Labor Day Thoughts

One of the consequences of the neoliberal order is that labor markets in Western societies are at war with themselves. On the one hand, the relentless competition within the managerial class, the so-called meritocracy, results in a relentless, passive-aggressive struggle for status. Within that class of people it is a state of constant anxiety, as these people worry that one small misstep will cause them to lose their standing within the managerial class. Everyone is miserable.

On the other hand, the math of the managerial system means pitting worker against worker, usually relying on foreign mercenaries, to suppress wages and prevent class solidarity. In order to support the swelling army of otherwise useless people in the media, academy and government, it means extracting ever more from the laboring classes and their private employers. The typical private sector worker is under relentless daily pressure to do more with less.

Compounding this is the natural response to these pressures, where workers accumulate in areas shielded from competition. Government grows, as a jobs program and as a way to maintain support for government. The massive growth in government, education and now health care are responses to the relentless competition within the so-called private sector. Skip to the bottom of this post, where there is a graph showing the growth in administrators within the American health care industry.

One vice jaw is the relentless pressure for efficiency in the daily lives of most workers, while the other jaw is a metastasizing layer of naturally inefficient services crowding into daily lives. The typical American spends all day under relentless pressure to perform, while having to navigate a labyrinth of ineptitude in the other parts of their lives. A trip to your kid’s school or a visit to the doctor is like entering a secret world where nothing gets done, no one gets fired and no one cares.

A reason America is such an angry place, despite the massive material prosperity, is that the labor markets are upside down. Prosperity and efficiency should result in a more relaxed and predictable private work place. Good times are supposed to be good times, not a frenzied state of constant worry. Within living memory, a booming economy meant a rise in general happiness, as workers and business enjoyed the fruits of general prosperity. Today, good times are defined by constant dread.

On the other hand, the administrative side of modern society, government, education, health care, should be declining in the lives of the people. In the dreaded private sector, automation means reductions in labor. In the public sphere, automation has meant an explosion of people. The post-Cold War economic boom has seen government more than double. The education bureaucracy has swollen like a tumor. Health care, as seen in that graph, has grown to become a dominant part of life.

Now, the dynamics in the workplace are not the only reason for the rising unhappiness in the West. Importing those foreign mercenaries to undermine domestic labor markets and dilute the vote has consequences beyond economics. Today, people find themselves living among strangers, who practice weird customs and speak exotic languages. America is rapidly becoming a land of foreigners. Diversity plus proximity always results in conflict. No one can afford to relax anymore.

There’s also the massive wealth gap in modern America. As the middle-class is being squeezed to support the managerial class, the over-class is looking like the aristocracy of 18th century France. The tech and financial barons live lives incomprehensible to middle-class people. Worse yet, the reckless disregard of the over-class makes them natural villains. Americans have been trained to admire success, but today’s successful are ugly, un-American people, who elicit nothing but contempt.

The growth of mass media certainly plays a part in the general unhappiness. At the end of the Cold War, most people had television and a newspaper. It was impossible for unwelcome advertisers to invade the private space. Today, we are awash in media and most of it is terrible. How many times do you have to have a video start playing while you are reading the sports pages, before you are in a sour mood? Make that a constant state and it is easy to see how mass media immiserates us.

Immigration, mass media and massive wealth gaps are certainly sources of unhappiness, but they can be remedied. People can form local communities, tune out the media and enjoy their own prosperity. The conflict in the workplace and the growth of the administrative state are unavoidable. Even in traditional homes, worry about the workplace will cause private anxiety. The swollen ranks of single people, defined by their career, are beholden to the daily uncertainty of the workplace.

Turning America is an economic zone, modeled on 20th century business management techniques, has resulted in a marketplace of miserable customers. Rather than economic prosperity resulting in a happy populace, it is a free-for-all of Darwinian competition, where everyone sees everyone as a threat. Prosperity itself becomes a daily threat, as it is built on a relentless drive for efficiency. Bad times meant belt-tightening. Today, good times means being replaced by a Hindu.

That slams into the other jaw of neoliberalism, which is the incoherent inefficiency of the managerial class and their plaything the administrative state. Leave the office to attend to something at your kid’s school or get a physical and you are confronted with a world of negative productivity, run by people with prestigious credentials, frittering away their days in nonsense activities. The constant clash of unpleasant realities makes a normal man spit on his hands, hoist the black flag , and begin slitting throats.


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Chris_Lutz
Member

I remember as a kid when the talk was about how efficiency would result in a four day work week and the same standard of living. Instead it became a push for more things, both parents working, and the destruction of the family.

Of course, the media has spent, since I can remember, showing any sort of normal life as abhorrent and evil.

Member

The economics literature of the 1950s predicted a 25-hour work week and questioned what we would do with all of our spare time. Didn’t quite work out that way, although I’ve heard arguments that most people actually do work about 25 hours a week and the rest of the time is just spent in the place of employment.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Diversity, I’d have to agree. The Internet was a boon and a bust in this regard. Used to be it would take hours to locate, download and install patches to software, now it’s minutes and often automatic. What to do with the time saved… 😉

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

I’ve been a “car guy” since I was a teenager. Before the internet came along – I had a bookcase full of parts catalogs and manuals for cars I had worked on and/or owned. A lot of these took many years to accumulate – as I would run across obscure purveyors of one-off parts for an obscure car – and squirrel that info away in case I needed it in the future. Every single mechanic or car hobbyist I knew back in the pre-internet days – did the same thing. Along comes the internet – and I could immediately see… Read more »

grey enlightenment
Guest

the workweek is shortening and as you say ppl spend less time actually doing work

Member

You work three days a week for yourself and two for the parasites feasting upon you.

wxtwxtr
Guest
wxtwxtr

Soon to be … two and three!

A.B Prosper
Guest
A.B Prosper

Once automation and urbanization kicks in , parasitism is inevitable There simply isn’t enough well remunerated work to support families in an urban society and each year it gets worse and worse. Though closing the doors to global trade has its merits and will have a positive effect, it is not a long term solution either. Even in closed market you don’t need A.I. or manlike robots or most of the Scifi hooey to devalue labor, you simply need the computers we already have Less money for workers , less future If we can’t figure out a way to do… Read more »

wxtwxtr
Guest
wxtwxtr

The Jetson’s world was pretty white. And somewhat sterile.

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

I recall skimming through a Time magazine cover story in the early 1990’s that was celebrating the fax machine and other new technologies as heralds of the new area of high quality living for American workers — all the increased productivity from the technology would allow workers to work fewer days/hours and be even more productive, with more free time and higher quality of life. After that, I never saw another article like that in a mainstream publication. Work hours increased while pay stagnated. Fewer holidays. Elimination of positions meant 1 worker doing the job of 3 workers. Etc. I… Read more »

Member

There were serious proposals during the Carter Regime when the Fax was first introduced to restrict them to the Postal Service : you would go to the Post Office to send one one and the recipient to theirs to pick it up.

In a sane society proposal alone this would have resulted in politicians swinging from lampposts.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Bile, I was just about through the comments and ready to go out to eat when I read yours wrt USPS. Now I have an upset stomach and no longer wish to eat. Bad memories, sigh.

Member

Ugh. I went to ship a package at the local USPS office a while ago. I wanted to ship it COD and was told that the package was too big to ship COD. How could the size of the package possibly make a difference in whether COD is possible?

DLS
Guest
DLS

Possibly because the recipient might not pay, and the USPS would have to send it back to you, which would be expensive for a larger package. Just guessing.

Member

When I was growing up, pre-internet and pre-desktop computer, my Mom worked as a “regional coordinator” for a pharmaceutical sakes team — sort of a combination group secretary, receptionist and logistical coordinator.

Fast forward a few years to my own work as a sales engineer and that role doesn’t exist anymore. Microsoft Office and the internet killed it.

Where are the people who did that job now? Near as I can tell, they work in HR making everyone’s life miserable to give them busy work to do.

A.B Prosper
Guest
A.B Prosper

Those people have to eat and if as a society we want people to have kids, they had better have jobs Since wages will never be allowed to go up enough for one income to support a family this means a lot of useless jobs that exist to annoy people along with loads of scams, and other sorts of leeching we only really have enough productive remunerative work for about half the working age population to work 30 hours full time and acres of junk jobs on top of that And note when upward mobility was a common thing, junk… Read more »

Member

Add to that white people that have children have got to be becoming aware that their children are going to be a despised minority when they’re adults. There is a desperation among those parents to make sure there is lots and lots of money for their kids to be above the chaos when the children are older. Of course the state is brainwashing the kids so chances are half of them are going to turn on their parents anyway
Terrible situation

SamlAdams
Guest
SamlAdams

You can avoid that brainwashing but it takes constant unremitting diligence and attention. Spent last year concurrently reteaching the AP US History course to one of my kids. It was worth it. She pulled a 4 on the exam and came out actually knowing something. But if I’d left it to the teacher and that god awful Zinn book they were using…..

Member

I can’t believe they were using zinn’s book. When I was in my early twenties and a liberal a lot of people I knew read that book and it was considered highly subversive. It was a badge of honor for people that claim to read it. Now it’s in the schools.

SamlAdams
Guest
SamlAdams

I happen to have a BA (and most of my masters course work) in history from what was once one of the best programs in the country–could literally mark almost every page of Zinn’s book with error corrections. Thank God, also happened to have a facility with numbers and went into finance. Never could have stomached a career in academia.

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

So I did a little research on Howard Zinn, and whatdayaknow!!!!

>>>Zinn was born to a Jewish immigrant family in Brooklyn on August 24, 1922.<<<

EVERY. SINGLE. TIME.

Exile
Guest
Exile

Or just trust your lying eyes.

comment image

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

I was fortunate to take AP US History in the mid ’70s, taught by a buzz-cut old marine. I can’t recall what text we used but it was more a backdrop to his lectures and the student reports (very small class for the time of perhaps 15). We each had to do a written research report plus oral presentation each quarter on a subject approved by the teacher. That was where I first heard of the Wobblies and other, more useful stuff. Surprised the teacher, the other students, and myself by getting a 5 on the test.

Flair 1239
Member

David Lowery introduces me to the Wobblies.

“I ain’t no Wobbly; No Pinko Commie; Lets start the end times right now!”

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Whitney, it is unfortunately still widely used and if I recall was rated the most popular book of its kind a few years ago. Indeed, when we as a State attempted to shut down our Mexican Studies programs in K through 12, the Zinn book was prominent in the stack of books on the local Director of MA Studies desk. Of course, the ignorant reporter interviewing him was clueless and asked no questions wrt to content of the assigned materials, such as Zinn, he was shown. The other day, I saw on Amazon a book being offered which was a… Read more »

Ganderson
Guest
Ganderson

Zinn’s book is all that all of you are describing and more, but you don’t realize that in reality most textbook used for US History classes have the same basic outlook that Zinn does. That and almost all History teachers are commies. No buzz- cutted Marines anymore..

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Agreed. Most widely used book in intro Political Science, “The Irony of Democracy”. Title says it all. Completely against our current democratic processes.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Geezus – they’re using that book by Zinn as a textbook? I remember when that came out – and there was a lot of criticism of it (at least among the right wing / libertarian circles I spent time in ) – and how full of outright lies and errors it was. What I remember of history when I was in school – was a sleep inducing repeat of the same stuff over and over and over again. I admit to not paying much attention during history class – but that was probably because I had been reading a lot… Read more »

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Or you could avoid the brainwashing entirely by homeschooling. We were forced to do this for my younger son when his Christian school (which has since closed) began importing diversity via scholarship so they could have better sportsball teams (plus the usual churchian psychobabble about how we’re all brothers). Then they replaced the retiring older teachers with shiny new products of ed schools with a bit of churchianity layered on top, and switched to more ‘inclusive’ textbooks. Even books from Christian publishers, which had been fairly good when my older son used them, now included entirely rewritten sections plus lots… Read more »

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

A lot of homeschool kids hit adulthood as maladjusted wierdos. They have no resistance to the Cultural Smallpox Blankets GloboHomo offers them.

I don’t say this as a defense of Public Schools, but it’s a real problem and it gets overlooked.

Exile
Guest
Exile

I blame the sheltered, watch-TV stay-indoors/home lifestyle more than homeschooling. Homeschooled kids should have more free time than K-12s to go out and socialize with other kids – no wasted dindu-sitting time for the instructor, less non-instructional BS in general to cope with. Parents who shelter their kids Benedict Option style aren’t making them stronger. Shelter them when they’re very young then make sure they’re socialized with other kids as they get old enough to handle themselves.

Pontius Pirate
Guest

Regarding “dindu” it seems to me there’s a semantic problem. All dindus, as we know, dindu dat thang dey did. Fair enough. However, most dindus also don’t du nuffin all day long neither, cept fo dat thang dey did du.

Statistically we should call them don’dus, using the present imperfect, or continuous. However, what dey dindu tends to have more impact den what dey don’ du, so it’s sort of a puzzler.

Guess we should stick with what’s already stuck.

Exile
Guest
Exile

13 wildu 50. Shitlibs woando nuthin bout it.

Gravity Denier
Guest
Gravity Denier

How much din would a dindu do if a dindu din du din? A dindu would do duns of din if a dindu din du din.

Educated.Redneck
Guest
Educated.Redneck

Homeschool or die.

Penitent Man
Guest
Penitent Man

We can be brothers in Christ. But God established the nations and tribes of the earth, for His reasons. It does not mean we have to or should cohabitate. To each their own land and peoples. Fraternity without fraternization works best by design. This may be unpopular here and I’ll see if I can get myself to care. I do not hate the other tribes or people of the Earth. I wish them well in Their Lands. I pray they all join the Corpus Christi. We can help each other in times of need, but it unwise for the tribes… Read more »

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

Well said.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

“But this tower of Babel forced upon us…”
Why, it is, innit? Exactly that.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Worse, the kids often turn on each other fighting over the inheritance. Most important strength is the family unit, from there all things are built, or destroyed.

De Beers Diamonds
Guest

For residents of Kalifornia, just wait for the fireworks when the black-brown alliance demands repeal of prop 13. Can’t have those old white people owning houses and passing them on.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

DeBeers, shhh!!
FFS

Member

I’ve had experience with the medical care systems of France, Russia and the United States. One thing is immediately apparent is that there are many more auxiliaries in the U.S. system–lots of people who spend most of their time standing around; In France, when you go to see a doctor, often the doctor opens the door, and when you call, the doctor answers the phone. In Russia, the overhead at the private clinic that I went to was higher, but my doctor gave me her cell phone number so that I could reach her directly. France has single payor although… Read more »

SamlAdams
Guest
SamlAdams

I work in the P&C side of the business….and as f-d up as I believe it is, walking into any medical encounter is positively Dickensian. I really don’t know how it functions. Had to sell a small health insurer owned by my old firm about 20 years ago. It was a truly shitty business.

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

Right now we have the worst of both worlds, our system is free market in name only, although you could say that about so many industries now. All we know as a country is putting more and more firepower on a problem for less and less results. In some cases literally. We’re paying $100mil per F35. People scream about Obamacare, but our system was broken long before that. The looming debt crisis will sweep a lot of this. The health care system is just another example of how our economy produces little to no value, and is based on maximum… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

One can’t talk about US health care inefficiencies without talking about alternatives now being developed, such as concierge medicine groups. These groups are opening where I live and they do not take insurance plans, instead you pay them a yearly or monthly fee per family member. You see a doctor, or he sees you when you need him. Procedures and costs are posted. For example, an MRI (they contract with a provider whose got the machine) is under $400. One even has its own pharmacy and fills prescriptions for cost. Point being that one now has a sense of “real”… Read more »

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Guest
Ris_Eruwaedhiel

I remember as a young child “emergency” paid for big ticket items. Basic care was paid out of pocket, which makes sense. You pay out-of-pocket for routine home maintenance such as repainting the walls or replacing the roof. If a tree falls on the roof, that will be covered. Regarding concierge service, what do you do about big ticket items? I’m an extremely strong and lucky person, healthwise, but did spend two days at a local hospital for double pneumonia several years ago. Medical insurance paid for everything except for the tv, phone and results of medical tests. The pneumonia… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

As I understand it, you buy catastrophic health insurance with a largish deduction. Say, you pay the first $5-6k. Hard to really state pricing because the Fed’s have everything so damn screwed up. But like I said, I and the wife are old, like really in the time of life to keel over and rack up a $100k bill. Indeed, the wife had a heart attack and racked up $50k five years ago, yet we only pay $15k or so for the current plan—which is good, not a phony high deductible. I believe we are on the hook for the… Read more »

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Part of the problem in this country – is peoples concept of “insurance” – is completely warped. They expect health “insurance” to pretty much pay for everything health related. Which to my way of thinking is a by-product of their free shit mentality. The majority of people in my experience have a complete disconnect between in their heads between what health care they get – and how much it actually costs – or should cost. They know damn well they’re paying a huge amount for health insurance – but they don’t connect this to what the actual bills cost. I… Read more »

Maren
Guest
Maren

Our self-employed small family of 4 started out paying about $450/ month for health insurance with a $1500 deductible. Seemed fair. This was in 2003. Over time it went up and up until 2015 it was $2300 per month with a $15,000 deductible. No prescriptions were covered, ever. When I told a woman I know, a Mexican woman who is in the country illegally, that one of my son’s inhalers was $175, she said, “Why don’t you just get your medicine from the county? It only costs $1.” Then I began to hate.

Maus
Guest
Maus

Whether you die by the gun in Texas, by hurricane in Florida or by fire in Mexifornia, we are all doomed. Eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we die. I am tired of dwelling on all the sh*t I cannot control in this supposed “land of freedom.” Time to bug out. Peace.

Member

Ok, see you in a week or so , right here.

DLS
Guest
DLS

In the clearing stands a boxer, and a fighter by his trade
And he carries the reminders
Of every glove that laid him down or cut him
‘Til he cried out in his anger and his shame
“I am leaving, I am leaving”, but the fighter still remains

John Smith
Member

OMFG…my mother. That bint drove me around the bend with her BS. In her defence, she’s an old Boomer that formed her opinions back when Diversity was a good idea and good jobs were everywhere. In those days a woman could still make good money doing clerical and admin work, and when she and her friends fell, it was always upward. Only the best people are employed by the govt, and if she ever had to work in the private sector…why, she’d make at least three times the money there than she did with the gubbimint!!! (She’d probably have to… Read more »

Exile
Guest
Exile

Required reading for those who can’t understand why the damned kids around here keep ragging on the Boomers. That world view is impenetrable. Xers have it too, I did. It took a lot of changes in life to flip my script finally open my big brain to new realities I refused to see from Reagan to Bush the Lesser.

3g4me
Guest
3g4me

My almost 90 year old mother is a silent, and before she started losing her mental edge (not real dementia, but not all there either) she would have been just like John Smith’s mother. I stopped discussing anything of substance with her decades ago, and moving 1300 miles away (after I returned from years abroad) helped a lot too.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

Stop blaming it all on Boomers and X’ers. I’ve got the same attitude as that which you claim all the kids have these days – but it’s because I spent my life working in private industry. No pension, no 3 months off in the summer because I’m a teacher, no retiring at 55 because I’m a government worker – none of that shit. Because I work in the private sector – I’ve been laid off multiple times. When the stock market goes down the shitter – my “pension” goes down the shitter with it. I don’t see this as necessarily… Read more »

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

The boomers will be the least visited people in the nursing home. They’ll be ghosted worse than they did to grandma in 1987. Don’t worry, she’ll finally get to experience those exotic diverse people in her incapacitated state, as they steal anything of value from her night stand and leave her with bed sores. She can go to bed hearing the shrieking monkey like Tagalog and smelling the oils from some fish head soup they bring into the place.

Eusebia
Guest
Eusebia

If the Boomers are least visited, that just means the Boomer’s children are worthless. How sharper than a serpent’s tooth…

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Indeed. Boomer here. No one I know and respect would ever use such language or descriptions wrt their parents, much less their mother. There are ghetto gang bangers who were raised (if you can call it that) in the darkest parts of our inner cities by single, drug addicted mothers who wouldn’t use such disparaging language.

What you say may all be true, but you have not earned the right to say such. Perhaps on your deathbed, you’ll have such a right.

Eusebia
Guest
Eusebia

They yammer endlessly about tribalism and deracinated, atomistic post-modern society, pine for white communities and solidarity, but aren’t even loyal to their own “bitch”, “cnut” mothers, their own flesh and blood.

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

Older generations are not facing what younger people are facing. The few who are clear headed and not wealthy are understandably quite concerned (panicked at times even). My view of the future is that I am entering into a war (how hot of a war is yet to be determined), and must prepare myself for it to the extent possible (not just materially, but mentally and spiritually). In truth though, it’s not so much a war that is coming, as a hunt, in which people like me are the prey. My boomer parents are actually fairly sane and clear headed… Read more »

Ayatollah Rockandrollah
Member

Whites are now turning against our own parents as part of the self-loathing monkey show we’re putting on for the spectators. I don’t get it any more. Like everyone around me is in some bizarre death-by-a-thousand-self-inflicted-cuts cult. I despair of this ending in my lifetime, and have largely given up on making any future plans. As a Christian I do not despair of my soul, but I have abandoned hope in this culture and this regime. I fear everything of value will be taken away by the tides. This is not the school of resentment let loose in the streets,… Read more »

John Thompson
Guest
John Thompson

Frankly, Whites have a long history of being detached from our families compared other races. Individualism drives it, and it is one of the most unique things about western society. It probably explains a lot about the current situation we’re in.

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

I forgot to mention, “only the boomers I don’t like and were part of the problem.”

Yves Vannes
Member

The great failure of the Boomers as a whole was in part due to being the first generation raised on the fantasy world of television. It gave them the illusion of omnipotence: if we can think it we can do it, we can even bend nature to our will. The first generation who believed deeply that they could replace tradition and history with abstract fairytales that would right the wrongs of their fathers and grandfathers.

Anon
Guest
Anon

Disgusting language… I’m sorry that you are bitter at your mother, but she is still your mother. That said, are you really not capable of setting aside your political disagreements?

The main idea on this website is that we need strong, nuclear families and strong white communities… calling your mother a “cunt” is not really productive.

Sad.

Mark Stoval
Guest
Mark Stoval

One of the things that destroyed the working people of the USA was a thing called inflation. The USA federal government sucked ever more money away from the people using inflation. Fake money backed by nothing but the power of the central government. This high inflation led to couples needing two incomes. It led to children being very expensive and that led to smaller families. Both parents working also led to smaller families but also to not raising the children as well as former generations when mom could stay at home. The satanic central government has been attacking the family… Read more »

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

If the US had stayed on the gold standard (which sadly never would have happened ever) the government would have stopped growing in the 70’s and would have had to trip costs even more. It was the detachment from the monetary anchor that allowed all of this.

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

how do you grow an economy if you are on a gold standard?

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

How did they grow it for the first 150 years? Not through endless extension of credit from the Fed.

Ayatollah Rockandrollah
Member

We went from a creditor economy before Vietnam to a debtor one afterward. That war did us in. The dollars we were throwing around the world like faux gangster-rap “artists” were coming home to roost, both in inflation and a run on gold. In fact, the “end” of the Cold War a few decades later set off the the timer on the dynamite underneath the House of Empire: 25 years. Time’s up.

Speed up 1946-2019 and view it all from space, and you can see it. The tide is coming back in on us. Hard.

A.B Prosper
Guest
A.B Prosper

Gold and silver standard actually. The gold standard was highly deflationairy and caused contant bank panics and staving workers wages

The bimetallism espoused by Bryant or some variation of it would have been far more suitable especially with a 5x population increase while still constricting spending

Da Booby
Guest

The Booby once had to utilize the health care system in Panama because… well because the Booby’s a klutz, but that’s neither here nor there. Point is, a doctor was called – an English-speaking, US-trained, doctor – who promptly came to the hotel room (Anyone remember house calls? No, the Booby doesn’t, either), made his diagnosis, administered an injection, prescribed (and personally hand-delivered) two antibiotic prescriptions and a topical cream. There were no administrators, it’s not even clear if the doctor has a secretary. Cost of the house call and all the treatments? US $80. Paid in cash. In his… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

This could soon be the same in the US once folk get back to an understanding that they—and no one else—is responsible for paying for their medical care. However, the political parties are vile panderers and would rather control that segment of the market than promote free commerce within. See concierge medicine.

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

Sort of off topic, but related to modern malaise. I thought of you, Da Booby, when I saw this article (I believe you commented on alimony in the past. If I have the wrong man in mind, my apologies!). I wish this man well and hope something comes of his efforts. The current set-up almost encourages women to get divorced and live off her ex’s labor. It is terrible for the children, adds to harpification of women and is so unfair to the men — very bad for white people. ****************************** Calling alimony ‘legal extortion,’ Huntington Beach man aims to… Read more »

Da Booby
Guest

Thanks Ursula.

Crazy isn’t it? If a gal’s standard of living goes up for no other reason than because she marries a fella should it not go back down if she divorces that fella? And visa versa?

She gets to divorce the fella but keep enjoying the standard of living he provided. Huh?

Whatever happened to “a woman needs a man like a fish needs a bicycle”?

Marriage today is a legal scam.

Peace.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

I remember thinking this was screwed up all the way back in the 1970s – when there were a few high profile celebrity divorces and the ex-wives were arguing for huge alimony payments. Their stated reasoning was ” I need to be supported in the lifestyle I’ve become accustomed to”. This was something that really made an impression on my teenage boy mind. You mean if I marry some woman and start making a bunch of money – and then we get divorced… I’ll basically be paying this bitch for life? WTF!. It’s things like this that just make me… Read more »

Da Booby
Guest

When the Booby says “today” he means the Western World post-1960s soft coup by the academic left. 😉

DLS
Guest
DLS

Not sure who said it: Don’t get married. Just find a woman you hate and buy her a house.

Calsdad
Guest
Calsdad

That was Rod Stewart:

“Instead of getting married again, I’m going to find a woman I don’t like and just give her a house.”

Chet Rollins
Guest
Chet Rollins

My old man was your typical boomer civ-nat free-marketer. With his humble associates degree he worked his way up the corporate ladder to a high-level senior position. Somewhere around the 2000’s executive culture changed, and it seems to be universal. He noticed that his job became more a matter of power struggles and political maneuvering than performance. He was never one to play the game, and figured he would keep his nose down and work his way though, the way he always did. Then, one day. He came to work and his keycard did not work. Ends up one of… Read more »

Exile
Guest
Exile

They’ve essentially turned the country into a company.

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

My Dad would be retired, but his pension, which he’s paid into for decades, will quite certainly go broke very soon. There are too few union members paying in (God bless neoliberalism, free trade, Ronnie Raygun, et al. We must be Free, even if middle class living must go extinct for it), and scams like the 2007 crisis, which the elite weathered, or used to further themselves, have greatly damaged it. “Everyone rob everyone else blind, he who dies having spent/accumulated the most wins. This is sane and decent living, and mandated by the Rights of Man.” Who could have… Read more »

Official Bologna Tester
Guest
Official Bologna Tester

“That is the sound of inevitability.” ” It is in the interest of tyrants to reduce the people to ignorance and vice. For they cannot live in any country where virtue and knowledge prevail. The religion and public liberty of a people are intimately connected; their interests are interwoven, they cannot subsist separately; and therefore they rise and fall together. For this reason, it is always observable, that those who are combin’d to destroy the people’s liberties, practice every art to poison their morals.” -Samuel Adams Rome has grown since its humble beginnings that it is now overwhelmed by its… Read more »

Official Bologna Tester
Guest
Official Bologna Tester

Here’s a toon for everyone who still has hope of turning back the sands of time.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSZxmZmBfnU

Official Bologna Tester
Guest
Official Bologna Tester

Here’s a post from yesterday between Mark Stoval and myself that got 4 up votes.
Mark Stoval said: “It is not “black pilling” to talk about reality.”
“Hear Hear! Speak the truth and let the chips fall where they may.”
Golly gee, what happened between then and now?

.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

OBT, I just pushed your negative (-1) to zero. But really, you can’t post here and pay too much attention to the up/down votes. There is no posted standard for giving an up/down vote. A negative can mean any number of things—from simple disagreement to “you’re an idiot”. 😉

Official Bologna Tester
Guest
Official Bologna Tester

Compsci said: “But really, you can’t post here and pay too much attention to the up/down votes.” True. I was simply pointing out the little inconsistencies I get from one post to the next. I just think it’s a teensy bit hypocritical to through spitballs at the left for not being able to face facts if we won’t do it ourselves. That’s all I’m saying.

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

LOL. Here are my suggestions for those who, like myself (“dreamers of the day”), dream (“hope against hope”) of making a positive dent in the world: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrBUr8Ks3IA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vD90MsVRUko https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUj-2aCOHSQ “Life is a struggle involving plants, animals, and humans. It is a struggle between individuals, social classes, peoples, and nations, and it can take the form of economic, social, political, and military competition. It is a struggle for the power to make one’s will prevail, to exploit one’s advantage, or to advance one’s opinion of what is just or expedient.” “Should the white peoples ever become so tired of war that… Read more »

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

LOL, that up-vote is from me.

Here’s my recommendation for us dreamers of the day, Gustav Holst’s “Mars, the Bringer of War” (I prefer this recording by Karajan, who’s Beethoven symphonies I also prefer). I post it with the stipulation that this is, and will remain for a long time, an intellectual war. Only with the massive spread of ideas do we stand a chance, and violence only impedes our ability to spread those ideas:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lB8F852qJsU

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

“All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible.” T. E. Lawrence For those who are 100% black-pilled (I’m just shy of it): “We are born into this time and must bravely follow the path to the destined end. There is no other way. Our duty is to hold on to the lost position, without hope, without rescue,… Read more »

Lordon G Giddy
Guest
Lordon G Giddy

The Democratic Party selling out labor for the sexual deviant lobby has accelerated the pain of working class whites. Until we get back to normal average IQ jobs able to provide for a family of four and we encourage men to marry and have families we will continue running in this gerbil cage. Females leading a society does not work. Neither does white cucks with thousand dollar suits and their “Amish” bankers “consolidating” and finding ”synergys” in the private sector while the public sector balloons in fat and unnecessary labor work either. It all is going to have to correct… Read more »

Exile
Guest
Exile

“Turning America is an economic zone, modeled on 20th century business management techniques, has resulted in a marketplace of miserable customers.,,,Today, good times means being replaced by a Hindu.” Of course. In hindsight, how could we have expected it to turn out the Milton Friedman way? The number of things that are now obvious to me post-red-pill are enough to shut me down with self-loathing sometimes. It’s not just that “not everybody” is cut out for a world of Sociopathic Darwinism. Nobody is. No nation has ever been this rich, or this miserable. The world happiness report (https://worldhappiness.report/ed/2019/) has special… Read more »

Da Booby
Guest

“The typical American spends all day under relentless pressure to perform” Yes. Do you think the dude at McDonald’s wants to ask you if you want “to add two cookies to your order for only $1.25”? No, he f’ing hates it. The customer hates it. If the Booby wanted to add two cookies to his order he bloody well would have. The customer snaps at the dude behind the counter, then the dude’s manager asks him at the end of the week why only 1% of his orders took the extra two cookies. It’s a shit world. A co-worker’s daughter… Read more »

Exile
Guest
Exile

The lack of meaningful work is one of the biggest problems for scaled-up capitalism. No amount of corp-speak can make a kid find meaning in “providing a customer service experience” unless he owns a piece of the place and has an actual say – as a minimum, and that’s for higher-level kids, not the left side of the Bell Curve. Just pulling a check or even tips won’t cut it. I’ve done those jobs. Those jobs are drivers for Adderall abuse, as with data entry, code monkeying, and similar repetitive grinding jobs. It’s the kind of drug that lets you… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Well said. We are meant to work, but work without meaning… is not the answer. Wish we were discussing such in a national discussion rather than UBI. However, there must be jobs of all sorts out there with some type of fulfillment that you or I don’t conceive of. Mike Rowe of “Dirty Jobs” seems to find such people for his show. One of Rowe’s shows was on people gathering blood worms for fishing. Back breaking piecework, but they seemed to enjoy the thrill of the hunt and gathering. Studs Terkel in his famous book, “Working”, has hundreds of vignettes… Read more »

Member
Felix_Krull

In the fishing village where I once lived, the hands-down hardest and dirtiest job was unloading trawlers, harder than anything you’d find on a fishing boat. It was also one of the most popular; it paid a small bonus, but the main attraction was that it gave the young bucks a chance to show how hard they were, how much faster you could shift tonnage than the faggots in the next village. Sometimes, when the quay master was assembling a team, we’d ask him to pick fewer hands, because that made the job so much tougher, gave you more bragging… Read more »

Rogeru
Guest
Rogeru

When I was in Alaska, the high school football players would pitch fish. Good workout.

Da Booby
Guest

Jerry Rice’s dad was apparently a brick layer or something, and made make young Jerry catch the bricks he threw down from top stories. Gave him good hands.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Felix, good observation. Our folk music here—think Johnny Cash—is full of songs about the working man doing hard manual labor and through such labor winning the respect of his fellows. Listen to any singer’s version of the “Ballad of John Henry”. To listen to these songs, which are not that old, tells a story of what this country once was wrt the working man.

Member
Felix_Krull

Listen to any singer’s version of the “Ballad of John Henry”.

Yes.

Disney made a small masterpiece based on it, but it seems to have been removed from Youtube. Can’t have videos about black a man working, that’d be racist.

johnmark
Guest
johnmark

When I was seventeen, I was hired to work 2nd shift near Christmas time at a big city Post Office. The first two hours of the night were picking up and emptying bags of mail that came in from mailboxes into bins for a conveyor belt for initial sorting. You had to work fast. Some bags were light but most averaged 50-60 pounds. You were lifting and emptying one every five seconds or so. One night I tried to calculate how many tons of material I handled. I was astonished by the number Two hours of it would be over… Read more »

Member

Are you Boris?

Member
Felix_Krull

A lot of Takipocalypse exiles in here.

Member

Yes I remember you.

Member
Felix_Krull

Ditto.

AnotherAnonymous
Guest
AnotherAnonymous

What exactly happened there anyway?

Member
Felix_Krull

Takimag’s editor got fed up with all the shitlords shitlording all over her nice, boutique-fash website, so she slapped a paywall on the comment section. She then had the chuzpah to advertise the pay-to-comment-scheme with “join our famous comment section”.

I guess that’s not so much of a selling point anymore, because now that happy message has been replaced with a standard e-begging banner.

Da Booby
Guest

Sorry, friend. The Booby has no idea who Boris is.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

“The constant clash of unpleasant realities makes a normal man spit on his hands, hoist the black flag , and begin slitting throats.”

As an example, take our recent Texas spree shooting. Heard he was a recent RIF.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

RIF?

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Reduction In Force. That is to say, politely, “fired”. Another shooter who was angry, but rather than shoot his immediate supervisor, or the head of the company, decided to gun down symbolic targets, i.e., society at large.

At least the Crypt’s shoot at their rivals, the Bloods. (Facts still coming in may change my conclusions here.)

Rod1963
Guest
Rod1963

Maybe another “Falling down” case. The guy had no real criminal record, just a few misdemeanors.

He just had it, He was begging for help so to speak by calling 911 at work after he was fired and just rambling(emotional breakdown) and then calling the FBI. He was at his wits end.

MemeWarVet
Guest
MemeWarVet

>>> The constant clash of unpleasant realities makes a normal man spit on his hands, hoist the black flag , and begin slitting throats.<<<

Careful with that kind of talk, goy…wouldn’t wanna trip one of those Red Flags you hear about…

Rod1963
Guest
Rod1963

It’s never goes from A to Z. There’s a progression. Look at military recruiting quotas that aren’t being met even after lowering the standards. The kids are wising up to the scam. The next thing you’ll start seeing as the suckage increases is sabotage of the infrastructure. Traffic cameras getting burned out by lasers, transformers being shot out, company toilets being filled with expanding concrete, management’s cars getting their valves cut, etc. And as the corporations and Fed keep kicking the white worker in the teeth and telling him the game is totally rigged against him comes: The disgruntled worker… Read more »

Rogeru
Guest
Rogeru

I read the Atlantic article. The author’s antidote to meritocratic stress seems to be to increase the number of people who can compete! I’m not sure how that’s supposed to reduce the stress of cut throat competition, but who am I to question such a credentialed professor? The land of foreigners link shows a map of counties that have become minority white. I lived in one of those counties until last year: Guilford county, NC. In High Point, there was a Sikh temple, a Buddhist monastery, mosques and halal markets, women in full ninja costume walking down the street, corrupt… Read more »

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

It’s not just that extractionary businesses have popped up, it’s that American culture has no pride. So now every city is identical, only the weather changes. The super Target across from the Super Walmart, with the Costco down the street. Everything has become centralized, one size fits all, and fits no one. Right down to the auto companies that fit cheap plastic shells onto the same platform. So everyone has the same ugly, egg shaped car. And they expect the average American to trust a system that they’re no longer connected to in any meaningful way. It feels like trusting… Read more »

Anon
Guest
Anon

Hmm..

According to Wikipedia, in 2010 Guilford Co. was 64% white. According to Pew, by 2018, it had reached only 50%. That’s a 14% drop in 8 years… out of a population of 530,000.

Is it really that drastic? And if so, how is that being allowed to happen? Chain migration out of control?

Shrugger
Guest
Shrugger

I used to buy the “Murikan free market capitalism” bit and would regularly lecture lesser intellects on its virtues. Then the waves of mergers and offshoring and H1B displacement hit and wiped out most of the good paying jobs, eventually mine too. The last “Thanksgiving spread” at the office was indistinguishable from the buffet at an Indian restaurant.

But, hey, that’s “Murikan free market capitalism”, so it’s all good.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Shrugger, not to deny your reality, but H1b VISA example is a better one of crony capitalism as these VISAs were prohibited if natives were available to do said work. Near as I can tell such restriction is weakly enforced. Disney example of a few years ago was infuriating.

As to off shoring jobs, you have a point there. There are and should be limits to free capitalism when it beggars your population and wipes out the middle classes.

De Beers Diamonds
Guest

The tech industry is screaming that DOL is denying too many applications, but the Big 5 are able to afford better lawyers and still get their visas mostly approved.

The worse part is that the predominantly Asian H1Bs, when naturalized, display unimaginable contempt for white conservatives, voting even more leftist than Hispanics.

You don’t assimilate unless you mirror white voting patterns.

Shrugger
Guest
Shrugger

Sorry, guess I wasn’t clear–this company flagrantly abused the H1b system, as many do. It’s a government-supported form of profit enhancement and should be shut down.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

Shrugger, no argument here. Thanks.

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

“Freedom isn’t free,” indeed. “There’s no such thing as a free lunch,” indeed. Capitalism is not neutral, it carries things in its train. For example, the incentive for globalism to an elite at the apex of society, an elite who benefit from absurd inequality in terms of wealth and control of the means of production, and who are therefore in a position to make their wishes a reality. Ever more economic centralization and wage-slavery is another example that comes to mind (I’m thinking of Distributism and men like Belloc here). Resistant political elites, whether of the far Right (like those… Read more »

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

This phenomena seems to tie in with the concept of a society not being able to sustain a modern economy once the number of imbeciles rises to a certain point.

Dutch
Guest
Dutch

Currently reading up on the French Revolution, late eighteenth century. Some things jump out at me. The government people, working hardly at all, most either incompetent or not giving a fig, basically sucking the rest of the society dry, even though the French economy was actually doing ok. Same government types lording it over everyone else, as they appointed themselves as a special caste. The public learning to love emotion, not discipline. Holding up women and motherhood as the ideal. As the media and the arts became available to all, the culture flattened out and everyone got a say about… Read more »

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

There are some great books on it, and as they say, history doesn’t repeat but it rhymes. Human nature is fixed, only the technology changes. They were writing the same things that we are today, only with quill pens. The natural cycle of things like this is years of stasis with dysfunction growing each year, followed by a sudden rage, usually some straw that broke the camels’ back that spirals out of control. You need a certain threshold of people to say (check please, I’m done).

Karl McHungus
Guest
Karl McHungus

where would you go (that is better)? maybe Alaska. but that is not an easy hang either…

JR Wirth
Guest
JR Wirth

I have always preferred the Northwest. Alaska is too far north though.

De Beers Diamonds
Guest

Argentina

With their stupid decision to re-elect Kirchner, they ensure more economic stagnation and decline. People will be running away, not trying to immigrate. That’s probably about as good as it would get for despised exiled conservatives.

De Beers Diamonds
Guest

That whole part about the “Masonic conspiracy”

It was true.

CAPT S
Guest
CAPT S

Best Labor Day essay ever. Once upon a time, the American worker could take a week of well-earned leave and rather seamlessly roll back the following Monday without missing a beat. Today, before you take off for a mini-vacation you bust your butt to empty the inbox, then carry your electronic leash everywhere you go for 24/7 “emergencies”, and when you get back to work there’s about 10-days of 12-16 hr days of catch-up. All that to say there’s no resiliency in our workforce. And if you’re one of the truly indispensable, hard-working and smart laborer, watch out – you’re… Read more »

Aditya Barot
Member

Z-Man, I repeat: wh n you become Warlord of the Atlantic Northeast, make me your Commissar for Pajeet and Kebab Removal. Loyal and efficient service 💪👌💯🙏 guaranteed!

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Heh. Susseriakhar, khehali! (Hello, how ya doin’)
Ghurkas were the business end of the Empire, and ran railroads on time in Africa, even, that most insoluble of places.

Added plus: that turban means “I kill Muslims”
Our Carpathian forces would welcome the help

Whiskey
Guest
Whiskey

This is the state of affairs that nearly 70 years of peace has given us. White men replaceable by Chen and Pajeet and Mahmoud. White women “empowered” to mimic celebrity sluts like Miley Cyrus. An ever growing government staffed by Stacey Abrams and Triggly Puff look-alikes, and a war of all against all in the private sector abetted by periodic anti-White purges. Now let us imagine a state of war. Imagine say China nuked San Francisco. We’d lose “Lightworker” Mark Morford, and the Castro Street Fair, and a goodly portion of the divine gays so worshiped by White women. Plus… Read more »

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

This should be in National Review; “The Conservative Case for War: Building a Better America.” I think we find ourselves in this predicament in part because WWI and WWII put a big dent in the alpha white man population, in whose absence less desirable people harnessed political and financial control from WWII up till today, people whose beliefs required dismantling of white Christian society in order to come to fruition. Now we’re seeing the fruits of that globalist or oligarch/peasant model. Another world war or civil war should just about finish off the rest of the best white men, leaving… Read more »

Penitent Man
Guest
Penitent Man

Ursula, You may be correct in thinking another Civil or World War (is that even possible with nukes anymore?) may finish Us as people. I believe this will end well. That is because I believe in the Promise for the end of days. I don’t know if that is now, (falling into that encourages sitting on our hands). It is hubris to think I can read “the signs and prophesies” and thus know the mind of God in regards to His where and when. No, it is best to carry on as if this is just another cycle in the… Read more »

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

Penitent Man, thank you. You inspire me. I was a fan since you first posted. I too believe in the Promise but often assume I won’t be here to see it and that dam is not yet ready to break, so I need to continue on in faith, flawed and amateur as I am, and as a woman and of average intelligence to boot. Perhaps my passion mitigates my ignorance? Maybe not! The gentlemen here are gracious to tolerate me. I too see signs of ‘end times’ but, as you said, treat our times as just another part of a… Read more »

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

This Semitic revolution- war without bullets, yet achieving full spectrum dominance- is killing us and the world (overpopulation, pollution, environment).

Sadly, it is the false peace.

Alzaebo
Guest
Alzaebo

Can’t help but mention again it’s in the Book-
The false one will appear to die (the “Holocaust”), but spring back to life to go on and rule the world in a false peace-

A peace so terrible it will bring untold suffering, the end of the world

Ursula
Guest
Ursula

Yes. It’s all there in the good Book: Matthew 13:37 He answered and said unto them, He that soweth the good seed is the Son of man; Matthew 13:38 The field is the world; the good seed are the children of the kingdom; but the tares are the children of the wicked one; Matthew 13:39 The enemy that sowed them is the devil; the harvest is the end of the world; and the reapers are the angels. Matthew 13:40 As therefore the tares are gathered and burned in the fire; so shall it be in the end of this world.… Read more »

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

In every war—including modern ones—White people took the brunt of casualties. POC, reliable enough to form the tip of the spear, are not plentiful. Was not a problem when numbers were of non-Whites were low. But today? A protracted war could simply speed up the current replacement calamity we face by a generation.

(Whoops, I missed Ursula’s better stated comment. Sorry.)

TomA
Guest
TomA

Now connect the dots. The parasitic crazy is accelerating and the house of cards must eventually collapse when the host is bled dry. Then what happens? Analyze and predict. The hungry parasites will demand an autocratic government that feeds them at the expense of whatever productivity remains. But then the producers may choose to go on strike, and it’s hello tyranny and jackboot time. The process of subjugating an armed population is difficult and slow, so there should be time to nip things in the bud. Simple/secret/solo/spontaneous.

Penitent Man
Guest
Penitent Man

“The swollen ranks of single people, defined by their career, are beholden to the daily uncertainty of the workplace.” I found this unsettling. It’s true and the saddest part of this Zman post for me. I see this constantly, or at least iterations of it. A friend’s daughter raised in good solid home, now, post university, she thinks only of her university job, her stupid cat, and virtue signaling (she facebooked she would like all gifts to her for her birthday to be converted into cash donations to Planned Parenthood instead). The 20-30 something year old neck-beard obese males I… Read more »

TomA
Guest
TomA

You’ve just described the wages of prolonged affluence and the extinction of hardship and existential threat. Our current environment makes no significant demands on self improvement or hard work. You can be as lazy as you wish, and government will provide welfare galore; including food, housing, indoctrination masquerading as education, medical care, clothing, cell phone, etc. All they ask in return that you vote slavishly for a Progressive D politician.

LineInTheSand
Guest
LineInTheSand

TomA, the degenerate effects on society of affluence is one of your main themes. The implication seems to be that a prosperous society cannot be a healthy society.

Do you have any thoughts on the socialist, high tax, affluent Scandinavian countries before the massive immigrations? They were usually ranked as the happiest countries on the planet in spite of the bad weather.

Of course, it is probably true that their affluence caused their welcoming of massive immigration and their cancerous feminism.

Member
Felix_Krull

They were usually ranked as the happiest countries on the planet in spite of the bad weather.

Look up the stats on alcohol consumption.

LineInTheSand
Guest
LineInTheSand

Do they consume more than Scandinavians in the USA?

Member
Felix_Krull

Do they consume more than Scandinavians in the USA?

I have no idea. It was a bit tongue-in-cheek; Swedes and Norwegians are pretty moderate drinkers, but Finns and Danes are certainly doing their part in eradicating alcohol from the face of the planet.

TimNY
Guest
TimNY

For a pretty hilarious, or perhaps disturbing, account of life in Sweden read this thread, found via BAP.
https://mobile.twitter.com/moldbugman/status/1167485529040007168

Member
Felix_Krull

Thanks. Mencius nails it pretty well. I don’t believe the story from the airport, but the rest is on the nose. The thing about Scandinavians being the most happy people in the world, is bs. It must be some kind of artifact of socio-linguistic conventions; you just need a few hours in, say, Australia, to debunk that. Scandinavian Noir didn’t come from nowhere – in the original tale, The Lille Mermaid dies and the prince marries someone else since, without her voice, she cannot tell the prince she loves him. The one nugget of truth, is that the welfare state… Read more »

Member
Felix_Krull

Mind you, America is not sending their best: most American expats here are BernieBro-types looking for handouts or for racism to stamp out.

Hold on, that’s stretching rather a bit too far.

There are a lot of Americans here on business, and ordinary people who simply had the poor judgement to marry a Dane. It’s just that it’s the BernieBro-types that the government broadcaster gives airtime.

Educated.Redneck
Guest
Educated.Redneck

Let me tell you about a little thing called synthetic opioids… For every commie prole drowning in vodka, there’s two rustbelt Americans in an early grave from pills.

Compsci
Guest
Compsci

When I was a teenager, my father and I went back to the “old country”. As some of you may recall, I’m a first generation American. Albeit, I was young and wet behind the ears, I still remember my father commenting on his relatives—brothers, sisters, aunts, etc. We were discussing why these people always went out to restaurants and bars and “party” when we came over. My father—not a philosopher by any means—had an explanation. Basically, he pointed out that these people were in the throws of socialism, although he did not use the term—soft, European style socialism. They had… Read more »

Normie
Guest

Sounds like heaven on earth…

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

Between being stuck in neoliberalism’s developing dystopia of open borders Third World ghetto/favela/South Africa existence (if you’re lucky, you can get one of the shrinking number of middle class cubicle slave slots), and a quiet simple life working at a factory in the GDR or Brezhnev’s Russia, I’m choosing the latter two. Their poverty kept them traditional, and their elites weren’t racing to flood their lands with genetic barbarians. Communism largely froze Europeans from the ravenous, decaying effects of Progress. Their births rates were higher, their family lives more stable, they ate traditional foods. The people were kept basically sane… Read more »

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

This probably wasn’t the place for this comment. That Con., Inc. degenerate lower in the thread raised my blood-pressure.

greyenlightenment
Guest

“Diversity plus proximity always results in conflict. No one can afford to relax anymore.”

This is one of those things vox day repeats over and over as if it’s true, but the empirical evidence shows otherwise. the data shown by pinker and others shows that violence has been falling for decade in spite of increasing diversity in the us. Look at the Civil War: ethnically and racially both sides were identical. This narrative that if enough non whites that whites will rise up or that sometime will break and the system will flail, seems like wishful thinking.

epicaric
Guest
epicaric

Please come with me for a walking tour of Beirut.

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Guest
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.

Or … Bay Ridge

Brooklyn.

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

Diversity significantly contributes to making people feel miserable, to making them alienated and distrustful toward their neighbors and communities (there are other factors contributing to all this, however). As for violence, I’ve wondered what it would be today if technologies like surveillance cameras and DNA testing, and mass imprisonment as well, had not come into being. Note that the money for things like these, and the IQ’s to develop them, are leaving the West more and more with the continued onward march of Progress. Note also that these same developments are killing privacy and anonymity, and will be utilized by… Read more »

Member

You have to look at this over an extended period of time, currently if you looked at places like NY and SF, you might easily conclude that diversity works pretty well there, but look a little deeper, what sustains these places are bubbles in sectors like finance and advertisement, take them away (which will happen eventually) and see what happens.

Member

This was foreseen 70 odd years ago
“When you see that in order to produce, you need to obtain permission from men who produce nothing; when you see that money is flowing to those who deal not in goods, but in favors; when you see that men get rich more easily by graft than by work, and your laws no longer protect you against them, but protect them against you … you may know that your society is doomed.
Ayn Rand “

Member

It’s the bottom of the ninth bases loaded two outs here comes the pitch. It’s a high hard one down the pipe. There’s the swing. ZMan hits the ball it’s going going towards center field it’s going going going gone! A home run. The contingent of South African Super Models goes insane at the real world observations. Well done Sir!

greyenlightenment
Guest

“Diversity plus proximity always results in conflict. No one can afford to relax anymore.”

This is one of those things vox day repeats over and over as if it’s true, but the empirical evidence shows otherwise. the data shown by pinker and others shows that violence has been falling for decades in spite of increasing diversity in the us. Look at the Civil War: ethnically and racially both sides were identical. This narrative that if there are enough non whites that whites will rise up or that the system will flail, seems like wishful thinking.

LineInTheSand
Guest
LineInTheSand

Your citing of Pinker’s work is quite relevant and requires further discussion.

With regards to the Civil War and other white-on-white conflicts, I say that white ethnostates won’t preclude conflict but will preclude inter-racial conflicts. We don’t need that extra problem.

Larry
Guest
Larry

Does he include abortion numbers o tis abortion considered non violent?

Member

The saying is not “Only diversity plus proximity equals conflict” but the proximity of hostile competing tribes is a guaranteed recipe for conflict. There have obviously been wars between whites but even then there was an ethnic component.

Brad
Guest
Brad

Wait, you mean (((Steven Pinker))) who wrote the Blank Slate? Haha. Ok.

Demeter Last
Guest
Demeter Last

Pinker showed that things have been improving. But correlating this to “diversity” is as daft as correlating this to the widespread consumption of video games. If you’re interested, there’s an easy check to make sure you’re not talking out of your ass with regard to diversity. First, look at yourself and figure out which racial or ethnic census box you fall into; second, look around where you live and work and figure out what boxes the other people fall into. If you have kids, weight the diversity makeup of your kids’ school at 3x. Now you have some baseline to… Read more »

BadThinker
Guest
BadThinker

Oh good lord. They *weren’t* ethnically and racially ‘identical’. Read a freaking history book. The US Civil War was essentially the English Civil War(s) re-fought over here, with the conquest of the southern (US) cavaliers by the northern (US) puritans as the result (with scots-irish in both armies). Sure they’re both ‘English’, but a Bavarian and Saxon are both ‘German’ in the same sense, but quite different.

BadThinker
Guest
BadThinker

I would argue that the “relentless pressure to perform, while having to navigate a labyrinth of ineptitude in the other parts of their lives” should actually be: “all day under relentless pressure to perform, while having to navigate a labyrinth of ineptitude and process at work”. The amount of insane process we have to deal with in bigger corporations to make simple changes is nuts. Million dollar projects to build something that should cost at most $50k, 2 consultants in 2 months. 95% of the staff on those projects are make-workers. And the h1bs are some of the worst. They… Read more »

Member

The chart about the growth of hospital administrators is fascinating and reminds me of a similar chart that Cato put out before they went completely crazy showing the explosive growth in cost and employees in public schools that result in no improvement in results ( https://imgur.com/a/NGDixkE ). When you look at a big hospital system campus, try to imagine how few people working there are actually caring for patients versus those “administering”

Member

“Americans have been trained to admire success, but today’s successful are ugly, un-American people, who elicit nothing but contempt.” The problem is they are wealthy, not successful. The simplest example are the foundations or the offspring of real successful people who inherit wealth and want to mold the world. But that is old money. The newer versions are “Bain Capitalism” – do a leveraged buy-out saddling the company with debt, declare a huge dividend so you get an immediate huge profit, then sell off any functioning parts, outsource labor to MexiChina, and eventually go bankrupt from the debt (RadioShack, ToysRUs,… Read more »

Member

The idea they taught us in the economics programs was simple: a guy with a computer had higher marginal productivity and, since labor earns the value of its marginal productivity, the real wage of labor has to go up. Not only that, if we re-position the economy such that we are all doing only the highest value work, then the value of the marginal product increases, too. Magic, guys. The analysis is true, I think. But what it means it that the wage of capital, relative labor, has to decrease. What was supposed to happen was that capital would flow… Read more »

david
Guest
david

“The tech and financial barons live lives incomprehensible to middle-class people.” Nah… read up on the lifestyle differences between rich and poor during the industrial revolution in England or the northern US. Cholera outbrakes, syphilis epidemics, infant mortality and EXTREME workplace danger. 40 people lived in each household in London at this time, according to some accounts. Open sewers in the cities. Today, 75% of americas poor have cable tv, smartphones, air conditioning, a used car, and twenty pounds of extra weight. Sure You’ll never have a lazy boom like the boomers had. Free markets are always competitive. It brings… Read more »

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

I’m sure as hell not on your side, friend. I wouldn’t just give my life to defeat it (everywhere, and forever), I’m willing to live a long, boring life of anonymity, patiently chipping away at the foundations of it to the best of my ability, doing everything in my power to collapse the whole rotten ignoble structure, and send it to “the ash heap of history” where it belongs.

BadThinker
Guest
BadThinker

So our options are either materialistic cog-in-the-machine, devoid of meaning, life-and-soul-destroying capitalism, or materialistic cog-in-the-machine, devoid of meaning, life-and-soul-destroying communism?

Gosh I can’t believe I used to be a libertarian. Are we really just ‘stuff-collectors’ for whom a job is the highest value?

Prussian
Guest
Prussian

How many of you have seen this quite epic 1.5 minute video of evil Vladimir Putin, the KGB man raised under “communism”, putting an oligarch and his cronies, publicly and humiliatingly, in their place?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flC—s2moA

That’s what a proper State can do (only to a much greater extent). Under liberal democracy, this is denied from us in short order. My fear is that Russia and Hungary, for example, will lose leaders like Putin and Orban (both grew up under “communism”), and will collapse into liberal disintegration (a la West Europe, America, Australia, etc.), in the near future.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉
Guest

Gee.
Positive suggestions and perfect finish.

I like.

Happy Labor Day. Keep the smiling cutthroat vibe.

Chester White
Guest
Chester White

The common denominator: government destroys whatever it pumps money into, particularly education, health care, and itself. I would draw a distinction between cartel doctors and cartel medicine, and the declining number of private doctors and entities struggling to survive in a progressively socialized health care system.

Drake
Guest
Drake

I wish I could find a growth chart of federal and state healthcare regulations to overlay on the Administrator growth chart. I bet we’d have a pretty close match. Twenty years ago I was working for an insurance company that sold it’s health-insurance division to Aetna – partially because they just couldn’t keep up with the pace of regulations. Each state has been passing it’s own “Mandated Health Insurance Benefits” for decades now. The result is an incredible byzantine labyrinth of rules that vary wildly between each state. Layered on top is all the recent federal crap like Obamacare. Doctors… Read more »

4th Amboy
Guest
4th Amboy

That “labyrinth of ineptitude” has also crept into a lot of workers’ work day…at work. For example, my employer has gone hog wild with offshore IT and we find ourselves, more and more, swimming in a rising tide of IT mediocrity. Whether it’s from developers who sometimes seem smart (and outsmarting themselves is what they do best) but just don’t get it, or IT infrastructure that’s infuriatingly buggy and generally unreliable, we often get bogged down with unproductive stupid stuff that we rarely had to deal with until recently. It’s like being expected to drive as fast as possible to… Read more »