What If You’re Wrong

A good rule that no one anywhere follows, is to contemplate the consequences of being wrong before doing something. For example, if legislatures had to post a wrongness analysis for every bill before they could be voted on, at least some of the terrible ideas would get stopped before becoming law. Of course, that is probably why such a thing can never happen, at least in a democracy. New ideas are about hope and nothing is worse than dashing the reformer’s hope for the future.

Even so, thinking about wrongness has its utility. For example, many people on the Right still cling to the idea that government cannot keep borrowing money. Going back to the 1980’s, perhaps even further, conservatives have been predicting that there is some limit to government debt. Ronald Reagan ran on this idea in 1980, when the Federal debt stood at $900 billion. Forty years later and the debt is $23 trillion, a number so large no one can imagine it.

Maybe there is no limit to debt. Maybe what conservatives think they know about public debt is wrong and disaster is not around the corner. If this were anything else, that’s how you would bet. If the weather had been sunny for forty years, despite daily forecasts calling for showers, you would have stopped listening to the weatherman a long time ago. Sure, he may be right eventually, but forty years of being wrong still counts for a lot. Maybe conservatives are just wrong about debt too.

Similarly, what if the growth of the state is not going to lead to a citizen revolt against a tyrannical government. This is another chestnut from the so-called conservatives that dates back to the age of Reagan. He ran on the argument that the government was the problem, not the solution. The per capita spending of government, in constant dollars, is close to double what it was in the Reagan years. That’s with the U.S. population growing by more than half in that same period.

Now, in fairness, there has been a negative result to this massive expansion of the state over the last forty years. It’s not that people are angry that it does too much, but that it does too little. This is true all over the West. The populist revolts are fueled by demands that the government do more to address the concerns of the people. It turns out that everyone was wrong about the size of government. The bigger it gets, the worse it gets at doing the basics and that’s what gets people angry.

How about multiculturalism? An axiom in dissident politics is that diversity plus proximity equals conflict. Many of the same people saying that were wrong about the deficits and the growth of government. Maybe they are wrong about this too. Maybe they are wrong in entirely different ways. What we know so far is the importation of fifty million barbarians has not caused the empire to collapse. It’s made society more fragile, for sure, but collapse is not in the cards, at least so far.

How about something closer to home? Many people on this side of the great divide, especially the former alt-right, are sure Trump is going down to defeat in the 2020 election. They argue that his pandering to civic nationalists, non-whites and Baby Boomers is alienating his real base. Further, they argue that he won in 2016 by getting racially aware whites out to vote. It is a gratuitous assertion, for sure, but it is a common argument on this side of the great divide. What if it is wrong?

Trump, despite his many faults, has proven to be a natural political athlete, one we have not seen in a long time. This is a guy who does everything wrong, according to political convention, yet comes out smelling like a rose. Remember when everyone said WW3 was upon us when he droned the Iranian general? How about those predictions about impeachment? He begged the Democrats to follow through with impeachment and here he is more popular than ever. Maybe he knows something.

It is very possible that Trump does know what he is doing with all the pandering to blacks, Hispanics, one-legged lesbian Elvis impersonators and so on. Further, maybe the votes of the alt-right, white nationalists, racially aware whites and so forth really don’t count for a whole lot in elections. It may be an uncomfortable thought, but in a wrongness analysis, it has to be a possibility. The evidence is pointing in that direction, so maybe all of these folks are wrong about Trump.

Inaction is largely based on the belief of some inevitability that no one dares question, because it is comforting. Generations of conservative white people voted Republican, based on their assumptions about debt and the size of government. That vote was not action, but inaction. They comforted themselves in the belief that inevitability would be the ultimate cure. It turns out that nothing is inevitable in the affairs of man. Things happen because men make them happen.

The other side of this, the people trying to harness the forces of society, never stop to wonder if they are wrong. As they work to gain control of events, they are so certain in their righteousness they resemble fanatics. They never wonder if they are wrong. They know they are on the right side of history. As Bertrand Russel put it, “The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts.”

That is the place to start for all dissidents. What if we’re wrong? What if all of the critiques of and arguments for cosmopolitan globalism are wrong? What then? That’s start of the journey in search of an alternative to the prevailing orthodoxy. It is not only the questioning of conventional wisdom, but the questioning of the critics of the conventional wisdom. Maybe the reason for the current crisis is that everyone was wrong about the new world order that emerged after the Cold War.


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Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
7 months ago

Invert, always invert.

What if we’re wrong about multi-everything destroying society? Well, then things turn out okay. But if the other side is wrong, we’ll get Yugoslavia or Zimbabwe.

The multi-everything bet is insanely stupid. If you win, you get the same society you would have had if you didn’t invite millions of non-whites into the country, i.e. you don’t win anything. If you lose, you get the Dark Ages.

Tarstarkusz
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
7 months ago

The onus is on them, not us. We want to not change anything and they want to completely change everything. Not imposing radical changes is the default position. I suppose it is somewhat fair to say that we now want to reverse, at least partially, all of the evil changes we were unable to stop. But I still think it is way more justified and less likely to be wrong than those radical changes were. Another thing is these radicals will be more or less correct, right up until the moment they are proved wrong. The fact that some evil… Read more »

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
7 months ago

Sure. Until you hit the brick wall, the car is travelling along swimmingly. Part of the difficulty is that in civilizational terms, things happen slowly. Rome was not built in a day; nor was it destroyed in one.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
7 months ago

Chesterton’s Fence

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  BadThinker
7 months ago

They are Chesterson and his fence now. That’s what commenting while the enemy waged war gets us.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
7 months ago

Wait a moment; what do you mean the “onus” is on them, not us. The Onus of the Onerous is most certainly on US, my fellow beasts of burden. > this is Boxer saying the onus is on the Pigs. No, slave the onus is on us. And we’re the ones who want to change things, we are screaming to change course before the ship wrecks. They have the ship, most of the crew – we are “passengers” in the not so comfortable hold. The onus is on them. Jesus. The onus stopped being on them no later than 1965.… Read more »

jim regina
jim regina

I like the way you think, VXXC and Zman…..that very large ship has already set its course….we are the one’s initating change of direction…..also, we must ALWAYS wonder if we’re wrong in our accessment… 😁

Juri
Juri
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
7 months ago

There is not rights or wrongs, it is only time. Society is a enormous survival system It took 74 years, 50 million dead and horrific material damage for Soviet Union to collapse. Ukraine farmers in 1933 wondered, how the country can survive without the farmers. After 6 million Ukrainian farmers and 10 million other population dead, it came out that very well. We won the war, got nuclear bomb and sent first person into space. There is so few pro white people that Donald may ignore them. US is not Poland or Hungary. US has a great land mass. It… Read more »

JR52
JR52
Reply to  Juri
7 months ago

Great response. There’s a widespread belief here (the most sober minded place on the internet) about the limits the vast majority of people will accept as society goes downhill. The limit is much greater than they realize.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  JR52
7 months ago

There’s no limit.
Without organization, leaders there are no movements and never one revolt or riot. Not one, ever.

Look the enemy is the official polite society, the everything…the state, the official religion. They ARE INEVITABLE, they exist.

We don’t. We’re a wish, we don’t exist. We’d have to organize to exist.

Ifrank
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
7 months ago

Brings to mind Pascal’s Wager, concerning the question of atheism. Is there a God? What would be the consequences of my answer? He concluded it was wiser to wager a little bit now, in order to win a big payoff later.

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  Ifrank
7 months ago

Yep. I thought of using Pascal’s Wager.

Another analogy is trending following. Make a lot of little bets. Cut your losers quickly and let your winners run. The multi-everything bet is the opposite. It’s one giant bet and you ride to the grave.

PortMoodyKid
PortMoodyKid
Reply to  Ifrank
7 months ago

As did Voltaire on his deathbed.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
7 months ago

Lest we fall into the same blind malaise and hubris we see in both political parties and our rulers… we should constantly review our progress and survey the landscape.

But no, the purpose and mission of the Dissident movement isn’t wrong if that is what you are implying, even if just philosophically.

greyenlightenment
Reply to  Penitent Man
7 months ago

Z is playing devils advocate . It given how bad things seem to us at least, there should be some sort of collapse or reset yet it has not happened.

Penitent Man
Penitent Man
Reply to  greyenlightenment
7 months ago

Grey,

This was my assumption as well. My answer will always be steadfast championing of the cause and enduring cheerleading. That’s the role my heart and mind are best suited for.

WaitingForTheStorm
Member
7 months ago

First, I will disagree with your statement that noone follows the rule. Second, I will admit that my perspective is a tad pedestrian and not as urbane as some others. I am not one of those that cannot see the forest for the trees, I am that guy that cannot see the forest for THE TREE. It is a sort of tunnel vision that hampers me in some ways, but has allowed me to solve a large number of real problems that have been described as impossible. I wrote software for my entire adult life. Some of that code managed… Read more »

Member
Reply to  WaitingForTheStorm
7 months ago

When being wrong gets people killed, moral men take extra care to look down the path for consequences. Gets to be a habit. Drives my wife nuts, too, that I examine decisions even of moderate import this way.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  WaitingForTheStorm
7 months ago

This is also the life of an engineer. When we make a mistake, something usually fails, and then bridges fall down. You can’t fix that with eloquent rhetoric.

Judge Smails
Judge Smails
Reply to  TomA
7 months ago

“Mistakes were made but it’s time to move on” as they fish bodies of your parents and their car from the bottom of the river.

The Right Doctor
The Right Doctor
Reply to  TomA
7 months ago

This is absolutely a way of life for a physician, wondering what could go wrong. I can’t prescribe penicillin without remembering a patient I saw who died from it many years ago.

So much so that I always wonder WTF when I meet physicians who are on the left. Primum non nocare and all that.

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  The Right Doctor
7 months ago

TRD, We all make decisions with the information we have at hand. The only way that should bother you was if that person knew they had a penicillin allergy and it wasn’t conveyed to you.

Chester White
Chester White
Reply to  The Right Doctor
7 months ago

Physicians are mostly socialists now because they want, and are getting, someone other than their patients to pay for their services. As a profession, medicine is dead, until the money printing ends and government-funded “healthcare “ collapses. Then you will see the true heirs of Hippocrates.

Maus
Maus
Reply to  TomA
7 months ago

Eveything living dies. The only thing separating man from other mortal animals is our “eloquent rhetoric.” And “First, do no harm” as a credo or principle of action is a stirling example of just such rhetoric. We may be hardwired to do wrongfulness analysis, but it frequently turns out to be woefully inadequate.

greyenlightenment
Reply to  Maus
7 months ago

henry kissinger is testing that theory to its limits

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  WaitingForTheStorm
7 months ago

One of the great 19th century thinkers wrote that it is the quiet men who carry civilization and the loud who reap the benefit.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  WaitingForTheStorm
7 months ago

Good points. If only politics had as much concern for likely consequences. As Z (?) and others well note, this is the exact opposite of how a democracy works, in fact would penalize any politico who dared to value the long-term costs over the short-term payoff for him and those who bought him. I think the best we can hope for is a benevolent dictator.

Guest
Guest
7 months ago

Now the US is just another sad country with the “resource curse”, like the countries whose elites control their oil and diamond resources and don’t need taxpayers or their votes. Except our unlimited resource is debt.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Guest
7 months ago

I don’t believe debt is an unlimited resource. People think “well the economy didn’t fall over and we’re all still standing!!” – even though we’re up to something like $23 trillion in debt. People who say this should be considered idiots when it comes down to forecasting where things are going to end up. One data point I saw mentioned back in the 2008-2009 timeframe in regards to whether the economy was really bad or not – was the observation that when times get tough people stop buying steak. They go back to buying hamburger. When times get tougher –… Read more »

Sandmich
Sandmich
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

Just to somewhat echo your comment, most of what people think is wrong in the country, like health care costs, college costs, “low wages”, etc. are driven in part by the debt-driven society. When I point out to minimum wage activists that the issue isn’t that people aren’t paid enough, but that stuff costs too much due to federal money printing, they seem to know that I’m correct, but that fixing that is beyond their power, whereas passing a law for a minimum wage increase is within their ability.

TomA
TomA
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

The reason most young people are becoming Bernie Socialists is because they correctly anticipate that they have been screwed by endless government borrowing. They damn well are not willing (nor able) to repay our debts because they know that there will be no pot of gold waiting for them at retirement. The price of debt is the extinction of generational trust.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  TomA
7 months ago

Exactly. Debt is just transferring money from the future – to buy something in the present. Which “works” – I guess , if you really need to eat right now – and are out of work – but have a guaranteed job that starts next week and you are almost certainly assured you can pay it back once you receive a paycheck. But giving 30 year mortgages to 80 year olds – is most assuredly not being paid back. I suppose even that is ok – once you realize that the bank can always repossess the house that the 80… Read more »

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

Good point. I feel that the decline of a nation (e.g. ours) is a long-term affair, and it is by and large inevitable. As some wise ass once said, “A trend, once in motion, tends to remain in motion until it ends.” Re national debt, there was little consensus to stop or reduce it in 1960, 1980, 2000, and even less today. Those with a stake in the future (viz. children) should consider what the future may hold.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

*If we are wrong*, MMT works. Government debt is not ‘real’ since all fiat currency is government debt anyway. It’s the ‘belief’ that the money has value which matters. Value which is backed up by a lot of tanks and planes and guns. If we are wrong.

epicaric
epicaric
Reply to  TomA
7 months ago

I disagree. I do not believe that most young people today are actually fully cognizant of the extent of our indebtedness or the debasement of our currency. Their interests may rather be more base and personal, focused on student debt forgiveness alone.

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

Yes…Excellent take and well written. Am listening to you and the other gentlemen commenting in response.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

The reason debt is an unlimited resource is because it is paid back with printed money. What if we are wrong that you can’t keep printing money forever? If you can print money forever if prices and wages rise in tandem with the printing? What if we are wrong and growth never ends?

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  BadThinker
7 months ago

if printing money forever works, and we have nothing to fear about a -$23 TRILLION national debt, and in the year 2040 we will have nothing to fear from a -$100 TRILLION national debt, because we can just keep printing new fiat-debt for eternity, then why even have an economy today right now? if the untested “Modern Monetary Theory” of the economist expert’s is correct, then we can just print as much money as we want with no consequences. so why don’t we print out a million dollars and give it to every person in America? why not make it… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Burning Platform
7 months ago

The thing is they *aren’t* handing out millions to each person. Instead, they’re doling it out slowly to favored (((parties))), essentially stealing all productivity gains. What if we are wrong that it isn’t 2040, but 2100, or 2200?

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

i would never reduce the final acts of heroism of the brave soldiers of the Reich to mere “fanatacism.” the siege of Breslau is an example of that par excellence. 50,000 German soldiers defended a moated and fortified castled city on a hill from 85,000 Soviet soldiers. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Breslau 60,000 Soviet soldiers died. the Reich held Breslau for a week after Hitler’s suicide, and only surrender on the same day that Herman Goerring offered the unconditional surrender of the Reich. why did those German soldier sacrifice themselves to such an irrationally extreme degree? because they were fanatics? because they were themselves… Read more »

Oldtradesman
Oldtradesman
Reply to  Burning Platform
7 months ago

Except you’re not fighting to the death. None of us are. None of us will, either. Typing ain’t fighting. The man who takes any of us seriously, such that he is willing to risk his family’s welfare in the present, fight and die against overwhelming odds, suffering great pain along the way, is a forgettable fool. He’s a fool because we don’t have his back in cyberspace, much less where it counts – on the ground. He’s forgettable because a time is coming where nobody will remember him. We are armchair warriors, tolerated until we’re no longer tolerated. Comply or… Read more »

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

The reality that people can’t wrap their minds around is that federal “debt” is not debt at all.

Instead it is money creation.

Which causes problems, but not the types of problems that individuals face with debt repayment.

Nicholas R. Jeelvy
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

Forcing everyone to use your currency in order to run a deficit without tears has protected the US from first-order effects of trade deficits, but not the second order deficits effects – if you don’t take the hint of runaway inflation, then the deficits eat away at the value of land and labor as original factors of production.

I imagine something similar happens with budget deficits as well.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
7 months ago

O damn. Now *this* is gonna be good.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Alzaebo
7 months ago

Game on lol

joey junger
joey junger
7 months ago

The two sides are watching two different movies, as Scott Adams said (or, to use your example, living in different bespoke silos). Still, the fake sciences have a useful word, “inter-subjectivity,” to describe the state in which the movie you’re watching at least shares some of the general contours with the movie someone else is watching. Plainly, if two people see the same thing, it is less likely to be a hallucination. If America right now is a movie, most Republicans and independents are watching Trump up on screen fending off multiple thugs trying to waylay him in an alley;… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  joey junger
7 months ago

The crisis is in the matrix. Most of it is virtual. The real world effects won’t become acute until the dream world gets decided. Dreamers awake.

Sorry I know that’s obscure but it’s the best I’ve got right now 🙂

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  joey junger
7 months ago

That’s too great Joey, an upvote isn’t enough.

Tarstarkusz
Member
7 months ago

The fanatics are throwing sand, water and other debris into the machine betting the machine doesn’t break. All of the idiot lights are on, flashing bright red while everyone stands around amazed that the machine is still running. They will be right, right up to the moment the machine fails. When it fails, something other than sand, water and sundry debris will get the blame, perhaps someone forgot an oil change once.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
7 months ago

Wrong.

The commie fanatics ARE outright attempting to break the machine…… because “capitalist”. They assume that when the machine breaks – they’re glorious communist paradise will magically rise from the ashes.

Even though it’s never happened before – despite multiple attempts.

Tarstarkusz
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

That’s a different machine. The machine I’m talking about is society, not the economy. A bunch of “brown” people with absolutely nothing in common, working with a bunch of sexual freaks and degenerates are supposed to bring in a social utopia where nobody is ever judged, prisons don’t exist, police departments have been disbanded and where there are no real social rules anyway are supposed to pick up the pieces of society and put old Humpty LaRasa back together again.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
7 months ago

We all know how things break down when the rules are not followed. TPTB are actively encouraging everyone to break all the rules and have everything break down. But that is not the end game, which is to reconstitute a different set of (totalitarian) rules that benefit only TPTB. They have had enough of our experiment in self-government. Always look for the end game that is in play, because the players will wear a skin suit that looks different than what they are really up to.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
7 months ago

You can’t disconnect the two in the way you seem to think you can. And the Frankfurt School commies have been very clear about their effort to infiltrate all levels of society and commerce – in order to screw things up and force the day when their communist utopia comes into being. Is the social utopia an ultimate goal – or is it just a tool to bring down society? That’s the piece I think a lot of people are confused about. I don’t think the social utopia is a “real” end goal – it’s just a sell-job to get… Read more »

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

Calsdad….you’re on fire today. Remember…I’m daughter of Trots Commies. You nailed it. They never stop. Forward always forward the 10 pillars to utopia. That’s just the line to gaslight everyone under the High Elite. Cloward-Piven forever…until the fall and then the Elite kill off their first line command…then kill off second line command….etc. There is no utopia and they know it.
Putin got his car and driver, yachts, endless dachas and 17 year old gymnast(s). And Power.
Watch the movie Doctor Zhivago. Lessons there.

Tarstarkusz
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

Why would the people with all the money and power want to change it all into a communist utopia? If a communist dictatorship comes, they will all be killed, or, perhaps, have all their stuff taken. It just does not make any sense that the ruling elite would want to change the status quo into a new status quo where they no longer have the money and power. Surely, the vast majority of these people cannot possibly think they will arise to the top and be America’s Stalin after such a violent change to the status quo. The managerial class… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
7 months ago

Economy is down at the bottom. The chain goes something like Biology>Culture>Institutions>Politics>Economy. Focusing on economy misses everything above that.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
7 months ago

They do want to break both the economy and society. I have accused a commie-in-law of wanting to be my feudal overlord. If I was to assume there was logic behind their plans, they must be seeking a return to medieval feudalism.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

Because “White.”

Communism and capitalism are secondary issues to today’s Wokies.

For the most part, Wokies are the machine, they’re not trying to break it.

How many “punch a Capitalist” or “eat the rich” memes have you read lately vs. muh Whiteness, black bodies, Browning, etc..? There might be some geezers hanging around the Antifa bars who still get amped up over socialism, but today’s hotness is ethno-cultural, not economic.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

Normies also ought to take greater notice that Wokies have had no issues with the CIA and FIB, their old presumed enemies. On popular tv we see both organizations populated by cool kids and the sexually ambiguous.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  james wilson
7 months ago

I’ve been pointing out to people that there’s been a distinct shortage of exploding Mohammeds in the past three years since Peter Strzok , the Anti Terrorism Head of the FBI has been too busy spying on and trying to impeach Trump when he wasn’t busy sending 20,000 texts to the FBI lawyer he was banging. (although how they found time to do any actual shagging is a mystery to me.)

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

Agreed. If I had to move to one of two countries sight unseen, and all I knew was that one was white communist and the other was non-white capitalist/libertarian/whatever, I would choose white communist.

This doesn’t mean I favor communism over capitalism, it means I understand that race is far more dispositive than economics.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

There is a percentage of communist who, like Marx late in life, appreciate capitalism. They just want to be the ones who spend and control the flow of money. Hayek noted eighty years ago that many capitalist are socialists. Capitalism is not an ideaology, it is a talent. When socialist rule then it more resembles their ideaology, and socialist have now ruled for a century, give or take.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  james wilson
7 months ago

Yes … but , most people who proclaim themselves socialist (and/or communist) – are very distinctively untalented. Bernie Sanders is a perfect case in point – as his entire life history has been that of a person who is essentially useless outside any worth he has as a politician. You can go find the articles by doing a Google search, but one of the things I clearly remember reading when he ran for President the last time around – was people coming out of the woodwork who had known Bernie earlier in his life – coming out and talking about… Read more »

Tarstarkusz
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

They always try to frame their greed and lust for money and power as a desire to help others. But as you mention, they are nearly always personal failures who want to erect a system where they can do nothing and get paid. Like the “artists,” poets and musicians who think they should just get everything for free so that they can have time to pursue their “art,” music and poems. Nobody wants their shitty art and poetry, so they need someone else to pay the bills. There is some desert shit-hole “town” out West called “Slab City” which is… Read more »

Chester White
Chester White
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

Bernie is a grifter. I read somewhere he was kicked out of an Israeli kibbutz for not working, but I never fact-checked that. The entire game is to get someone else to pay for your existence. The Bernies and Hillarys of the world just want a higher level of existence.

David_Wright
Member
7 months ago

Maybe the demise of Rush Limbaugh is also symbolic. The old normycon world is giving sway to the pozzed world we are in now. No matter what is coming, it surely isn’t going to be better but on the contrary, life will be worse compared to previous generations.

As for the debt, maybe you are right, but once America ceases to be a world power those trillions will mean something.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
7 months ago

Yep. Reality can be deferred… but it can’t be denied.

David_Wright
Member
Reply to  Glenfilthie
7 months ago

Maybe the pot of warm water we are in is hotter than we will admit. Yes, even us red pilled people.

Anna
Anna
Reply to  David_Wright
7 months ago

We can’t even imagine how hot that pot is going to get. The world is in the middle of info and bio revolution. Two previous techno revolutions caused unmeasured changes to societies: invention of iron giving birth to agrarian age, and resulting late bronze age destructions. 3000 yrs later Industrial revolution. It brought Civil war here. In Europe — WWI, Russian revolution and WWII as a result of unsettled accounts of WWI. It’s not a coincidence that the USSR fell almost immediately after fax machines were introduced there, and an uncontrolled flow of info flooded the country that violently supervised… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Anna
7 months ago

Nothing to Notice here – just mysterious technological earthquakes tearing up your societies.

Nothing to do with imported subversives who aggressively lobby for more earthquakes, sell earthquake insurance and lobby for earthquake gibs, always managing to come out ahead.

Nope, just the enigmatic march of Progress. What’s a goy to do but accept the changes, amirite?

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

In Ex-America Garrett wrote of the Frankfurt School Jews coming to America–The American vista must have been almost as incredible as Genghis Khan’s first view of China–so rich, so unaware. Why should anyone fear government?
Its cruel and cynical suspicion of any motive but its own was a reflection of something it knew about itself. Its voice was the voice of righteousness; its methods therefore were more dishonest than the simple ways of corruption.

abprosper
abprosper
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

Its not just the Subversives though there is a hell of a lot of Subversion going on. The current social order people like you and I are Noticing is when “Nice” Christianity’s evangelicalism/world healing tendencies meets Tech. Hell the entirety of modernity has been a disaster for every stable social order. Is a trap though Every single modern society has dangerously low fertility rates and that spreads into every society that can afford ubiquitous television. The Mouse Utopia will win. Subversion speeds this up but the TFR went low well before the culture was nearly as fracked as it is… Read more »

Sandmich
Sandmich
Reply to  David_Wright
7 months ago

What caused me to wonder about this was Venezuela. Yes there’s “a lot of ruin in a nation”, but I didn’t think there was that much in a place like Venezuela. For instance, they held onto their currency way past the point when it obviously dead spec walking. If that place could hold on to thinking they were a high-end country ten years longer than they should have, then we probably have it in us to do it for a century.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  David_Wright
7 months ago

The debt means something, and we would be better off without it. However, there is no competition for sole superpower or world’s currency. To the world, we are too big to fail. Think about it this way. If you have a loan from a bank, the bank can come and take what you own. But what if the US defaults? Is China going to take over our oil fields? The world is more at risk from our debt than we are. Thus, interest rates will remain low because they have to. The world will eventually run out of capacity to… Read more »

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  DLS
7 months ago

So then what is the timeline for whites going below 20%? Because that’s when the final solution (so to speak) – will finally come into full view. If that 20% number is not due to be reached for another 30 years – well then might as well shut this site down, because all that’s really happening here is a bunch of intellectual masturbation, none of which will be remembered when the inflection point comes where the problem can finally be resolved. Nothing is “too big to fail”. The history of the world is littered with the ruins of empires that… Read more »

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

I’m not saying we should do nothing and wait for it to collapse. I just don’t see an effective solution on the horizon. If you have one, count me in 100%. Tea Party movements come and go, and both parties keep spending. I agree with you as far as the US pushing wealth out to its colonies. How brilliant was Spain to unload Puerto Rico on us. PR gets bailed out of natural disasters and free US citizenship. I still cannot comprehend what we get out of it.

Gravity Denier
Gravity Denier
Reply to  DLS
7 months ago

The U.S.’s brief flirtation with imperialism (Philippines, Hawaii, etc.) quickly reached its limits, and just as well. Alas: we substituted a through-the-looking-glass anti-empire. Resources now flow from the mother country to the former colonies. Puerto Rico, for instance — thanks to a brief moment of foolishness in the Spanish-American War. We should have told Puerto Rico, “Sorry, we messed up, here’s your country back plus some money to pay for the damages. Best of luck.” Instead it has become our perpetual child. It’s not really benevolence. It’s always been an advertisement to the world that we are so flipping rich… Read more »

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  David_Wright
7 months ago

You can be assured China is playing the long game, and knows if they can keep their regime stable for another 30 years they will not only be a world power, but the sole world power.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Chet Rollins
7 months ago

The mandarins are indeed playing the long game, but the Chinese are also known for their lack of self-awareness. In all the history of China their dynasties never rose above the limits of the Chinese resevoir, because they are Chinese. Only the many complexities of Europeans drove them to greater and greater heights. The Chinese have no complexities. Fools like Thomas Freidman see this as their strenth, which it is, and he envies that. He cannot see the flip side to th erule of a small elite because that would require a curious mind.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  David_Wright
7 months ago

The mafia can run its protection racket only for as long as it is the top dog in town. Lose that position and the racket goes bust. In that sense, I understand how Russia can be a threat – they are doing things that take a long view towards eventual superiority (supporting family, nationalism, religion; removing degeneracy).

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  David_Wright
7 months ago

Rush Limbaugh is not easily replaced for civ Nat’s. Trump is not easily replaced for civ Nat’s. We are currently in peak civ Nat. We can see the end of Rush’s career coming. We can see the end of Trump in 2024. The Progs and Obama’ didn’t have an answer after Obama. They still don’t. Yet. At this point I don’t think the Civ Nats have an answer after Trump? I don’t think it’s Pence. Tucker if they are wise. Not sure Tucker has the donor money behind him and unlike Trump Tucker will need financing. 2024 is the big… Read more »

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
7 months ago

Germany once had an unpayable debt. Guess what, they didn’t pay it. Times were tough for eight years or so, but no one starved (we would benefit from some starving) and they were the first out of the Great Depression. Perhaps we could recognize it is the forever debt spending and it’s fiat money that enables the unlimited resourses committed by the deep state to end this previous civilization.

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  james wilson
7 months ago

what would America defaulting on its debt look like? that can only mean one thing: devaluing the USD. as of 2018, $6.3 trillion in USD are held by foreign Central Banks. https://fas.org/sgp/crs/misc/RS22331.pdf sure, Uncle Sam could devalue and tell the Central Banks of the rest of the world to fuck off and if they have a problem with that, then come talk to our 2,021 ready-to-fire nuclear ICBMs. what could cause the US to devalue? i have no idea. because if the US did devalue, it could backfire and trigger a fire sale of US treasuries by foreign debt holders.… Read more »

Paul
Paul
7 months ago

Wut. Not sure I get this one. Has the odor of pilpul about it. I’m all for thinking outside the box, but not thinking outside of reality.

Going to go outside and kick some rocks.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Paul
7 months ago

Kick some lefties. They’re softer.

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  Paul
7 months ago

agreed. this is pilpul. anytime there is an epic thread about the Federal Reserve, my Noticer antennas light up when i see a bunch of termites come out of the woodwork to comment “blame the Frankfurt School! those diabolical schemers are behind everything. Just don’t blame the you-know-who.”

they don’t want us to notice certain things about who is behind the Federal Reserve and the itinerant Bankster class.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
7 months ago

This is a sobering and worthwhile exercise; something each of us should do periodically.

Bill_Mullins
Member
7 months ago

Here’s what I would ask all the never-Trump-ers,”What If You’re Wrong?” What if NOT voting for Trump results in Bernie or Creepy Joe or Fouxcahontas or even Butt-gig taking up residence at 600 Penn? Sure he is many things you loathe and despise, but he is NOT one thing you (hopefully) TRULY despise. He is NOT Bernie or Creepy Joe or Fouxcahontas or Butt-gig. However bad you may believe him to be for the nation, surely he is enormously BETTER than the alternative. Would you truly prefer one of the aforementioned crew running things with a fully DemonKKKRat-controlled legislature and… Read more »

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
7 months ago

my response to your question is that the Democrats will have a permanent electoral majority by 2024 anyway, and Bernie is an opportunity to put a uniquely unqualified and out of touch Octegenarian in place.

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
7 months ago

Very little will happen. We’ll still be in a ruinously expensive occupation of the Middle East. We’ll still be allowing ~3 million immigrants (legal/illegal/overstays) in a year and give them work permits. Immigration enforcement will remain at 1980 levels. De-platforming of “bad thinkers” will accelerate. “Quantitative Easing” or whatever they’re calling it this week will continue.

Sperg Adjacent
Sperg Adjacent
7 months ago

But the thing is, we’re not wrong.

greyenlightenment
Reply to  Sperg Adjacent
7 months ago

food for thought

Whitney
Member
7 months ago

I think collapse is coming sooner than we think. Iowa was just an indication what happens when the Coalition of the ascendant get power and are in charge of things. Tyrannical governments work somewhat when it’s Chinese or Russian white people in charge but these people can’t run it. We are decriminalizing pretty much everything and the infrastructure is shutting down. I do totally agree that nobody is going to rise up against the government while there’s plenty of food but competent people are voluntarily turning the reins over to the incompetent. The question is, if any of that is… Read more »

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Whitney
7 months ago

Actually, competent people don’t want anything to do with the system. They avoid it at all costs and isolate themselves from the effects of a decadent civilization. They understand the futility of opposing the zeitgeist, and they have more important things to attend to than arguing with lefty. If Thomas Jefferson were alive today, he would be considered a cranky old hermit.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  Epaminondas
7 months ago

Jefferson’s home is in the middle of nowhere, perhaps he anticipated what’s going on but happening a whole lot sooner.

Maus
Maus
Reply to  Epaminondas
7 months ago

I agree, Ep. I like to flatter myself that I am one such cranky hermit. I’m definitely not a Rand fan; but it’s well past time to go John Galt on the American experiment.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
7 months ago

Jefferson was a cranky old hermit. That’s a good thing.

greyenlightenment
Reply to  Whitney
7 months ago

I don’t think there is going to be collapse, but if there is, the assumption is that those who lack guns and rations will be the first to go. No, it will be those who get sick.

Dutch
Dutch
7 months ago

The problem is bad things don’t matter until they do. The “what” is not hard to figure out, but the “when” and “how bad” are the tricky parts. We are also bombarded by those who benefit in the short run from us not dwelling on the “what” of bad things. Magical thinking has its beneficiaries, and those beneficiaries are the ones constantly telling us to avert our eyes and not believe what we can plainly see. All that said, constantly checking your assumptions is good practice. The respectful give and take with others is a great way to check and… Read more »

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
7 months ago

This is both a good and bad post. Bad: this self doubt got us here. Leftie told us 20 years ago the queers only wanted the privacy of their own bedrooms. Yesterday Men like me couldn’t really argue that and acquiesced. Now we have queers in the bathroom, the schoolroom, the boardroom, the courtrooms… and 26 variants. And the legislation to protect their rights by undermining yours. More, much more is on the way according to the shitlibs and vibrants. Good: one of the reasons the alt right failed is that there was no room for self doubt or dissidents.… Read more »

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Glenfilthie
7 months ago

Yeah, this was a pretty crappy Zman post.

Whitney
Member
Reply to  Forever Templar
7 months ago

Yeah. The voices in the wilderness are always right. From Isaiah to Enoch Powell it’s just they gather steam as they get closer and closer to fruition. We are the steam

John Smith
John Smith
Member
Reply to  Forever Templar
7 months ago

I dunno if it is one of his worst or one of his best! 🙂 Reality can be deferred, but it can’t be dismissed. Sorry, the math says that you can’t keep borrowing forever and defaulting on payment. Healthcare proposals are just jazzed up pyramid schemes. Adding endless numbers of vibrant immigrants to your population, and giving them full access to social programs they never paid into will only end one way. And that is the tragedy in all this. Leftie has gotten so adept at feeding our fears and insecurities, that he even got us questioning obvious truths –… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Forever Templar
7 months ago

Well Templar, I didn’t like the post either—at first—but now I believe I understand. People here are now thinking/questioning implicit/explicit assumptions and I’d say that was the intention of the post.

Not sure I am convinced of rightness or wrongness in beliefs discussed, but certainly timelines are called in question. Also, it helps to rebut some of the challenges made by Z-man by going back to first principles and reevaluating those.

james wilson
james wilson
Member
Reply to  Forever Templar
7 months ago

I can question my belief that “diversity” is destructive and only discover that it is worse than I had supposed. But if we were not prepared to question our basic beliefs we would still be civic nationalist and that would be a sorry state to be stuck in.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Glenfilthie
7 months ago

I think it was a good post, occasional self-questioning if not doubt, is the price one pays for thinking for oneself. I agree w you about gays. I’m becoming less and less tolerant of them. I think there’s a reason they have been suppressed. When out in the open they bring cultural decay and sexual deviancy. Dislike for gays is probably a case of Chesterton’s fence.

ChrisZ
ChrisZ
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

There’s a strong insight here, Simba. I appreciate the invocation of Chesterton’s Fence: the assumption that a given thing exists for a reason, and until you’ve understood that reason you can’t judge whether to dispose of it or not. It seems to me that there are a lot of people who could and would tolerate individual gays, even defend them against outright prejudice, as long as homosexuality per se did not play a constitutive role in society. On the face of it that seems “unfair,” but in fact the necessary secrecy of gay life under the old dispensation may have… Read more »

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  ChrisZ
7 months ago

Thanks. First it was ‘no discrimination against gays’. Uhm okay, sounds fair enough. Then it was gay ‘marriage’. Before I knew what was going on they were forcing people to bake them cakes. But where I blew a fuse was gay adoption and forcing school kids to hear that ‘gay is just as normal as ‘cis”. That’s perversion and that’s what this whole gay clown show looks like to me. In retrospect, asking for common decency and tolerance sure seems to have been the thin end of the wedge. This whole freak circus left me feeling like the nice guy… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  ChrisZ
7 months ago

Gays are just another aberrant group seeking validation from the wider, “normal” populace—the overwhelming, normative population. Nature promotes a general normalcy in all its species, or the species goes extinct. The problem is that we’ve left natural selection behind due to both technology and cultural rot. But as the saying goes, ‘You can’t fool mother nature’.

ChrisZ
ChrisZ
Reply to  Glenfilthie
7 months ago

Like it or loathe it, this is the kind of post you’d only read on this blog. Very refreshing, counter-intuitive, and generative of a high-level of discussion. So thanks, Zman. Frankly, I feel (from recent experience that I wrote about yesterday in this forum) that one of the liabilities of leftists is that they’re so damn certain about their point of view. Often their certainties of today are different than those of five years ago, but no matter. They are certain they’re right in the moment, and any dissenting voice is therefore purposely obtuse or evil. It’s a real fragility… Read more »

Walt
Walt
Reply to  ChrisZ
7 months ago

This right here. You would never read or hear anything like this on a leftist site. An inability to have perspective is a sign of a weak mind.

tonaludatus
tonaludatus
Reply to  ChrisZ
7 months ago

I also liked it; to me it is a wise advice from a wise man.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
7 months ago

Whether a generation sees its age as ascending or as collapsing probably depends largely on group cohesion. This doesn’t necessarily translate into a civilization’s actual rise or fall. During the civil wars at the end of the republic period the Romans probably figured their time had passed. The empire proved to be their most fecund period. During their actual fall they were all having a grand ole time. To read of that period’s excesses is now a great belly laugh at their inability to correctly read the chicken entrails. It takes not one generation to understand whats up, it takes… Read more »

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Yves Vannes
7 months ago

The Roman Republic was nothing like the Empire. The decadence of the 2nd century B.C. really did destroy it. By the time of Julius Caesar, most of the Latin race had moved out of Rome. The capital became a multicultural hell-hole during the Empire. So, yes…those old Roman aristocrats who were defeated by Caesar were correct. It was over. And it never came back. They were replaced. And try as he might, Augustus could not pull the Latins’ chestnuts back out of the fire.

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
7 months ago

Europeans replaced Europeans. It may have ceased being latin but it didn’t stop being European.

We’re being replaced by everything but.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Yves Vannes
7 months ago

Latins were from the north. What came into Rome upon their retreat was not the sort of DNA that builds societal comity and empire. Caesar saw this coming. He merely acted from a rational point of view. The empire creaked along for another 500 years on the template he drew up…a military monarchy.

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  Epaminondas
7 months ago

Trajan (98 – 117AD) was the first Roman Emperor who was not a native born Italian–he was from Spain. yet Trajan is considered to be one of the “5 Good Roman Emperors”, which ended with Marcus Aurelius.

perhaps Barry Soetoro was our Trajan in a way.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Burning Platform
7 months ago

So Rome continued as one, then two, empires- after kicking out Jerusalem.

Jerusalem then re-formed as Islam, killed the Christians, stole the Persian Conquest, and went to war.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Yves Vannes
7 months ago

Britain’s fall from 1900-2000 is another instructive Imperial collapse, largely due to war, demographic replacement and decadence. In less than 50 years Britain went from the most powerful nation on Earth to the U.S.’s footstool to Eurabia’s outhouse. Lots to unpack there.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Yves Vannes
7 months ago

It might also be worth noting that during the end times, the Roman Empire was torn apart by the various non-Roman, barbarian tribes that they had to fight on all sides. Some they even let into the empire and called “Romans”!

I see no reason that such foolishness should/can be repeated here with differing results.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Ris_Eruwaedhiel
7 months ago

Most people, including “conservatives,” don’t have a problem with Big Government when it benefits them, or it’s something they approve of. They only have a problem with Big Government when it doesn’t benefit them, or it’s something they disapprove of.

The other side of Z’s coin is if like Cassandra, you warn and warn and warn, you’re ignored and yet you turn out to be right.

george 1
george 1
7 months ago

Well one thing is for sure. The average life expectancy for empires throughout history is about 200 years. We are well past our sell by date.

Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Ris_Eruwaedhiel
Reply to  george 1
7 months ago

We weren’t an empire in 1789, unless you consider the settlement of America an empire. The American Empire might date from 1898 when we gained overseas colonies.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Ris_Eruwaedhiel
7 months ago

Correct. The structural changes put into effect by the “progressives” were what laid the foundation for the empire. It wasn’t until the militia was removed as a military force, a national bank was put in place, an income tax was put into place, the structure of the branches of government were modified to keep them under elite control (restriction on the size of the House and direct election of Senators) …. etc – that the empire could really get rolling. One of the ways I’ve seen life described in the US before those changes occurred – was the average citizen’s… Read more »

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  Calsdad
7 months ago

and the creation of the National Secret Police… every Empire has gotta have one. the FBI was illegally founded by Teddy Roosevelt in 1908 in a secret act of defiance of the Congress explicitly passing a law forbidding the creation of a National Secret Police.

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  george 1
7 months ago

bbbut… This Time It’s Different!

Hoagie
Hoagie
7 months ago

You lost me at “Maybe the reason for the current crisis is that everyone was wrong about the new world order that emerged after the Cold War.” What is the current crisis?

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Hoagie
7 months ago

The natives are restless.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

“The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts.” There is a deep truth in this, and a danger to those who would start by asking themselves what if they are wrong. The danger is that self-confidence by itself makes success far more likely, at least in the short term. This is true for business, for romance or for self-defense and Im sure many other things including politics. Self-doubt leads to choking, to half-hearted measures and premature abandonment. I don’t mean to suggest that I… Read more »

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
7 months ago

Z Man said: “Maybe there is no limit to debt. Maybe what conservatives think they know about public debt is wrong and disaster is not around the corner.”

From: “The Sun Also Rises” by Ernest Hemingway.

“How did you go bankrupt?” Bill asked. “Two ways,” Mike said. “Gradually and then suddenly.” “What brought it on?” “Friends,” said Mike. “I had a lot of friends. False friends. Then I had creditors, too. Probably had more creditors than anybody in England.”

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
7 months ago

A system where the connected have unlimited resources and everyone else is accountable can’t work. If nothing else the pitchforks will come out eventually. Worst case you end up with communism, which has never lasted more than several decades. The problem might be one of perspective.

Vegetius
Vegetius
Reply to  Official Bologna Tester
7 months ago

I think we’re going to find out whether or not debt is the biggest long con in human history when USD loses its status as the global reserve currency.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
7 months ago

Somebody (apologies— I don’t recall the handle) said yesterday things don’t collapse, they stop working. I think that’s correct. The jarring moment is when enough people realize things aren’t working anymore, and that seems like collapse even though it’s been a long time coming.

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

How about multiculturalism? An axiom in dissident politics is that diversity plus proximity equals conflict. Many of the same people saying that were wrong about the deficits and the growth of government. I think there is empirical evidence that this axiom is true enough. But that does not mean it leads to open war, with the possible hope and solutions that war could bring. The conflict could take the form of gangs and drastically increased levels of violence, sort of an entropic death of society instead of a war-made renewal of the cycle. Instead of Yugoslavia or Lebanon it could… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
7 months ago

Maybe he knows something. Or maybe the globalists know something, maybe they’ve got him real dirty on camera, the full Masonic initiation with all the bells and whistles, and the reason he seems so adroit, is that he’s a protected asset. How come nobody seems to be able to find serious dirt on Trump? Are the attacks against him just kabuki to boost his cred with his base? Are the globalists playing the MSM as useful idiots, feeding them bogus scandals about Trump? This doesn’t lead anywhere. At the end of the day, it’s a coin toss. Heads, you don’t… Read more »

Moran ya Simba
Moran ya Simba
Reply to  Felix Krull
7 months ago

I agree, we can’t know. The difference between school homework or even college math problems and then real life decisions is that in real life you never have all the relevant information. A more fruitful and important approach is probably to decide what is most important to you? I support gun rights, small government (not that any of us know first hand what that is), lower taxes and ignoring climate change. But it gradually became clear to me that demographic replacement of Western countries is what I care most about. Trump is very far from good on that. But he… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Moran ya Simba
7 months ago

But he does seem better than the alternatives on offer.

That’s why he’s dangerous. By doing so good on all the irrelevant parameters, he is preventing actual nationalists from building a broad base. Trump is sitting in a chair that by rights should belong to Jared Taylor.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
7 months ago

It would have been better had Melania placed that medal on Jared Taylor instead of Rush Limbaugh. I think we are some years away from that.

Bierce
Bierce
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
7 months ago

Congressional Democrats working hard to insure Trump’s reelection. Those who select Presidents wish to keep his base — essentially the productive element which keeps the country working — riled up and complacent in that they think they have a friend in authority.

Peter
Peter
7 months ago

As an aside related to Trump’s appealing to minority voters, Bob Weisberg had made the point that he is really trying to appeal to suburban whites, mainly females. They feel more comfortable voting for a party that is ostentatiously trying to appeal to blacks. It makes them feel more comfortable voting Republican.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Peter
7 months ago

It’s a definite possibility. On the other hand if he can pull 20% of blacks it’s over. Play it the same way, either outcome is a winner for him.

Barnard
Barnard
Reply to  Paintersforms
7 months ago

Trump getting 10% more of the black vote doesn’t impact many states on its own. Increasing and maintaining the gains he made among white voters makes a bigger impact in the electoral college.

T. Morris
T. Morris
Reply to  Paintersforms
7 months ago

Trump can’t “pull” 20% of blacks; it wouldn’t make any difference in the results if he could, and I’m pretty sure he knows that. He’ll win re-election in any case, be assured of that.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  T. Morris
7 months ago

Don’t get me wrong I’m not a fan of the strategy because of the rhetoric/policy shift we’ve seen. I don’t like the compromises.

I’ve heard 20% of blacks is the magic number for Republican dominance. I assume it’s because of all the people (like white suburban women) who’d come with it.

Carlton Ritz
Carlton Ritz
Member
Reply to  Peter
7 months ago

Exactly

JZs
JZs
7 months ago

Good post here. On a related note, the whole sovereign debt fret thing never concerned me much at all. I spent a few years starting in late 2007 at Karl Denninger’s site listening to people spewing the end of the world because of the national debt (you know, money we owe to our collective selves). Anyone here remember the poster over there @ Ticker Forum named Nothing? He/she constantly claimed a debt singularity moment was upon us, which would end the monetary system as we know it. Never happened. I get it that private debt can certainly get out of… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  JZs
7 months ago

Brandon Smith does the same thing. He has called the debt crisis to hit the fan, and the Soros takeover of the world, weekly, for how many years running now? He has some interesting insights, but pounding the table, with no self awareness, gets old after a while.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Dutch
7 months ago

Most of these doomsday artists are trying to sell precious metals or Argentine real estate. All you need is enough money saved up in gold or silver to see you through a four-year currency collapse. The rest is over-dramatized bullshit.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Dutch
7 months ago

There should be a constitutional amendment that discharges all debts after 10 years or something like that. Meaning if you haven’t paid off your mortgage, student loans, etc. after a decade you’re free and clear. Same with sovereign debt. Let the banksters make a little profit on good loans but don’t let them become our masters.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  JZs
7 months ago

Not my own thoughts, but it seems to make some sense to me: From what I understand, we do not “owe it to our collective selves.” We owe it to a central bank, which is privately owned by banksters. The threat is not the debt itself, but the interest payments – to whom are they made? essentially, it becomes a skimming operation and a wealth redistribution from the lesser to the richer. Who cares if the “debt” gets repaid as long as the banksters are collecting their interest payments (which are no doubt then converted into more stable assets than… Read more »

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  c matt
7 months ago

When it is time for the debt to default, it will be packaged into securities to be sold to Joe Normie, aka “the Muppets”, to deal with. See 2008.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  c matt
7 months ago

This is the essence of what they discovered with MMT and financialization. And they dont just do it with govt debt either. There is a reason stock buybacks are debt financed. The institutions that would have stopped this are fully conrolled.

Cui Bono?

Member
Reply to  JZs
7 months ago

Philosophers talk about this thing called “reification”. It basically means mistaking some mental concept for a real thing. I think the error of most economists is that they reify money and its transactions without realizing that ultimately its all a symbol for something in the real world. Usually, the real thing is force. To paraphrase Mao “all economics flows from the barrel of a gun”. In this case the guns are those of the US global war machine. To put it another way, free markets require a hegemon of some sort. Foreign governments, individuals, and corporations “invest” in the “debt”… Read more »

Rogeru
Rogeru
Reply to  pozymandias
7 months ago

TL;DR
The economy will collapse not from debt but from loss of confidence.

Member
Reply to  Rogeru
7 months ago

Well yes but there are different kinds of loss of confidence. There’s the loss of confidence that the dollar is really worth anything that might have some people buying gold, guns, and ammo, and the loss of confidence that the US can keep the Red Sea and Persian Gulf out of Somali (or Iranian) hands. In the end, yes, it leads to the same place which is a debt spiral and economic collapse.

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  JZs
7 months ago

It was the chaos of the king’s finances that finally resulted in the Estates-General’s being called into session in early 1789, followed by the beginning of the French Revolution with the fall of the Bastille in Paris in July 1789. But the new revolutionary authorities were as extravagant in their spending as the king. Vast amounts were spent on public works to create jobs, and 17 million livres were given to the people of Paris in food subsidies. On March 17, 1790, the revolutionary National Assembly voted to issue a new paper currency called the assignat, and in April, 400… Read more »

Vizzini
Member
7 months ago

There are plenty of historical and contemporary examples of what happens to governments that engage in massive currency devaluation, which is a necessary feature of maintaining unimaginable amounts of debt. Only the US dollar’s status as the world reserve currency protects us, and that status will not last forever. As both a software engineer and a rancher, I have spent my life dealing with “what can go wrong?” I annoy the hell out of my family with what they regard as meaningless rituals regarding things like gates: “Dad, there’s not even any animals in the farmyard. Why do we have… Read more »

REE
REE
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

Best comment I’ve read in quite some time.

T. Morris
T. Morris
Reply to  REE
7 months ago

Ditto.

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

With apologies to the heroes of FinTwit, who taught me.
When did we abandon the relationship between Taxation and Spending? Who was behind the Financialization of every aspect of the economy? (Otherwise known as the transfer of wealth from Labor to Capital.)
Once Pricing became a cartel (backed by the FDIC) the cost of everything went haywire. (Housing, College, etc.)

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  ReturnOfBestGuest
7 months ago

When Uncle Samiel is creating the currency out of thin air and digitally helicoptering it to his corporate cronies via the Fed, price is meaningless – even more so when that pretend currency is the world’s reserve Clown Coin.

This breakdown is why all of the fundamentals and laws can go off the rails yet we still have a superficially-functioning economy in a Frankenstein sense. It’s animate and goes through the motions of past economic activity, but something critical is missing.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

Analysis paralysis came to mind for me when reading this as well. It’s advisable to check yourself regularly but the empirical evidence for human society points in (and away from) some consistent directions over our million years or so of history.

The odds that we’re going to discover a hidden or delayed-onset upside for Clown World are small. We haven’t got the biology that wrong and “because we live here” is a pretty robust social hueristic – a bit more sturdy and straightforward than the vast mega-volume mythology that the “Athens and Jerusalem” crowd is selling.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

“… because we live here” is a pretty robust social hueristic …”

The American nation is now the largest people in the world not to have our own state. Our people are in possession of none of the control nodes (coinage, courts, media, manufacture of cultural products, etc) of our own civilization. We have been deliberately and systematically dispossessed.

Rogeru
Rogeru
Reply to  Horace
7 months ago

“We have been deliberately and systematically dispossessed”

I say “conquered ” it hits harder.

Ifrank
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

“The Mandibles”. Lionel Shriver. Excellent fictional account of how Vizzini’s prognostications could play to.

Barn Jollycorn
Barn Jollycorn
7 months ago

The endless monetization of debt has a reality check in the bond market. ZIRP, or even negative rates in Germany, are indicators of low or negative expectations of economic growth. Massive expansion of the “money” supply is not producing an increase in bond yields, not only because no one believes in organic growth of the economy but because above a certain level the interest burden on the debt, payable to the private owners of the central banks, cannot be met. Jeff Gundlach put the “line of death” at 2.7% on the 10 yr, IIRC. The last time we crossed that,… Read more »

Member
7 months ago

“What If You’re Wrong” is a simplistic subset of analysis of reality. I don’t mean that pejoratively, as simple does not equal dumb. WIYR is the beginning of analysis/examination of a phenomenon or course of action. Take the US gov’t debt, for example. It has gone apey, no doubt about it. Many economic explanations are given as to why the US system has not yet crumbled. Many OTHER countries have gotten as inverted as the USA and then gone tango uniform, so what is the deal? Given reality, the US CAN go apey into debt–$23T worth– without collapse. *Reagan and… Read more »

Cool for Cats
Reply to  roo_ster
7 months ago

Except for the fact that all of those countries, the U.S. included, HAVE been invaded, and continue to be invaded, on a daily ongoing basis, and no defense has been mounted. The U.S. has been invaded and conquered so decisively that we are on the brink of having imposed on us, through our own conquered systems, a permanent racist totalitarian genocidal dictatorship. Similar things are true about Sweden, Canada, Australia, etc. Not only have these countries been invaded, their native populations are being systematically destroyed. And not only are the natives not doing anything about it, not even complaining about… Read more »

cheesypeak
cheesypeak
Reply to  Cool for Cats
7 months ago

Yeah, the US is much more diverse than the other comparable countries. There’s no equivalent in their countries of the demographic change in California.

roo_ster
Member
Reply to  Cool for Cats
7 months ago

Did I not mention sewage in the harbor?

You’re preaching to the choir, bud, regarding the immivasion. Still, immivasion is not seen as a destabilizing force and thus not part of safe harbor calculation by most the globohomo set and others with the wherewithal to move money to the USA.

And even if they do allow themselves to see the truth, the US has a white genocide problem, but a lesser african & muslim problem. Squatamalans are not perceived as threatening as muzzies and africans.

Thus, USA is still the safe harbor of choice for folks with money to protect.

Rogeru
Rogeru
Reply to  roo_ster
7 months ago

” the debt example, I think we can discount USA’s collapse due to barking crazy levels of debt as long as the USA is perceived as a safe haven.”

I wonder if you’ve inadvertently answered the question as to why the democrat machine seems to dislike Sanders so much; they fear his damaging the perception of security.

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Rogeru
7 months ago

That’s EXACTLY why I am voting for Sanders in the primary. I’ll still vote for Trump in the general b/c 4 more years will imo be useful in exciting our dormant sociological immune system. Drain the swamp or burn (Bern) it to the reeking ashes. I have no hope of the former/

Member
Reply to  roo_ster
7 months ago

A lot of our problems and our puzzlement about the way things are stem from the fact that Westerners in general and Americans especially have lost any sense of what the vast majority of the planet is still like. I’ve always found it odd that people who claim to be “multicultural” also just blithely assume that somehow, under all those other skin colors and tribal headgear, everyone on earth is really a flabby suburban white guy with a pickup truck and a copy of muh Constitution in his back pocket at heart. This is why so many Americans dismiss concerns… Read more »

Horace
Horace
Reply to  pozymandias
7 months ago

“…Americans … have lost any sense of what the vast majority of the planet is still like.”

I used to be civnat. Three months in Africa cured me.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Horace
7 months ago

Africa wins Again!

c matt
c matt
Reply to  roo_ster
7 months ago

How safe do they think their assets will be when AOC is in charge?

Apres Trump, le deluge.

Epaminondas
Member
7 months ago

Now I’m going to have to go back and reassess my attitude toward MLK. Maybe after all he WAS the greatest human being ever to walk the earth…

TomA
TomA
7 months ago

Being wrong about something, and then having to face the consequences of that error, is the essence of evolutionary fitness selection. If you were living on the savanna and one day decided that the big kitty needed petting; well, you probably got eaten and wisdom abounded for the rest of the tribe. Today, being wrong has no feedback mechanism of existential consequence. Push the restart button on the video game and presto!, no real consequence to stupidity. Perhaps all reality will become a video game soon and it won’t matter.

Vizzini
Member
7 months ago

Sigh. I had a long post discussing various aspects of today’s Zman post all set to go and it disappeared due to the vagaries of bad satellite internet. Maybe later. Anyway:

Does diversity plus proximity equal conflict? Ask these nice folks:

https://medium.com/@DarkSkyLady/dog-gate-the-divide-between-liberal-white-people-black-people-6a13c62ddd99

roo_ster
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

My comment also went into the ether

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  thezman
7 months ago

Ah ha! Thanks! My satellite internet has been up and down all morning, so I just assumed it was that.

Normie
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

I’d shoot the dog and the cop in a heart beat…

Cloudbuster
Member
Reply to  Normie
7 months ago

That’s why you are a normie. The correct answer is shoot the Black man and the cop. The dog is just an exploited pawn.

Karl Horst (Germany)
Karl Horst (Germany)
7 months ago

I’ve often asked “What if you’re wrong?” when I share the salvation of Jesus Christ with non-believers and they tell me it’s all just religious nonsense. I’m not sure which is harder for people to wrap their heads around; the concept of eternity or the consequences if they’re wrong about accepting Christ.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
7 months ago

That’s the classic “Pascal’s Wager.” My experience is that it is effective only among a small, extremely pragmatic portion of the population. I’m not much of an evangelist, though.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
7 months ago

Superficial tactical belief in God b/c game theory isn’t exactly what Jesus was talking about. If the Christians are right, Pascal’s still knocking on the gates wondering where he went wrong. The idea that you can lawyer around God by technical compliance was in the Jewish spirit of the Law that Jesus preached against. Check out Dan Taylor’s “Skeptical Atheist” for a Christian perspective that mostly lines up with how I see the question of belief vs. non-belief. Lotta devils in the details though, and I don’t subscribe to “World Christianity for all mankind,” FWIW. For the most part, Faith… Read more »

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

Pascal was a far deeper believer than his wager. See his Pensees. https://www.gutenberg.org/files/18269/18269-h/18269-h.htm

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

Pascal was much more than his wager. From his Pensees: “Therefore I shall not undertake here to prove by natural reasons either the existence of God, or the Trinity, or the immortality of the soul, or anything of that nature; not only because I should not feel myself sufficiently able to find in nature arguments to convince hardened atheists, but also because such knowledge without Jesus Christ is useless and barren. Though a man should be convinced that numerical proportions are immaterial truths, eternal and dependent on a first truth, in which they subsist, and which is called God, I… Read more »

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Karl Horst (Germany)
7 months ago

I’ve witnessed enough genuine conversions to know that something’s going on.

Cool for Cats
7 months ago

Another question you might ask is: what did you get? The U.S. is in debt to the tune of $23 trillion, a staggeringly large number. What did we get for $23 trillion? It’s enough money to not just send every single American to Harvard, it’s enough to buy an entire Harvard Yard for each American. It is an incredibly large amount of money. So… what exactly DID we get? Can we point to it? Do we all have flying cars? Where are our moon colonies? Let’s see… Lunatic wars for the Jews, approx. $10 trillion. Bailing out Jewish bankers, roughly… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Cool for Cats
7 months ago

Cat, based on one of Trump’s verbal spasms in 2016, I hoped he’d be the guy to sit the world down and say “all of our books are cooked and no one is paying any of this back. Let’s re-set this thing.” At least get the ball rolling in the public mind. A worldwide creditor haircut is what we’re eventually going to have by dint of collapse but the idea of managing the landing is something our creditor class refuses to consider. Debt forgiveness is an evergreen populist issue though and no matter the political climate its going to be… Read more »

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Cool for Cats
7 months ago

In the last ten years we’ve indebted ourselves to the tune of $1.5 for every $1 gain in GDP

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Cool for Cats
7 months ago

Cool cats. We got “things” in two areas: War and Welfare. Both have zero relationship to investment, which is sort of what your post speaks to. In the long run, only true investment can be expected to grow the pie for future generations.

c matt
c matt
Reply to  Cool for Cats
7 months ago

The remaining $3 trillion, I have no idea.

Hammers. For the military.

Burning Platform
Burning Platform
Reply to  Cool for Cats
7 months ago

https://www.gao.gov/assets/670/665575.pdf that links to a GAO 2014 report which audited the properties and assets held by the Pentagon worldwide. what did you get for $23 TRILLION in debt to the Greatest War Machine in history? here is what you got: “557,000 facilities (buildings, structures, and linear structures), located on over 5,000 sites worldwide, covering more than 27.7 million acres, and with a value of approximately $828 billion.” “data for the Air Force showed a utilization rate of 0 percent for 22,563 buildings” and the other branches of the military have equally low utilization rates (less than 50% or they simply… Read more »

King Tut
King Tut
7 months ago

How many Americans are now sufficiently based to be considered DR? A few hundred? A few thousand? A couple of million? I have no idea but my impression is that the DR is, by numbers at any rate, still a very small, outlier phenomenon. We may be more numerous than one-legged lesbian Elvis impersonators but that’s a very low bar. Given that, would it not electoral suicide for Mr. Trump to base his policy platform on appealing to the DR instead of ticking the boxes for normies who, let’s face it, constitute the broad mass of America and everywhere else?… Read more »

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  King Tut
7 months ago

We may be more numerous than one-legged lesbian Elvis impersonators but that’s a very low bar.

You say that now, but when their army limps to the crest of the hill to the tune of “Love Me Tender’ and the sun glints off their sequined softball shirts, and the whole world seems to pause, you’re going to be sorry.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
7 months ago

I read the book several years ago called Peak Oil which told us the world was running out of oil… soon. I bought into the theory. The world is truly running out of oil. Just not soon. I thought killing Soleimani would harm us in the Middle East. It probably will. Just not soon. Empires have fallen all through history due to high debt loads. I view it like the difference between a car crash and a worn out car. Empires usually don’t crash in a big event like the French Revolution or the Bolshevik Revolution. They just wear out.… Read more »

Rogeru
Rogeru
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
7 months ago

But how are you enjoying the Ice Age predicted in the early 70s? Ready for some global warming, yet?

Anonymous Reactionary
Anonymous Reactionary
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
7 months ago

Shale is such a money loser we probably hit “peak profitable oil” during the Bush years, on average. Using less oil, mostly by buying on Amazon instead of retail so far, was by far the better investment.

Brian
Brian
7 months ago

What if deficits don’t matter because a hard reset is planned? The old dollar goes away, the $trillions in debt go away, and we start from scratch. A “Super EBT” card gets the reboot started. Much of the population, especially the younger generations, is already conditioned to accept such cards as normal. Less than 2% of the population is involved in food production, so that’s a relative handful that our masters have to keep happy. Distribution adds a bit more. Hardly anyone who was making serious bank before. Sure it’d be a mess, and there’s all kinds of ways it… Read more »

Dave
Dave
7 months ago

The debt doesn’t matter because no one seriously believes that it will ever be repaid; when it becomes too burdensome, it will be defaulted or hyperinflated away. The system will not collapse as long as present production of real goods is adequate for present consumption.

The real problem is that the people producing those goods marry late and have very few children while low-IQ heavily-tattooed petty criminals are fathering babies all over the place.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Dave
7 months ago

The real problem is that the people producing those goods marry late and have very few children while low-IQ heavily-tattooed petty criminals are fathering babies all over the place.

If they were White low-IQ heavily-tattooed petty criminals, I wouldn’t care much, but even poor Whites are reproducing below replacement rate.

Vegetius
Vegetius
7 months ago

I predict that Trump’s unashamed pandering to blacks (pardons and payouts) is going to work: he will get 1-5% more of a black vote that will already be depressed by 5-10%. This will produce an electoral landslide in the neighborhood of a 1972 or 1984. If this is achieved against a DNC-imposed candidate it may well break the Left-Neoliberal coalition apart and this will be Trump’s greatest achievement. In this scenario, Orange Faggot Bad whining from the sidelines is self-marginalizing stupidity. Better to be seen as inside the tent pissing out or at least pissing off everyone around you by… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Vegetius
7 months ago

I see a few problems with this scenario. First, we’ve got (likely) 4 more years of Trump. After that, who will even pay lip service to our agenda? Pence? Whatever cucks the Vichy Right puts up against the next generation of Democratic lunatics?
We’re not going to get a permanent, much less accepted, place at the table in a post-Trump political landscape.
Whatever we do, we’ve got 4 years to do it.

Vegetius
Vegetius
Reply to  Pickle Rick
7 months ago

I am less interested in being told what I want to hear than being able to tell other people what I want *them* to hear.

Election campaigns provide a predictably scheduled opening for this.

If our men and women had shown up at the Iowa caucuses en masse and done nothing more than hold up #WHITESFORTRUMP signs it would have made global news and served as a useful consciousness-raising exercise.

Whites as such must become aware of begin to display their political strength before we can expect anyone else to recognize this.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Vegetius
7 months ago

Veg, if we’re going to be a persistent bloc in electoral politics, our coalition has to first learn to vote their own interests over all of the rule of law/magic paper Talmudry, Second Founding mythology. I can see a future coalition of dissident Right parties going Groyper on the candidates and grading them for White interests someday but the dissidents need social and cultural footing to fight that way. We’re still finding the places around America and elsewhere where we can settle, travel and otherwise live while laying the foundations for that sort of broader political movement. I’m skeptical on… Read more »

Vegetius
Vegetius
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

If I can channel J-Bo for a moment: We have a vanguard, disorganized as it is. What we need is to link the vanguard to the will of the mass. I see electoral politics – the process, not the product – as one of the best spaces in which to do this. Our biggest problem is not the usual suspects or the cucks or the debt or even immigration. Our problem is the masses of white people do not know who they are. Trump showed the way: the media will give you free air time and allow you to live… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Vegetius
7 months ago

Veg you make good points – particularly about the fact that the Trump-Alt-Right coalition was a feedback loop. Trump’s potential as an uber-elite-tier disruptor made a lot of us bolder. My own red-pilling would have been much slower without 2015-2016 Trump. Our problems with GoodWhites and non-Whites are also interrelated – we shouldn’t ignore the fact that the Usual Suspects are hammering away at Whitey 24/7, but if 90% of Whites just said “no” and did what was good for Us, all the (((Theys))) would be relatively harmless. One of the benefits to our community strategies is that they serve… Read more »

Vegetius
Vegetius
Reply to  Exile
7 months ago

I think some of our enemies see this all much clearer than we do: “Every move to normalize the AfD as a democratic party, however small, helps them to gain a foothold in the mainstream. Every inch they gain in state government in turn serves as a springboard to make the leap nationally. It is thus in some ways appropriate that this would begin in Thuringia, where the Nazis first entered a state government in 1930 and began testing strategies to eventually absorb the German polity whole without firing a single shot.” Clearly the systems are different, but the enemy’s… Read more »

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
7 months ago

What if we’re not even asking the right questions? GIGO

Durendal
Durendal
7 months ago

Question Z. Is this meant for us to do some legitimate reflection or just to black pill the ever living shit out if us?

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Durendal
7 months ago

They’re highly reflective black pills.

Exile
Exile
Member
7 months ago

The fact that most of us have gone through major transformations in world view to get here suggests that we’re guys who test our opinions for “word to world fit.” We’re thinking and debating here and now as part of the testing process. Most of Us are not so “connected” that they’re giving up a seat at the table of power in order to be with Us. The conflicted interests don’t run as deep as you’d see with one of TPTB becoming a dissident. The truth is a luxury we can afford. Red pills are cheap, blue pills are expensive.… Read more »

JR52
JR52
7 months ago

Bit of an odd poast so I’m going to go off topic: Buttigieg is literally a CIA operation. I can describe further how we know this. Personally, I have family members who ran three letter agencies and a couple who are still in the game so I thought this was obvious about mayor Pete…but if you don’t have familiarity with the signals allow me to go on: 1. Pete’s dad is an “immigrant” from a sketchy terrorist-adjacent type country who just moved here and copped a tenured professorship at one of Americas most important national universities and one that happens… Read more »

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  JR52
7 months ago

Like every other candidate in recent memory he’s getting those Goldman Sachs folks on board.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  JR52
7 months ago

I’m sold. It’s not as if the Deep State hasn’t been trying to “normalize” overt political action by the DS for years now – Brennan’s talking-head appearances, McRaven’s treasonous call for removing his CINC, etc… At least when HW ran he had to downplay the spook thing. Now it makes Russiagate LARPers flush with patriotism.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  JR52
7 months ago

There are the hangers-on like Biden, who never go away, and then there are those who get vomited up out of nowhere into the big time. From nowhere to big-time is an interesting tell. c.f. Obama.

Whiskey
Whiskey
Reply to  JR52
7 months ago

Yep. And he’s the nominee now. Dems went from panic over Sandernistas Brown Wave to happiness over Mayor Buttplug. Road tested rigging the Caucuses who do you think will count the votes in November?

President Buttplug. Get ready for it. Gay will be mandatory for all White men. Who will be forbidden from owning anything or voting or holding office save Mayor Pete Buttplug. Forever wars we are forbidden from winning, woke stuff every where, open borders, punitive and confiscating taxes aka France all coming.

The Deep state will not tolerate us any longer.

See you at Manzanar.

Cloudbuster
Member
Reply to  Whiskey
7 months ago

Hold fast, boys. Don’t shoot until you see the brown of their pucker.

AnotherAnonymous
AnotherAnonymous
Reply to  JR52
7 months ago

100% with you on our friend the Spook. Malta is quite the glam circuit for diplomatic intrigue and petrodealings. His father was brought over during Cold War as expert on all matters cultural Marxism and Gramsci in particular. Pete has absorbed this stuff like water. He knows /understands propaganda! Apparently he didn’t do any training at the Defense Language Institute – which might indicate he wasn’t going to be put into a field post that requires perfect language skills. Gays are rich and politically active and, for now, the gay agenda has the greatest potential as a wedge against conservatives,… Read more »

Christopher Chantrill
Christopher Chantrill
7 months ago

My current analysis, after Curtis Yarvin in “The Clear Pill.” He divides society into Gentry, Commoners, and Clients. The point about Trump is that he represents the Commoners. His rise is the Rise of the Commoners. And Rush LImbaugh, with his 30 year run on AM radio, is the Voice of the Commoners. What do Commoners want? They want the system to work so they can have jobs and families and homes and SUVs. They are not educated, but they have learned a lot of common sense and skill. They are not ideological, but they are tribal. Their tribe is… Read more »

AnotherAnonymous
AnotherAnonymous
Reply to  Christopher Chantrill
7 months ago

That sounds pretty good! The group you are describing was the Jacksonian Democrat of old. The people who got things done, made the country run, and didn’t need to be told what to do. They weren’t intellectuals – their role was far more important as the glue of society. They were the (mostly) Protestant petty burgeouis who built the country and the expansion – before the waves of everyone else were brought in to unionize and start a class warfare. DeToqueville described them as he met them up and down the Mississippi and Midwest. The very people who are most… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Christopher Chantrill
7 months ago

Those are people worth investing in.

Din C. Nuttin
Din C. Nuttin
7 months ago

Several years ago I looked around the internet and found a receipt for a slave, indicating someone paid $300 for the right to the slaves future earnings. Compare that to a Treasury bond, which also gives the holder the right to the future earnings (interest) of laborers. Every new bond issued by the “government” enslaves us a little bit more.

AnotherAnonymous
AnotherAnonymous
7 months ago

For the first time ever, Bush/Obama made sure that NO shakeout ever occurred in response to the 2007 financial crisis. Government bailout “saved” the day, but in order to keep things propped up, the interest rate HAD to be held down — Indefinately. Millenials have never seen a normal financial adjustment cycle – yet they lost their home while growing up! Instead of shutting their doors in 2008, a lot of marginally profitable firms are now clogging up entry of new firms, thanks to a bottomless creditline. The FED’s new role in the economy is to temper the interest rate… Read more »

Gauss
Gauss
7 months ago

Maybe the formula is
diversity+proximity=oppression
The only way to keep the lid on is to silence complainers even harder That’s the way Britain has responded to vibrancy.

Normie
7 months ago

One of my favorite questions to ask my CivNat bro in law is: “where are all the Tea Party people” now that Trump has the highest year over year deficit in history…

Conservatives seem to only care about debt when a DEM is in office. Just go to show that the people who pretend to be the most “principled” are the biggest liars and phonies.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Normie
7 months ago

It’s beyond clear that neither party is going to do a darn thing about the debt or the deficit. Worst case, I’m right and it will someday be a huge problem, at which point painful solutions will be unavoidable. Best case, as Z said, all those doom and gloom prognostications continue to be wrong. If I was Emperor, I’d do it differently, but I’m not, and our wonderful electorate wouldn’t give the time of day to any candidate who proposed the steps actually necessary to run at a surplus and eliminate the debt. The gap between revenues and spending is… Read more »

Anonymous Reactionary
Anonymous Reactionary
7 months ago

High government debt is a result of an aging society that has a high demand for bonds, because stocks are a risk tolerant young person’s investment. Governments relatively fund themselves with debt instead of taxes in this setup. It is a consequence of sexual degeneracy and demographic failure, but neocons successfully cast it as a strictly financial phenomenon.

Walt
Walt
7 months ago

I disagree with Leftie on most things. I believe so much of what has gone wrong is due to Leftie. But I have actually stopped to think like Z on occasions – what if I’m wrong about all this? What if those snarling banshees are right? I’ll keep it short by saying that Leftie has never considered this. They are blinded by group think, self loathing and white knighting. They never consider the other side of the argument. That’s how I know we are correct.