cost of housing (principal, interest, taxes, maintenance, acts of God) is really starting to bite those in the 100 to 200k gross income range.

Personally, I’m somewhat regretting not taking a recent opportunity to move to a lower cost of living area even though a job in those parts was not a foregone conclusion.

Allen
Allen
1 year ago

What are the chances? No one in the GOP gives a fig about fiscal matters or budgetary constraints so it’s something else. The democrats just about a month ago said the usual about the GOP wanting to knock off grandma, and lo and behold Pompeo delivers the goods. What’s left to do is figure out what the con is. My bet is that he’s being used to generate campaign donations for another GOP hopeful who will roundly proclaim, “Pompeo is just wrong and… blah, blah, blah. I’d also look at the democrats funding to see if they need a little… Read more »

right2remainviolent
right2remainviolent
1 year ago

Love it. This is exactly why I don’t cast votes for people (you put a law or policy on the ballot and I’ll toss my yea or nay in). Ya, democracy means I get to help pick in a popularity contest where the contestants are chosen by their money and connections in relationship to what’s decided to be acceptable by a class of people who are so far from normal they might as well be lizard/alien hybrids. Then the person that gets picked goes on to toe the party line and not actually vote for or create legislature that benefits… Read more »

Tired Citizen
Tired Citizen
Reply to  right2remainviolent
1 year ago

Not to mention, every retard who would serve society better by feeding themselves into a wood chipper gets to nullify your political power. Great, right?

Arshad Ali
Arshad Ali
1 year ago

“Mike Pompeo is running for president, so he shows up to give a speech. In his speech, he promises to throw old people off the Social Security and Medicare system.”

These people have been contributing to SS and Medicare their whole lives. Now Pompeo — an avatar for the Deep State — wants to strip them of these things. The empire wants its denizens to contribute their sweat and toil to feed the insatiable maw of the war machine. In return the denizens get nothing. Pompeo and the rest of the political class deserve the fate of Ceausescu

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Arshad Ali
1 year ago

Social Security was always intended to be a way to rip off the peasants. It was established back in the 1935 with the idea that most people only live to 65. You pay into the system your whole life collect for a few months, and then heart attack. Then the government can take the rest of that money you paid “into the system” and do whatever it wants. And it did, that’s why social security is always on the verge of collapse: they already spent the money. We’re just finally reaching the point where the public opens the briefcase only… Read more »

Arshad Ali
Arshad Ali
Reply to  Ploppy
1 year ago

“only to find it full of slips of paper, being subsequently informed that those are IOUs and just as good as money” I think GWB informed the peasants around 20 years ago that the SS trust fund contained only IOUs. This is why I think SS is even more vile than a mere Ponzi scheme. Still, have to be philosophical about this. This is part of the lifecycle of disintegrating empires. When the Soviet Union went down, the pensioners were being paid in increasingly worthless rubles. When I wandered around parts of the old Soviet Union in the early 90s… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ploppy
1 year ago

Plopped. Your (mis)understanding of the SSI system is profound. Yes, it’s not actuarial sound. No, it won’t go “broke” and disappear—unless Congress acts to replace it. It has its own funding source—yes, modeled after Ponzi, but able at this time estimated to fund 75% of current benefits on an ongoing basis. The box of “IOU’s” you refer to has been currently *opened*! Every month several billon dollars of Treasury notes are redeemed and used to pay benefits. This has been going on for some time now. The Treasury simply sells notes to someone else and pays up. These Treasury notes… Read more »

Getthemoneyfromtheseskels
Getthemoneyfromtheseskels
Reply to  Arshad Ali
1 year ago

“…to feed the insatiable maw of the war machine…”

The #1 best outcome of the Trump era, without reference to whether HE was the driving force personally, or a result of the action of his enemies = opening the eyes of millions of potential “Gold Star Mothers” – and fathers. To choose NOT to offer up their young on the altar of those that lie to them, yet expect their blood sacrifice.

And now they report that 75% of American young are not fit for ‘service’. Boo fucking hoo.

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

When I saw the title, The Internal Monologue, I just assumed it was going to be how leftist NPCs have no internal monologue.

This piece shows why the GOP is worthless. They promise us they’ll do something good, instead, they get to Washington and do something evil and none of the good things.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

when I saw the title, i thought it was the sequel to The Vagina Monologues. very disappointed it wasn’t…

Owlman
Owlman
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

“When I saw the title, The Internal Monologue, I just assumed it was going to be how so-called NPCs have no internal monologue.” This is exactly what I thought too. Mild disappointment it wasn’t, as peering into the souls of the soul-less is less interesting. Fat Mike Pompous has no soul. And to the poster wondering why, West Point gard at top of his class of robots, Hah-vahd law, didn’t produce a better man of the right … he is a PRODUCT of his ‘impressive’ background. Also fat and hideous to look at. Does he have the steak dinner in… Read more »

Tired Citizen
Tired Citizen
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
1 year ago

To some degree, you have to respect leftist democrats more than GOP scum. At least the leftists tell us the truth that they hate us and want us dead. The GOP does everything the leftists do, but lie about it instead.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Tired Citizen
1 year ago

The traitor is always more loathesome than the declared enemy.

The Greek
The Greek
1 year ago

There’s another reason for Mike Pompeii and republicans to be talking about cutting old people off social security and Medicare. It’s just another example of republicans trying their best to throw what should be a slam dunk election for them. Can’t upset their lefty overlords in the uniparty. Plus, we can’t forget that they even said out loud that they like being the party out of power because when they are in power, people actually expect them to do stuff. Skyrocket crime, inflation, radical gender theory being taught to elementary school kids, flowering anti-white hatred…should we talk about any of… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  The Greek
1 year ago

I am unable to get past the fact that they chose 2020, of all possible years, to revisit Roe v Wade

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

Ja, that one got heard, but this one is just not making the grade:

https://reason.com/2023/02/27/scotus-says-domestic-spying-is-too-secret-to-be-challenged-in-court/

Any questions?

3g4me
3g4me
1 year ago

I seem to be a unicorn once again – an old White lady who wishes both Social Security and Medicare were abolished. Yes, I understand people paid in – my wages were garnished every year since I was 16 just like most of you. But to assume people would have saved that money themselves and invested it and therefore what they paid in plus interest is ‘theirs’ is lunacy. Yes, I am also well aware of the constant devaluation of the dollar and that the sums paid in back in the ’70s and ’80s and ’90s are worth more in… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

“I absolutely agree with Whites getting whatever they can from America’s dying carcass,”

You can stop right there. Take everything from Leviathan and give it nothing. I want Whites to get every dime possible. I want Whites ON food stamps, on WIC, and demanding MORE Social Security and Medicare, whatever.

The country was stolen from Heritage America, so let it feast on its dying carcass. Bask in its warmth as it burns down.

Arshad Ali
Arshad Ali
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

I agree with you in principle. But. Many people — including you and I — have been paying into it for decades. Involuntarily. Are we to get nothing in return except Joe Biden’s vacuous and meaningless grin?

Nick Nolte's Mugshot
Nick Nolte's Mugshot
Reply to  Arshad Ali
1 year ago

I am sure that Zelensky will express his graditude for your lifetime of sacrifice as he lounges by pool of his multimillion Miami mansion when he finally bugs out of the smoking wreckage of Ukraine.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Arshad Ali
1 year ago

No, you will get what you’d get if you were a shareholder in a bankrupt business, i.e., the share of the sale of the company’s assets remaining. In this case, it will be the income from the current workers paying in. Which at this time is estimated to be 75% of your promised benefit.

Tired Citizen
Tired Citizen
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

@3g4me – I agree with everything you just wrote, but I would add another thing. Not only do I want whites to get whatever they can, I want to see everything that the ferals get taken away. Just so they can finally get a taste of what it’s like when everything you have gets taken away from you and given to someone else. It still won’t match the destructive selfishness that they exhibit because we actually WORKED for the money we hand to them, but anything that can be taken away from them is a plus in my book. Of… Read more »

ray
ray
1 year ago

Instructive as usual. Lord give me counselors like this in the times to come, amen.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
1 year ago

“Now, Mike Pompeo is a ridiculous person by the standards of normal people, but he is typical of the political class.” So here’s the question: if Mike Pompeo is ridiculous, can this system, as presently configured, possibly reform itself from within? Mike Pompeo, by any objective standard, at first glance doesn’t look ridiculous. He grew up in Orange County with normal parents. He graduated first in his class at West Point – not easy. Whatever you think of Harvard Law School, he got in and graduated. He worked at Bain (not easy) and got backing in business from the Koch… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Captain Willard
1 year ago

Within a year De Santis will be sounding just as ludicrous as Pompeo, and for the exact same reasons.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 year ago

The Ukraine War will reveal the pathos of DeSantis and reduce him to rubble. I look for the plug to be pulled on the Ukraine shortly after the GOP primary so it doesn’t spill into the general election, not that TPTB care but just as a gut punch after all the domestic arguing.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
1 year ago

Yes Ostei, my friends in Florida are throwing their panties at DeSantis and I keep telling them to pump the brakes, but so far they are smitten and writing big checks.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Captain Willard
1 year ago

I’d have thought the Jeb endorsement was the kiss of death, for me it certainly was.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

I always thought maybe 2000 was when the window closed, we had a budget surplus, forever wars had not started yet… but maybe it was the Clintons that closed the window on economic sanity, they are complete scumbag grifters.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Why? The GenX cohort is within a gnat’s whisker of being as big as the Boomer cohort, and getting closer every day (currently 19% to 21%, IIRC) and Millenials and GenZ are already over 40%. That’s about 60% voting age people who Pompeo could be appealing to, against a measly 21%, plus maybe 5% that are Silents.

No matter where you go on the intarwebs, some generally GenX commentator or commenter is proposing pillows for olds or something similar. If Pompeo is appealing to that demographic, why couldn’t reform happen? What could stop it?

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  thezman
1 year ago

Perhaps. But a big part of the Pompeo problem is that the “Overton Window” has really narrowed dramatically in political discourse since Obama. Can Pompeo campaign on deporting immigrants, stopping wars, ending affirmative action and breaking up banking, tech and health-care cartels? No. The GOP donors hold the exact opposite positions. So we’re back to the anodyne Pete Peterson/David Stockman budget lectures. Lest we forget, the odious Paul Ryan tried to talk about this Medicare/SS stuff too when he ran. Please recall Joe Biden was able to hold his own in a debate with Ryan on this stuff. Just imagine!… Read more »

Arshad Ali
Arshad Ali
Reply to  Captain Willard
1 year ago

“But his resume suggests he is at least as smart as Joe Biden or AOC.”

That’s pretty faint praise. The kind of intelligence he has — vulpine, predatory, and shark-like — is not in dispute. The point is he’s an apparatchik of a senescent and corrupt system.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  Arshad Ali
1 year ago

Agreed. This was my point :). You made it better than me.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Captain Willard
1 year ago

Asimov’s Mule was contained and the Foundation put everything back on “the plan”.

Much like Trump.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
1 year ago

Speaking of the Bourbons, we desperately need a Napoleon to come out of the woodwork to shatter this place to pieces. I’ll take anyone at this point. Pompeo would be one of those generals that he ripped through like crepe paper as he consolidated power. Pompeo desperately wants to pick up a sandwich but covets raw power even more, his handlers reminding him every 20 minutes that voters are turned off by fat white guys. Pompeo loves guns and butter. But when push comes to shove he’s Raytheon’s candidate.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 year ago

Don’t we have to have a reign of terror first?

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

It is underway.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

Yes. I was in downtown Portland las week. It’s here.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  JR Wirth
1 year ago

JR, I lived in Portland, OR in the 90s and loved it, other than the weather. It was a great place to spend my twenties.

Can you share any details about what you saw last week?

UsNthem
UsNthem
1 year ago

According to the DC bubble, White America is always supposed to care more about (and sacrifice for) freedom and democracy in some s***hole across the ocean rather than their own interests here. Why should we care more about inflation, a border invasion, massive chemical spills, out of control jogger criminality, cultural rot and non-stop governmental/media lying about all of it when can patriotically stand up for (or beat down) the little guy on the other side of the world? In the words of Ace Ventura, “gee, let me think.”

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  UsNthem
1 year ago

The Help in Congress usually can claim foreign wars and policies are a “success” because what happens is far away and opaque. Afghanistan was an exception because the failure was so spectacular, but most of these cons and adventures are just as screwed up as the DMV but can be deemed to be a great success because of distance and lack of transparency. The opacity also presents for more bribe opportunities. With a crisis of legitimacy and accelerated looting, the Regime needs to claim some success no matter how farcical and find a way to simultaneously line its pockets. I’m… Read more »

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

Agree Jack. They will declare victory and move on to the next disaster. The Bradley Fighting Vehicles left on the steppes of Ukraine will join the Hueys dumped off Vietnam, the Baghdad green zone outbuildings and the trucks left in Afghanistan in the boneyard of American failures.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

I wish I could see a peace agreement coming but I don’t. The west has poisoned the well for negotiations. Russia can’t drink from it anymore. I can’t imagine Biden braved the air raid sirens of Kiev for any other reason than as a prelude to escalation.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

Since they don’t care about the Ukraine or Ukrainians, they won’t hesitate a nanosecond to abandon them, peace agreement or not. There was no agreement with the Taliban before that withdrawal.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

In my opinion, you are overlooking the motivation of vengeance against an ancient enemy and the fanatical desire to impose trannies on traditional white countries.

They aren’t going to let this go until absolute failure.

We will see who’s intuition is more accurate.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

@LIS: I’ll stay with greed > vengeance. As you wrote, we’ll see. Looking forward to the kabuki conflict with China in the meantime.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

East Palestine ground water is less poisoned than US peace negotiations.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

I can’t see a peace agreement looking anything like Minsk given how the West has copped to flat out lying. Eventually Russia will just win, and the West will declare “peace” and go home (or on to the next boondebacle).

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  UsNthem
1 year ago

I can only think of three successes in the last 75 years: Germany, Japan, and Korea. We were a different country then and willing to go the distance, but mostly we defeated and therefore changed high intellect societies. Our failure was going into shit-hole, third world countries and expecting to change their populace. Not gonna happen.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

Plausible in theory. In practice, their army of ballot harvesters will never do it for a Republican. So they’d have to rig it with the machines themselves. Which perhaps they have already, but I’m not the expert on that.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

meant as a reply to Severian, sorry

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

As I’ve said before. Election fraud correction will *never* happen until the Rep’s use the *same* techniques to win an election or two. Then the opposition to reform will crumble.

Pete
Pete
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Not possible. All the courts, FBI/DOJ and other institutions that turn a blind eye to Democrat fraud would leap into action and jail any Republicans who tried to do this.

The midnight raids with flash-bangs, yanking children out of their beds to be handcuffed etc would be epic.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Pete
1 year ago

“All the courts, FBI/DOJ and other institutions that turn a blind eye to Democrat fraud…”

Yes, but these people have families. Soft targets. You can’t make the steal so obvious that it would taint the jury pool. Just 1-in-12 is a hung jury.

anon
anon
1 year ago

Social Security question: I just turned 62 should I start taking the money now or wait for full benefits? I leaning to taking it now because who knows where this clown car will be in 3-5 years.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  anon
1 year ago

Now! How stable do you think the present system is…?

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  anon
1 year ago

It’s designed so it comes out the same either way, if your life span is average or close to it. People who live much longer than average win by waiting to 67. People who live much shorter than average win by starting at 62.

I wouldn’t base the decision on expectations of systemic collapse. As they say, the market can remain irrational longer than you can stay solvent.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  anon
1 year ago

now, for sure. your time is worth a lot more than the $$ you are leaving on the table. also, i read that SS is set up so that you get about the same total $$ no matter when you start collecting. i started collecting at 63, BTW, and have 0 regrets.

wendy forward
wendy forward
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

Agree. I started as early as possible. Do it.

Dr. Dre
Dr. Dre
Reply to  wendy forward
1 year ago

I waited to collect. My family is enormously, even freakishly long-lived, so I’ll need every penny cuz my kids won’t be able to help!

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

Karl, total SSI varies depending on your life expectancy. Live longer, collect more. The tables are changed every so,often, but let’s say you are expected to live until 84. If you take early, or delay you might come out about the same—but if you delay and live longer you get more in the long run. Vise versa for taking early. Any accountant has software that can print out all options and totals collected for both spouses for whatever longevity you feed in. And of course if you are sickly, then grab the cash—unless you don’t need it, then you can… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  anon
1 year ago

The question is not as simple as you state it, nor are the answers you receive here correct—indeed, they are *incorrect*—given the lack of questions about you and your wife (if married) and your health. For example, if you and your wife are eligible for SSI, you need to plan together—especially if there are age differences and income differences. One reason, when both of you get SSI benefits, and one does, then you have the option of choosing the spouse’s benefit check if you wish. However, your spouse does not receive two checks. Just the larger of the two. That… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

iff money is the be all and end all of your lives.

cg2
cg2
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

no that wld be tequila.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  cg2
1 year ago

“Tequila, it won’t solve your problems, but it will make you not care about them”

george 1
george 1
1 year ago

Well let’s see if Pompeo thinks that the buildup and probable execution of WWIII “costs too much.” I bet he does not.

He is right about Medicare. It is not going to survive. You could possibly tweek Social Security and have it survive longer but not Medicare. Those chickens are coming home to roost.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

Medicare will be “fine.” Because every time it gets too close to not fine, they will raise the eligibility age. In one of those midnight congressional sessions without any public discussion of it ahead of time.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

Jeffrey Zoar: “they will raise the eligibility age” If the worst case scenarios concerning the V@xxines of Death prove to be true, then they won’t even need to do that. Personally, I find muhself constantly falling into this trap of pre-COVID thought, particularly when it comes to sweet hawt young White skirts waltzing into muh perview, and I get to wondering, “Mother of muh Children material?”, and I allow muhself to fantasize about it for a few microseconds, but then muh Amygdala kicks in, and starts screaming at moi, “PUREBL00DED OR V@XXINATED, YOU MORON?!?!?” These days, muh Amygdala ruins all… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

don’t let reality set the limits of your fantasies!

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

my personal philosophy is to do everything i can to stay healthy, so i don’t need to use the medical system in any way. so far that plan is serving me very well.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

I’m scared to even get a tetanus booster at this point.

And I changed from the famous market-dominant globalist multivitamin manufacturer to a family-owned multivitamin manufacturer here in the USA.

The weird thing is that I don’t feel even the slightest bit paranoid anymoar about having made the switch.

Now it just feels to me like the only possible recourse for any hominid which is even slightly smarter than a bag of rocks: STAY THE HELL AWAY FROM HOMINIDS WHICH WANT TO MURDER YOU!!!!!

And for the sake of Goodness, don’t purchase the products they’re peddling.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

there are so many health promoting supplements that don’t require a doctor being involved. but the #1 thing you can do to maintain good health is to get your diet in order.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

Medicare enrollment has been pegged at 65 yo since inception in 1965. If anything, they now have a Bill,in Congress to lower it to 60 yo. sigh.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

You don’t need to tweak Social Security. It’s already tweaked, albeit it could be made actuarial sound. Social Security has its own funding source—workers. By law, if it runs short of funds, it simply reduces payout by that percentage short—across the board. The current estimate is we will all take a haircut of 25% when the Treasury Bonds run out in 2030. So your monthly check will come out to 75% what it currently is. Of course, a sharp recession causes the trust fund to run out sooner. As it is, we already do not take in as much as… Read more »

Eusebio
Eusebio
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Market forces are another form of rationing.
It’s not possible for normal income people to have infinite healthcare.

There hasn’t been a proportionate increase in colon cancer rates for young people in other OECD countries so maybe less incentive for their healthcare to repsond similarly?

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Eusebio
1 year ago

Actually, not true. I read a paper in the British Medical Journal a few years ago “decrying” the “under resourcing” for preventive colonoscopies in the NHS (Brit socialized medicine). They actually pointed to the US as a model for more screening for colon cancer at younger ages. Why did I read such? 5 years any month now (got to look it up) and I am free of colon cancer according to the American Cancer society. Yeah, I read a lot about this as I was not going to shit into a bag for the rest of my life if I… Read more »

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

Social Security has been a fraud ever since LBJ dumped its trust fund into the general budget to fund Vietnam…If it gets cut or eliminated, people will notice, since the Gov will still be taking SS taxes out of your paychecks…Medicare is hyper-expensive, but if it gets cut, and grandma is left to die..people will want their heads in a basket…

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  pyrrhus
1 year ago

Grandma is still left to die unfortunately—it’s just not as obvious. What good is seeing a doctor 6 weeks out when you are really sick, or worse seeing the AA doctor who must take in Medicare patients to have any patients at all, whereas all the competent Whites have left the system.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

Interesting about the AA docs. Noticed that if you want a White or Jewish doctor, many are now charging an annual retainer/premium anywhere from $5k up for the privilege of being their patient.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  c matt
1 year ago

Yep. I pay privately for a personal physician and it ain’t cheap—since I see him once a year and really am not a sick person. But damn it’s refreshing to have one on call who’ll prescribe over the phone, or via an email photo.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  pyrrhus
1 year ago

“Social Security has been a fraud ever since LBJ dumped its trust fund into the general budget to fund Vietnam”

If that and his ties to the Most Powerful Mob don’t show that LBJ was of jevvish bloodline, I don’t know what does.

Damn, they really did kill the Irish Catholic so they could take over, didn’t they?

To rewrite, plunder, and enslave: this is the Way.

TomA
TomA
1 year ago

And yet, the average Joe is still wedded to the belief that voting matters, and most importantly, that voting is easy to do versus anything hard that might actually make a difference and require getting the fat ass up off the couch. A recent DoD study concluded that 75% of American youth are unfit for military service. Most couldn’t change a tire if their life depended on it. Yes, DC is a cesspool of dysfunction, corruption, and malevolence; but the base stock is also declining at an alarming rate. We now have businesses like Door Dash that bring food to… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  TomA
1 year ago

The thing about Door Dash and other voluntary expenditures is the frivolousness of it. If one takes a look at what we piss our money away on, no wonder we are broke when we retire and become wards of the State.

When I was at the University, students were complaining about costs (as they should be), but this was followed up in one article with an analysis of just what those “expenses” were. One repeated expense was the $5 daily latte’s from Starbucks. 🙁

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

$5/day x 365 days/year == $1825 per year for goyslop caffeine…

And considering that the goyslop is made from a base of palm oil, which, when heated, is a known carcinogen, now you’ve got CompSci’s “rise in colon cancer in the younger population” [as above].

In other words, you’re literally paying (((them))) to become billionaires via murdering you.

Sometimes you do start to wonder whether the goyim have what it takes to survives the darwinian fitness test posed by (((modernity))).

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

how is coffee made from palm oil?

also, i read that palm oil is similar to coconut oil, and is healthy for you.

please post some links for these assertions.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

They say red meat is a carcinogen too but I’m not easing up

bourbon
bourbon
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

Palm Oil Starbucks
https://tinyurl.com/44eexcck

Palm Oil Cancer
https://tinyurl.com/3bhu4was

TomA
TomA
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

Freshly ground coffee beans have better flavor because the internal oils are preserved by the bean husk and only exposed by the grinding process. These internal oils will evaporate and oxidize to some extent in pre-ground coffee and this degrades the flavor via the loss of these natural oils. Large coffee vendors offset this deficit by admixing palm (or other non-natural oils) into their pre-ground base supply in an attempt to recreate a faux-flavor and allowing them to charge extra.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

ok, TomA answered my main question. i don’t go to Starbucks, ever, so it was just curiosity.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  karl von hungus
1 year ago

Life lessons: Pick your own cotton; grind your own coffee.

Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

This is where having a malfunctional news media is an issue. No one, especially the general public, can be expected to be informed on all questions and if pertinent information is systematically hidden from the public eye, the fitness test changes. Protecting basic health and safety in a crumbling society by developing a means of reliable information flow outside corrupt institutions will be key. Our people have silos of knowledge that don’t communicate with one another.

cg2
cg2
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

My bulletproof coffee made at home every morning costs about a dollar a day even using high end beans, grass fed Irish butter and organic coconut oil. And it takes the place of breakfast, so breakfast amounts to 7$ per week.

RealityRules
RealityRules
1 year ago

ConInc will produce a candidate field comprised almost solely of “diverse” candidates to show that they represent the voters on the margin that they hope to attract to remain relevant, and that they are not rayciss. Their policies will make the liberal McGovern Democrats they used to scorn look like reactionary strict constructionalists. The anti-white regime will continue its campaign of aggression against the professional class. More and more white people will awaken to what is happening. How many more cycles of denial will remain before they become a part of in-group organizing is hard to tell. Accepting that you… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  RealityRules
1 year ago

“Accepting that you have enemies who are deeply malevolent is a very difficult thing to do.”

Not as hard as hoisting in the fact that those who claim to be your friends are actually deeply malevolent enemies.

Ken
Ken
1 year ago

None of the people in Washington have to rely on social security because they are in the much more lucrative system of federal pensions. No talk of those being restricted in anyway.

Maniac
Maniac
Reply to  Ken
1 year ago

There have been talks about term limits and salary caps, but alas, nothing comes of it.

Stranger in a Strange Land
Stranger in a Strange Land
1 year ago

I had a sense as I was reading the essay there’d be a ZMan metaphoric gem. Lo and behold…”Once the door is shut on Trump and his voters this election, the internal monologue will return to sounding like an opioid laced talk show on National Public Radio. The people inside it will drift off into the dream world of their own making”…

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
1 year ago

Yes, that’s a winning ticket: tell old folks their Social Security has to be cut to fund Ukrainian pension plans. Brilliant stuff, not that it matters.

The GOP is just as dead as CPAC. American “democracy” also is a corpse. The pageantry will continue a bit longer but full-blown autocracy is here now. In many ways it is liberating.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

Great point Jack, but I think it’s more of an Oligarchy rather than an Autocracy. I would welcome an autocracy. At least someone might be held responsible for this sh*tshow. As it is, there’s nobody obviously in charge.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Captain Willard
1 year ago

Yeah, I’ll go oligarchy with autocratic features. It’s always been an oligarchy but the totalitarian aspect is relatively new. Even the illusion of democracy has been cut out.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Captain Willard
1 year ago

IMO, it’s a rather vast Power Structure comprised of FedGov, Big Media, Hollywood, Wall Street/Silicon Valley and academia. They all work in concert to transfigure the perverse and diverse, to subjugate whitey, and to enrich themselves at our expense.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

The question is what happens to Trump voters when Trump is gone? They’ve been half red-pilled. They know something is wrong with the system and with the GOP, but they don’t know where to go or do other than vote for Trump. The establishment is annoyed by Trump voters but is hoping that they fade away after Trump. It may be right. Trump is too vain to build a larger movement and political faction. He wants all of the spotlight. Not that it matters much. Demographics will make all voting irrelevant in the presidential race soon enough. Well, voting in… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

Citizen: My impression of today’s devoted Trump voters is that they remain race-blind civic nationalists, so I would hardly call them half red-pilled. Despite deploring ‘the swamp,’ they still revere the constitution and remain convinced that everything will work out fine if they can just vote the right people into office. I scan the headlines at Gayway pundit and they encapsulate how these people think. They are thrilled by every non-White success story and angrily retort to an L3 (loony leftist lady) who opposes Whites adopting feather Indians – not because of her faux outrage at ‘genocide’ – but because… Read more »

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

the word you are looking for is “mindless”.

george 1
george 1
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

Yes. Go to conservative treehouse sometime and read the Trump voters comments. It’s Civ Nats Unite!!

You are right. They will never learn.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

george 1: I was banned years ago by Gayway pundit and Conservative Treehouse and Amren and . . .

I just skim headlines and occasionally glance at the comments.

wendy forward
wendy forward
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

It’s very depressing isn’t it. Sundance is a brilliant guy and is good on Russia (my test) although buying into the anti-China narrative and not discussing multipolarity. CTH was my first foray into what has now become the DR for which I will forever be grateful but he’s too CivNat as you point out.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

Yeah. Certainly, older Trump voters are hopeless colorblind CivNats. They’ll take that to the grave.

They don’t like the anti-white agenda, but they don’t like it because they feel that any identity politics is wrong. Being colorblind is a part of their self-identity. They won’t let that go.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
1 year ago

“Anti-racism” is not a White value, because the word and concept of “racism” was not invented by Whites.

We are taught foreign values; our culture is no longer ours, but imposed upon us.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

If you wanna get really depressed, then take a gander at this thread over at Normie-Con FreeRepublic, extolling the virtues of the various kneegr0w quarterbacks of the Southeastern Conference and their prospects for being selected in the upcoming (((NFL))) draft…

https://freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/4136037/posts

84 replies and counting…

wendy forward
wendy forward
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

Way back in my NormieCon days I used to be on that site a lot. Then they had huge threads on the Oscars and Grammys so that was the end of that

Mike
Mike
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

I started checking out FreeRepublic in 2016, I was interested in Trump’s candidacy and no other site was anything but never Trump. So, I went there a lot over the years. It was always civnat as could be but sometimes it went over the top. But when Ukraine started it got overrun but bots and paid shills boosting Ukraine 24/7. You could tell it was a fake because they posted and answered each other never deviating from the party line and they would use the same cliches to attack the people trying to get balance and see both sides. Those… Read more »

Compsci is
Compsci is
Reply to  Mike
1 year ago

I hear ya. I was getting several of those Ukrainian fluff channels recommended every week for a time there. Once in a while I’d simply comment “Pure Ukrainian propaganda” and delete recommendation for further viewing. These channels were all similar. Computer voicing of Ukrainian victories of troglodyte Russians and video that had nothing to do with the info posted. Always a few thousand subscriber and a few hundred views. Comment were all “Slava Ukraini” mindless mantra.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  3g4me
1 year ago

My brother still believes that Trump is our savior.

While he acknowledges my observations about the world, tribalism and race realism, he still believes in his gut that a good economy will solve all problems.

All we really need is a meritocracy and to slash some regulations on business. Problem solved. Prosperity solves everything.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 year ago

Not a savior—but anything that can toss a monkey wrench into the system has my vote. (Yes, I will break my cow and vote once more for Trump should I be able to.)

c matt
c matt
Reply to  LineInTheSand
1 year ago

A good economy does not solve cultural problems, at best it simply masks them.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  c matt
1 year ago

On the contrary, a good capitalist economy may very well make cultural matters worse. Just look at how the Left has hijacked capitalism and used it for its anti-white ends.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
1 year ago

Did anyone mention that Nimarata Randhawa is BOTH a Wyman AND an Indian? (Dot, not feather) I feel this is really important to “own the libs”, and should be brought up as much as possible, especially from the candidate’s own lips. It’s both stunning and brave. (Someone should ask her if the British were right to use imperial colonialism to stop the India culture imperative of “sati”, or if it was an example of arrogant western imposition of western values? Is the west doing more of the same with good think by exporting and imposing homosexuality, pederasty, and transgenderism? That… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 year ago

I figured Trump could destroy her by just saying that at least he uses his real name to campaign. What little, faint breeze is in her sails would then go away.

Mr C
Mr C
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
1 year ago

Hoping she is allowed to win and looking forward to the look on normie’s face when she swears in a uses her real name.

The Empire and our special friend will then have heads of state from the subcontinent.

Diversity is our strength!

^100% sarcasm

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Mr C
1 year ago

Portentuous voice:
“…and now, President Rindhawa”

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
1 year ago

Not any more bizarre than “…and now, President Barack Obama.”

Or , “and now, Chief Justice Ketanji.”

We can track America’s descent into hell by the increasing number of Third World and Ebonic names owned by people in positions of great authority.

trackback
1 year ago

[…] The Internal Monologue […]

Barnard
Barnard
1 year ago

I didn’t read far enough and just came to this howler: He predicts that the Supreme Court will rule against the Biden administration. Even then, Pompeo said, the loan amnesty sets another dangerous precedent where the government coddles citizens promising that the state “can save you from yourself.” Yes, millions of 18 year olds all decided to take out massive student loans for college in the last 40 years against the advice of the government, their high schools, and every other leadership entity of society. The especially didn’t encourage kids who were totally unfit to complete college level work to… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

Can’t blame them completely. A large portion of the fault lies with employers. They are the ones demanding a “college” degree for positions that have absolutely no need for them.

Winter
Winter
Reply to  c matt
1 year ago

True. But much of this is because IQ and similar tests are outlawed because some groups are notoriously stupid, er I mean plagued by test bias and institutional racism.

So now young people need pricey degrees to prove they’re smart and capable. But of course college has been dumbed down accordingly even as tuition has skyrocketed. The whole system needs to be destroyed and rebuilt from the ground up.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Winter
1 year ago

By system you mean AINO. It is irretrievably evil and dysfunctional. Everything must go.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  c matt
1 year ago

Which came first, chicken or egg? Employers demand degrees—even when the job does not require anything taught past HS level—because it is a proxy of sorts. The degree signifies an ability to get up daily and sit through any number of mind numbingly boring courses for 5+ years in exchange for a meaningless piece of paper. In short, you’ve shown you are the perfect factory drone. In “The Case Against Education”, Caplin outlines this phenomena in detail. He does admit however, there may be a bit of increase with an advanced degree in numerical ability and literacy—if those courses are… Read more »

RealityRules
RealityRules
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

13 years (in K-12), of getting up daily and sitting through mind-numbing courses isn’t enough to prove you are a drone? After that a score on a standardized test not enough to show who is motivated enough to do the work to get the reward?

Insane.

Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden
Reply to  RealityRules
1 year ago

We forget how much education at all levels has been dumbed down and gutted of its cultural and technical expertise. Starting largely with the Dewey revolution, our children have been taught more and more poorly and the emphasis has shifted to cultural destruction rather than cultural support. A PhD in this era means nothing compared to what it meant before, and even fairly fluffy degrees like English literature demanded a level of scholarship and erudition absent today. Consider the modern PhD candidate and compare to even a modestly intelligent undergraduate of a hundred years ago. Every standard has been ground… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  RealityRules
1 year ago

A statistic that is recent. Here in my burg, the local University (a “top 20” research institution—I kid you not) admits to 40% of its entering students taking one or more remedial classes!

When I was applying, there was no such thing. If you needed remedial classes, you were told to go to Community College and reapply next year. Of course, I applied and enrolled to university in another country, you may remember it— 90% White America.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  RealityRules
1 year ago

The difference between K12 and so-called “higher ed” is that the former is obligatory while the latter is not. “Higher ed” then, in theory, indicates a certain amount of gumption and initiative.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

That’s a good book.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  c matt
1 year ago

That’s because a college degree is a Bonafide Occupational Requirement approved by the Feds, which can be used to screen out minorities without getting sued….

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  pyrrhus
1 year ago

So, of course, the “screen out” function was nullified by giving their occupation troops degrees…

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

Those loans are never going to be paid back. Team R repeatedly steps on it’s own wee-wee by conflating a contractual obligation (loan) with a moral imperative. It’s not; it’s just a contract that went south for the lender and the lendee. Don’t pay a car loan? Fine, the collateral is your car. Don’t pay a house mortgage? Your collateral is your property. Making education an unsecured loan non-dischargeable in bankruptcy was a colossal mistake, and literally did create a class of debt slaves. Team R did this under Bush. They really, really f’d it all up. Not discussed are… Read more »

RealityRules
RealityRules
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 year ago

The issue is taxpayers subsidizing the loss. The cost must fall on the parties to the contract. I think the borrower gets a credit hit, the loan originators take a haircut and the college pays the difference out of its endowment.

The latter is the most important. Make them pay the price. That will also make the donors and Wall St. (who manage the endowments), pay a part of the price.

It won’t happen, but it should.

george 1
george 1
Reply to  RealityRules
1 year ago

Yes. Those big college endowments should be fair game. The kids were defrauded. Harvard alone is said to have a billion dollar endowment.

Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

There is a complication to all of this. Those institutions protect cultural heritage. We are going to have to figure out a way around this problem. Protection of our lives and survival is most important, of course, but cultural survival is more important than people sometime realize. Conquerors typically destroy as much of a culture as they can, even if some of the people are kept alive. We are a sharp contrast to this (note our tendency to preserve the cultural output of those we have displaced or conquered) but we cannot expect loving preservation of the output of our… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

Harvard’s endowment was $40 billion last I checked

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

I bet it’s larger than that. The University of Texas’, too.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

Those endowments are only a portion of the goldmine that is the modern American university.

Once one begins thinking about and examining the income and assets of a typical American university it becomes abundantly clear how each on is able to support such enormous hives of Marxists.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  george 1
1 year ago

Harvard had at the end of 2022, $51B in endowment. Harvard, as well as the other Ivies could afford to charge *no* tuition. However, since they can, they will.

Mow Noname
Mow Noname
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 year ago

Non-discharchability is a major issue.

Obama, however, gets credit for nationalizing the student loan market to “pay” for ObamaCare.

The fact that it is a federal problem is on Barry.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Mow Noname
1 year ago

Obama was also a big proponent of everyone going to college as if that was going to be some magic formula that got everyone into a good paying job. Just his own experience with Michelle should have disabused him of the notion that having a college degree is a mark of intelligence.

ponder Ray
ponder Ray
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 year ago

Here’s a thought–make non payment of student loans enforceable by draft, you don’t pay, you go fight you’crazy’uns..

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 year ago

I would do a deal to cancel all college loans, in return for the Feds cancelling all college subsidies and loan guarantees to the banks who actually make these loans…The loan money would then dry up, and colleges would have to slash their tuitions…

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  pyrrhus
1 year ago

Pyrrhus: the Big University Bailout.

The Banks are the System, the Universities are the System, and the System creates no end of money to defend itself.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  ProZNoV
1 year ago

“It’s just a loan, not an indentured servitude contract.”

Pilgrim, you aren’t getting on that boat we own unless you agree to the terms of the ticket.

You too can have a new life in the Colonies!

Barnard
Barnard
1 year ago

From the RPC article: Pompeo has already warned his own family not to rely on the federal government for their retirement. “When I talk to my son,” he said of the way things stand now, “I tell him, ‘Make sure you have a good job because Social Security is not going to be there for you.’” How do they see this playing out? People pay into Social Security for 40-45 years and get half or less of what they were promised and everyone just accepts it? Maybe they think if they kill enough people during the civil unrest that follows… Read more »

Winter
Winter
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

Funny how that works. For most of my life, I’ve heard that social security won’t be there for me. Oddly enough, I’ve never heard anything about not paying into it.

And why is it that we never “run out of money” for welfare or foreign aid?

Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden
Reply to  Winter
1 year ago

It’s learned helplessness induced by behavioral conditioning.

Wkathman
Wkathman
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

“No one is ever going to accept a lockdown again.” Au contraire. You have way too much faith in your fellow humans. People scare quite easily. The government and media can use fear to coax a majority into accepting nearly anything. Plus, the precedent of quarantining the well has already been established. Therefore, it should be even easier to pull off next time around. The fact that the system called them “lockdowns” — a prison term — and got away with it is all you need to know about the pliability of the dipshit public. But take people’s Social Security… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Wkathman
1 year ago

I want to believe that next time certain states/municipalities will not go along with it. But I am certain that many will. Probably most, population wise.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Wkathman
1 year ago

States and localities in fact did buck FedGov over the lockdowns and told it to FOAD. I imagine that shocked the Regime and is the only reason they ended.

The old wine will have to be poured into new bottles next time, so expect a variation.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Jack Dobson
1 year ago

Don’t know many that actually said FOAD, but a fair amount simply ignored it. Of the population that did comply, a not insignificant portion simply saw it as extra PTO. WFH has been a silver lining of sorts.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

I thought the injections were meant to help manage the Social Security and Medicare burdens?

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

“I tell him, ‘Make sure you have a good job because Social Security is not going to be there for you.’” Admittedly, Congress can screw things up. But the “all or nothing” phrasing wrt SSI is false as I’ve posted countless times before. Beside, SS was *never* intended to pay all retirement expense. No analyst, nor historian, I ever hear or read states that SSI was designed to do more than supplement retirement income to the tune of 30-40%. You are listening to a grifter politician spread FUD for his own political benefit. Scare the old people, get their vote,… Read more »

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

Barnard: “Maybe they think if they kill enough people during the civil unrest that follows the system becomes solvent again.” They sure did kill a bunch of ’em when they locked ’em up all together in COVID-infected nursing homes. What’s fascinating is that the V@xxines of Death don’t seem to have nearly the efficacy when administered to septuagenarians & octogenarians & nonagenarians as when administered to infants & children & young adults. That speaks to the sadism of the Moguls & Oligarchs which are waging this war of attrition against us: They are trying to eradicate precisely the hominids which… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Bourbon
1 year ago

Do we know that the jabs are less lethal in the old folks? Or is it just that strokes and heart attacks and suddenly aggressive cancers don’t look as suspicious in 85 year olds

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
1 year ago

Physical activity seems to play a role in all the sudden coincidences.

There are few at 70 and above doing heavy duty physical activities.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
1 year ago

TWGH: “Physical activity seems to play a role in all the sudden coincidences.” Yeah, that’s been my thinking as well. I’m un-v@xxed, but still I’m betting that I’m chock full of shed-spike-proteins. [I wouldn’t be surprised if all of us “Purebloods” were carrying an enormous load of shed-spike-proteins. You’ve gotta figure that shed-spike-proteins are simply everywhere now.] I used to push myself like crazy in both cardio exercise & carpentry or stonemasonry projects around the house, but I have consciously & intentionally cut way back on how hard I push my body now. These are strange strange times, and dying… Read more »

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

And as if Pompeo’s kid would ever need SS…

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Barnard
1 year ago

As if Pompeo’s son is going to have to rely on Social Security! Ha! These clowns can’t even lie plausibly.

Winter
Winter
1 year ago

Regarding social security, it’s probably safe…until Boomers are gone. As a member of Gen-X, I fully expect to be screwed when it’s my turn to collect. Regardless, I’ll still consider it a kick in the teeth, considering we’ve got plenty of money for foreign invaders and neocon wars, not to mention gibs for people who contribute nothing but crime, squalor, and more replicas of themselves.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Winter
1 year ago

Karl Denniger has run the math on that a couple times and actually once the boomers are gone the math on Social Security starts to kinda-sorta work again. That doesn’t mean it won’t get gutted because at the point the main beneficiaries will be old, underpowered Whites. Medicare has it’s own host of issues but you can note the theme: -SS: Has own tax base, mostly benefits Whites. Always mentioned for cuts. -Medicare: Has it’s own tax base, mostly benefits Whites and BigMed corps. Often mentioned for cuts. -Medicaid: A budget disaster with no revenue stream, mostly benefits non-Whites and… Read more »

mmack
mmack
Reply to  Winter
1 year ago

As a fellow Xer I suspect what will happen is the age to receive “Full Benefits” will be raised to 70 or 72, and eventually to 75.

M’Lady is a bit older than me and recently got her SS Statement. For now, her age for receiving full benefits is 67. I suspect within a few years our cohort will be looking at a “needed adjustment” to 70.

karl von hungus
karl von hungus
Reply to  mmack
1 year ago

don’t hold out for full benes, start now. time is precious, the extra few shekels each month are not.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  mmack
1 year ago

When they last “fixed” SSI, the age raise did not affect anyone within a decade or more until retirement. They are never going to get away with telling a 60 yo they now need to wait to 70. I remember I was 30 or so, and was excluded.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Compsci
1 year ago

That was then, and in a different country. Now they feel free to inflict anything on you without fear of consequences in this here Fortified Democracy. Ain’t it great?

David Wright
Member
1 year ago

CPAC seems like the trade shows I have attended except not much in freebies. I wonder if Daily Wire had any candy bars for purchase because i understand online orders take a few weeks. I assume the line is too long at the booth where you can have your photo taken with Tim Scott or Candice Owens.

mmack
mmack
Reply to  David Wright
1 year ago

Man, sounds like you can’t even get a decent t-shirt or swag bag. 😔

David Wright
Member
Reply to  mmack
1 year ago

Maybe a Mike Pompeo pen.

Severian
1 year ago

I’m calling it right now: 2024 is the year we start to see the Fortification for Democracy start running in the Republicans’ favor. The “two party system” will never die, since everyone in Washington is very good friends and the grift is just too good to give up (think of all the consultants and rent seekers and whatnot that would be put out of work if the Republican Party officially went away). So they have to maintain the kabuki that elections matter, since after all there are only so many Persian billionaires to underwrite “conservative” grifting operations like the Bulwark.… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

“Now we could do it with conventional weapons, but that could take years and cost millions of lives. No, I think we have to go all out. I think that this situation absolutely requires a really futile and stupid gesture be done on somebody’s part!”
“We’re just the guys to do it!”

Severian
Reply to  Pickle Rick
1 year ago

Don’t you wish John Blutarsky really WAS a Senator? He’d be the smartest, soberest, most responsible man in Congress…. by a long shot.

mmack
mmack
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

Hell’s Bells, I’d vote for Governor Lepetomane if he ran for the Senate.

“Holy underwear! Sheriff murdered! Innocent women and children blown to bits! We have to protect our phoney baloney jobs here, gentlemen! We must do something about this immediately! Immediately! Immediately! Harrumph! Harrumph! Harrumph!”

Heck, I’d vote for Hedly Lamarr right about now.

mmack
mmack
Reply to  mmack
1 year ago

Sorry, it’s Hedley. 😏

ponder Ray
ponder Ray
Reply to  mmack
1 year ago

“watch me pull a rabbit out of my underpants”

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

Severian: “Don’t you wish John Blutarsky really WAS a Senator?”

Weird.

Just yesterday, I was thinking about the epic 1978 John Vernon* rant, “Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son,” and it dawned on me how much more intelligent a Bluto Blutarsky was than a braindead John Fetterman or a braindead Tater Joe Paedophile O’Biden.

============

*In 1976, John Vernon had played the role of “Fletcher” in The Outlaw Josey Wales.

Those are two of the greatest supporting actor roles in the entire history of cinema.

According to Wikipedia, Vernon was Armenian.

Go figure.

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

The “two party system” will never die, since everyone in Washington is very good friends and the grift is just too good to give up

That’s the smart move, so I’ll take the “under” on that bet…

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Severian
1 year ago

It’s too important that Republicans be seen to lose again in ’24, preferably again via blatant cheat. Their voters have to be humiliated without relief. Democracy must *mean* that normal people have no say and get nothing, ever. Elections must *mean* the humiliation of disobedient citizens. Young Democrats have this understanding. The average man doesn’t yet. His prior conditioning is too strong.

Liz Cheney next time.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Hemid
1 year ago

Normie glories in his martyrdom.

He’s sacrificing to right the wrongs! He’s atoning for sins, shouldering the burden of saving the world! Take up this cross, o noble white wo-man!