Political Onanism

Note: Behind the green door is a post about the classic film Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, a film I did not like, a post about code-switching and the Sunday podcast which remains a morning edition for now. Subscribe here or here.


Carl Schmitt famously said that “the political is reducible to the existential distinction between friend and enemy.” The shorthand you hear in dissident circles is that politics is about friends and enemies. You can see this in your own life when it comes to some issue with which you have been on the opposite side of a friend. That person may now be a former friend if the issue was important at the time. It is why families often avoid talking about politics during the holidays.

A practical aspect of this reality is that political activism should always seek to harm the opponent and boost your side. An action that makes the other side look bad is good activism and it is even better activism if it also makes you look good. Of course, bad activism is that which boosts the enemy and harms you. The Charlottesville rally in 2018 turned out to be disastrous activism for the alt-right. It rallied their enemies and gutted their support in the broader community.

Life is not always so cut and dried. Generational politics, for example, often feels like good politics to the people doing it. Whether it is young people moaning about old people having had it easy or old people moaning about young people having it easy, the people doing it always feel good about it. A Nick Fuentes feels like a hero when he makes fun of adults for being adults. He thinks it is good politics because it brings in money and gets his young fans excited.

Of course, this goes both ways. Matt Walsh from the Daily Wire often makes fun of Zoomers for being whiny and soft. Recently, a young girl posted a video of herself crying about having to work forty hours a week and still not having money to live like she did in college so Matt Walsh made sport of her. The young people who always complain about the boomers then piled in to tell him he was a horrible person for not empathizing with the young girls in the video.

At a personal level, generational politics is good as it makes money for the people doing it, but at another level it is bad for their overall political mission. The only people engaged in generational politics are white people who are either in white identity politics or aligned with it. Nick Fuentes casts himself as a white identitarian, but he spends a lot of time mocking white people. Matt Walsh opposes antiwhite politics, but like Nick Fuentes, he spends most of his time attacking white people.

You will note that the people who control the culture are fine with this sort of politics, despite it coming from people they hate. In popular culture you will never see a young black guy calling his grandfather a boomer. You will not see an old Jewish guy laughing at his grandson’s student loan debt. For the people who control the centers of cultural production, generational politics is only for white people. It is one part of their antiwhite pogroms that have come to define popular culture.

Generational politics is not politics at all but a form of political onanism. It is not only a fruitless activity, but it also discourages the sort of politics that could bear fruit. It is no different from the war of the sexes business, where feminists and anti-feminists seek to pit white males against white females. Whatever the truth of the mutual critiques, it is not an activity that can lead to anything other than temporary ecstasy. It is a form of politics that can never lead to good activism or any activism.

For example, look at the recent trend of attacking Reagan. Critics correctly note that he signed off on immigration reform. He also ushered in economic reforms that now feel like bad ideas, especially for young people. This critique of Regan usually ends with angry shouting at boomers for having enjoyed the good times that followed the reforms of that period. The boomers are bad people for having enjoyed a good stock market and low interest rates over the last forty years.

Let us assume that Reagan and his supporters were evil people who knew what they were doing would harm their grandchildren and great grandchildren. Let us also pretend that the boomers all agreed it would wreck the country for their children and grandchildren who they would live to see. Even if you could prove this, what would be the point of doing it? The most you get from it is the momentary satisfaction of shaking your first at an imaginary version of the past.

The reason to care about the past is to understand how you reached the present and to have some sense of what comes next. Understanding the politics around the Reagan era immigration policies is about understanding the nature of the people behind the just proposed immigration reform bill in the senate. Chuck Schumer put that together because he hates you and he has always hated you. There is no talking him and his allies out of hating you. He is the forever enemy.

There you see the problem with generational politics. The young people trembling with anger over the thought of Ronald Reagan are focusing on their grandparents rather than the people who finked on their grandparents, the same people who are now trying to close the door on America, by opening up the borders. It is a politics that turns old friends into imaginary enemies and enemies into fans cheering the people attacking one another in the arena of generational politics.


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Vxxc
Vxxc
5 months ago

Politics is Power. That’s it. Like electricity. Carl Schmidt is Weimar then the Nazis, he’s also German. Nothing like us. Friend/Enemy is for women and schoolchildren. Not war or politics. Charlottesville; if the minor indeed trivial setback of Charlottesville has you giving up, stop showing up. Politics isn’t for you. As noted in the post they hate White people, so we might as well be feared. Black it up a little. Blacks have some measure of political power and leeway, even respect in America- why? Fear. Blacks do Charlottesville daily, although usually with shooting. They are useless for anything else,… Read more »

Intelligent Dasein
Intelligent Dasein
Member
5 months ago

The reason why only white people have anything that could be called “generational politics” is because generational politics is a subset of ideological politics (e.g. the Boomers draw the ire of many because they are broadly associated with certain ideological trends) and white people are the only ones currently concerned with ideological politics at all. Minorities are basically apolitical in that sense; they only engage with the political process if they can get something out of it, not to advance a belief or a style of life. This is not going to change for the foreseeable future, so in order… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Intelligent Dasein
5 months ago

One quibble. One need not win the ideological battle. One need only win the moral battle. Even commies fight for good over evil, though they misunderstand the concept of good/evil.

Tired Citizen
Tired Citizen
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

Steve

Took the words right out of my mouth here. It is the moral argument that wins all. This is why people like Sailer and most conservatives are retards. You can show a leftist pages of charts, graphs, statistics and present all of the facts and it won’t do a damned thing. They’re not interested in that. Showing that you are a good person by kissing the feet of kangz and kweens and excusing their barbaric, violent and destructive behavior is what wins the day. Don’t do this and you will risk losing your livelihood and/or your freedom.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Intelligent Dasein
5 months ago

Whites used to be ideological. I’m not so sure they still are. What has become a tribal divide between whites doesn’t seem to me to have very much to do with ideology anymore.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Intelligent Dasein
5 months ago

There’s no end to argument. It goes back and forth until you don’t know if reality is real. At some point you have to quit it.

Yman
Yman
5 months ago

At this point, no one gonna stop non-white legally looting white people
Nazis would laugh off at their graveyard, if they rule over you at least you still have your women and better life
Now all of your pretty women and wealth taken over by Shlomo and action Jackson

Good riddance, White America

Gideon
Gideon
5 months ago

Boomers (and I’m not talking about any one age cohort here—though there are examples enough therein—but a mindset) are a lot like third-generation family business owners. They’ve grown up in relative prosperity, but have no real notion of what that entailed. For instance, the congressmen who voted on the 1924 Immigration Act may well have experienced the Reconstruction Era. They had few illusions about race and got that they weren’t very proficient at governing people from Sicily or the Pale of Settlement. Those who voted on the 1965 Act, on the other hand, were fresh from the experience of WW… Read more »

Gespenst
Gespenst
Reply to  Gideon
5 months ago

There goes one of them again. Did you not read about the uselessness of saying that very stuff?

Jaysus wept

usNthem
usNthem
5 months ago

It’s really getting to the point where Whites just need to band together regardless of generation or language – we’re all the damn target now and we’d better freaking come to that realization and take appropriate measures.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  usNthem
5 months ago

Agree. They hate us all. They don’t distinguish between us. Maybe we shouldn’t either.

RealityRules
RealityRules
5 months ago

This is an excellent point. We need people out in front in our movement who are mature. Blaming Dad or blaming Junior is not getting us anywhere. That video of Paul Krugman saying that in the end the power that white Americans have is going to go away and then smiling demonically afterward is the issue. Someone chose the uniforms and the teams. Those someones hold the power to have made that choice. We must do the same. We can and should criticize our own and more importantly mitigate, disempower and disown the stupid as much as we can. As… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  RealityRules
5 months ago

“I sense some good memes of Fuentes being a clown and blaming Dad while Krugman and Mayorkas admire the borders they have burnt to nothing.”

And this is the key point. Depending upon your viewpoint, the Boomers or the Zoomers may be idiots or snowflakes, but people like Krugman and Mayorkas are mortal enemies. Avoid scattering your forces and concentrate on focusing your fire where it belongs. That’s the key.

NeoSpartan
NeoSpartan
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

Fuentes seems to be a sort of man-child who has never kissed a girl because he is either asexual or gay. Seen his show a few times. He has some good takes and some terrible ones. Definitely lacks maturity. I think Z is correct that the reason he is somewhat tolerated by the system is because his personality is too flawed for him to be seen as a viable threat. Kept around to send seekers into a blind alley by packaging good ideas together with futile ones. Examples: Society could use more religion, but not packed together with blind adherence… Read more »

Frip
Member
Reply to  NeoSpartan
5 months ago

“Fuentes is somewhat tolerated by the system is because his personality is too flawed for him to be seen as a viable threat.”

If he was “somewhat tolerated by the system” they’d demonetize his YouTube account. Instead they banned him from YouTube and took away his right to fly.

“And he seems to encourage sectarian bickering between prots and catholics. Extremely detrimental.”

Oh brother. It’s called humor.

Migapede
Migapede
Reply to  Frip
5 months ago

So you’re saying he was retarded ironically? That’s still being retarded.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  RealityRules
5 months ago

This whole Rodney King “can’t we all just get along” stuff is what’s wrong with this whole topic. NO, as a matter of fact we can’t. Now what? There is not vision of the future because there isn’t even a future in this current paradigm. The current paradigm is nesting Boomer sitting there on their Medicare saying “can’t we all just get along” like todays Z post, while the younger, under 35 people are saying “maybe we can do communism right the second time around. Maybe with a racial twist.” The only thing future generations will be envisioning is trying… Read more »

NeoSpartan
NeoSpartan
Reply to  JR Wirth
5 months ago

If there is a place where our people might not be a scapegoated underclass in 20 years it’s Ireland I think. Already has largely happened in the good old USA. Once thought Poland, but they have been too sheltered. Surviving will require having learned hard lessons, the doom just hasn’t hit Poland yet. We will see how they react when it does. If anyone is truly to bear the brunt of the blame however(other than the obvious culprits, but that’s a given, demons will do demonic things, it’s their nature), it’s the men who once actually did have the power… Read more »

Brandon Laskow
Brandon Laskow
Reply to  NeoSpartan
5 months ago

Ireland’s not looking that great these days. Their “Taoiseach” (Prime Minister) is a half-Indian fudgepacker. They’ve been importing foreigners by the droves and there was that incident a few months ago where some Middle Easterner went stabby on natives in Dublin, if I have it right. And when there was a national outcry TPTB labeled protestors as “Extreme right”, “xenophobes”, all the usual.

NeoSpartan
NeoSpartan
Reply to  Brandon Laskow
5 months ago

US media ignoring it, because of course they are. But tens of thousands marched against immigration today there. Not against “Green energy” or “Pension reform” or any of the other safe for the system strawmen that take the focus away from the root cause of our disenfranchisement.

Remember, Unions died in Detroit and elsewhere because they brought the blacks in and eroded solidarity though racial disharmony. Once, the manufacturing leader of the world, in a few decades turned into a joke.

Also, dozens of “refugee centers” have burned down. The Irish have balls.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  RealityRules
5 months ago

RealityRules: “That video of Paul Krugman saying that in the end the power that white Americans have is going to go away and then smiling demonically afterward is the issue.”

URL?!?!?

Thanks in advance.

RealityRules
RealityRules
Reply to  Bourbon
5 months ago

https://rumble.com/v3e6cdg-paul-kroger-craziness-coming-from-rural-white-americans-losing-their-countr.html

There are others that last a bit longer where you can see him give a demonic smile after he finishes.

Fakeemail
Fakeemail
5 months ago

People could and did forsee this at the time.

Reagan won 49 states on the backs of patriotic white people. He was the implicit and explicit whote vote. He had no legitimate business offering ANY amnesty whatsoever anymore than trump had business taking advice from that big asset whore to do a platinum plan.

3g4me
3g4me
5 months ago

Zman, your point that intergenerational politics is not ‘helpful’ to the White nationalist cause is well taken . . . BUT. I see an enormous amount of butthurt in this thread, on both sides. So as part of a mid/later boomer couple (end of ’58/beginning of ’61) and a parent of a Millennial and a Gen Z son, I would argue I do see and understand and sympathize – again, with both sides. No, not all boomers. And not all millennials, and not all silents. But we all have our exceptions and personal experiences. I would have hoped that the… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

“I would have hoped that the IKAGO and NAXALT fallacies would have been widely understood here sufficiently to prevent their use in defending one or blaming another generation…” No argument on your basic premise, 3g4me. However, since one gratuitous assertion (argument?)—as in IKAGO or NAXALT—is logically and sufficiently refuted by another gratuitous assertion, there is almost an irresistible temptation to engage in such fruitless exchange. I am guilty myself of such, but do attempt to add a bit more to support my assertions and hopefully get folk to think about their intergenerational bias. There is no shortage of Boomers reading… Read more »

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

“IKAGO” == ?????

Scot Irish
Scot Irish
Reply to  Bourbon
5 months ago

I Know A Good One

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Scot Irish
5 months ago

Thanks!

[ERROR: Your comment was too short. Please go back and try your comment again.]

Thanks again!!

Wiffle
Wiffle
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

Well said. Yes, of course generational discussions as politics are often not helpful. Yes, they derisive On the other hand, everyone knows what it means when they are called a Boomer, particularly the Boomers themselves. It appears that generational realities extends over borders as well. If I am to be a race realist, then generational realist is part of the package. And yes , the old Jew is calling his grandson whiny about student loan debt. Yes, if the black knows his grandfather, he’s probably slinging around “Boomer” at him because even his young adult life was more straightforward/prosperous. Generational… Read more »

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Wiffle
5 months ago

Wiffle: “if the black knows his grandfather”

That is an absolutely fascinating question.

How many kneegr0w men know the full names of both their father & their father’s father?

My guess would be that it’s very likely to be in the single digits, percentage wise.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

Seriously, no one actually hates EVERYONE in a generation. But every generation has obnoxious ideological truth regimes (credit Academic Agent) and it is worthwhile to point those out so people can be engaged with in a productive manner. Like you just aren’t going to convince any olds that mustache man did nothing wrong because their identity is centered around WW2 America the good guys.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Ploppy
5 months ago

I don’t think the White race, in and of itself, ever really had “obnoxious ideological truth regimes”.

“Obnoxious ideological truth regimes” are the hallmark of the Bronze Age Death Cult.

What the White race didn’t realize [until relatively recently] was the capacity for mesmerizability & hypnotizability amongst a significant portion of the White race, when subjected to the cultural poisoning courtesy of the Bronze Age Death Cult.

DaBears
DaBears
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

Many of the generational political and other polls I review just happen to exclude GenX. They jump from Boomer to Millennial in their survey. I can appreciate that some in my generation, X, are somewhat annoyed by this phenomenon and similar ones.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  DaBears
5 months ago

They typically get shit on for being cynically uninvolved. Hipsterism too, although that may be more Xennial because i sure remember those assholes from college.

rasqball
rasqball
Reply to  DaBears
5 months ago

We Gen X are a much smaller cohort than B’s or M’s. I think it’s that simple.

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

The downvotes are very telling. It is incredibly effeminate behavior and not at all surprising. Getting your back up because you take general observations personally is snowflake AF and Boomers and Zoomers seem to be the most susceptible. Oops! There I go generalizing again. Awaiting the glorious downvotes. My only schadenfreude is that the Boomers will be smothered to death during the day of the pillow when Shaneequa and Okimbe have finally had enough of their endless demands and whining. And the Zoomers will be a hated minority in their own country having helped to erect the prison and forge… Read more »

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Apex Predator
5 months ago

I see a lot of the “someday I’ll be dead then you’ll be sorry you were mean to me” type responses.

NeoSpartan
NeoSpartan
Reply to  Apex Predator
5 months ago

Children are ignorant retards with no life experience.

Zoomers are children, children decide nothing they are just along for the ride. I don’t take joy.

Take away your car and force you to live in a mandatory facility with apes and you will get beaten too, you wouldn’t be asked or allowed to call the apes apes either.

You really should think a bit more before you speak.

Cpt Tripps
Cpt Tripps
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

Let’s hear more about your book, I expect a few people are interested
Thanks

YMAN
YMAN
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

I always knew boomer white thinks blacks are cool which is not

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

Outstanding comment. I can get angry at the boomers. But then I remember that it isn’t all boomers. And that we are all entering dangerous territory. There are serious people who literally want a world without Whites. Stopping them supersedes everything else. Including your and everyone else’s feelings

NeoSpartan
NeoSpartan
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

Having read many of the commenters here and contrasted them with those of other forums… I don’t think that it is actually too big of a problem here. Most here to seem to have a reasoning ability within the top 10% of the general at least. Probably more like 5%

Good book btw, you should write more of them 🙂

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  NeoSpartan
5 months ago

NeoSpartan: Thank you. I can definitely be overly loquacious, at times. Need to edit more before I hit post comment. And I shall assume that others, like you, understood my ‘book’ reference was to my prolixity (lovely word – you can tell I’m was an English major).

Justinian
Justinian
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

And why you have done this to your kids?

bgc
bgc
5 months ago

Well said!

Resentment is a self-perpetuating and worsening misery, indeed a psychological cancer, for whoever nurtures it – as well as being a sin.

Because it is primarily self-harming, it does not matter who is being resented or whether they “deserve” it.

(This is most obvious when the object of resentment is dead, or even imaginary!)

As you imply: resentment is the territory of The Left: where would the Left be without class, sex, sexuality, national and race resentments?

Adding generational resentment to the mix is Just More Leftism.

Jersey Mike’s
Jersey Mike’s
Reply to  bgc
5 months ago

“ Resentment is a self-perpetuating and worsening misery, indeed a psychological cancer, for whoever nurtures it – as well as being a sin.” I get irritated when people pronounce moral judgments on emotions that are experienced throughout all of humanity to some degree. Yes, there are emotions that are far more susceptible to miss-use than others. However these emotions are present for some reason related to our survival and are not there because of “sinful nature” One could hypothesize that resentment protects the mind against the kind of stupid, naive, trusting, idealism that lead to our current state of affairs.… Read more »

Wiffle
Wiffle
Reply to  bgc
5 months ago

Speaking in broad strokes, the Boomer generation as a whole does not know what’s like to despair. There are many other sins of that generation, but as whole it’s optimistic and carefree viewpoint on the future, richly reward from young adulthood, doesn’t even understand the emotion. Thus when confronted with angry voices sometime generations deep, there is simply confusion and distress. Envy/resentment, as you rightly point is a sin, and one that Boomers understand. But on the whole, I think the reasonable frustrations of following generations do not involve envy, but are coming out of something like despair. Despair is… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Wiffle
5 months ago

…the Boomer generation as a whole does not know what’s like to despair…

So that’s why the 75-84 age range has the second highest suicide rate of any 10 year age group, exceeded only by the 85+.

I was wondering. A life with out despair. Makes sense.

R2RV
R2RV
5 months ago

IMO, I see a lot of whining like you describe (not just in politics) a bit like the admission that you don’t have a solution. The same that our position on the right can’t just be an “anti” position. We must formulate, articulate, and execute a “pro” identity and strategy.

Robert Moffett
Robert Moffett
5 months ago

I think it’s good that people are talking about Reagan and his amnesty. From what I remember Reagan was told his amnesty would only be for 300,000 illegal aliens. Also, his bill had enforcement provisions that would prevent future illegal immigration that were conveniently removed the day before the bill was passed. I have always wondered why no one has put together the names of the people responsible for removing the enforcement provisions from that legislation. Also, it would be convenient for people to know why the 300,000 illegal aliens turned into almost 3 million who got amnesty. This was… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Robert Moffett
5 months ago

It’s baffling that to this day, Civnat G. Normiecon continues to believe it’s possible to negotiate with leftists as if they are good faith actors. Perhaps Reagan also should have known better.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

Yes. The Reagan amnesty betrayal happened because the republicans believed that they were negotiating in good faith with people who wanted the same outcomes that they did, like two people arguing about the best route to drive to an agreed upon destination. While the amnesty betrayal is probably not the first example, it is a monumental example of republicans negotiating in naïve good faith with people who hate them and want to dispossess them. 40 years later and most white republicans still don’t understand that they are on the losing end of a fight to the death. “My esteemed colleague… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

Exactly. I’ve given passes to those people in the past, but that was probably because I was not old enough or smart enough to understand that they “should have known better”! In any event, what’s done is done. I no longer give passes. Lucy and the football cartoons are only funny because Charley is so damn stupid.

Anyone who doesn’t understand the stakes involved in the struggle deserves no forgiveness.

Guest
Guest
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

It’s hard to comprehend in 2024, but in the 1980s there were many Democrats who were modestly liberal in the sense of that time, but were not traitors hell bent on the destruction of America. Representative Mazolli, one of the authors of the 1986 bill, was one of them. These moderate Democrats were purged from the party beginning in the Clinton era, but it really kicked in during the Obama purges. There are no moderate Democrats left. It was not so much that the Act itself was flawed, but that the Democratic party undermined its enforcement provisions at every turn… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Guest
5 months ago

“Reagan failed to foresee that the Democratic party would come under the influence of, and eventually be captured by, Marxists.”

I simply cannot respect someone who thinks that we are battling Marxists.

Dude, no one wants the proletariat to own the means of production.

You are afraid to say ANTI-WHITE!

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

Line: A sure sign that the writer is over 50 is the incessant use of ‘marxists’ and ‘communists.’ It’s the old binary, ideological mindset. We now live in an age of racial identity, and they keep viewing it through an ideological lens.

I may be old, but I’m not that stupid.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

There is a part of Marx that’s still represented among today’s left/”left.” It showed most clearly in his support for the American civil war.

He cheered it not because it would end slavery or establish a more communism-susceptible industrial mega-state, but because it would impoverish Southern white farm workers and small holders—not to awaken their consciousness and bring about a revolution, as he’d claim in other contexts, but just to injure and oppress them. He relished it almost sexually.

There’s a very clear echo of that today in NATO fans’ rhetoric about Russians. Calling it “Marxism” is a bit obfuscatory.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

Yep, Leftists are *not* Marxists. If they only were. Leftists are a very special type of evil. Anti-White just being at the top of the list. In there I might differ from LITS, but he comes from an atheistic perspective, I from the other camp. And yet, as he states, we both would be happy to “have each other’s backs.”

We need a bit more of that philosophy in this group.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

This was a notable tic among Brits during the Summer of Floyd and beyond. When discussing the ritual of taking a knee before a soccer match, those opposed were always very, very careful to say they opposed the “Marxist BLM organization” and that’s why they didn’t support taking a knee. It was almost impossible, even with the anonymity of the internet, to find someone saying, “I decry taking a knee because it’s an obvious gesture of white subservience to blacks.

Pozymandias
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

This is more a response to 3g4me but since there’s no “reply” button for her post I’m doing it here. On the “Marxist” rhetoric – I think it’s more a case of Marxism having evolved into something that doesn’t look much like what it was in the 19th century or the Russian Revolution. The essence of the thing, though, is still redistribution of wealth and status. The old Marxism didn’t give much thought to non-Whites so it was class based. Multi-racial Marxism emphasizes racial disparities. The people embracing these ideas, then or now, always assume that *they* will get to… Read more »

Guest
Guest
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

You are mistaken because your thinking is one-dimensional. The anti-white bias of the Democratic party is a relatively new thing. The Clintons were not anti-white. They definitely were neo-Marxists. Marxism is, and has always been, about controlling the means of production in service of the party. In the early 1900s this was accomplished by explicitly taking over the factories, farms, etc. under force of arms. The fall of the Soviet Union demonstrated this technique had a limited shelf life. In the late 1900s and 2000s the means of production are controlled by controlling access to capital. In the Clinton era… Read more »

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

Nice response, Guest. I appreciate your thoughtfulness and civility and will try to recirprocate. I’ll agree with you as far as I can. Before WW2, the democrats were ideologically committed to helping the little guy. You can call this “Marxism” if you want but I just see it as most of the people in the USA saying that they didn’t want to be serfs. I don’t mind if we see these things differently However, after WW2 things changed to anti-whiteness, and I will leave it as an exercise to the reader to figure why. I’ll agree with you that Clinton… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  LineInTheSand
5 months ago

After Clinton, there was no race-blind socialism, only anti-whiteness, and that is what we currently face. Not Marxism. I upvoted your last response, @LitS, because you are spot on with everything except your very last sentence. As @Pozymandius explains, modern Marxism is not the Marxism of the late 19th century. The concept has evolved as classical Marxism was proven flawed. Modern Marxism is much closer to Mussolini’s definition of fascism, corporatism to use the closest translation to the term he used. If you hold current American society and Mussolini fascism up to the light, you won’t see much difference, apart… Read more »

Fakeemail
Fakeemail
Reply to  Guest
5 months ago

People could and did forsee this at the time.

Reagan won 49 states on the backs of patriotic white people. He was the implicit and explicit whote vote. He had no legitimate business offering ANY amnesty whatsoever anymore than trump had business taking advice from that big asset whore to do a platinum plan.

Reziac
Reziac
Reply to  Robert Moffett
5 months ago

It turned into 3 million because the Democrats reneged on their half of the deal. Reagan later said this was the last time he ever trusted the Democrats. This should be a lesson to us. No matter what “good” provisions are in a Democrat-pushed bill, or in a bill that requires subsequent cooperation from Democrats, they will find a way to screw us with it. Now someone will whine about Trump’s DACA proposal, about how it would have legalized umpty-zillion illegals. Well, I read the thing, and…. it had very strict provisions. The prospective DACA recipient could not have so… Read more »

Oswald Spengler
Oswald Spengler
Reply to  Reziac
5 months ago

Democrats always renege on their side of a bargain. For another example, remember the 1990 budget deal, when George H.W. Bush (“Read my lips, no new taxes!”) agreed to raise taxes in return for spending cuts by the Democrats to balance the Federal budget. Bush raised taxes and the Democrats just kept right on spending anyway.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Oswald Spengler
5 months ago

How dare you diss on Democrats. There is nothing more American than reneging on a deal!

KGB
KGB
Reply to  c matt
5 months ago

Hence the term “Indian Giver”.

My Comment
My Comment
5 months ago

Boomer hate is just a sign of how feminized the culture has become even among those who condemn the feminization. It is emotional without regard to overall facts and the Big picture. It is very personal.

Women always need someone to blame for their problems. Since they want to speak to the powerful it is never the powerful they blame.

My father lived through the Great Depression (when he was homeless) and WW2. He never whined about older generations or wanted his elders to die in spite of his having a hard youth and tough early middle age.

Women whine

Reziac
Reziac
Reply to  My Comment
5 months ago

That is an astonishing point, and I think you are absolutely correct. Oh, people have always complained about “old fogeys” and “kids these days” but nothing like we hear today. Never did we wish them all dead, as I’ve seen repeatedly expressed in recent years.

My Comment
My Comment
Reply to  Reziac
5 months ago

There is a myth that the US was a whitetopia before boomers. Yes it was more white but life for most was harder than it is now. The 50s were an anomaly.

Most boomers were working class, at least they grew up that way.

I am curious to find out what what some laid off factory worker in Ohio who became a welder or truck driver should have done differently so younger people now can have better lives. Vote harder? Because we did know voting works.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  My Comment
5 months ago

Depends what you mean by “harder.” There’s little harder than having African apes crammed down your throat by every waking moment, and nobody had to deal with any of that before the late 60s at the earliest. In other words, cultural misery can be worse than economic misery, and I ought to know because I’ve experienced both.

My Comment
My Comment
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

And what was that working class man supposed to have done about that?

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

“And what was that working class man supposed to have done about that?” Killed more hippies. As they went on to basically rule the world. The ones screeching the loudest about “Da Man” were the sons & daughters of “Da Man” the rich and privileged whose feet had never touched the earth and had never known a day of hard work in their lives. The useful idiot Zoomers screeching today and holding up BLM and LBGTQ signs are their children & grandchildren. Same sickness and myopia, different generation. The offspring of the working class man are now cored out husks.… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

@Apex Q: …what some laid off factory worker in Ohio who became a welder or truck driver should have done differently… A: Killed more hippies. Dunno. What did the hippies ever do to me? It was the politicians and bureaucrats who listened to the idiots and put us where we are. Somewhere along the line, people got the idea hippies should be taken seriously instead of just “seen and not heard.” Reiner’s Meathead and Struther’s Gloria were and still are morons. I know I didn’t have any opinions worth considering back when I was in my early 20s. I know… Read more »

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  My Comment
5 months ago

But they have been “voting harder” to this very day. Ironically the older they are the harder they vote. Sitting there watching (insert Fox News host) telling them what they want to hear. You condemn your own age group.

Never say “my father went through WW2.” You didn’t. You don’t get good graces from having a father who had seen sh- t.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  JR Wirth
5 months ago

Aye. And that goes double to those who traffic in being the “descendant of concentration camp survivors”.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  JR Wirth
5 months ago

And triple for those who grew up in a house with two kitchens, and never knew where their next meal was coming from.

Jersey Mike’s
Jersey Mike’s
Reply to  My Comment
5 months ago

“ I am curious to find out what what some laid off factory worker in Ohio who became a welder or truck driver should have done differently so younger people now can have better lives.” For starters they could have avoided constantly counter-signaling people who advocated for more far-sweeping radical solutions. Your typical Joe Blow worker may not have much real power, but they mostly bought into the system and propagated the standard egalitarian cultural memes that got us here. Or do you believe that an individual member of a mob is blameless because he was just going along with… Read more »

dr_mantis_tobbogan_MD
Member
5 months ago

My parents are Boomers and they’re fine folks. So are my in-laws, who survived communism and a civil war in their country. I never lacked for food or love. My parents didn’t spare the rod when it came to disciplining my sister or I, but we always were loved. My Dad worked lots of overtime at the chemical plant to ensure we had the things we needed. We weren’t rich, but hell if my Dad would’ve let us suffer for the necessities of life. I never had a basketball game, be it in CYO, high school or college, that my… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  dr_mantis_tobbogan_MD
5 months ago

One anecdote from the Reagan years says it all. Supposedly Reagan and the speaker of the House, Tip O’Neill, would meet regularly in the Capital lounge to drink hard liquor and discuss political matters of interest. The discussion was less upon goals, that the path towards those goals.

Those days are dead and gone with the decline of the White race and the emergence of a racially mixed populace. Now it a battle over the spoils of a once great country. No option but to win (or lose) remains.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

Reagan keeps popping up in this topic. I don’t understand why. Politicians are merely the outcroppings of their eras. Reagan, in dogsh-t brown suit and corpse makeup was just a part of his era. An old man in a new world. Did he care about what the next 40 years would be like? He was already 75. Does Biden care about what 2075 will be like?

KGB
KGB
Reply to  JR Wirth
5 months ago

If you read or listen to his speeches, Reagan was very much fixated on the world he would leave behind. Watch his 1976 Republican Convention speech for a perfect example.

And yes, he screwed up, with a lot of “help” from the left, the 1986 amnesty. But continually pointing that out is kind of the mirror image of the NAXALT or IKAGO arguments.

Ploppy
Ploppy
5 months ago

Going completely against the thesis of today’s post I want to mention something I saw on the idiot box last night that was peak boomer: they were doing a news segment to try and warn the diaper-clad remainders of their rapidly expiring audience about romance scams on the internet machine their grandson Jimmy set up for them. So the human element they put in to make the story relatable is this dumb boomer that somehow manages to get suckered into sending 500k to a pajeet running a bitcoin scam pretending to be a young Chinese woman that messaged him on… Read more »

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Ploppy
5 months ago

It’s called the hog butchering scam by the scammers. Speaking of food, the boomers are just the leading edge of the obesity epidemic in America. We’re all under threat from metabolic syndrome, either directly or indirectly from harm to family members. Big Ag and Big Pharma want you kept in the dark on this.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Tom K
5 months ago

I mean even if it was a beautiful woman rubbing her giant tits in my face in person if she started asking me about an investment scheme that would be one hell of a red flag. Doing it for a couple pictures of a Chinese model is just straight up retarded.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ploppy
5 months ago

This might be a bridge too far. I’ve seen this scam pulled on others of my generation. Folks, people get old, brains *decline*. Do you blame a Boomer when he trips and breaks his hip? Cognitive decline hits many of us and it’s scary, but the decline is often emotional, subtle, and judgmental—something along the line of a young child accepting candy from a stranger. Such con artists existed in the generations before Boomers and will after the Boomers are gone. Women fall for young (foreign) lovers professing their undying affections as well. Loneliness is a horror and drives people… Read more »

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

I should clarify that this guy was like in his 60s not poo pants age. He still should have been expected to know better.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

@Ploppy, maybe. My IT guy tells me every couple days about one of the employees clicking on obvious phishing scams. Do boomers do it more often? Not that I can tell. If anything, my Xer employees are the more gullible. Maybe from being raised in a world where people were still expected to be “nice”, before “nice” meant likely sex predator.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  Ploppy
5 months ago

Mr. “Bad Moon Rising” would probably have willed his property to some Sierra Club affiliated open spaces non-profit because 20 years ago his kids popped his narcissist bubble and he’s still upset.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

Time flies. It’s already Feb. 2024 (where did January go?). In a mere 15 years, there will be very few living boomers. Will we still be blaming them, or have moved on to blaming somebody else? Maybe boomers are the easy target precisely because they are perceived as white (and male, half of them). People have to blame somebody. The need to feel superior to someone being part of human nature. So you blame the people who it costs the least to blame. The people it is fashionable to blame. Since blaming the real culprits, or any other culprits, comes… Read more »

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

The collapse started at Gettysburg and in recent years has increased exponentially. This has been a long time in the making.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

I look at collapse as more of a moral process that eventually manifests itself statutorily, rather than the other way around. So I have a hard time ascribing collapse to any one event, such as Gettysburg or the Civil War. Rather that the collapse already happened prior to the event, and manifests itself through it.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

I will stick with Gettysburg because it was the first and eventually the fatal attack on the white majority. My morality is who/whom and that was a strike on my side of the ledger.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

I think well before that, but that was the first large-scale event on this soil of brother killing brother, which is a big-time sign of collapse in progress.

Another sign is that just before the rats all escape the sinking ship, they loot the place. I do not believe it coincidence that once freed from the more rights-based Democrats, the Republicans tried to loot all they could with greenbacks and income tax. Same thing 50 years later, with looting the continent just before entering into a war of cousin killing cousin.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

The looting has accelerated to unprecedented levels now, which is a hallmark of an end stage empire.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

Noblesse oblige? You mean paternalism? You know that couldn’t stand in 20th century America.

Ploppy
Ploppy
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

Every generation has their role to play in the collapse, the millennials will be remembered for woke sanctimony as the boomer are remembered for neoliberal egoism.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Ploppy
5 months ago

It is a shame I won’t be around to see future generations judge millenials and gen z as harshly as they have judged their forebearers

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

Nah. Jeffrey, you’re just saying that. Your postings indicate differently. Schadenfreude isn’t your thing.

ray
ray
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

The Civil Rights Act was ’63, ’64. Everybody’s a Protected Class except white males. Immigration Act, ’64, ’65. The Booms were in grade school.

New Amerika was in the works long before the Booms. They were the first mass-com and mass-programmed generation. They saw the fruit ripen, and the fruit rotten.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  ray
5 months ago

Yes. At a minimum, it started with Lincoln.

Bill Jones
Member
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

The Jeffersonian Republic never survived Jefferson. The French cheap real estate sale totally changed the role of the Federal Govt. and the goals of its politicians.

jrod
jrod
Reply to  ray
5 months ago

“They saw the fruit ripen, and the fruit rotten.” That’s true. My fellow boomer, best friend and I often remarked how other generations will never know what they’ve lost because they never knew what we had. Also, it seems to me that being aware of and grateful for the advantages we boomers had, might provide some small amount of grace against the onslaught by the subsequent generations. No matter how it’s presented, I’ve always seen the inter-generational attacks as both whining and irrelevant complaining, Both of which I cant’ abide.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

Over half of Boomers are/were run-of-the-mill conservatives. Such people are/were naive and a bit obtuse, but there were not malicious and pernicious. Those descriptors belong to the hippy cohort of the Boomers and the felonious postmodern Frenchmen who poisoned their minds.

Jersey Mike’s
Jersey Mike’s
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

“ It’s hard to come up with another generation that has seen so much collapse in their lifetime. Whether or not they were the cause of it.”

As an X-er growing up in the 80s and 90s, I had to constantly listen to the Boomers talk “their generation”.

They had that stinking anthem about it by “The Who”. I wanna puke every time I hear that song.

If the boomers don’t like generational warfare, its because the weapon they invented has been turned on them in their old age

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Jersey Mike’s
5 months ago

Well I’m a boomer and well remember listening to my father starting whines with “The trouble with your generation is…”.
Think again.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

>>The need to feel superior to someone being part of human nature. So you blame the people who it costs the least to blame. This is psychologizing. You purport to understand the reasons why one might attempt to find a cause behind an historical effort, and those reasons are, in your book, most likely emotional ones. Feelings. How do you know that? Moreover, why assert it? The reason one would engage in this sophistry is to rule out a response from your interlocutor or target. Well, if it’s just muh feelings and need to feel good about myself, then there… Read more »

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

“…to find a cause behind an historical effect,” not “effort.”

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

You’re right, I do assign shallow dime store psychology type motives to something as shallow and puerile as boomer blaming

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

Jeffrey Zoar: “In a mere 15 years, there will be very few living boomers.” I dunno about that. 2024 + 15 = 2039. First year boomers born 1946 Final year boomers born 1964 2039 – 1946 = 93 years old 2039 – 1964 = 75 years old There’s still gonna be a ton of 75+ y.o. boomers in 2039. As things stand right now, we still have a SILENT as President, and a SILENT as President pro tempore of the Senate. The youngest of the Silents [born 1945] are only 2024 − 1945 = 79 years old. Tom Selleck is… Read more »

rasqball
rasqball
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

“Collapse Indicator” –
Beautiful…!
(I hope you don’t mind…?)

Xman
Xman
5 months ago

The problem with criticizing those who blame the Boomers is that it was the Boomers themselves who introduced generational politics — “Don’t trust anyone over thirty.” The radical Cultural Revolution fomented by Boomers in the Sixties made everything political. Wasn’t that the slogan during the Clinton years — “the personal is the political”? Feminism, homosexuality, abortion, weed, race — it’s all political now, everything’s a political movement. You can’t just take a black or a woman or a queer as an individual any more on his or her own merits and demerits any more, it’s all part of a political… Read more »

Evil Sandmich
Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Xman
5 months ago

As I always say: it’s not as if behavioral genetics took a break. Just take a look at their parents who continued to vote Dem based on decades old FDR nostalgia (that was, itself, pretty phony baloney).

The only criticism that feel is slightly justified is that time, the only differentiator, has imparted zero wisdom even though the time frame they’ve experienced should have imparted a lot.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
5 months ago

You could say the same of Civnat G. Normiecon and his Reagan nostalgia. Not that he had a better choice when it came to voting.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

XMan: ” it was the Boomers themselves who introduced generational politics — “Don’t trust anyone over thirty.””

I guaran-damn-tee you that that slogan was NOT coined by any White Christian boomers.

That slogan was created deep in the bowels of the Frankfurt School, by the very shrewdest & most learned behavioral psychologists on the payroll of the Council of the Sanhedrin.

Almost none of our “known” history is what it appears to be.

Almost all of it is a (((mirage))).

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Xman
5 months ago

… it was the Boomers themselves who introduced generational politics — “Don’t trust anyone over thirty.”

Actually, it wasn’t. Jack Weinberg (a guy with an amazingly big nose) said it was a popular saying in the movement by ’64, when the oldest of boomers would just be hitting 18, and the youngest not yet born.

But don’t let facts get in the way of a good narrative.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

Yeah, I get it. Weinberg wasn’t a Boomer — but only by a couple of years. Neither was John Lennon or Allen Ginsberg or William Burroughs or Timothy Leary or Betty Friedan or Martin Luther King. But you’re just being pedantic here. The Boomers mainstreamed all the radical shit. They were the targeted audience, and they accepted it, lived by it, promulgated it and institutionalized it. They did see themselves as having moral superiority, as being sui generis and changing the culture. Frankly the Obama slogan “we are the ones we’ve been waiting for” would have been perfect for the… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Xman
5 months ago

Six years, a good third of the cohort, but who is counting?

The Boomers, to the extent there was a coherent culture, might have best been manifested by “That ’70s Show”, supposedly set ’76-’79, where dad was unemployed. The high school kids there are just a bit older than the midpoint of the Boomer generation, birth year ’52 or so.

So how many of whatever generation you are a part of can say that dear old dad was unemployed for the better part of your high school years? The non-black part of your generation, I mean.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

Oops. ’62. Math’s hard.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Xman
5 months ago

XMan: “Frankly the Obama slogan “we are the ones we’ve been waiting for” would have been perfect for the Boomers.” The Boomers were born from 1946 to 1964; the bookends are the Japanese Surrender [1945] up to Griswold -v- Connecticut [1965]. Obama was born in 1961, four years before Griswold, so he’s solidly a Boomer. =============== PS: It is very very difficult to overemphasize the harm which Griswold did to the White Race. Amongst many other things, it put an immediate end to the White Baby Bomb. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griswold_v._Connecticut Which arguably is precisely why the Griswold Psy-Op was green-lighted in the… Read more »

jrod
jrod
Reply to  Xman
5 months ago

Man: If only you could have been there to show them the way.

jrod
jrod
Reply to  jrod
5 months ago

Was meant for Xman

old coyote
old coyote
Reply to  Xman
5 months ago

Z-man points out the work of those want us to hate each other; boomer hate maxes out. lols.
The ‘culture revolution’ moved into max White genocide with the help of the “deep state” intelligence agencies and jewlywood. strictly a cohencidence- https://archive.org/details/weirdscenesinsidethecanyonlaurelcanyoncovertopsthedarkheartofthehippiedream2014b

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
5 months ago

I think there is a larger point not discussed about the “crying girl” video: Why did she make a video of herself crying and post it to the world? Her specific troubles around money, work, becoming an adult, etc are typical. But she chose to share her weaknesses and vulnerability with the entire world while knowing the potential consequences. Has our society fallen so far that she (and her generation) believe that they must cope in public? Are their interpersonal bonds so weak that they must beg for sympathy from strangers? That’s why I didn’t laugh at the video. I… Read more »

Pete
Pete
Reply to  Nicholas Name
5 months ago

It is a basic part of female nature to cry to men for help. If a man has a broken sink faucet, he fixes it. A woman with a broken faucet informs a man of the problem and the man fixes it.

This is how women get problems fixed. Unfortunately this girl will continue voting Democrat, so it’s akin to asking a man to fix her faucet and then hiding his tools, or calling the police to bar him from entering her apartment to fix the faucet.

george 1
george 1
Reply to  Pete
5 months ago

Expanding on the corollary you state. What this young woman actually needs to do is to put her energy into is finding the Lord and then finding a good man and building a life with him.

She is, like many young women trying to fight nature and engage in the BS feminist narrative she has been propagandized with she she was born. I feel very sad for her.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Nicholas Name
5 months ago

“Has our society fallen so far that she (and her generation) believe that they must cope in public? Are their interpersonal bonds so weak that they must beg for sympathy from strangers?”

Yes and yes. This is what an atomized society looks like. The digitalized Oprah Show simply makes it more obvious.

btp
Member
Reply to  Nicholas Name
5 months ago

Well, good questions. The younger generation is like that, I guess.

But the real question is: what do you think we, as a society, owe this young woman? Conservative boomers all say: “Not one damn thing.” Liberal boomers all say: “Lots more abortions.”

ray
ray
Reply to  btp
5 months ago

I only wish ‘conservative boomers’ said that.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Nicholas Name
5 months ago

“Has our society fallen so far that she (and her generation) believe that they must cope in public?”

In a word, yes. It’s just one of the many pathologies that typify our morally dystopian age.

JerseyJeffersonian
JerseyJeffersonian
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

Staking one’s claim to victimhood; it’s a case of “monkey see, monkee do”.

Today’s strivers, strive to secure a higher place in the victimhood hierarchy, ’cause lying on the floor weeping is more efficient than ever before in achieving that access.

I’m not heartless, but this sort of maudlin simpering fails to impress favorably.

Compsci
Compsci
5 months ago

“ The reason to care about the past is to understand how you reached the present and to have some sense of what comes next. Understanding the politics around the Reagan era immigration policies is about understanding the nature of the people behind the just proposed immigration reform bill in the senate.” Exactly. Having lived through the Reagan era—albeit too young to fully understand it at the time—I can attest to Z-man’s analysis. A couple of major lessons taught by the Reagan/Bush era: One—immigration. Reagan *compromised* and allowed a smallish amount of IA’s to stay—about 7M (7M is about what… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

Or, the other lesson to learn is that both parties are in on it. That is the more bitter red pill to swallow.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
5 months ago

“The boomers are bad people for having enjoyed a good stock market and low interest rates over the last forty years.” –That’s not it at all. It’s that they don’t understand that they were riding a wave of leverage that began in 1983 and never looked back. They think they’re brilliant boot-strappers. I see this in my own family, with neighbors, etc. They look at the younger generations and say “What’s his problem anyway? What’s her problem? You’ve gotta hustle out there. Do ALL boomers believe this? Of course not. The smart ones peer out their plantation shutters and say… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  JR Wirth
5 months ago

I can’t paint all Boomers with that wide a brush as I’ve said repeatedly here. It is a fallacy to take those Boomers in the top quintile of economic prosperity and equate them to *all* Boomers (77M). Indeed most Boomers are suffering as they head into retirement as are Millennials and Zoomers as they attempt to make their way in the current economy. The younger cohorts have one advantage, youth and the potential to survive downturns. The Boomer generation is about to get screwed big time as the economy collapses. That there is a segment of Boomers who think and… Read more »

btp
Member
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

Ah. No, I suppose not all boomers are like that. Thanks.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

I agree that the boomers will come out in the worst shape by far over the next five years. I disagree in that I see a group of people who have no idea how fortunate they were.

My biggest issue is a pervasive shoulder-chip among the older crowd. I’ve never seen so many old people root against their own progeny as they spew “suck it up buttercup.” As if they themselves were these hardened empire builders. The truth is, the most defining feature of our togetherness as whites, spanning from the oldest to the youngest is our softness.

Maus
Maus
Reply to  JR Wirth
5 months ago

Thinking that the inability to “flip a PowerPoint” is a meaningful skill deficit is the true onanism. If you’re paid to prepare PP decks for your lazy boss and his or her peers to brief their even-higher-ups, then you’ll think that adds value. It’s the same bullshit that believes tweeting on X is activist journalism. Or that choosing the color of the quarterly TPS report is significant to the organization’s operations. As Upton Sinclair observed long before any Boomer existed, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it.” So,… Read more »

Nicholas Name
Nicholas Name
5 months ago

I agree with Zman that arguing generational politics is a pointless endeavor, and will add my own position that generational beliefs are baked in and impossible to change with words. Example: Imagine if the Boomer God-Emperor Trump proposed a 1% reduction in Social Security benefits. Even the Boomer with three MAGA flags on his golf cart would turn on him immediately. But, Gen Xers like me (and most of this group) should be aware of our own negative generational traits. Specifically, the pathological cynicism regarding ANY kind of organization, which let those dopes keep their hands on controls for so… Read more »

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Nicholas Name
5 months ago

Ironically, the later Boomers were the first subjected to Social Security cuts. It happened while Reagan was president and they were too young to vote. IIRC, the full benefit age was increased by almost three years. This will happen again. As I pointed out earlier, the biggest problem with the Boomer bashing is the retarded innumeracy of quite a bit of it, which diminishes the valid points.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

Don’t forget, under Reagan SSI was “fixed”. That is to say, the retirement age was moved higher to match longevity and the “trust” fund regulated such that when exhausted, the SSI payments automatically reduced to match income.

We now look to a 25% across the board cut in the next 5-8 years or so. This of course was not expected to happen since Congress was expected to revisit SSI and boost retirement age and or SSI taxes in the early 2000’s. Of course Congress would do no such thing since making the right decisions require people of integrity.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

Social Security is about the last federal program that benefits whites more than any other ethnic group, so it will be cut with impunity in the near future. It really isn’t more complicated. Some time when the youngest X’ers/oldest Millennials are eligible the demographic mark will be hit and it will be eliminated.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

I get where you are coming from, but don’t believe it can be eliminated *without a replacement*. Perhaps UBI or some such. The reason is simple, without some form of retirement income some folks will starve (regardless of race as is the nature of people not to plan ahead) in the streets. The elites won’t allow that as this produces a riotous populace.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

I’d be surprised if it is ever eliminated. But the eligibility age (medicare too) will keep on getting raised as necessary.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

@Compsci:

Maybe UBI since it would at that point primarily benefit non-whites.

btp
Member
Reply to  Nicholas Name
5 months ago

No. We do it because the friend/enemy distinction is useful. Nobody here would suggest that the White family with a “In This House We Believe,” poster in the yard is anything except an enemy. The boomer is an enemy, though he is White.

We shouldn’t waste time obsessing over it, but it’s useful to explain what they stand for and why dissident politics finds them so odious.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  btp
5 months ago

The Leftist Boomer is an enemy. The conservative Boomer is a dead weight who has the potential to be a friend.

imbroglio
imbroglio
5 months ago

The weakness in the friend/enemy dichotomy lies in the conviction that the distinction is cast in stone. The evolution of the identities poses a problem for the fixed friend/enemy mindset. When white identitarians find that a growing number of non-whites and Jews echo their sentiments and grievances and can be political allies, it’s tempting to feel, “We’ll ally with them ’til together we win, then we’ll cast them out.” As though these allies couldn’t detect the attitude. This prejudice, too, is a type of political onanism and it’s why Black America, as currently constituted, is cruising for a great fall.… Read more »

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  imbroglio
5 months ago

I am not sure that for Schmitt it is set in stone. Remember, this is not a personal enemy, this is an enemy of a particular collectivity, and is readily identifiable. The grey areas, he admits, are grey, and I do not believe he spends much time writing about temporary alliances with other enemies, etc. I believe he is writing about the exigent, obvious cases of enemies confronting one — in other words, you know ’em when you see ’em. That’s sufficient for me as a criterion. 1) “The political enemy need not be morally evil or aesthetically ugly; he… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  imbroglio
5 months ago

imbroglio: I can understand being ‘for’ one’s own people, but when you continue to view every issue facing White America through the lens of anti-semitism, you are not helping your cause. Just as Compsci noted about the danger of making political deals with an opposition who never show good faith, most dissidents are rightfully highly skeptical of any alliance – temporary or long term – with a people who have shown themselves to be inimical to White peoplehood. For you to ‘warn’ us that not welcoming some supposed groundswell of non-White allies will result in some sort of dangerous blowback… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
5 months ago

“Recently, a young girl posted a video of herself crying about having to work forty hours a week and still not having money to live like she did in college so Matt Walsh made sport of her.” If Walsh wasn’t a grifter and gatekeeper he would have told her to get married and raise children instead of the low wage rat race. It is telling of our time that when a bunch of young to middle age men see a young woman crying about the stress of her wage slavery and think the best thing to do is to make… Read more »

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
5 months ago

American politics is about doing gratuitous injury to the already fatally injured.

It’s right-wing to mock white people for both personal and collective failure to have overcome an unprecedentedly totalized proto-genocidal race terror waged from both above and below.

It’s left-wing to use the word “chud” while doing it.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
5 months ago

Salutary observations from Z, but I would take them even a step further. Hence, white cannibalization is not merely generational but civilizational. Many dissidents, in their thunderous perorations, wind up denouncing practically the whole of white civilization, and in doing so, sound rather like postmodern Leftists. Yes, we can descry certain aspects of Christianity, for instance, that have conduced to our lamentable pass, but to condemn Christendom is to virtually reject white civilization. The two are not coterminous, of course, but the overlap is huge. And if you denounce, practically in toto what you claim to revere, what is the… Read more »

anonynony
anonynony
5 months ago

Carl Schmitt, that Nazi. Why a lead-off quote by someone from that despicable party? Undermines whatever comes next.
Repeat after me, there are no good Nazis.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  anonynony
5 months ago

I think you took a wrong turn at Reddit.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  anonynony
5 months ago

“Repeat after me, blah blah blah….”. The hallmark phrasing of a female Tik Tok poster.

trackback
5 months ago

[…] Zman does a deep dive. […]

Hun
Hun
5 months ago

I think the main complaint with boomers is that they are out of touch with today’s reality for young people and that their advice tends to be seen as useless.

That being said, I agree that generational warfare is counterproductive. We need to focus on the real enemies that have been at war with us for many generations.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Hun
5 months ago

They don’t help. They mock. They scorn. They laugh. They never speak of any obligation to those after them. They were able to live Woodstock for 50 years, even those of them who despised it. They benefited from the loosening of moral strictures in the late 60s onward that — for a short while, like bank robbers giving a cut to their family and friends — permitted the creation of new wealth from unproductive and illusory labor, such as the service industry. Meanwhile, what was sold off were, essentially, the family heirlooms that previous generations had built from the 1620s… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

Did you actually read all the way through the post or did you just trigger out seeing the word, “boomer”?

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

Yes, I did. What part of it do you think I missed? Would you care to elaborate, or just fire off-liners as if you’ve demonstrated something? I state flat-out it’s unproductive. I also conclude by asking what, at this point, can be done, given that the house is sold off and we’ll be evicted once mom and dad die. Can we undo what’s been done? Maybe you reach a point where the mass of the car tips to such a point it is physically impossible to stop it from falling off the cliff. Maybe we’re there. Maybe smart guys like… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

I did. I have started several of my own businesses, and moved my family away from the centers of cultural rot. I homeschooled my kids by putting them in a conference room behind my office and was available any time they needed help. Their mom would do whatever it is she did to keep the house nice and get supper ready, then she would do her community stuff and church lady stuff until she picked up the kids in early afternoon. I’m pretty sure it can still be done. I know lots of young guys who did it. Like has… Read more »

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

Yeah Arthur, just start your own business. Its not at all like picking yourself up by your bootstraps, its totally different.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

@Valley Lurker, are you saying people born from around ’65 and on are incapable of running a business, or simply unwilling? What happened about then that produced the change? Fluoride was in the water long before that.

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

My only interest in hearing from you is to point out Arthur responded with this statement “They don’t help. They mock. They scorn. They laugh. They never speak of any obligation to those after them.” and you proceeded to live up to his expectations perfectly.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

@Valley Lurker, he asked if I had any solutions. I proposed one that I know from personal experience worked as recently as a decade ago, and, from some of my business associates prove, still works.

Sure, almost no one will get rich at it, but earn enough to buy the house with the white picket fence and the stay-at-home mom?

Absolutely.

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

@ Steve “Did you actually read all the way through the post or did you just trigger out seeing the word, “boomer”?”

No, you didn’t. This was your initial response, which proves his point.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

@Valley Lurker, reread the last couple paragraphs of Zman’s essay. That’s why I asked whether he read the whole thing or just triggered out. And, I’m guessing, you ,too?

jrod
jrod
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

“They don’t help. They mock. They scorn. They laugh.” Oh, you meant them. Glad it’s not you. Your kind of bitterness is unnecessary static. Sounds like whining bitterness. Let’s not share a foxhole any time soon.

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
5 months ago

The Boomers didn’t do most of the damage. It was done before they were in charge of anything.

The real problem with the Boomers is they broke the social contract. Their (and Gen-X) failure to have children is the main reason all of our societies have opened up to the dregs of the 3rd world.

But who did this to them? This is the question that is almost never asked. How did a generation grow up so hedonistic and self-centered? Everyone blames the Boomers because they are still alive.

Boarwild
Boarwild
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
5 months ago

Tars – “Their (and Gen-X) failure to have children is the main reason all of our societies have opened up to the dregs of the 3rd world.” The real reason is Chapaquiddick Ted’s 1965 “immigration” bill. Prior to that – going back to Calvin Coolidge – immigration was practically non-existent. Coolidge slammed the door to let all those who came in latter part of 1800’s/early 1900’s assimilate which they did (they don’t now). When there was immigration we got the best of the best: physicists, scientists, doctors, etc. Post 1965 we’ve been getting riff-raff; practically illiterate, no/low skilled people who’s… Read more »

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Boarwild
5 months ago

That was Manny Cellar’s bill. New York Jewish Old World fella. He had tried mightily to stop the 1923 immigration act, but failed. He then spent the next four decades being re-elected to Congress, waiting to undo it. He and Phil Hart (WW2 vet) teamed up, and most Republicans (Dirksen in particular) helped push it through the Senate. Kennedy was just a junior senator at that point. Cellar was then permitted to remain in Congress into his 90s as a reward, before Liz Holtzmann took him out in 1974 after Watergate. It was mainly, if one wants to get picky… Read more »

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Boarwild
5 months ago

Yes. The finger on the scale to contort who/whom was the big deal.

Tars Tarkas
Tars Tarkas
Reply to  Boarwild
5 months ago

While what you say is true, it ignores social security. As far back as 1981, demographers saw the problems of SS in the future. The worker to retiree ratio was going to be too low. Since Europe has the same problem, we can’t import Europeans to work and pay the taxes.

Now, this whole stupid plan cannot work and will not work. For one, the foreigners don’t want to support the Boomers. But for two, only White people and Asians are net tax payers. So we’re destroying the country for nothing.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Boarwild
5 months ago

As far back as 1981, demographers saw the problems of SS in the future.

If it only goes back to ’81, why did the rate increases start in 1950?

https://www.ssa.gov/oact/progdata/taxRates.html

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Boarwild
5 months ago

“ If it only goes back to ’81, why did the rate increases start in 1950?”

That was the time we started to draw down on SSI from initial statute and life increases began to be noticed among the populace.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Boarwild
5 months ago

Right, @Compsci, that was when it became clear to anyone with a grasp of basic arithmetic. But those with actuarial experience, and, most importantly at that point in time, access to the numbers, saw the problem coming decades ahead of time. The first cartoon (meme) where I recall the populace starting to get concerned was about the time the Concorde came on-line, early 70s, I think.

Something like,
Q: What soars higher and faster than anything in the past, and is abbreviated SST?
A: Social Security Taxes.

(Maybe a dated reference. Concorde=SuperSonic Transport)

RVIDXR
RVIDXR
5 months ago

Being bitter that boomers had better economic conditions is silly but Reagan & his fanatic worshippers, as well as feminists for that matter, do deserve criticism. As for Walsh & Fuentes they’re certainly not helping things but it’s not like anything positive would happen if everyone became united tomorrow. We have no party & no political leader to rally behind, if such a thing existed much of this factionalism wouldn’t be happening. It’s now implicitly understood that the ruling class will never allow anyone to actually challenge them as long as the lights are on & the vast majority of… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  RVIDXR
5 months ago

Parties are for electoral politics and we are in a post-electoral environment. As for political leaders, well, we’re unlikely to have any until we unite, and inter-generational bickering certainly doesn’t encourage unity.

RVIDXR
RVIDXR
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

“we’re unlikely to have any until we unite” The vast majority of the Right has been united in not wanting open borders, tranny indoctrination & endless neocon wars Trump took office & yet the same backstabbers keep getting elected & the rot continues unabated. Meanwhile anytime the micro minority of dissident White people get together to do anything beyond hold conferences the feds inevitably get involved to drop the hammer on them. As for the the hand wringing over people being hostile towards Reagan worshipping boomers & feminists I don’t see that coming to an end so long as those… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  RVIDXR
5 months ago

Depends upon what you mean by the Right. Until about the last 20 years, the only real Right in this country was Buckleyite conservatives, and they were at best ambivalent about rampant immigration, and were the most rabid supporters of the neocon wars. But, with the advent of the DR, the BuckleyCons are no longer the Right; they are clearly the handmaidens of the Left. We’re the Right, now. And when I speak of unity I speak of unity in the DR ranks.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

Spot on. People either don’t know or don’t care about the ruthless efforts to stamp out the Right, Buchanan being just one example. For all his failings, Trump was the first to make it through that blockade. Reagan really was in spirit a Lefty and but/for the Cold War his many failings would far outnumber any successes.

RVIDXR
RVIDXR
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

“We’re the Right, now. And when I speak of unity I speak of unity in the DR ranks” Unified or not the DR is effectively irrelevant in affecting anything until such time it’s allowed to have real influence over society which won’t happen as long as the usual suspects have an ironclad grip over the levers of power. Until then it can only spread awareness about what’s coming & critique the system, which it’s currently doing. The DR was very unified right up until charlottesville which not coincidentally was when everyone believed Trump was a real leader of the movement.… Read more »

Kevin
Kevin
5 months ago

I don’t think Reagan or hus supporters were evil, or that his administration was all bad. My criticism is aimed at unfortunate talking points thar have cost conservatives greatly. One of these is the idea that government is always bad. The government is not an evil entity, but an organization made up of people. If those people are on your side, government power can be used to advance your causes. Unfortunately, too many conservatives cringe when people on the Right wish to use their government power. They will argue over the most mundane aspects, and end up sabotaging themselves in… Read more »

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Kevin
5 months ago

The truth is far from a libertarian’s idea of paradise..We need to seize the Federal government, and our State governments, and legislate or dictate an immediate end to the destruction of our society, on all fronts…With women voting, this is very difficult to do, maybe impossible, since they will be obsessing about the poor immigrants even as the lights go out and our kids are left without anything—but it has to be done, ultimately outside the electoral process most likely…

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Kevin
5 months ago

From a Christ-based point of view, government is always evil. Establishment Xianity long ago came to be partners with it, but there’s a reason that Jesus was tempted when Satan offered him the kingdoms of the world.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

I guess St. Paul and Christ were not on the same page. Maybe St. Paul hit his head too hard on the road to Damascus.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  c matt
5 months ago

Right. Not the venue for the discussion, but, yes.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Kevin
5 months ago

Indeed. The libertarian taint on the Right has needs be cleansed away at some point. And while we’re about it, so does the unthinking worship of the free market.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

I forget who said it, but paraphrasing, “the free market has an iron-clad alibi — it wasn’t anywhere around the scene.”

But for argument’s sake, what would you suggest in its stead?

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

I favor fairly heavily regulated capitalism. Not so much in the form of taxation, but in the form of various regulatory mechanisms to rein in corporate pillaging and cultural destruction. In short, my ideal society is one that places considerably more emphasis on culture than economics. And if we have to make do with Chevys rather than Mercedes (admittedly a facile synechdoche) in order to nurture a beautiful culture, so be it.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

Regulation is taxation, but they take the payment in the form of paperwork instead of cash. But I take your point.

Problem is we’ve been there, done that. Maybe there’s some way to avoid putting micro-tyrants into the job of regulator, but mankind has not stumbled across it yet.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

Oh, if you mean outlawing the corporate form, hey, I’m 4-square behind that. If you have so little confidence in your ability to deliver a product the customer wants, maybe you should find a different line rather than being indemnified against loss.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

In a sense, that regulation is supposedly what anti-trust laws are supposed to do. But it seems more honored in the breach than observance, at least for some players. Fascism was also a form of regulated capitalism but the danger is to what end capitalism is put. A strong argument can be made we DO have regulated capitalism (and fascism), but it is put to the end of enriching the few at the expense of the many. But this is more a problem of human nature than economics per se. A “bad” system run by good stewards seeking the good… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

How does the corporate form indemnify against loss? Insurance indemnifies against loss. The corporate form only protects against personal liability – it doesn’t “indemnify” you (i.e, pay you to make you whole from your loss). If the customer stops buying your crappy product, then you go out of business. The corporate form doesn’t indemnify you from that – you lose whatever you put into it. The corporate form has its place, and most states allow remedies for abusing it. What seems to have caused more damage is not the form, but (1) the financialization of the economy, and (2) privatizing… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

@c_matt, the corporate shield prevents creditors from attaching your personal assets except in cases like gross negligence or fraud. So, like we see time and again, you can open a business, get a bunch of vendors to extend you credit, pull in a bunch of customer money, and, as long as you expense all that before declaring bankruptcy, the creditors and customers take it in the shorts. Meanwhile, the principals, who overpaid themselves (like BLM’s Collors? Kollars?) get off scot free to pull the scam again. Living a couple hours from Chicago, I’m maybe a little more skeptical of what… Read more »

TomA
TomA
5 months ago

The recent history of Ukraine is a textbook example of how a relatively small number of powerful people duped a nation into committing suicide. Using various nefarious methods, they persuaded average white guys in western Ukraine to start killing average white people in eastern Ukraine. Then in stepped Russia to end this carnage and the elites upped the ante with a proxy war. Now you have a half million dead white guys, a few million maimed white guys, and an exodus of nearly half the prior population of Ukraine. You cannot beat this kind of evil with a slick political… Read more »

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
5 months ago

I understand your point, Zman, but as a boomer (young end of the boomer scale) it’s frustrating dealing with fellow boomers who believe the battle is Repub vs. Dem, watch NBC-CBS-ABC-FOX-CNN, gush over black conservatives, think absent fathers are the reason for black dysfunction, believe in “as long as they come LEGALLY,” and of course look at you in horror for talking about racial differences and the most taboo subject of all….which small group holds vast, disproportionate power. Maybe mocking these people is the way to reach them or maybe not. I don’t know. But they’ve staked out a position,… Read more »

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Wolf Barney
5 months ago

It’s really only the old white people with a little money and smugness about their situations that get attacked as “boomers.” They deserve it but I don’t know many of them. It’s more like a caricature to start the grievance mill grinding.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Tom K
5 months ago

Right. And although many, probably most Boomercons are as Wolf describes them, the truth of race realism is finally dawning on more and more of them. Begrudgingly and belatedly they are beginning to face up to the ugly facts of our multiculti cesspit. It’s too little and too late, of course, but even Gen-Xers such as myself were too dam’ slow on the uptake.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

I can’t say whether the truth is dawning on them in large numbers but some have changed. I’ve changed. One factor is the internet. I’m not sure I would hold the opinions I hold today without the internet. Of course, the detractors of an unmuzzled internet would say I’ve been flooded by ‘misinformation’ and ‘disinformation.’ LOL.

tp
tp
5 months ago

The goal should not be infighting, but it seems at least part of this is a desperate plea from younger people for their elders, who should have been helping to establish them in the world, to give even the tiniest of shits about their predicament. What other higher mammal out there laughs at the immiseration of their children? Also, if somehow a 40 hour work week for some master is not enough to live, then *you are a slave*. Why is frantic toil insufficient to survive? Why were you born owing money in the nation that your grandfather built and… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  tp
5 months ago

Why were you born owing money in the nation that your grandfather built and owned freehold?

Do you really believe that? Do you think there has been a freeholder since about 1789, at the very latest?

And I doubt you need worry about being in “debt”. It’s been monetized, and barring those “debt-holders” deciding to go all Scrooge McDuck and go swimming in pools of greenbacks, it’s never going to happen. What you should be worrying about is that they start deciding those greenbacks are completely worthless. That’s Weimar Germany at best.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

For those who downvoted, look up the difference between allodial title and fee simple title.

Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

How about you look up the difference between ‘goodwill debate” amd “smug Know-It-All.”

Your attitude is why everybody loathes Boomers.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  tp
5 months ago

“ it seems at least part of this is a desperate plea from younger people for their elders, who should have been helping to establish them in the world, to give even the tiniest of shits about their predicament.” Again too broad a brush. It’s not that we don’t care, it’s that for whatever the reason (I have ideas), we’ve helped in the wrong way. Just one example: Is there any younger generation cohort individual who can fog a mirror that cannot obtain 10’s of thousand of dollars in government loans to attend college? The largest public debt aside from… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  tp
5 months ago

It’s legitimate, but the reasons for our current misery are complex and longstanding and cannot all be laid at the feet of the Boomers. That’s too simple and easy. OTOH, it is unseemly for comfortable, self-satisfied elders to make sport of the agonies of the young. There’s blame enough to go ’round and we’d all best belly up to the shame buffet.

Captain Willard
Captain Willard
5 months ago

Honestly assessing past mistakes is a key part of determining the correct future path. Accepting responsibility for the plight and condition of the next generations is perhaps the main role for men in a society.

We know where we screwed up and we can see the mess our kids are in. So the inter-generational stuff is a huge waste of energy. The Barbarians are at the fricking gate now. Arguing about Reagan and teasing confused girls about their jobs and expectations isn’t going to help.

btp
Member
5 months ago

I’m a fan of no enemies on the right. But the boomer is not now, and has never been, on the right. They are a plague, they oppose everything we want down to free association and safe places for our kids.

Yeah, friend/enemy distinction is correct. They are the enemy.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  btp
5 months ago

Why does an idiot like yourself even come here?
Did you not get any insights from today’s piece or many of Z’s others.

btp
Member
Reply to  David Wright
5 months ago

— David Wright was born in 1953 and just wants all these lazy kids to pick themselves up by their bootstraps the way he did and STOP BLAMING BOOMERS, SNOWFLAKE!

Maus
Maus
Reply to  btp
5 months ago

This little outburst is an excellent example of the ad hominem fallacy. How does “winning” versus David Wright feel, btp?
You’d have more rhetorical force if you ended each of your posts like Cato, with “Boomer delenda est!”
Can no one see that the comments today have been an Alanis-level ironic demonstration of what Zman was laying out? Sound and fury signifying nothing.

David Wright
Member
Reply to  btp
5 months ago

Can’t stop the retard in yourself can you?

steve w
steve w
Reply to  btp
5 months ago

Joe Biden, John Kerry, George Soros, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Nancy Pelosi, Ted Kennedy, LBJ, Klaus Schwab, Diane Feinstein, John McCain… I might be your enemy btb (born as I was in 1960) but these are just a few of mine, and not one of them is or was a boomer.

Cast your net wider man.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  steve w
5 months ago

Not to bang on too much about this pet topic of mine, but here’s another cohort of non-Boomers who have much to answer for: Georges Bataille, Jacques Lacan, Emmanuel Levinas, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Paul Ricouer, Pierre Bourdieu, Jean-Jacques Lyotard, Roland Barthes, Gilles Delleuze, Michel Foucault, Jacques Derrida, Zygmunt Bauman, Michel de Certeau, Jean Beaudrillard, Luce Irigaray.

Jus Sayin
Jus Sayin
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
5 months ago

No Protestants in that list.

Or Anglos.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  steve w
5 months ago

Boomer is kind of like saying “Third World.” There is no academically accepted political science definition of “Third World” but everyone knows what you mean when you use it.

Sgt Pedantry
Sgt Pedantry
5 months ago

Z has a bad habit of putting just enough nuance on a topic to make simple and effective mass communication about it impossible, thus making mass politics impossible, thus making white survivial impossible. It’s akin to making a three-cushion shot but still scratching at the end. Politics? All boomers should be considered politically anti-white until they demonstrate otherwise. If there is a better way to get them see our situation and encourage action other than rubbing their noses in the mess they helped create, let’s hear it. Until the grandparents show any awareness that they were, in fact, finked on,… Read more »

Filthie
Filthie
Member
Reply to  Sgt Pedantry
5 months ago

No chit. Boomers will run their bloody mouths about how kids these days can’t afford homes or families because they’re stupid and lazy. Everything they have – they themselves have is because they worked HARD for it. When my parents went down that road I noted that THEIR parents, (my grandparents) literally fought wars to assure their future and prosperity for their kids. They voted on how best to do that and put their money where their mouths were. They saved and scrimped and were proud to put everything they had into their kids. By contrast, my boomer parents boated… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Filthie
5 months ago

The real reason the ’50s model, stay at home mom, 2.4 kids cannot work the way people imagine it to have worked is the clash of cultures. Too many people can’t seem to get it through their thick skulls that most people prefer a different culture, specifically a multi-income household unit. That culture generates a lot more disposable income, and, on average, will always be able to outbid a single income. For anything they put their minds to. You can’t have the house of your dreams with a tradwife if you insist on living in places where that culture doesn’t… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

Steve: Bullshite. The reason the ’50s model no longer works is because: A. The White US which manufactured everything is now mongrelized AINO which makes nothing, and B. That was a brief, highly unusual period in history when the US was the sole, massive industrialized economy which had not been turned to death and rubble by WWII, and C. The rapid replacement of an upper and wealthy class tied locally by ancestry and culture by a middle-man minority with a culture of verbal dexterity, wealth extraction, and a religion condoning ‘fleece the goyim.’ And while culture is generally downstream from… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

A. The White US which manufactured everything is now mongrelized AINO which makes nothing Yes, but how and why did it happen? For instance, take the early ’70s. Why did the Iron Range of Minnesota stop mining taconite, to ship to Gary to be made into steel, to ship to Detroit to make cars? The Great Lakes were still there, the infrastructure to support the industry were all in place and mostly paid for. What changed? B. That was a brief, highly unusual period in history when the US was the sole, massive industrialized economy which had not been turned… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

What changed?

Material costs are but one component. Someone has to dig, transport and fabricate the materials into something to sell. And they usually want to be paid for their troubles.

At some point, total costs become lower to import (at slave wages) rather than manufacture at home.

Protectionist policies were also derided as “isolationist” and “anti-free market” like that is a sin or something.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

And they usually want to be paid for their troubles. Understood, @c_matt. So given that protectionism cannot be an answer, because all that does is impoverish buyers for the benefit of the government, what is the answer? Biden said in 2019 that the unemployed miners should learn to code. (Which just demonstrates how clueless he is — coding was already outsourced, the rest of it filled with H1Bs.) But if coding isn’t the answer, either, what is? Sure, there’s trades, but that’s just sloshing money around. So is FIRE. So are tariffs, come down to it. What can we do… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

What was the White to bipoc hiring ratio of the Fortune 500 companies (or equivalent) in the 1950s?

What is it today?

Steve
Steve
Reply to  c matt
5 months ago

I agree. Affirmative Action was immoral when it was started in the ’70s, and it’s gotten worse since then. Particularly in the last decade. If one believes that voters make a difference, there’s a lot of blame to go around. In 2015, only about 1/3 of the electorate were boomers. Had every one of us conspired to deprive you of whatever it is we did, we’d have still been outvoted 2:1. And as boomers die off and zoomers come of age, we are even further diminished in 2024. So there must be some kind of an explanation for the rise… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  c matt
5 months ago

Well, there was that Harvard study that found no correlation between voting/people’s preferences and actual implemented policies. BUt this really has noting to do with voting, and everything to do with who is in positions of control/influence.

The ones currently in the upper management ranks of industry, government and academia tend to be in the “mature” age bracket, and have been for quite a while. They are the ones setting policy, and that policy is to crush young White males at every opportunity.

Not saying you are one of them, but NAXALT means nothing if EXALT.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  c matt
5 months ago

The ones currently in the upper management ranks of industry, government and academia tend to be in the “mature” age bracket, and have been for quite a while. They are the ones setting policy, and that policy is to crush young White males at every opportunity. Correlation/causation, right? I’d agree the effect of those policies has been to crush young white males, though it is more general than that. It’s designed to crush all whites, but to splinter us up enough that we never realize it. And that’s why I come back around to the corporate form. Which exists not… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Filthie
5 months ago

“ they themselves have is because they worked HARD for it. When my parents went down that road I noted that THEIR parents, (my grandparents) literally fought wars to assure their future and prosperity for their kids. They voted on how best to do that and put their money where their mouths were. They saved and scrimped and were proud to put everything they had into their kids.” Again too broad a brush, not enough nuance. A couple of points from *this* Boomer: It is quite possible for those Boomers you speak of to truthfully claim they worked hard to… Read more »

Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Reply to  Compsci
5 months ago

“When I went to college, my tuition and board (sans food) was about $300 per semester. Just about everyone in the dorm had a min-wage job which paid those expenses. Within our economic environment at the time, we were earning our way.”

Monumentally clueless and incurable deaf, the Boomers shall shuffle off Life’s stage….

Brandon Laskow
Brandon Laskow
Reply to  Filthie
5 months ago

Aren’t you an older Xer, Filthie? If your parents are Boomers they must have been quite young when they had you.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
5 months ago

Anything that pits whites against each other, especially since their government hates them and wants them replaced and dead, is stupid. “Boomer” for based whites has become an epithet similar to “white nationalist” for the greater Regime, which raises the question what is wrong with white nationalism, which also points out that the use of white supremacism is avoided as a slur precisely because it reveals a certain truth. These slurs contain enough truth to be amusing even if there is a retarded amount of innumeracy in “Boomer” and “white nationalist” is one of those only-if things. All that aside,… Read more »

Celt Darnell
Member
5 months ago

Yeah, but the generational thing is part and parcel of the white civil war.

In the end, the immigrants, blacks and Yids are not the source of our evils — white liberals are. They are the ones who side with all the others against their fellow white people.

Jack Dodson
Jack Dodson
Reply to  Celt Darnell
5 months ago

Exactly. The Puritan prong of the “Judeo-Puritan” Regime leadership is our most deadly enemy. I suspect it even is getting ready to give the boot to its Jewish junior partner now, which is great but not a panacea for us.

Catholic Immigration Charity
Catholic Immigration Charity
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

The Biden regime is the least Protestant administration in the history of the US.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Jack Dodson
5 months ago

I seriously doubt the Jewish partner is the junior one. In any partnership, it is the rainmaker who controls. Who controls the central banks?

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
5 months ago

I have no problem with having it out, but that might be in my nature. Went hard on my parents but also explained my position, and we came to an understanding.

That’s possible because we’re clannish people— it hasn’t been beaten or bought out of us. You have to have that bond to air grievances and not become enemies. Which goes to the point of this post, I think. Like a lot of people say on here, it’s probably hardship that will rekindle tribalism in whites. Until then, it’s a race to the bottom.

fakeemail
fakeemail
5 months ago

Reagan did massive amnesty that killed CA and now rest of country, singed in MLK, and made it impossible to sue vaccine manufacturers.

It’s not about “attacking old friends” per se, it’s about opening one’s eyes we’ve been in the matrix a LONG time and a totally new mindset is necessary. Cutting taxes, free markets, and meritocracies just aint gonna cut it any more.

Gideon
Gideon
Reply to  fakeemail
5 months ago

Don’t think the Zman necessarily disagrees with you. He really red-pilled me on the Republicans. Not that I thought the political system was any answer; just that I didn’t fully recognize the extent of their complicity. His point seems to be that generational politics can become a distraction.

Guest
Guest
Reply to  fakeemail
5 months ago

As to the vaccine amnesty issue, those reforms were a necessary piece of government intervention into a market that had broken and a reasonable political compromise at the time. The US (and therefore the rest of the world) was facing a situation in which pharmaceutical companies were simply walking away from developing critical vaccines because: (a) they were expensive to develop, (b) the market for the vaccine the developed was uncertain, and (c) they were facing class action lawsuits based on science that was shaky at best and farcical at worst–the state of mass tort law in the 1980s was… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Guest
5 months ago

I struggle to think of a useful or worthwhile vaccine that’s been produced in the last 40 years. Maybe Gardasil? That’s about it. So the vaccine amnesty was to save us from genital warts.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
5 months ago

And it wouldn’t be needed if not for free love.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Guest
5 months ago

The free market economists of the era had no free market solution to the problem, because none existed.

Except there was and still is a free market solution to it, but it will never be tried. That is, people develop the vaccines and those who want them can buy them. So long as there is informed consent, those who get the jabs have no legal recourse, since it was, y’know, consensual.

But it requires that government butt out of the entire process. And once they got that power, they will never release it.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Guest
5 months ago

I’m not sure the Framers understood the evil corporate power would become, but they certainly understood the evils of government in the Anglo tradition, and we disregarded their wisdom, because government, for a time, was supposedly the people’s champ.

It’s not public/private but big/small. You can’t let the big get too big, or they’ll pen you in and domesticate you. Yeah, freedom is harder and more dangerous, but at least you’re not livestock.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Paintersforms
5 months ago

I think that’s why collapsing civ is the original first world problem lol.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Guest
5 months ago

The solution was to reform tort law (which many states did) not grant immunity. The SCOTUS Daubert opinion, followed by most states either judicially or legislatively, pretty much put to rest the junk science part of the lawsuits. And if a drug kills and maims, it should be lawfared out of existence, not granted immunity. You want the financial rewards, you take the financial risks.

Interested Reader
Interested Reader
5 months ago

Matt Walsh’s response was ridiculous. You should be able to work 40 hours a week and afford a 2 bedroom apartment. The fact that this is no longer possible is just another indicator of our coming 3rd world future. The typical person in Brazil can also not afford a 2 bedroom apartment on a 40 hour a week work schedule. The typical person in Brazil will work 40 hours a week scattered across 3 or 4 informal labor gigs to live in an informal tin shack with 7 other people. This is why republicans are the stupid party and how… Read more »

joey jünger
joey jünger
Reply to  Interested Reader
5 months ago

Women should not be working, at all. It makes them miserable. That girl should be having kids. Not Matt Walsh’s kids. Walsh should be sterilized for shaming that girl, as if she were an adulteress rather than someone reacting as any woman should to being forced to work.

Interested Reader
Interested Reader
Reply to  joey jünger
5 months ago

I only know of a handful of families where the wife doesn’t work and they exclusively fall into 3 categories. Category 1) husband is a lawyer or established professional engineer. They make enough to live in a safe neighborhood with safe schools. They will have enough income to pay for their kids to have a house in the future. Category 2) Families who inherited a house, or whose family has enough income to pay for a substantial amount of the down payment. Their parents are essentially papering over the downward mobility their families would otherwise experience. They won’t have enough… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Interested Reader
5 months ago

“They make enough to live in a safe neighborhood with safe schools.”

Well that’s the problem, isn’t it? Not everyone is fit or needed to be an educated professional, and those who try and fail are saddled with debt, compounding the situation. Plus, the whole thing about moving and buying happiness is a lie. Nothing good was built by weak-kneed nerds.

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Interested Reader
5 months ago

“You said Category 2 twice.”
“I like Category 2.”

Apologies to Mel Brooks.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  joey jünger
5 months ago

joey: No, women ought not be working. But that girl was crying about not earning enough to PLAY. If she was working to help her husband save for a starter home in order to have children, that would be one thing. But she’s a child crying about childish things.

Gideon
Gideon
Reply to  3g4me
5 months ago

Not disagreeing, but it may come down to your definition of work. In historic terms, women have always worked. My grandmother, for instance, kept a flock of poultry and milk cows, tended a large vegetable garden, preserved vast amounts of food, kept the house and lawn spotlessly, and cooked three meals a day for her own sizable family and one or two hired men (in summer). My mother, though college educated, lived a similar lifestyle. I think the work versus stay-at-home question only arose when people were forced off the land and into the cities, and then only among the… Read more »

Gideon
Gideon
Reply to  Gideon
5 months ago

Em, should have said second-wave feminism.

Marko
Marko
Reply to  Interested Reader
5 months ago

All around the developed world is the same thing. Housing prices are disastrous. It wasn’t always so…100 years ago or so, housing was cheap but food was expensive. Sometime after the Wars that flipped, and food became cheap while housing got dearer. Now of course we’re in Joe Biden’s post-WuFlu America, and both housing and food are expensive. This is literally the most expensive time to be an American. Did I mention that salaries haven’t risen since the 1970s?

Every time I hear some Conservatard bang on about student loan debts and bootstrapping, I reach for my gun.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Marko
5 months ago

And do you fire it, if perhaps only at a passing sparrow to let off steam? (-;

Bruno the Arrogant
Bruno the Arrogant
Reply to  Interested Reader
5 months ago

I couldn’t afford a two-bedroom apartment working 40 hours a week even in 1980, at least without a roommate. I’m not buying a word of this. Being young has always meant starting out on a shoe-string, unless you happen to be very, very lucky. I’d be interested in knowing when this mythical time was when people fresh out of school were earning enough to afford a decent 2 bedroom apartment solo. All I can tell you about it is I didn’t live through it, and I’ve been around for a plenty long time. There were plenty of young people making… Read more »

Interested Reader
Interested Reader
Reply to  Bruno the Arrogant
5 months ago

A 3 bedroom 1500 square foot house on a 1/5 of an acre lot, built in 1963 near me just sold for $740,000. So you will need to save up $148,000 in cash for a 20% down payment. Then you will have a mortgage payment of $4,100, plus another 800 for property tax, and another 200 for insurance. Almost 5,000 a month. If you make 100,000, which would be great money for a guy in his 20’s your take home will be around $4,500 a month. Oh, and you’ll be paying $2,000 a month in rent while you try to… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Interested Reader
5 months ago

More “OK, boomer”, I guess, but no one is forcing you to live where you are. Not yet, anyway. You get to choose whether you want to live somewhere with expensive housing or somewhere it’s more affordable.

It has never been the case that just because you want something, you can afford it.

Oh, and @Bruno, you could afford Rice-A-Roni? I am so jealous. Next you will be saying you could buy Hamburger Helper, too.

btp
Member
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

Yeah, this is part of why there is so much hatred for the boomer.

If you can’t possibly afford to live in the town where you were raised, jut move away from your family and friends and start all over! Here you have an example of a specific case where nobody could reasonably be expected to buy into the working-class neighborhood they were born in, and Steve here just blithely tell everyone to start their own community, snowflake.

Gradually, I began to hate them. Sorry, Z, there’s nothing for it.

Valley Lurker
Valley Lurker
Reply to  Steve
5 months ago

Instapundit must be down.