The Chevron Case

Imagine if when the Supreme Court decided Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, they drew a sharp line between public and private discrimination. Maybe in Katzenbach v. McClung they drew a bright line around the Commerce Clause and ruled that as long as you were not conducting business across state lines, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 did not apply to your business. In other words, what if the court said that the principles of discrimination and inclusion apply only to the government?

The answer is we would have a vastly different world. Just consider the Katzenbach case in which the court claimed that the restaurant in question was not doing business across state lines, but it was possible that it could one day buy product from a vendor in another state, so the Commerce Clause applied. If the court had ruled rationally, we would now have a world where private discrimination was still legal, just as long as you did it locally, not nationally.

Of course, if the court had drawn the line between private discrimination and public discrimination, most of our race troubles never would have manifested, because normal life would not contradict official morality. A colorblind state is well within the spirit and sensibility of the American people. The liberty to associate or disassociate with whom you choose, for any reason you choose, is also consistent with the history and sensibilities of the people.

That is not what happened, and we have suffered a half century of demographic collapse as a result of the court imposing a new moral framework. It is a good example of how even small changes in the law can lead to a revolution in how people interact with each other and the government. We may be seeing another revolution brewing with the most recent court rulings in Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo and Corner Post, Inc. v. Board of Governors.

The Loper decision ends what has been called the “Chevron deference” which is the longstanding principle where the courts defer to federal agencies with regards to regulations, interpretation of regulations and enforcement of regulations. Put simply, if a business or industry did not like a federal regulation, they had to convince the regulators to change it or get help from Congress. The courts would defer to the alleged experts in the administrative state.

What the Supreme Court has done in these two cases is continue to dismantle the logic that animated the Chevron deference and much of administrative law. They are going about it in two ways. One is the Court is saying that these agencies only have powers explicitly granted to them by Congress. Second, companies and industries can now go into the courts for redress. They can challenge the expertise of the regulators and the process used by the agencies to make policy.

This may sound arcane and boring, but keep in mind that most of the federal rules that directly impact your life are not passed by Congress. In fact, no one in Congress can tell you how most of the rules come into existence. The reason for that is the federal agencies craft the rules that regulate every nook and cranny of life. Until now, they did so without having to answer to anyone. Technically, Congress oversees these agencies, but Congress is full of simpletons.

What the Court seems to imagine is a new paradigm. If the Gaia worshippers, for example, want to ban gas stoves, they will need to get enough votes in Congress for a ban on gas stoves. Currently, they just have to cajole or bribe people in the administrative state and convince industry that they can profit from the new shenanigans in order to ban your gas stove. You, the citizen, have nowhere to turn to get your gas stove back.

There are now over 200,000 pages in the Code of Federal Regulations and few people have the slightest idea what they mean. This is why large companies have lawyers who interface with the agencies overseeing their industry. It is why small and midsized companies have trade groups. It is why there is a large army of lawyers whose specialty is administrative law. This is because the leviathan, which is the administrative state, has tentacles reaching into your most private matters.

What made this all possible was the habit of Congress, going back to FDR, to grant agencies in the executive branch broad powers to make laws, interpret those laws and enforce those laws. The way they did this is to give an agency a mission and then a budget to set off on that mission, which was used to lobby Congress for more money to expand the scope of the mission and underwrite various schemes that allegedly were in pursuit of their mission.

The direction of the Court is to ignore the vague powers granted by Congress and focus only on the specific powers granted by Congress. If Congress passes the Puppies and Rainbows bill that authorizes the Department of Education to do what they can to promote puppies and rainbows, the Court will not intervene. Once the DoE makes a rule requiring puppies and rainbows in the schools, then a school system can go to court arguing that the DoE was never granted this power.

There is a long road to go and many more court cases to define this new paradigm, but the end of that road is an administrative state that is limited by the specific powers granted to it and one that must defend its rules in court when challenged. For the same reason our coins have ridges, bills coming out of Congress will have to come with specifics, rather than pages of esoteric language designed to give the administrative state unlimited power to craft new rules.

In the short term, it means that every comma in those 200,000 pages of Federal regulations is now open to challenge in the courts. Inevitably, some popular rules will be struck down and that means Congress will be forced to pass actual laws reestablishing those popular rules. On the other hand, it also means there is a chance to get rid of odious rules that serve narrow interests. Getting a light bulb ban through Congress, for example, never would have happened.

It is not all puppies and rainbows. Rich people have been bribing Congress for generations and America presently has the worst class of rich people since the French Revolution, so it means lots of terrible laws from Congress. The difference is that this stuff will be out in the open where now it is in the shadows, allowing both Congress and its wealthy owners to play dumb and pretend to be something other than odious carbuncles strip-mining the middle-class.

Civil rights looked like a small change in private behavior in pursuit of a greater good, but it led to the demographic madness of the present. These rulings in pursuit of reducing the managerial state to mere bureaucracy may not look like much, but they threaten the moral authority of managerialism. Rule by experts no longer make sense when experts can be challenged. This may one day give people room to salvage whatever is left of the American experiment.


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H I
H I
20 days ago

More simply, the court could have gone along with what the Constitution actually says: the Fourteenth Amendment prohibits discrimination by the government, while private discrimination is expressly allowed by the First Amendment (freedom of assembly/association). The government has to be evenhanded, but the Civil Rights Act is unconstitutional.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  H I
20 days ago

“…Fourteenth Amendment prohibits discrimination by the government” No, it DOESN’T. It prohibits discrimination by the STATE governments. The Federal government is free to discriminate all day long… and it does, against sexually normal white men. The First Amendment (and thus the entire Bill of Rights) begins with the phrase “CONGRESS shall make no law…” The Fourteenth Amendment reads “No STATE shall… deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” This is a crucially important point to understand. The Constitution does not require “equal protection”” by the Feds. The Fourteenth Amendment effectively inverted the Constitution. The… Read more »

Hokkoda
Member
20 days ago

Nearly all “laws” enforced during COVID, from masks to vaccines to lockdown, at the Federal, State, and Local level were these bureaucratic “laws”. They would say something vague like “follow CDC guidance”, and then threaten people with Federal prison sentences for noncompliance.

Elected officials loved this arrangement because passing mask laws would have been very unpopular. Instead, they let bureaucrats run amok.

A lot of people got arrested, their businesses shuttered, etc. for not following rules of the managerial state. This ruling appears to end that lunacy.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

But not so invisible these days…

Hokkoda
Member
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

Throughout covid, I wondered how far people would let “county health departments” get away with those rules before people started burning their houses down.

Pretty far, it turned out.

Outdoorspro
Outdoorspro
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

I’d have to say that that was the biggest black pill of all the black pills in the last decade.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Outdoorspro
20 days ago

Agreed. I already was very cynical and the slavish devotion to Covid lunacy managed to intensify my dark attitude.

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

Covid was a big wake-up for what little optimism I ever had in the general public. Mind you, I was already pretty cynical about them. But not even I thought they could be cajoled into staying at home while their businesses went bankrupt. Their is no indignity they will not endure.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
20 days ago

It’s as if the masses have somehow been deprived of all heart, soul, brain and ball. What remains is some strange hybrid of a turnip and an oyster that walks on two feet.

Last edited 20 days ago by Ostei Kozelskii
Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

Yep. Almost cost me my doctor. He was all gung ho on vexxination and masking, but decided that my yearly fees outweighed such a health concern during office visits. We now have a somewhat better relationship and he has agreed to therapeutically treat Covid with Ivermectin and such. Even doctors can learn. His punishment (my revenge?) of course are the daily revelations of new vexxination adverse affects, of which I have none—for myself anyway.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Compsci
20 days ago

Most, but not all physicians these days are medical drones who simply follow Power Structure protocols. Whatever the CDC tells them to do, they do it. They just don’t use the old noodle too much anymore.

Hokkoda
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

The various boards will revoke their licenses. Saw it first hand with my wife, a pediatrician. If you fight the system, they’ll not only destroy your ability to earn a living, they’ll send swarms of lawsuits your way. A lot of the docs know it’s bs, the tranny stuff too, but the hammer the shyster lawyers can drop on them is brutal.

Its not an accident that Pharma gets lawsuit immunity, but the doctors do not.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
19 days ago

Ostei Kozelskii: “It’s as if the masses have somehow been deprived of all heart, soul, brain and ball.” Those of us with functioning Amygdalae failed to realize the almighty power of the mesmerization & hypnotization & social-mores-shaping & social-mores-shaming techniques being wielded upon the Normies via Talmudvision & Scrotial-Media & the J00vies. To a certain extent, we Free Thinkers failed the Normies when the Normies were in their time of greatest need. Arguably it goes at least as far back as (((Sarnhoff))) being allowed to destroy Farnsworth. And prior to that, there was the quaker traitor, Henry Alloway, who engineered… Read more »

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Bourbon
19 days ago

“(((Olz)))” should have read “(((Ochs)))”

[as in Ochs-Sulzberger].

Zulu Juliet
Zulu Juliet
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
20 days ago

“cajoled into staying at home while their businesses went bankrupt” It wasn’t really like that. It was more like “pressured to wear face diapers or loose your job”. There is a lot of leverage in a paycheck. Going deeper in the worm hole, businesses mandated the face diaper because they surely knew if they didn’t follow CDC guidance and one of their employees got the cooties, a lawsuit would surely follow. On the brighter (but not sunny) side, my company tried to get people to diaper-up last year when people started banging the COVID drum and there was almost a… Read more »

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
19 days ago

Tars Tarkas: “There is no indignity they will not endure.“ In the coming decades, they will be enduring the indignity of watching their children & grandchildren being miscarried & stillborn, not to mention the indignity of dying themselves from their own turbo cancers. And the few who live long enough will eventually learn that their daughters & granddaughters & great-grand-daughters have irreversible ovarian failure. Similarly with their sons & grandsons & great-grand-sons, with irreversible testicular failure. Gonna be an helluva lotta indignititties to suffer before it’s all over & done with. Psycho-Sociologically speaking, the truly fascinating question is WHEN, or,… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Bourbon
19 days ago

See how much better this flows without the wEirD $pELLiNg?
What is that ‘Pμrebl00ded’ crap anyways, you got to hide it?
The Zman tells us to respect our readers. This is much better.

Last edited 19 days ago by Alzaebo
Hi-ya!
Hi-ya!
Reply to  thezman
19 days ago

Can we keep presstitutes?!?!

Hi-ya!
Hi-ya!
Reply to  Bourbon
19 days ago

Pureblood here, thanks amygdala, whatever you are!

tashtego
Member
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

Think of it as the Great Disillusionment. Conversely, it becomes very freeing to have such a concrete demonstration of the absurdity of democracy as an idea and the true authoritarian nature of our governance. It isn’t authoritarianism that is the problem though because it is a given that there will be authority to fill the general population’s need to be told how to think and behave. The problem is the actual people filling the roles of authority and the mission should be focused on replacing them with people that will dictate according to our moral sensibilities and not those of… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by tashtego
Lucius Sulla
Lucius Sulla
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

In my ideal world, county health inspectors and bureaucrats would have been dealt with thusly:

https://youtu.be/jL2BfupSjWE?si=x7Nsl6-lOpNBto1w

Fed Up
Fed Up
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

Bad cop, worse incompetent cop.
When they write the rules and install their own to interpret those, the result is a foregone conclusion.
Somewhere the notion of a Republic got lost. The insiders wanted control and they got it.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

And thanks to Trump’s declaration of a state of national emergency, they were able to do it: https://www.macpac.gov/subtopic/federal-emergency-authorities/

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

And where did the authority for that declaration come from?

Phineas McSneed
Phineas McSneed
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

This is one of the most obtuse TDS takes ever. Executives at every level from city, to county, to national assumed dictatorial powers to invent and enforce new rules/laws, over the entire industrialized world, during covid. The technical details are all irrelevant. There was a panic providing a pretext to grab power, and they grabbed. It cannot be blamed on Trump.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Phineas McSneed
20 days ago

I do not have TDS (the Boomercon’s equivalent of calling someone “racist”). I worked for Pat Buchanan’s 92 and 96 campaigns. I guarantee you I have deeper roots in this movement — such as it remains with Democrat grifters like Trump, who called Buchanan an “anti-Semite” in 2000 — than you or most here. You go ahead and watch Trump wave that Israeli flag around next summer in Jerusalem. Maybe you can go and kiss the wall with him or something, I dunno what the routine is with you folks. You watched Trump hand the key to locking us down… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by Arthur Metcalf
Mike
Mike
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

I won’t argue your points, but you do have TDS and you’ve got it bad. Burn the house down just because you hate BOM so much. Who’s on your list who would be better and electable?

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Mike
19 days ago

You belong on Breitbart or Free Republic.

Vinnyvette
Vinnyvette
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
19 days ago

You belong on Mother Jones or the Daily Beast Arty Metcalf

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Mike
19 days ago

BOM = ?????

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Bourbon
19 days ago

Bourbon: Some of the old academics here think it’s edgy to use their own abbreviations, Bad Orange Man (ie Trump).

Vinnyvette
Vinnyvette
Reply to  Mike
19 days ago

14 downvotes for calling out a TDS’er. I upvoted you. You appear to be a newbie. 99% of the commentariat here are hard core TDS’ers. Most like to hide it. Just a heads up.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

Whew! And here I was thinking you had TDS… (-;

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

Metcalf has a point. What he mentions are mostly observable reactions based in observable reality. True TDS would be the flights to fantasy of Hitleresque dictatorship, internment camps, assassinations, and the like.

The choice between two evils is still evil. I don’t see it that way wrt to Trump, but can understand such a position.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Compsci
20 days ago

Just seems to me that AM loathes Trump primarily because he said a mean thing about his buddy, Paddy Paddy Byook Byook all those years ago. It’s still TDS, albeit a rightwing variant. And I say this as a confirmed Trump skeptic, myself.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
19 days ago

Write like a man, not a teenaged boy. I made substantive points and you respond with the equivalent of Dindu Nuffin.

Must be a Zoomer thing, lack of education, etc., etc.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
19 days ago

Heh heh. Well, alright. I see you’re just a choleric old goat and won’t waste any more time with you.

Last edited 19 days ago by Ostei Kozelskii
Vinnyvette
Vinnyvette
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
19 days ago

You have TDS. Who the fuck are you to call out anyone!

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Vinnyvette
19 days ago

Blow it out your ass, dickface.

Vinnyvette
Vinnyvette
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
19 days ago

Because you worked on such and such’s campaign is no cover for you’re TDS. 90% or more of the Republican party machine suffer from TDS.
You are the enemy “Arty Metcalf.”

Last edited 19 days ago by Vinnyvette
Heresolong
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

To be fair, it was probably a good idea at the time because no one knew anything about Covid-19. Also to be fair, he should have reversed it after the first couple weeks once it became clear that a) it wasn’t as bad as they feared and b) the bureaucracy was corrupt and taking advantage.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Heresolong
20 days ago

Upvote, but disagree no one knew anything about it. Fauci and Collins practically created it. They knew 1) it was wildly transmissible because they engineered it with gain of function in their biolab, and thus all “slow the spread” measures were useless, and 2) the fatality rate was the same as the flu, and thus all vaccine coercions were immoral.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

Well, they don’t seem to care. I have to assume most of them above are vaxxed and this is their own way of dealing with it. The lack of any criticism of Trump is odd, but I’m watching people on the left and right drop IQ points on a daily basis, so, no surprise there either.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
19 days ago

Arthur Metcalf:I have to assume most of them above are vaxxed and this is their own way of dealing with it.

The Elites all got harmless inert normal saline injections in Made-For-Taldmuvision propaganda spectacles.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Heresolong
20 days ago

probably a good idea at the time” CANNOT have enough downvotes.

It was designed specifically to give ‘executives at every level… assumed dictatorial powers”.

You know it, I know it, they know it, we all know it…
And still they lie.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Alzaebo
20 days ago

Well, he really showed me. Pointing out that Trump declared a “national emergency” (no such thing in the Constitution, completely fictional) breaks their minds.

It seemed like a good idea at the time is a perfect motto for July 4th in American 2024.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Heresolong
20 days ago

” . . . it was probably a good idea at the time . . . “

No. Never. Go look after yourself but keep the f**k away from me and mine.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  3g4me
20 days ago

Too harsh 3g4me. There is often need for such authority in crisis, say an earthquake or fire. The executive needs to assemble relief ASAP. To do such may require confiscation of equipment and supplies, forced removal of populace from endangered areas, expenditures outside of competitive bidding, and the like. Covid is a bad example in general. However, quite a good example of the need for competence in government. The average layman had a better idea of what to do for the general (his) welfare.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Compsci
20 days ago

Compsci: I strongly disagree. This was NOT a public disaster or calamity requiring an official response. It was not Ebola, the dangers of which we know and about which the authorities shrugged, because it’s African. This was a nasal virus, and plenty of people within the government and military knew of the US labs overseas and the crap they were messing with. Not to mention I wholeheartedly reject the nanny state and the ‘authorities’ taking care of me. This was a highly successful power grab. And those supposed fellow citizens who cringed in terror of death – and who now… Read more »

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  3g4me
19 days ago

3g4me, I am convinced that as the Normies slowly become aware of what was done to them, they are not going to lash out at the gubmint nor at the j00ish pharmaceutical chemists which created the mMRNA concoctions, but rather the Normies are instead going to lash out at the Pμrebl00ded. As a general rule of thumb, Normies can’t hate in the abstract the manner that we Amygdala-dominant Free Thinkers can hate [in the abstract]. To the contrary, Normie hate is very physical & tangible & immediate, and, in particular, Normies [driven by Passive Aggression] tend to search for potential… Read more »

Vinnyvette
Vinnyvette
Reply to  Bourbon
19 days ago

Down voted for your sophmoric spelling. Grow the fuck up.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Vinnyvette
19 days ago

So says our resident 13-year-old.

Idiot.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Compsci
20 days ago

Hamilton The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are infinite, and for this reason no constitutional shackles can wisely be imposed on the power to which the care of it is committed. Wise politicians….know that every breach of fundamental laws, though dictated by necessity, impairs that sacred reverence which ought to be maintained in the breast of rulers towards the constitution of a country, and forms a precedent for other breaches where the same plea of necessity does not exist at all, or is less urgent and palpable. (Alas, wise polititions?) Madison   It is a melancholy reflection that liberty would… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Compsci
19 days ago

Ah yes, the old “necessity” defense, but from the government’s point of view. Sorry, but I’m with 3g4me on this one. I and everyone else have to contend with agents of force. And that’s true whether it’s a criminal or our government claiming to act for the “common good” or whatever. But there are certain lines that will not be crossed, certain hills worth dying on. When it comes to my freedom, my property and my life, those belong to me and anyone else will take them against my will only over my dead (or at least incapacitated) body. I… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Heresolong
20 days ago

Covid was a great example of the expertocracy running away with its own imagination and then responding to what is in their imagination. To this day they are patting themselves on the back for their outstanding work and heroism.

The lockdowns, masks and vaccine passports were terrible ideas.

If no one knew anything, why the hell did they panic?

Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Reply to  Heresolong
20 days ago

“To be fair, it was probably a good idea at the time because no one knew anything about Covid-19.” After many decades of scare-mongering, starting with 1976’s swine flu (and the first attempt at coercive mass vaccination), and including H1-N1, SARS, Anthrax, Ebola, Zika, etc etc etc, I knew from the very first time I read about “Coronavirus” ( on Zero Hedge, it was) that it was all absolute and total bullshit. Just like the previous 15 health panics were bullshit. “Not knowing anything about Covid 19” says a great deal about a person right there. It doesn’t exonerate Trump… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
20 days ago

In theory, we should have all snuffed it from Legionnaire’s Disease back in ’76, but here we are…

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
19 days ago

Most people don’t know that many in Europe keep their water heaters set at 140 Fahrenheit, to prevent the growth of Legionella bacteria (https://www.hotwatersafety.org/blogs/what-to-know-about-legionella-bacteria-in-hot-water-heater-tanks). In America many regs say never exceed 120 because stupid people will scald themselves. Plus many US water heaters will start overflowing if heated above 120. Conundrum.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  3g4me
19 days ago

The items of information one picks up at Z’s place…

Hokkoda
Member
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

That’s true, to a point. But also remember that in SCOTUS’ immunity ruling they defenestrated the ability of the managerial state to prosecute a President who doesn’t do what he is told.

They used that weapon against Trump a lot before and during covid.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

Why did Trump sign a “Declaration of National Emergency” when there is no such authority in the Constitution?

No “national emergencies” in this country. None. No such thing. We don’t have those.

But we do now, I guess, and Trump used it. People can downvote away and excuse him (“He was forced to!” “He had no choice!” “The Dems are the ones who made that possible!”), and it makes Trump look even weaker and more pathetic than he did at the time, slumped over while Birx and Fauci smirked at him every day in the Briefing Room.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

There is one remedy in the Constitution for such Presidential overreach, Impeachment. Since that was not offered/attempted, the fault lies with Congress as well as the President (Trump).

People also argue that all wars after WWII were illegal because there was no official Congressional declaration of war as specified within the Constitution. They are wrong as well.

Hokkoda
Member
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

I can simultaneously hold different ideas in my head at the same time.

I saw Fauci giving an interview outside the NIH in early 2020, and my first thought was “WTF is this guy?” followed quickly by “Trump needs to fire him asap…delusions of grandeur.”

Trump should have done (and not done) lots of things. I don’t think he or anybody else believed our own government would conspire with China to release a bioweapon to win the 2020 election.

Shame on all of us for complying.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Hokkoda
19 days ago

One of the roles of the president would be to inform the voters of such a state of affairs, I would think. Trump should’ve fallen on his sword, told us what they were up to, and walked out of the White House. Instead, he played along. At what point does someone elected to office actually show some backbone? Covid wasn’t some yearly budget resolution not worth fighting over. This was a sui generis event and it was STAGED. I’ll wait for Trump to renounce his support for the vaccine. Until then, I suppose everyone here will keep telling me he… Read more »

Last edited 19 days ago by Arthur Metcalf
Mycale
Mycale
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

Kind of weird that people on this side still do not understand that 2020 was a color revolution. The thing about color revolutions is that they happen TO the person who is ostensibly in charge, who is left with only one option that they can or cannot exercise, and that is the Assad option. Trump is not Assad. Whether or not he declared a national emergency was irrelevant, it was happening anyway.

If you haven’t read the Molly Ball article on the color revolution, you should.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Mycale
20 days ago

It’s election season. The sorting has begun. I don’t expect to hear much critical talk about Trump from now on.

2020 is fading in the minds of most. Even the cons. Most of them got vaxxed anyway (like Tucker) and I’ve yet to hear a single one of them say they made a mistake and were duped.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

The vast majority of us don’t give a shit about the Potemkin elections. To us, they’re merely sources of amusement.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
19 days ago

Yet you’ve been up and down after me all day for daring to suggest that Trump had something to do with the Covid lockdown. Why so invested in the guy?

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
19 days ago

You’re exaggerating. I simply noted that you are unusually peevish on the subject of Trump. Don’t take that observation for MAGAism, let alone an endorsement of our rigged political system

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

The problem with “state of emergency” declarations, Fed’s or States is in duration. Your citation does not seem to include duration specification. I’m too lazy to pursue. Here in AZ, the legislature passed law that, if I recall, limiting such to 30 days at which time the Legislature must meet to extend it.

This is the problem, no oversight of the “Chief Executive” by the people affected. If the chief executive can declare a state of emergency in perpetuity, then we have a dictator.

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Compsci
20 days ago

The legal aspect of it is more relevant as the duration, because at the time, nobody asked “how long is this for?” They simply accepted that the US was under a “national state of emergency.” The legality was accepted, which means that the duration would be, too. Can’t have the second without the first. Everyone accepted it, even the ever-suspicious Boomercons, out for government plots to take their guns under cover of martial law. Not this time, they said. This time, them Chineeeese are sendin’ poison birds at us. I gave up, honestly, during 2020. I’m not coming back. Trump… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by Arthur Metcalf
Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

Trump will win, huh? Let us revisit that statement in November. Not that I’m ruling it out, but the outcome of the so-called “election” is by no means clear. The Power Structure will get its way, of course, but what that way is is anybody’s guess.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
20 days ago

Disagree. An emergency is just that, something requiring immediate action. It is not a problem for discussion or debate at the moment. Timely action is what is required. If not required, it is not an emergency. This point is arguable wrt past Covid nonsense. This is exactly why there is a chief authority, the President, defined in the Constitution. Supreme authority was assumed to be necessary in some situations, such as invasion from a foreign power. Since the President is the highest national authority, he can exercise such (implied) power. I don’t see that as having changed. You don’t agree… Read more »

Arthur Metcalf
Arthur Metcalf
Reply to  Compsci
19 days ago

Ah, someone from Dick Cheney and David Addington’s office stopped by! Hello!

Yes! Go look it up!

Sorcerygod
Reply to  Arthur Metcalf
19 days ago

“America has the worst class of rich people since the French Revolution.”
Yep. They’ve grown uppity and assertive in their casual elegance & powers. Even the ones that lean Democratic like Warren Buffett and his billionaire pal Bill Gates have anti-populist leanings that permeate their soul. The reason that the rich aren’t hated is because every peon in the land has a secret dream of winning the lottery and “joining those ranks.” Fool’s gold, in every way.
— Sorcerygod (www.dark.sport.blog)

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

It’s as if the court was ok with the Chevron deference until it was radically abused during the plandemic, kind of like how there had been no need for precedent on presidential immunity since nobody had bothered to really test it, until just recently. As if the court is now attempting to pull the reins on Clown World.

Hokkoda
Member
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
20 days ago

There was an interesting concurring opinion written by Clarence Thomas and he wrote that a private citizen cannot prosecute anyone, much less a former President. That statement was a “We have your back” assurance to Judge Eileen Cannon in the Miami/documents case. Not only is Trump now immune because EVERYTHING about the documents case involves an official act, but she can also order all of the documents be returned because they were unlawfully seized. The immunity ruling essentially says that bureaucrats cannot make law. But that’s what DOJ is doing when it charges Trump with violating nonexistent laws. Or, put… Read more »

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

The great lesson of 2020: Laws don’t matter at all. Only “personnel” does. Covid, BLM, and the “installation” made police and soldiers irreconcilable enemies of every citizen. The “warriors” will never get over the deep, sadistic, sexual pleasure they got from being officially aimed away from criminal enemies—their mostly collegial but occasionally dangerous rivals for politicians’ favor—and pointed at wholly innocent, unexpecting citizens. Every “good cop” retired. Every “good soldier” was cashiered. There were almost none of either. Now there’s not a single one anywhere. So, the Court made a couple good decisions, and at least one unprecedentedly bad one.… Read more »

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Hemid
20 days ago

As per your last point, how? I’m not disagreeing with you, I’m just not understanding how.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Hemid
20 days ago

Hemid: It has almost always been thus. The conceit of Americans was that we were a nation of laws, but influence and power have always accompanied wealth and social position. Now laws merely codify that influence and power behind vague language and the blatant fallacy of “the people’s representatives.” I do not share any hope that any court or lawyer will help salvage anything from the American experiment. Laws and rules can only constrain a people capable of being constrained for the common welfare, whose rulers share their race, mores, culture, and concerns. That requires understanding and being honest about… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Hemid
20 days ago

Laws are only as good as their enforcement. In-groups enforce laws more equally and fairly for members of their group than they do for out-groups. Whites were somewhat of outliers in that they enforced laws somewhat equally and fairly at times for out-groups as well as their own in-group. It is stupid for them to expect that to be reciprocated. Look at Fani Willis, Judge Chutkan, Judge Engeron, Alvin Bragg, and so forth, and you see how other races routinely enforce the law.

Gideon
Gideon
Reply to  Jack Dobson
19 days ago

Yeah. The Southern “progressive” writer Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird had a black man falsely accused of a crime not because she thought her white readers would celebrate it, but because she knew they would be put off by it.

Hokkoda
Member
Reply to  Hemid
20 days ago

“Personnel is policy” is an old adage.

A point many are making with the “unitary executive” SCOTUS ruling is that Pres Trump will be able to guy the administrative state through firings. We’ll find out in January if Trump can both learn his lesson and act decisively to decapitate the #resistance…something he should have done in 2017.

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Hokkoda
20 days ago

“This ruling appears to end that lunacy.”

It does no such thing. Imagine this ruling had come out in 2019. It would not have prevented any of the covid madness. The challenges to the rules would only now be making their way to the circuit courts. And even this is a rosy scenario given the lunacy of the black robe class, the majority of which will rubberstamp whatever the agencies want.

We don’t need new rulings, we need a new ruling class.

Hokkoda
Member
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
19 days ago

We haven’t see a repeat of COVID because it was a one time good deal for the bureaucrats. When they tried to go back to masks and lockdowns in Fall 2022, they were told to go to hell by the public and even Trump was telling people not to comply. The worst thing that can happen to a government is mass civil disobedience. New rounds of masking and vaccines were a flop because the government could no longer mandate them. I get frustrated with the courts, but the rulings post-COVID have (by and large) made it nearly impossible for the… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
19 days ago

The problem is that the new ruling class is subject to the same environmental forces that, over time, would convert them into much the same as what we were hoping to extirpate.

As the Who famously sang, “Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.” I hate to gainsay them, but we do get fooled again. Over and over.

Coalclinker
Coalclinker
20 days ago

Nothing at this point can fix a State that is a dictatorship for all to see now. We don’t even know who runs the country, but you can bet its someone in the Federal Government who is unelected, who is a Democrat, and whose is intent to legalize a one-party state. This Leviathan of like-minded Democrat Communists who are entrenched for life by law in their government jobs will never be overturned since they essentially control everything. This cancer will never be excised when the whole body is a cancer. The only thing that can fix this problem at this… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Coalclinker
20 days ago

Since you mention Stalin, thanks, here’s an odd segue: apparently, Lenin wanted a confederation of sovereign States, a United States of Russia. What came next is why Joseph Schiff, the US banker who funded the Revolution, recoiled and tried to reverse what he had done. Stalin poisoned Lenin, then deified him in the Rotunda, like a late-stage Roman Caracalla who had his brother murdered and then declared a deity by the Senate. Stalin then centralized all power to the Federal government, and the Purge and gulags began. The former bank robber for the Bolshies accomplished this by bringing his Azerbaijani… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by Alzaebo
Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Coalclinker
20 days ago

The Dems, in the main, are not commies. Otherwise, OK.

Hoagie
Hoagie
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

Sure they are don’t be silly. And Joe Biden is still as sharp as ever, and he was always an honest man, and we’ve known him since he was just starting out and he’s a good person. Stop with the BS

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Hoagie
20 days ago

Don’t be such an imbecile. The DC clowns don’t know Marx from Mary Poppins. In fact, the Left has entirely hijacked capitalism and is using it for their own malign purposes, thank you very much. Some of them may still spout quasi-commie rhetoric in public, but that’s merely loon bait for LaKwe’shi’a. In fact, these people are postmodern fascists whose chief objectives are cultural, not economic. It’s not 1954 anymore, Hoagie.

Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

The foot soldiers do not need to “know Marx” in order to be faithful commies in practice. The ‘proletariat’ wheeze didn’t take, so the Bolsheviks merely swapped out the prototype and substituted sexual deviants and Holy Negroes for the Class Struggle clunker– voilá, the Eternal Trotsky Social Revolution rages on, comrade! Imagining other people are motivated by abstract theories written down in textbooks, and that absent the terminologies and jargon to be found found therein the people effecting the same social destruction do not merit the descriptor “communists”, is an idea I keep seeing touted about in DR circles. Of… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
19 days ago

You’re reducing communism to identity politics, and that’s a fallacy. The division of advanced humanity into capitalists and proles was not the sine qua non of communism. It was one part of a large and complex system centered around dialectical materialism and positing a communal telos in which the state simply withers away. If all you’re banging on about is identities–and not even the ones Marx and his epigoni bruited–then you don’t have communism. The reality is that poststructuralism supplanted Marxism in the second half of the 60s, and not only did the New Left no longer seek to initiate… Read more »

Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Stephen Dowling Botts, Dec'd
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
19 days ago

It is possible to be much too smart for one’s own good. While the rhetorical flourishes impress, the Bolsheviks carry on dismantling all laws, customs, safeguards, and bulwark erected against the forces of carnage and murder. And this time they plan to immolate me and mine. I do not want to argue with you. But I also believe failure to recognize who your enemies are must inevitably result in failure to react to your enemies’ strategies effectively. I recommend people focus a whole lot less on academic moonbeams and a whole lot more on how these thugs operate out on… Read more »

Coalclinker
Coalclinker
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

Communism and Fascism are males and females of the same species. For the low brow who don’t have a pot to piss in or a window to throw it out of, it’s communism. For the 1% cloud people, who love a government that will legalize their monopoly, it’s fascism. And for the Agitprops once known as the Press, it’s called “Muh Democracy.”

For the rest of us, no one gives a rat’s ass except we know when we get it good and hard, there won’t be any Vaseline.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Coalclinker
20 days ago

Sorry. But words have objective meanings. That certain groups persist in viewing contemporary Leftism as communism doesn’t make it so.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

Well, it’s not Bolshevism.

It’s a Huxleyan “Brave New World” communism, though, where the proles are supposed to be equal consumer sheep monitored by a watchful totalitarianism and kept quiescent by sexual license and soma (i.e., anal, abortion and weed).

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Xman
20 days ago

The proles, to such an extent they exist, are vibrants, which points up the cultural and racial essence of pomo Leftism. The white working class, which was the primary target constituency of the CPUSA before and during the Cold War, is now being slowly exterminated by the Leftist power structure. Strange behavior for a commie state.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

True, but only insofar as the white working class is the new kulak and must be targeted for his success.

Yes, it is not 20th-century industrial communism, but the government policy of forced racial, sexual, gender, and disability equality is certainly a form of communist egalitarianism.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Xman
19 days ago

It would be egalitarianism if the power structure truly sought equity between normal people and the coalition of freaks. In point of fact, it seeks to subjugate normal people and transfigure freaks. This is much more in keeping with fascism than communism.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
19 days ago

This is an important discussion, O. Not to be pedantic here, but I disagree that the Left is “fascist.” Sure, some of the techniques they use are the same — propaganda, goons in the streets, etc. — but I think democracy and communism have more in common with each other than communism and fascism do. Both democracy and communism pronounce everyone equal. Both democracy and communism are expansionist globalist ideologies that claim to have total moral virtue. Both GAE/capitalist-style democracy and communism are materialist philosophies. Democracy and communism united to defeat fascism. Consider that the UK and the U.S. teamed… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Xman
19 days ago

I don’t dispute the similarities between communism and democracy. However, as we’ve all made abundantly clear on this site, AINO’s co-called “democracy” is a total sham and a mere fig leaf for the polity’s vested interests–corporations, Hollywood, the media, academia, and the federal government itself. Just as America is no longer America, its democracy is no longer a democracy, if it ever was one, although I believe it came much closer to that ideal in the past than it does now. Therefore, if we don’t have a communist state, nor a real democracy, what do we have? As regards the… Read more »

Mycale
Mycale
20 days ago

All of the things that liberals have been whining about with regards to SCOTUS the past few years could be addressed by Congress. In fact, Congress did address one, when, in a truly stunning show of bipartisan unity, it legalized gay “marriage.” Overall though, liberals cannot get major buy-in on their agenda and they know it. The entire liberal, progressive, globohomo project – the arc of history, as King Obama called it, is built on the accumulation and expression of power. Changing the laws doesn’t matter when you have no means to execute the laws. Marijuana was de facto legalized… Read more »

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Mycale
20 days ago

” . . . liberals cannot get major buy-in on their agenda and they know it.”
That’s the same as saying “WE have all the guns.” And just as false. They have money and power beyond mere national borders. They have full time activists dedicated to rooting you out and with the patience of decades to corrupt your institutions and coopt your children. They have coordination and experience with igniting civil unrest. BLM? Covid? Venezuelan criminals? “We” have frightened, neutered people with the docility of sheep.

Mycale
Mycale
Reply to  3g4me
20 days ago

I feel like you are saying the same thing I am. What you are describing is institutional power, not buy-in from the people they rule over. Remember that gay “marriage” flamed out every time it was put to referendum, including, famously, in California. What did Democrats do, they used their institutional power to implement it anyway. If you went around in 2013 and asked parents if they wanted drag queens to rub up on their kids in the library, or teach the wonders of gay anal sex in 3rd grade, what would it poll? Doesn’t matter.

Last edited 20 days ago by Mycale
pyrrhus
pyrrhus
20 days ago

Indeed, overturning Chevron is momentous, a much more important decision than Dobbs, which overturned Roe v.Wade….We had been aware that Roberts, and one or two other conservatives, had been looking for this opportunity for some time, and the perfect case of overreach showed up…
In the past, the Court had sometimes deplored the abuse of power by the EPA and other agencies, but generally just remanded the cases…
Z-man’s very pointed comparison to the civil rights cases is outstanding…If a lunch counter in Atlanta is in interstate commerce, then everything is….Thank you, Justice Douglas and the rest of FDR’s hacks…

DLS
DLS
Reply to  pyrrhus
20 days ago

Agree. The moral claim they used to justify this is that the lunch counter owner goes beyond his circle of friends, and opens his business to the general public. Thus, if he allows in strangers, he is not really choosing his acquaintances and cannot discriminate. Fair enough, but it still ain’t interstate commerce.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

But if he discriminates based upon race, or some other visible sign, he is choosing his acquaintances. He’s choosing to acquaint himself with whites, nuggras, women, freaks dressed like the Snuppalupagus, or whatever.

Coalclinker
Coalclinker
Reply to  pyrrhus
20 days ago

The only problem is, before the foolishness enabled by Chevron is completely disassembled, the country will utterly collapse and dissolve long before. It’s about 40 years too late.

Last edited 20 days ago by Coalclinker
Intelligent Dasein
Intelligent Dasein
Member
20 days ago

This ruling has literally saved your life. The green agenda, the EV mandates, and the administrative war on oil and coal would have destroyed the economy, killed off most of humanity, and reduced the survivors to living like beasts if it had been implemented. Now we have the legal means to stop it, and the well-heeled energy companies are sure to have their lawyers on the case even now. A prayer of thanks for the SCOTUS. One of the few bright spots going forward is that America still has enough carbon fuel in the ground to supply a relatively prosperous,… Read more »

usNthem
usNthem
20 days ago

There now over 200,000 pages in the code of federal regulations…. This is the problem in a nutshell and while these rulings are a good start, it’ll probably take decades to achieve any meaningful results. As many have opined around here, reform with regards to the managerial state is impossible. Something far more significant is going to have to occur for any semblance of sanity and reasonableness to return.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  usNthem
20 days ago

“…it’ll probably take decades to achieve any meaningful results.”

This is exactly right. And we don’t have decades. We have at most just a few years. It will take something a little more explosive than law to rid ourselves of these petty tyrants and sycophants.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Epaminondas
20 days ago

#Project2025!
“If Trump is corninated King, millions of Americans will be illegally invading Mexico to escape Trump’s extermination camps.” ~ some nonwhite female

“If biden had any balls he’d just tweet out “Execute Order 66″” ~ some gender-indeterminate Redditor

“It is impossible to overstate how f*cking stupid Sonia Sotomayor is. 
The real question is, did she cry after she wrote this.” ~ Julie Kelly

No really, how come we’re always the ones scared of what they’ll do to us?
A purge of the traitors by the Unitary Executive is now declared Constitutional, legal, and most importantly, moral. Bukele for VP!

Last edited 20 days ago by Alzaebo
DLS
DLS
Reply to  usNthem
20 days ago

This is exactly right. To overturn a regulation, the injured party will have to start in lower courts, which will simply not follow this ruling, and then appeal all the way to the Supreme Court. That takes a lot of time and money.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

Not to mention the financial risks. You get a “wetland violation” with a $32k daily fine which continues to accrue during your appeals and after a couple of years in the system, you wind up with your entire worth resting on a win. This is in and of itself criminal punishment without conviction of any crime.

Horace
Horace
20 days ago

Brilliant work, Z. This is an important development. This is all too little, too late. I say this as someone whose ancestors were Americans before we had our own state, whose earliest American ancestors had grandsons who fought in our Revolution: the American experiment has failed. Maybe we can salvage the Bill of Rights, but we must return to hierarchical ethnocentrism. Reformation attempts should be seen as prelude to dissolution and separation. The two primary contenders for power over Americans are both Jewish projects (organized and led by, but not entirely comprised of) and can be abstractly labeled as the… Read more »

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  Horace
20 days ago

Breitbart has become too insignificant to name anything after, and it too wants your death—if that’s what Israel wants.

“Musk faction” instead. He’s an open advocate of increasing the population and enslaving it in a stagnant techno-surveillance hell forever.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
20 days ago

These rulings in pursuit of reducing the managerial state to mere bureaucracy may not look like much, but they threaten the moral authority of managerialism. Rule by experts no longer make sense when experts can be challenged. This may one day give people room to salvage whatever is left of the American experiment. Agree with all of that excerpt except the implication the American experiment can be salvaged. It died long ago. Still, CHEVRON’s long overdue death is much like relocating away from diversity in that it provides a modicum of relief in the interim. To add just a bit,… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Jack Dobson
20 days ago

I disagree that anyone is dumber than the members of congress. The regulators are worse in that they are clever zealots. I do agree the American experiment is over. We can’t go back to 1859, but can only forge something new from the rubble.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

It does chart a new course between Scylla and Charybdis. If a black Supreme gets the credit, that’s cool. If the civnats get the credit for pulling this off without bloodshed, that’s cool. If the Constitutionalists get the credit for lawfare not warfare, that’s cool too. Right now the triumph of the Dissidents over the established Conservatives isn’t in the cards…but it certainly is gaining momentum. MAGA populism is a reform movement, a quieter revolution; it’s a judo throw of Soros color revolutions, it flips them on their head. Popular morality versus forced morality has the tide behind its back.… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by Alzaebo
Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Alzaebo
20 days ago

Spot on, great comment. Take relief where you can find it.

RealityRules
RealityRules
Reply to  Jack Dobson
20 days ago

Agreed. Well said Alzaebo.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
20 days ago

The way I’ve felt this week, is this how leftists felt back when the Warren court was taking a wrecking ball to the republic? Probably not, because I’m still kind of in disbelief/hearing footsteps/waiting on the other shoe to drop. Shell shock, I think it used to be called.

Din C, Nuttin
Din C, Nuttin
20 days ago

“We can’t vote our way out of this” yet voting for Trump rather than Hillary gave us a Supreme Court that is making inroads against the bureaucracy.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Din C, Nuttin
20 days ago

Touche. SC appointments are the one area in which voting really does seem to make a difference.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Din C, Nuttin
19 days ago

Trump also managed to appoint quite a few solid judges at the Appeals court level that have been able to halt or even reverse some pieces of the prog lunacy.

Diversity Heretic
Member
20 days ago

I worked in an administrative agency for about seven years back in the 1990s-2000s, so I have some experience with rule making and interpretation of statutes. I wonder the extent to which the recent decision will apply to rulemaking under the Administrative Procedures Act. Rulemaking under that Act is referred to as “informal,” although in practice it’s rather complex. The agency publishes a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking in the Federal Register. As the Z-man correctly observes, only people with a particular interest read this, but only interested persons and groups are likely to participate in the next stage of the… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
20 days ago

Kind of like the Constitution itself, the old way of doing this worked so long as most everybody was operating from similar values/ideology. Once, as you note, the bureaucrats are no longer bloodless technocrats, but rather activists with an agenda, and want to force you by bureaucratic fiat to drive a car that runs on unicorn farts or force your kid to be taught sodomy in kindergarten, then here we are.

Last edited 20 days ago by Jeffrey Zoar
Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
20 days ago

Sigh. Heretic, your thoughtful posting is a very good analysis of exactly how the situation stood before SCOTUS decision. It deserves upvotes, not downvotes. Let’s not kill the messenger here.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
20 days ago

Great explainer there. You are close to right, too. When the APA was drafted back in 1946, the country was a 90 percent white nation that in fact did somewhat respect the rule of law. The idea that the “bloodless technocrats” would impose political preferences was dismissed at the time. That may have been naive even then, but it certainly no longer is the case. Administrative judges are blatant political officers at this point.

AnotherAnon
AnotherAnon
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
20 days ago

The NRA vs. Vullo is a pretty good example of how far one single activist bur-o-crat can abuse agency power before getting his/her/its chain yanked. The Supremes actually did a decent job here in oral arguments (except the wise Latina). In a similar vain, the current case of Trump vs US rather neatly reflects the sorry state of reality, which is that the bureaucratic state’s cheerleaders abuse the traditional guardrails in order to unleash the raw power of the state on political opponents. What were the traditional guardrails? Well, a system of comity that everyone understood (and did not need… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by AnotherAnon
Zulu Juliet
Zulu Juliet
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
20 days ago

Excellent comment, and if the bureaucrats were a few “bloodless technocrats” you are correct that regulatory procedure it is a superior way to make law than leaving it to the circus of creeps that is Congress. But, as you correctly observe, the bureaucrats are neither bloodless nor technocrats. They have their own agendas outside the common good, most prominently the accrual of scope, power and perminence for their agency. You are also correct that the voters rarely hold their congressmen accountable, but nothing at all is holding these bureaucrats accountable. And to be clear, congress is really just a worthless… Read more »

anon
anon
Reply to  Diversity Heretic
19 days ago

>Under Chevron, the courts were supposed to defer to the agency interpretation, even if the court would have reached a different result. 

Supposed to… but in practice, the courts could always “find” that the statute was clear when they disliked the agency’s rule, or ambiguous when they liked the agency’s rule. Overruling Chevron just means the court needs to write a few more paragraphs to get the result they want in the 2nd case.

Compsci
Compsci
20 days ago

“Second, companies and industries can now go into the courts for redress. They can challenge the expertise of the regulators and the process used by the agencies to make policy.” This is the big one. We need to see how the decision plays out in the lower courts. “By the People: Rebuilding Liberty Without Permission” by Charles Murray was published on May 12, 2015. He does a pretty good job of outlining the problem. All Courts heretofore deferred to the bureaucratic agency’s in house “appeals” process. Until these options were exhausted, redress in the Courts was denied. There was also… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by Compsci
Yakov Blotnik
Yakov Blotnik
20 days ago

But is it good-for-the-Jews or no-good-for-the-Jews?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
20 days ago

Heh! Imagine a world where the administrative state is reduced to “One Weird Trick” ads. Skip right past!

RealityRules
RealityRules
20 days ago

At this point we seem damned if we do, damned if we don’t. The elision between this ruling and the demographic disaster may not be fortuitous. It is conceivable that now that non-whites are a majority and that the white shitlibs are utterly insane, that Congress could go on a bender and just codify the administrative state into law. Moreover, we find ourselves with regards to the university and corporate led White/American/European male pogrom dependent upon the letter of the Civil Rights law. In fact we find ourselves in a situation where we can use disparate impact to burn the… Read more »

??what??
??what??
20 days ago

The end of “Chevron” is one of those decisions that is coming 40 years too late to matter. It is going to hamstring any potential for Trump #2 to use vigorous government action to go after the left and deport (as if that was going to happen anyway). The recent ruling will be used by the left from 2025-2029 to thwart the last gasp of Republican power. Then its significance will be jettisoned through one way or the other when the demographics lock the left into power. The only way to “Save America” is through a radical wielding of power… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  ??what??
20 days ago

The difference regarding expelling invaders is that this is explicitly the will of congress expressed in the laws it wrote. Thus, Trump’s administrative state should not be hamstrung by this ruling. Mass deportations won’t happen for other reasons, but not because of this ruling.

Mycale
Mycale
Reply to  ??what??
20 days ago

The way the laws are written with regards to the homeland invasion are pretty clear-cut – the executive has both the power and obligation to do so. The fact that, for the past 60 years or so, the executive has not done so, comes down in part to the “deference” that is being talked about here.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  ??what??
20 days ago

Hol’ up, people! Man’s got a point. They’re already demanding drone strikes on Mar-a-lago while Biden’s still in office.

TempoNick
TempoNick
20 days ago

“That is not what happened, and we have suffered a half century of demographic collapse as a result of the court imposing a new moral framework.”

Oh, that’s a great point I never thought of before. By blowing up naturally occurring social patterns, you’ve also blown up the way people meet and mate? Is that what you’re trying to get at?

DLS
DLS
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

Thanks, I wasn’t clear on that as well. Makes perfect sense. The greatest con job in American history was convincing the public that mixing completely different people together somehow makes us stronger.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

Actually, I think your point applies as well. The CRA’s significance wasn’t only about exposing America to the predations of the Third World. It was also, as you say, about destroying a form of civil society many centuries in the building. Not only were we required to regard hordes of Somalis no differently from ranks of Norwegians, we were required welcome domestic nuggras into home and hearth, doing fearful violence to our social fabric in the process.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

This comment was meant for TN.

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

It’s not only violence, it’s also that you’re just in an alien environment. It’s manufactured fun as opposed to being with your own kind such as maybe a social function like what what a lot of ethnic Church parishes have, where it’s just some more friendly environment where you feel like you’re more at home.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  TempoNick
19 days ago

Yes, that’s part of civil society, which the CRA and diversity destroyed. We are all much at ease with sympathetic people and uneasy around hostile peoples. The power structure has ringed whites with hostile tribes, condemned us for noticing the dismal new environment, and prevented us from defending ourselves. Quite the situation, huh?

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

The whittling of freedom of association started with ruling covenant contracts unconstitutional, and the ethnic cleansing that happened in the cities because of it.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
19 days ago

Jeff Childers, a Florida attorney, had several comments on his blog about the recent Supreme Court decisions.
https://www.coffeeandcovid.com/p/devastating-tuesday-july-2-2024-c

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
20 days ago

These high-potency 10,000 IU white pills have got me to feeling all giddy and mesmerized!

KingKong
KingKong
18 days ago

Experts are the people who get the small things right and tje big things wrongs. It’s why their ideas always lead to disaster in the long run.

I’m glad to see the expertocracy get some much needed pushback. A deep cleansing à le Augean stable is needed in the government.

Walrus Aurelius
19 days ago

I’m just glad that I and my fellow tradies are free of OSHA’s useless tyrant, at least for a day

Tim Condon
Tim Condon
15 days ago

Doomberg suggests Loper Bright May be a pyrrhic victory. Chevron was initially hated by environmentalists and loved by by conservatives for giving Reagan’s conservative appointees more power to enforce legislation like the Clean Air Act. The professional environmental/DEI left quickly learned to love Chevron and will do the same with Loper Bright.

Filthie
Filthie
Member
20 days ago

For the same reason our coins have ridges, bills coming out of Congress will have to come with specifics, rather than pages of esoteric language designed to give the administrative state unlimited power to craft new rules.”

?

Evil jews…?

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Filthie
20 days ago

Our coins are ridged on the perimeters (I believe the actual term is “knurled”) because European coinage is smooth and since coins back then were made from gold and silver, unscrupulous people would “chisel” the outer parts of the coin to keep the metal. If you’ve ever heard the epithet “chiseler”, this was an insult used to describe a cheapskate.
our coinage was knurled on the edges in order to prevent this from happening.

Filthie
Filthie
Member
Reply to  Steve
20 days ago

I spend too much time on Gab, Steve. I heard all that described as “coin clipping”… and guess who became famous for it in the Middle Ages…
😂👍

Steve
Steve
Reply to  Filthie
20 days ago

I knew that if I didn’t mention it, someone else would! I believe it started in Spain. My brother uses the term all the time. One day he was discussing someone who had gypped him and a friend of his out of something and he called the guy a “gleebling”. Is asked him what that meant and he said, “Someone so friggen cheap, they’re light years beyond chiseler!”
🤣

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Steve
19 days ago

Mostly correct. I’d differ on the verb: clip: “pare the edge of (a coin), especially illicitly.” (Source: Google). Here’s some fun trivia: not all that many centuries ago, clipping was punishable by death some places. For all practical purposes that definition is obsolete; to the best of my knowledge, circulating gold coins died in the 1930s (Roosevelt’s devaluation of the dollar finishing off what WW I had begun) and silver exited the international stage in the early 1960s. All we have now is base metal (collector’s coins excluded, of course, but I’ll be happy to accept that $50 gold Eagle at… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Filthie
20 days ago

Still somewhat missing the point. The government empowered the “alphabet” agencies to “fill in the details” in their enabling law. The myriad things—just the good ones—are so numerous as to defy specificity at the Congressional Bill/Law level. Even if they were relatively smart people, which they are not, it can’t be done.

The result should be less regulation and enforcement, and that’s a relief. But I’m not hopeful. The Fed’s will always overreach as long as Congress contains progressives. Look for the courts to now spend their time chipping away at the SCOTUS decision.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
20 days ago

Hey, maybe…

web: “JFK was your last “elected” president…
Since then the US has openly, for the non-blind, been a fascist oligarchy.”

So if the USSR lasted 70 years…maybe all we need do is make it through the next 10, and then the next 30 after that, and we’ll have our Putin revival! 

TempoNick
TempoNick
20 days ago

“Getting a light bulb ban through Congress, for example, never would have happened.” Although nobody liked the light bulb ban at the time, don’t you need to push people into things sometimes? As far as I’m concerned those curly fluorescent bulbs were crap, but they work quickly replaced with LED lights, which are superior to both. “Rich people have been bribing Congress for generations and America presently has the worst class of rich people since the French Revolution, so it means lots of terrible laws from Congress. The difference is that this stuff will be out in the open where… Read more »

Coalclinker
Coalclinker
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

” As far as I’m concerned those curly fluorescent bulbs were crap, but they work quickly replaced with LED lights, which are superior to both.” That’s what they said before they forced this upon us, but all of their new light bulbs are Made in China, so they burn out about as quick as the old incandescents, and cost more. And I am sick and tired of having to look for one that puts out as much light as an old 100 Watt bulb. They seem stuck on 75 Watts for everyone. I supposed we don’t need to read anything… Read more »

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Coalclinker
20 days ago

However, with commercial lighting, LEDs have also replaced mercury vapor, which gives off an awful light and sodium vapor, which gives off an awful orange hue. Metal halide is also disappearing. Metal halide didn’t give off such bad light, but LEDs are still superior.

Who knows? We may actually like electric cars when they finally succeed in forcing them on us.

Last edited 20 days ago by TempoNick
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

LED street lights, when they fail, also have the novel effect of turning into a black* light. At least that’s what I’ve seen around Tampa. And the failure rate looks fairly high, to judge by the frequency of the psychedelic illumination.

*I don’t know the technical details, but I find it curious that they only seem to fail as blue, not the other colors that are required to make white light.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
20 days ago

It was easy to invent red and yellow LED lights, but blue was extremely difficult. There are good youtube videos on the inventor that figured it out, and how that opened the color spectrum to almost infinity. This transformed LEDs from being simple red/yellow indicator lights, to the unbelievable color arrays in modern electronic displays.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
20 days ago

Is that what those weird purple streetlights in Florida are?
They’re kinda cool, but strange.

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
20 days ago

The ones I use around here start blinking when they are failing. I generally like the highway lighting they’ve been using. It’s a lot easier on the eyes than what they used to have. And I think it uses 25% of the electricity of sodium vapor. If you notice such things, and I am the kind of person who notices these things, they also look good on gas canopies. Nice, pleasant lighting.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

Ebikes are taking over, ecars not so much. I’m OK with ebikes, especially for cargo bikes. If I wanted a cargo bike, it would be electric, but for getting around, I’d still rather have the workout. The reason they’re booming is that they make riding less laborious (work, yuck), and existing battery tech will give you an adequate range for a bike, so you don’t have to stop in the middle of a trip and charge. Ecars have neither of these advantages, so far. Absent a revolution in battery tech, I don’t see ecars catching on. They’ve been trying them… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Paintersforms
20 days ago

Actually, Edison had a popular sodium battery e-car in 1926; it can’t catch fire, is not toxic, and could go up to 1000 miles at 45 mph on a charge. So of course the Rockefeller gang made sure it got nowhere, the same as farm-produced ethanol* which powered 1/3 of the Midwest’s tractors.

*(100% ethanol has no tuoluide “sniffing glue” or bitumen vapor coating everything, water vapor exhaust. Everything called Green today is poison, deliberate poison.)

Last edited 20 days ago by Alzaebo
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Paintersforms
19 days ago

I can’t speak for catching on, but “catching fire” seems to be a clear and present danger for larger Li-Ion batteries. The overall rate may be fairly low, but there have been some dramatic news stories and a few deaths too I believe. I’m not a chemist, but seems to me that there may need to be tighter safety and insurance regulations about storing indoors what is only a step or two down from a Thermite incendiary device. The fact that most this crap comes from Third World nations not known for scrupulous safety standards is a factor, too.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

Preferring LED to sodium light is the surest brainwashed “bugman” tell.

Retvrn to flip phone before your manboobs start dispensing soy milk.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Hemid
20 days ago

Hemid: His roots are showing.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Hemid
20 days ago

Ha ha ha. Personally, I’ve gone back to the old rotary phone and my poor wife doesn’t get much sleep as a result. (-;

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Hemid
20 days ago

Don’t put down the flip phone. I recommend such to parents for their children to use. The so called “smart phone” allows the world access to your child.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Compsci
20 days ago

That’s a great idea. It never made sense to give your 10 year old access to porn just so they can contact you in an emergency.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  DLS
19 days ago

“Dad! When do I go through puberty so I can fully enjoy this?”

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Hemid
19 days ago

For an equivalent light output, LED use a small fraction of what an incandescent would, and (I believe) more efficient than old school fluorescent, which is why the last couple “fluorescent” fixtures I’ve bought were actually LED. Arguments that LED’s bluish light may cause eye problems may have merit, but I believe these apply mainly to computer screens, TVs too maybe.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

I cannot think of any examples where they forced something good on us that would have succeeded anyway. I can think of many examples of the opposite.

Mow Noname
Mow Noname
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

Banning smoking in airplanes.

The only government regulation I can truly say made my life better.

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Mow Noname
20 days ago

Yes, and when they banned it in bars and restaurants. People in these kinds of crowds were complaining about the Constitution and all that, including me. As far as I’m concerned, turned out okay.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

Health benefits aside, it’s turning bars into restaurants that close at 10, and that kind of sucks.

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

Yeah, but isn’t this the same crowd that makes fun of libertarians thinking that the market will solve all problems? And there’s also extreme libertarianism that holds TPTB have every right to muzzle us because my thought crimes are being expressed on a privately owned network.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  TempoNick
19 days ago

I’m confused by your 2nd statement. Perhaps you are being facetious and I miss it. A libertarian, extreme or not, would be against (nearly) all forms of government regulation, and surely abridgment of freedom of speech would be near the top of the list. Thus, your second statement is illogical.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

Who is this, Gallagher? The front rows better get their plastic sheets up before he starts sledgehammering watermelons and smashing pumpkins.

pyrrhus
pyrrhus
Reply to  Coalclinker
20 days ago

Yes, the old incandescents were the best and the cheapest…We stocked up at the time, and are still using them…

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  pyrrhus
20 days ago

1800s technology.

Andrew
Andrew
Reply to  Coalclinker
20 days ago

My experience with LEDs must be very different because I put LED bulbs in all my fixtures when I moved into my current house 4 years ago and haven’t replaced one yet. I remember have to change incandescents at least once a year back when we were using them. I bought LEDs at $15 for a 24-pack. The cheapest I ever bought incandescents was 3 for $2. So, not only are the LEDs more durable, but nominally cheaper.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Andrew
20 days ago

That certainly flies in the face of my experience. My LEDs used to fail at about the same rate as the old incands.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

This might be a symptom of bad power feed. I’ve replaced very few LED lights for failure, but mostly because of light quality—brightness and color. It’s still a Wild West out there with China. What they print on the box wrt spec’s often bears little resemblance to reality. Try to match up two bulbs purchased across time and manufacturers. I simply replace all bulbs. Also, as I’ve noted before, electricity savings via LED and CFL is much less than the Fed’s estimated. Why? Because the cheaper the lighting cost, the more you tend to install and use. This is noted… Read more »

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

The Chinese, and they are all Chinese, distributors and their factories are extremely erratic in quality. They buy from different factories offering different deals and quality is no issue with them.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Andrew
20 days ago

Subliminal flicker and blue-light radiation. Electronic lighting is an unhealthy, unnatural spectrum. The Bugman spectrum, like ghastly fluorescents.

Still, you do got a point. What’s missing is the “being forced” part by insane, evil, cartel criminals. All they need is a crack in the door.

I have a gal in the family that ran a tanning booth salon. Most of her customers actually came in for medicinal reasons. Sent in by the doctors, too. It is somewhat astonishing the range of conditions that can be treated with light spectra, (and sound, and subsound.)

Last edited 20 days ago by Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
20 days ago

Addendum on the “sound, and subsound” part. This is why the Evil Ones waged a quiet war on…bells. Cast bronze and iron bells, all around the world. Nearly all the bells worldwide were smelted down for the “necessity” to make into bullets for the World Wars. The last bell-maker forge in Britain, in operation for 350 years, was arbitrarily shut down, millenia of arcane knowledge lost to us, generations of fathers teaching sons in the grand tradition. Why would the Evil Ones do this? Because of harmony. The harmonic vibrations of the church bells aligned literally every cell of every… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by Alzaebo
Mow Noname
Mow Noname
Reply to  Alzaebo
20 days ago

The bells in my church were blessed before they were installed. Not sure if that is just a wacky Catholic thing…

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Alzaebo
19 days ago

Incandescents flicker at 60 Hz (or 50 Hz), sometimes visibly. LED requires DC which “in theory” should not flicker at all*. I’m not an engineer, but I did have a background in electronics tells me that the LED element itself has a service life approaching infinity for all practical purposes. Far more failure prone is the power supply. In the case of a bulb that’ll likely be a Buck converter. Enhancing “failure prone” is the fact that perhaps with the exception of specialist or military grade gear, all this stuff is built to a low price point by third world… Read more »

Gideon
Gideon
Reply to  Andrew
20 days ago

Filament LEDs are a decent replacement for traditional incandescents in terms of aesthetics and light distribution, but I have to agree with Kozelski in regards to longevity. Instead of the filament burning out in an incandescent, it’s probably the transformer that goes in an LED. Could both be instances of built-in obsolescence?

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Andrew
20 days ago
Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Coalclinker
20 days ago

“Although nobody liked the light bulb ban at the time, don’t you need to push people into things sometimes? As far as I’m concerned those curly fluorescent bulbs were crap, but they work quickly replaced with LED lights, which are superior to both.” This explains your downvotes, Nick. The government decided it knew better than the market and forced CFL technology. By the time of the Inc ban, CFL’s were dead in the market and LED had been perfected—with no government promotion via law. The issue here is not one technology vs another, it’s that the government got involved in… Read more »

mmack
mmack
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

If the LED bulbs were truly better, there would be no need to ban normal bulbs. The jury is still out on the alleged superiority of LED. Now do automobiles. Haul the EPA and NHTSA into court and kill the CAFE regulations and these EV diktats! Sorry Elon, better hope SpaceX and X bring in more cash. 😏 If I want a Big Ol’ Car powered by a Big Honking V8 and have the money to pay for the gasoline that powers it, then By Goodness I want to have said automobile and drive it. Likewise, if I want a… Read more »

mmack
mmack
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

Agreed. We cannot have sedans or coupes that fit people and their belongings (groceries, luggage, etc.) because we must get 500 miles to a Dixie cup of gasoline so people buy CUVs and SUVs and pickup trucks with a shrinking bed and a growing cab to the point a pickup is just a sedan with the trunk lid removed. (As an aside I rode in the back seat of a friend’s new Nissan CUV within the last week. Legroom, what was that? Didn’t CARS used to have that?) Gone are the days of my cheap Chevrolet pickup with a rubber… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

2700K (iirc) LEDs. Close to incandescent color. I’ve been using them for 8 years. Maybe 2 have burned out so far. Not bad, not clearly better, but they do draw less power.

Last edited 20 days ago by Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

Yeah, it’s a race to see if LED price drops faster than electric bills rise lol.

And the blue light is awful. I bought a couple of ‘daylight’ bulbs initially because they were cheaper and promptly returned them.

Last edited 20 days ago by Paintersforms
DLS
DLS
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

The same thing happened with all the “smart appliances”, like washing machines that automatically determine how much water you are allowed to use. The manufacturers were happy to go along because they could add a shitty electronic panel and charge twice as much, and then sell you a new one when the electronic panel breaks.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

Everything in AINO is a bloody scam wrapped in a racket inside a scheme. But, hey, capitalism…

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  DLS
20 days ago

Speed Queen or die! Time to start trolling laundromats for obsolete equipment.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Paintersforms
20 days ago

Paintersform: That was another reason we bought our property – our too-small house came with a one-year old Speed Queen washer and dryer. Still working just fine.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  DLS
19 days ago

My earlier blatantly pro-LED posts notwithstanding, I’m fully in agreement. Automation has its place, but it has no place some places. Your example of a washing machine is one of those. I have an acquaintance who is an early adopter. I visit a couple times a year. The BMW i3 was cool; he could start it via wi-fi, or maybe his phone. At the time he had a washing machine that had f—king wi-fi!!! I was never clear on what the value of it was, but I suppose one got an email or a text on one’s phone that the load… Read more »

Zulu Juliet
Zulu Juliet
Reply to  thezman
20 days ago

I have a dragon’s hoard of incandescent bulbs, including the coveted 100w, but I am all in on LEDs. It was dumb luck that LEDs came in time to keeps us from having to use those awful twisties. I am burning through the stash of incandescents. I will not lament when the stash is gone. All my work bench fluorescents have been replaced with LED strips. The LEDs are far brighter and slimmer. Some of the LED setups are supersonic cool. LEDs for my aquariums are the Word: They are programmed for a dim orange sunrise, transitioning to full daylight… Read more »

Guest
Guest
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

Nudge your way back to Chicago, Mr. Sunstein.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

TempoNick: Caelum non animum mutant qui trans mare currunt.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

I hate the new light bulbs. The light they emit is ghastly. The wife and I have stocked up on the old incandescents so we don’t have to be bathed in wan and pallid emanations.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

Try and learn about the LED color ratings and variations. It’s a pain, and I’ve spent about twice as much as with the old Inc bulbs via LED toss outs, but I’ve set up the entire house with only LED. Especially useful are dimmable LED lights. It was a project after the house move that kept me busy. But that’s just me, I had time and money to spend. Alternatively, you can just say the hell with it and save aggravation. 😉 Addition/correction: I have a reading light by the bed that’s 3-way Inc. I have simply not found a… Read more »

Last edited 20 days ago by Compsci
Zulu Juliet
Zulu Juliet
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
20 days ago

Many LEDs are programmable to set whatever tone you find pleasing.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Zulu Juliet
20 days ago

What do you mean by tone? Brightness or color? Brightness is not the issue for me; color is. And from my experience, the baleful light of LEDs makes everybody look like something from a Boris Karloff horror flick.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
19 days ago

Color temperature is the technical term. As with old-fashioned lighting, LED should be available in a range of color temperatures from ‘warm” (reddish) to “cool” (bluish) and several in between. Thus, you have the option of skin tone looking like an albino’s corpse to a feather Indian and many more. Note to racists: Don’t try a “black” light; it’ll make you look purple.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ben the Layabout
19 days ago

Hm. I shall have to repair to LED Emporium. I have not noticed such choices on offer at the grocery store where I shop for bubs.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  TempoNick
20 days ago

Kind of mixed thoughts on the LED v Incand. LED do use less power, and the range of light color (as well as effects) is nice. Not sure they really last much longer. Also dislike with extreme prejudice the “retro” fit recessed lighting. Having to replace the whole unit rather than just a bulb is a pain in the ass.