The Time Of The Golden Agers

Major social events are often a lot like moving furniture around the house. Moving the bookcase from one side of the room to the other is a mundane task. What you find behind it, however, can be quite interesting. Sometimes you find something you searched high and low for at some point. Other times you find something that you never knew was missing. Maybe just moving things around a bit gives you a new perspective on your living space that leads to other changes in your environment.

That’s how big social events feel sometimes. The event itself is not as important as what it reveals. Maybe you find out your neighbor is a bit of kook, who quietly has been stocking the basement with dried food and ammunition. Maybe we learn that the local government is more useless than anyone imagined possible. The Chinese pandemic is one of those events that will be more important for what it reveals than for the impact of the virus itself, unless you die from it, of course.

For example, we are getting a glimpse of what the great Baby Boomer retirement is going to look like in the coming decade. If we execute all of the people, who like debating the precise dates of generational divisions, we can agree that the cohort in question is roughly those who came of age in the late 1960’s and the late 1970’s. Two waves of the post-war baby boom. Right now, the number of elderly people grows by an average of 2.8 percent annually. It will peak at about 80 million.

For as long as anyone reading this has been alive, Baby Boomers have driven American politics. In the 80’s, they wanted to make money, so we financialized the economy and gave everyone a 401K. In the 1990’s, better schools were all the rage then better access to college. Health care became an issue, first because Boomer parents were getting old then when the Boomers themselves got old. Cheap health insurance was the most important political issue until now.

Notice that Bernie Sanders promising free health care got no senior support. The reason is seniors have Medicare. Blacks have Medicaid. The only people who care about health insurance premiums are younger white people and no one cares about them anymore. In fact, Bernie’s Medicare for all probably scared the crap out of older people, who rightly assumed it would mean longer lines for them. Worse yet, it could mean taxing their retirement to pay for it.

This brings us back to the Chinese Flu. Otherwise sensible people like Greg Cochran and Steve Sailer are clanging the bell, trying to get people to declare a war on the Covid19 virus. What they are suggesting, short of some miracle cure or a vaccine, would require rearranging American society. It would need rounds of universal testing, mass quarantines and testing of every human crossing the border. North America would have to become something like North Korea, in terms of travel restrictions.

Keep in mind that polio is still around, despite generations of eradication efforts. We have vaccines for a lot of nasty viruses. For the most part, these have been eradicated in the West, but they still exist in the world. If stop vaccinating people, those viruses will reemerge in the West, which is why we remain vigilant. We have no vaccine for the Chinese Flu and no one is sure we can get one. In other words, eradicating this virus, without vaccine, will require a massive reorganization of society.

What we’re seeing is the first glimpse of what democracy looks like when 20% of the population is elderly. Baby Boomers have always voted for stuff they want and soon, they will want to be insulated from the dangers of old age. If it requires us to turn America into a hermit kingdom in order to prevent a Boomer Pox from getting loose, then that’s the price the younger generation must pay. The salient political issue of this decade will be how best to guard the old coots from the Grim Reaper.

Now, this is the part where angry oldsters stop reading and post a comment about how not all Boomers are like that. This is true. In fact, it is plausible that no Boomers are willing to crater society to get a few extra days. This is a variation on the Simpson’s paradox. That is, this trend is uncommon in small groups or individuals, but appears when looking at the cohort as a whole. This turned up with education, abortion and health care. The data says Boomers collectively vote their interest.

Now, there is another angle to this. The sorts of collective action proposed by people like Steve Sailer and Greg Cochran can only happen in a cohesive, high-trust country with lots of social capital. The sorts of communities where people like Cochran and Sailer grew up had those qualities. Modern America, in contrast, is a multicultural amalgamation of low-trust clusters. The store of social capital has been burned up a long time ago in order to have cheap stuff.

This raises the question as to whether this cohort will suddenly have a come to Jesus moment over demographics. Most of those Trump voters in comfort fit slacks, carrying over-sized constitutions to the rally, think we can get back to the way things were when they were kids. If you dispute this, look at the comment section of Breitbart or Conservative Treehouse. For those people, it is always 1985.

What happens when they find out that ain’t happening? Will it make any difference if the oldsters finally see their interest are threatened by the great brown wave that is washing over America? We’ll soon find out. This panic, and that what we are seeing, will change things far more than the virus. We’re about to learn just how much social capital is left and the answer is probably not going to be encouraging.

The fact is, all the snarky comments about the Boomers and the irreverent mocking of the Zoomers is not changing the reality on the ground. America has operated like a young country for a long time. It still does in many ways. It is an old country now, a country run by old people just coming to terms with their mortality. The psychological revolution in American culture that is upon us will make the past decade seem like golden age. Instead, it will be the prelude to the time of the Golden Agers.


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roo_ster
Member
6 months ago

Due to the fact that social capital has been converted into profits for multi-national corporations, the social capital required to enforce an effective quarantine does not exist. What we can expect if the panicked population prevails, is the use of local state and federal law enforcement and suspension of liberties we thought we had to enforce quarantines.

Welcome to the low social trust multi-ethnic American Empire.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  roo_ster
6 months ago

And this is where the demographic fractures are showing up. So it is a good thing. This can’t be hidden much longer.

Tarstarkusz
Tarstarkusz
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

Not all areas of the country will be equally susceptible or equally low-trust and unable to cope. I can’t wait until the white privilege stories for the wuflu start showing up.

Marko
Marko
Reply to  roo_ster
6 months ago

Yeah I think “curfew” and “military” will become common words in the coming months.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Marko
6 months ago

Heh – Uncle Sam is in the midst of deploying a division to Europe to flex our muscles. Much of the military will be “over-there” or quarantined.
https://www.voltairenet.org/article209437.html

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Drake
6 months ago

It was the military shuttles back and forth to Europe that donated the Spanish Flue to the US.

Militarism, the gift that keeps on giving.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  roo_ster
6 months ago

Government of course had nothing to do with looting the social capital.
The government flat out burnt it to the ground and planted feral wogs domestic and imported wherever it went.

Frankly the dissident right are white leftists who discovered that whites are written out of the script. Like Liberals moving into conservative, healthy communities you bring your envious and covetous viruses with you.

As if the corporations just didn’t cut a deal, as if those left out aren’t simply envious.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
6 months ago

Great essay. Makes sense as to what happened to Bernie Sanders in the democratic primaries.
I could see perhaps in an election cycle or two a young leftist willing to attack the established Democratic Party pulling it off.
In truth Bernie is not the revolutionary the young generation thinks that he is.
As for Trump it has been an effort to live in 1985. That is very true.
Reality sets in.

Wxtwxtr
Wxtwxtr
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
6 months ago

Someone elsewhere argued that Bernie is a fascist, because although he relentlessly attacks “millionaires and billionaires”, he had no criticism for Big Corps – big tech, big pharma, big med, big edu, big agra, or any others.
Bernie is Hitler!

Member
6 months ago

Shit just got real.

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Use this as an opportunity to buy some high quality utility stocks. Some are now yielding an annual dividend of over 4%, and share prices are down over 20%. In less than two months, those stocks will be right back where they were before. And good utility stocks are like having gold in the vault.

CAPT S
CAPT S
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

Not countering, just an addendum. It’s also the right season to invest in $2.95 seed packets; properly cared for this investment will provide well over $100 of chow over the course of 3-4 months. It’s times like this where it’s better to have food in the larder than gold in the vault.

miforest
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

they are not safe from the looters. to wit:
On January 14, 2019, following the departure of CEO Geisha Williams, who had led the company since 2017; PG&E announced that it was filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in response to the financial challenges associated with catastrophic wildfires that had occurred in Northern California, in 2017 and 2018.

shareholders lose everything.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

miforest—chapter 11 is a reorganization, not a sale of the creditors assets. It is unknown what the haircut will be for stock owners, but I doubt if they will lose everything. Negotiations will need to be conducted after all the suits against PG&E are tabulated. Most likely all will be forced into so class action. But I agree, lawyers come first, PG&E second, people a distant third—if anything. Suit will take years.

miforest
Member
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Compsci – while a loss of equity ifs not Guaranteed, but usually that’s how it works.
the lawyers negotiate and plan and then at the 11th hour 59th min they issue new stock to the “creditors” and lawyers.

The common stock shareholders get nothing , bondholders take a big haircut, suppliers go bankrupt because they don’t get paid, and the bankers walk away with a debt free company.

I work in the auto industry, and the common stock shareholder is usually completely destroyed. talk to the GM and Chrysler shareholders. they got nothing .

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

Much of what happened to the auto industry—I assume recent recession under Obama—was arguably illegally mandated by the administration. But PG&E is a utility, so there is concern for its future outside of producing a commodity like a car. I hope for the best. But it’s difficult to predict since the liability claims are not even all tabulated. For one thing, that a utility company, regulated by the State can be made bankrupt for such an accident needs to be thought through carefully. Of course, CA is insane, so thought may not be in the cards.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Under the supposed logic of the system, there is no reason to treat power company employees any differently than government employees. It’s a very heavily regulated industry with managed competition at best. Almost all of its operations are intertwined with local and state government as well as the feds. It’s a double-edged sword. Opting for tort liability as a private company theoretically holds the negligent party responsible but the taxpayer ultimately foots that bill even though it’s a “private” company because it’s a functional monopoly that passes its costs straight to the customer (with rubber-stamp CPUC approval). If you treat… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

Well done, miforest, that’s a classic attack, a hallmark of disruption economics or disaster capitalism. Boomer economics think in terms of high- trust, stable “growth” or “progress”. They don’t recognize the boom-bust cycle of raiders razing territory. Fatten the sheep, then shear them. The ‘block-bust, then gentrify’ model. For instance, blow a China bubble- buying up weakening American assets- Use a panic to pop the bubble, collecting on the shorts- Now use those short profits to ride up again as everything moves back to the U.S. What we can’t see are the very large short spreads being laid out in… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

Sorry, tl;dr:

La Corona-chan is the cover for another planned Meltdown.

This crap happens about every 10 years, right on schedule.
Ya think you might finally get ahead, and then the sheep get sheared.

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

Mr Alzaebo is correct.

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Have to look carefully at the risk profile of the geography the utility operates in. In PG&E’s case, same for SoCal Edison they are locked in subrogation litigation with insurers who have deeper pockets and longer time horizons than individuals.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  SamlAdams
6 months ago

(Thx, Saml, I’ve forgotten the very long-term thinking of the actuaries, and of insurance as a capital pool. You must be a busy lad right about now.

King Cuomo the First has quarantined New Rochelle, the upper City, and I was thinking of our Saml and Ris, may they stay, and stay safe and well. Near the hot zone myself today.)

SamlAdams
SamlAdams
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

Yep, we can outlast almost anyone in litigation. But,yes early in this game our CFO (and actuary) and I were looking at the data plots coming out of China and concluded these were managed numbers and this thing was worse than people thought. I’m a parabolic rifle shot from the edge of the containment. NYC is turning into a ghost town. National Guard has now taken over an island one the shorefront as a testing and logistics center. It is also easily isolated from the general public. Suspect we’re getting closer to spicy time. Things are moving fast.

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

You’re both correct. Utility stock possibly a good buy EXCEPT if the BOD is run by enviro tyrants. Enviros control the BOD of PG&E, hells bells they’re on the BOD of every Mexifornia company. PG&E board damage is great…..”you can’t trim those trees..bushes…cut the grass to protect your property from fire. Release massive water pulses down rivers but don’t wash your face! Life of the wee doodlewiggly is more important than you.” PG&E=Corruption +Enviro Marxists=You’re Screwed!

miforest
Member
Reply to  Range Front Fault
6 months ago

technically true , but I know of no utilities that are not fully Woke.

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

Probably true. The takeover is complete!

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

Utility assets won’t be busted up and sold off.
That sheep is immortal, too big to fail.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Range Front Fault
6 months ago

Jerry’s ‘drought’ and the ‘green’ policies- that fake spotted owl crap- left millions of tons of deadwood fuel waiting for a spark. I listened to several Western state governors complaining. PGE execs knew their 100 year old substations lacked maintenance because they were stealing the maint. budget for themselves. This sounds like Soviet commissars stealing all the heating oil in a Russian winter to sell on the black market at inflated prices. It took Jerry’s friends, a J**ish Hollywood couple, 20 years to bust out Lost Hills and grab the land and water rights to the Kern aquifer, the main… Read more »

vxxc💂🏻‍♂️😉 Toxic masculinity vector
Reply to  Alzaebo
6 months ago

One of these days the voters will perhaps learn that Marx and the Rothschilds were cousins.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

They Hewlett-Packarded PG&E.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

Stocks of streaming services (Disney) and the backbone tech (5G) as the Hive cells isolate.

Toasty
Toasty
6 months ago

About the “War on Coronavirus”

This is just more empty boomer talk like the “Convention of States” and stupid secessionist movements like counties switching from Virginia to West Virginia.

Just hot air that never goes anywhere. Boomers love to talk about all the things they’d like to do, but there is never any follow through.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Toasty
6 months ago

Well if there’s one thing Boomers care about, it’s “our greatest ally.” And none of the things you mention benefit said ally.

george 1
george 1
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

Yes MemeWarVet. I once posted on CTH that I did not think it wise to go to war for Israel. I also asked why Israel is considered an ally when they have committed serious espionage activities against us many times and actually attempted to sink a U.S. Navy ship, killing many sailors.

You would have thought I had murdered Mother Teresa judging from the responses.

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  george 1
6 months ago

I’ve posted pretty much the same thing on a number of forums – and like you – have gotten the “Why did you kill the kitten?!” response as well. But here’s the thing: I’ve been doing that for years. And I do definitely detect less Israeli dick-licking behavior now – than there was 10 or 17 years ago. The USS Liberty incident is always a good one to bring up – because you FORCE people to start defending an attack against a US military ship – which killed multiple sailors. Because the Israel dick-lickers are usually the same people who… Read more »

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
6 months ago

And you can spin the Liberty atrocity into the cover up being conducted by none other than John McCain’s daddy. That leads into the traitor McCain being such a hero in Vietnam (He has more confirmed American kills in Vietnam than any Viet Cong you can name.) that they have a monument to the guy in Hanoi.

http://www.reflectionsontheroad.com/visiting-the-john-mccain-monument-in-hanoi-vietnam/

George 1
George 1
Reply to  Calsdad
6 months ago

Yes Carlsdad. They can claim accident till the cows come home but I will take the word of not one but two Israeli pilots who were on scene and came forward to report that the Liberty was positively identified as a US ship and still attacked. It was not an accident.

Walt Jeffers
Walt Jeffers
Reply to  george 1
6 months ago

CTH posters – Israel or Donald Trump can do no wrong. SD is better, more nuanced than his commenters. In fact, just before the Iranian general was murdered, he wrote a post about how Pompeo and the neonuts started the whole thing and essentially backed Trump into a corner.

David_Wright
Member
Reply to  Toasty
6 months ago

This from Tucker last night. Maybe his best and most relevant to this crisis.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EbyPW8lJX2E&

Jacques_Lebeau
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Excellent clip — thanks for link. It would be nice to think we would learn from this, but greed and stupidity are very powerful forces.

miforest
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

The economic consequences of this will dwarf anything we have seen since 2008.

BFYTW
BFYTW
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

Including 2008.

Normie
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

No way… Trump said it’s a partisan hoax.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Anyone see this clip from Joe Rogan?

https://youtu.be/cZFhjMQrVts

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Thanks Z! I only watched the first 90 seconds (damn wagecucking) and that was my gut reaction, but I figured I’d send this to the board in case I’d missed something.

“I know a guy who knows a guy in Italy who says….”

Cerulean
Cerulean
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

Here is a good site for hard data on progress and outcomes of the disease vs. time, by country

https://hgis.uw.edu/virus/

The site is a little slow — probably from high traffic.

I think the data from Japan are interesting.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Cerulean
6 months ago

Here’s the Map that’s become the Standard from Johns Hopkins.
https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

miforest
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

One thing that annoys me is tucker calls out a lethality rate , which we do not know and cannot know. the lethality rate is the percentage who die divided by the total number of cases .
The ” number of cases” is actually the number of confirmed tested cases. that number leave out the number of people not tested because they have no symptoms ,r that have no test kits available . that would raise the number infected and lower the lethality significantly.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

Don’t forget that medical tests are never 100% accurate. Massive # of false positives if we test everyone.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

This is a great point. There are potentially tens, possibly hundreds of thousands of people out there that have this virus that do not know it because the symptoms are so mild, or they are misattributing their illness to the common cold or seasonal flu. To me, this seems to indicate that the true lethality rate probably is not far off the South Korean data, and not the, “10x worse than the flu,” or, “4%,” number the hysterical media is trying to push.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  miforest
6 months ago

Stop calming folk. I want to hear doom and gloom. 😉

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

The data from Taiwan is impressive, given the high volume of cross-Strait movement during normal times. Only one death. The government has been completely transparent too, so those are reliable numbers. Arrivals from China, Korea, Japan, Italy and elsewhere are subject to 14 days quarantine. Furthermore, the government stepped in and stopped the hording and price gouging associated with face masks. It has also worked with several factories to produce millions of protective uniforms for hospitals and health care providers. An interesting stat from the John’s Hopkin site is Zhejiang province. One death vs. 1200 recovered? If it’s not CCP… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago


Deleted. Cripes, I sound like a Girl Scout.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Twitter, today:

>corona virus hits the US
>trump does nothing
>invades Yemen

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

Also Twitter:

“The American response to a viral pandemic is yet another mass media campaign about racism and complaining about the stock market. I challenge anyone to find a country with a worse ruling class.”

CAPT S
CAPT S
Reply to  Toasty
6 months ago

“Boomers love to talk about all the things they’d like to do, but there is never any follow through.”

That’s not a Boomer thing, it’s a human-nature thing. The problem with Boomers (my generation BTW) is hubris. Boomers like to play King Canute, seeking to orchestrate planetary forces in accordance with postmodern whimsy. But Boomers aren’t the first generation of American buffoonery … nor the last.

Boomer lessons-learned for young folk: Know the limits of human intervention; know what you don’t know; know what man quickly descends to when civilization is removed.

Tim from Nashua
Tim from Nashua
Reply to  CAPT S
6 months ago

“Man’s got to know his limitations.” – – – The Great Philosopher, Dirty Harry

Tim from Nashua
Tim from Nashua
Reply to  Toasty
6 months ago

Germ Wars The Phantom Menace . . .

Member
Reply to  Toasty
6 months ago

I’m not sure what is peculiarly “boomer” about secessionist movements. I seem to recall a big one in the 19th century well before any boomers existed and I’m a GenXer myself. Wanting to leave a failed polity is perfectly understandable. Granted there does need to be follow through.

Felix Krull
Member
6 months ago

Now, this is the part where angry oldsters stop reading and post a comment about how not all Boomers are like that.

Not all Boomers are like that. Italy is full of Boomers, and they’ve shut down medical services to old coots since they’re going to die soon anyway.

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

One glaring error Tucker made was to call China “the most racist nation in the world.” I’m not sure where China actually fits on this list, but it definitely no higher than number 2. The top spot is well and truly taken.

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

(This was supposed to be a response to David_Wright’s comment above with the link to Tucker’s opening monologue about the pandemic…sorry for the confusion…)

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

Japan?

BFYTW
BFYTW
Reply to  Jim Smith
6 months ago

Israel 🙂

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  BFYTW
6 months ago

Axeshually, I was thinking of Samoa, but you’ve convinced me I was wrong…

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

Samoa may not be our greatest ally, but they do have the greatest big thighs….

I’ll see myself out.

Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

Can you say Mosi Tatupu?

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Libertymike
6 months ago

Up-voting for the obscure “niche” reference.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Libertymike
6 months ago

He was referenced in one of the best episodes of The Simpsons, so yes.

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

Italy panicked. All the deaths are in the 80 and above category. But they are Italians so what do you expect.

Same thing here. The latest death in CA was a older woman 60+ with a underlying medical condition.

That’s the virus target audience.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Rwc1963
6 months ago

Save the pension plans!

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

Such triage/rationing is everywhere there is universal health care—unless perhaps where you can opt out or buy your own supplemental health care. Medicare is basically the same here, except it’s rationing for a subset of the population, the elderly. The rationing has heretofore been done by restricting payments for certain procedures, while requiring “by law” that those payments be accepted as payment in full, if you accept Medicare patients. Rationing also is done by long waits for procedures or doctor appointments. Many physicians have stopped seeing such patients. Billings are a joke and little more than a Kabuki Dance. Nothing… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Yup, Obamacare is death by attrition.
Too slow to notice.

At least the NHS has the decency to take away their water, so one can know they’re being murdered- and that one can’t do jack about it.

Epaminondas
Member
6 months ago

Ok, I’m one of those old coots. But my health has always been so robust I never bothered to buy health insurance until I was forced into it by the goddamn government. I always figured my biggest risk was an auto accident, so I made sure I was covered. I broke my leg about 20 years ago, hobbled into the nearest hospital and paid for it all on a credit card. (And they gave me a discount!) You’re right about feeling mortality, Zman. It comes upon you by stealth as you approach 70. You can see the pavement running out… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

hobbled into the nearest hospital and paid for it all on a credit card. (And they gave me a discount!)

Jim Goad (I believe it is) doesn’t have a health insurance either, he pays up front too, and he also notes that it is a helluva lot cheaper than if you’d been insured, and you weren’t billed an obscene list of extra “services” or given superfluous x-rays – the hospitals know you’re much more likely to check each item if you pay out of your own pocket.

David_Wright
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

My crappy and high deductible health insurance years ago did me no good. Needed an mri on my head and was billed $3500. Insurance paid $700. Ok , no surprise knowing the plans details. If I had no insurance I could have gotten discounts and some relief. It would have been negotiable.
That said, right after that I found independent labs charging a cash price around $1400

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

This stuff is common. You could get a cash-pay MRI for $500 in SoCal some years back while they were charging third-party payors $1500. “How much you got” pricing isn’t just for auto repair shops nowadays.

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

My Health Care Provider used to have a +30% discount for those who paid on the day. Now you can’t do that. So you don’t even know when you leave what the PRICE will be. It’s all a mystery.

Member
Reply to  bilejones
6 months ago

I could have vacationed in Japan and still had the MRI done

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  bilejones
6 months ago

Heaven forbid we should have such a system! It would mean the end of Charlie Kirk’s open-borders dream. We can’t have that, can we? /s

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

There are at minimum, two sets of costs: inflated for insurance purposes, which they don’t pay anyway, and out of pocket cash costs. Here where I live, I write a check out to my doctor yearly. He accepts no insurance. For that, I see him as often as needed, or he comes to me. But mainly, he is “my” gate keeper to all medical services/specialists I desire for treatment which are paid by insurance (I am, like others have said, required to sign up for Medicare) or out of pocket. There are a growing number of concierge medical practices like… Read more »

JustaProle
JustaProle
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

It was interesting to read your note about mortality. I’m not quite your age, but I lived a wild life when young. Had children late by most standards, and it was only then that I began to contemplate my mortality, and it hit me like lightening. It also made me have skin in the game of society, because as a bachelor, I gave zero thoughts of anything related to but hoping to live long enough to play like Nero. Always interesting to see/read how we walk different paths but end up at same destination.

T. Morris
T. Morris
Reply to  JustaProle
6 months ago

…as a bachelor, I gave zero thoughts of anything related to but hoping to live long enough to play like Nero.

My eldest son and I often repeat the phrase when subjects like this come up, “You know what the Mormons say, right? ‘Any unmarried man under the age of 25 is a menace to society.'”

UFO
UFO
Reply to  T. Morris
6 months ago

yeah, if 40 year old bachelors / divorced dads could stop dating all of our 20 something women, it would be greatly appreciated by men of my age.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

UFO, will do, as soon as your 40 year old wine aunties stop being so AWFL.

You’re asking me to live and sleep with ladies you guys hate to see for four hours a year over Christmas dinner. i’d rather stuff a rabid weasel down my pants.

I’m not specifically fishing for 20-somethings but if I hook one, I’m not throwing her back.

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Rabid weasel down knickers….way visual. Does it have tats and face fishing tackle too?
“I’m not specifically fishing for 20-somethings but if I hook one, I’m not throwing her back.” Never say “Whoa!” at a horse race.

Mike_C
Mike_C
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

“i’d rather stuff a rabid weasel down my pants.”

How about a ferret?
https://www.outsideonline.com/1902036/king-ferret-leggers
This is a classic – has nothing to do with Wuhan Flu nor Boomers, but still a classic.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Mike_C
6 months ago

Mike, ask me about Ferret Gurl sometime. NSFW.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Mike_C
6 months ago

Ferret legging! Saw that in the WSJ, in the glorious 80s. Showed it to the Big Boss, who snorted.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

It’s an odd, bittersweet feeling. Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeonings of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my… Read more »

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow,
Creeps in this petty pace from day to day
To the last syllable of recorded time,
And all our yesterdays have lighted fools
The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!
Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

Act 5, Scene 5: Macbeth

Cherie
Cherie
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

People are queer, they’re always crowing, scrambling and rushing about Why don’t they stop someday, address themselves this way? Why are we here? Where are we going? It’s time that we found out We’re not here to stay; we’re on a short holiday Life is just a bowl of cherries Don’t take it serious; it’s too mysterious You work, you save, you worry so But you can’t take your dough when you go, go, go So keep repeating it’s the berries The strongest oak must fall The sweet things in life, to you were just loaned So how can you… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

Yeah, I feel that way every time I leave my polling place after I vote in the current farce (election).

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Compsci, I put the ferret in my pants *before* I get to the polling place.

Kip
Kip
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=emb_title&v=m78cSts3tJw

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

“I am fading away. Slowly but surely. Like the sailor who watches his home shore gradually disappear, I watch my past recede. My old life still burns within me, but more and more of it is reduced to the ashes of memory.”
– The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Jean Dominique Bauby

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

“Rage against the dying of the light?” I like it.

Always been a Aubade kinda guy…”Being brave kept no one from the grave.”

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  ProZNoV
6 months ago

Memento mori.

Lawdog
Lawdog
Member
Reply to  ProZNoV
6 months ago

Death is no different whined at than withstood.

Have the whole poem memorized

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  ProZNoV
6 months ago

Nah….maybe a guy way..Old Scratch was showing up at the end of my driveway due to late stage Lyme. Once I CHOSE to move past the Ahhh Shit stage, I decided to go with a ton of grace-dignity and a minimum of arm waving. Then…the Lyme was gone. And I am now resurrected. Am carefully crafting a new life….and pinch myself in gratitude. The new car smell of my new life never goes away.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

Amen about insurance. You can get a cash eye-exam at the nearest Wal-Mart for around $100-150. There are plenty of dentists around that will do preventive teeth cleanings and inspections for cash. You can get that price down quite a bit if you can find a good dental school in your area. No need to carry expensive insruance coverage for these items if you go this route. Doctors that work in cash, particularly specialists, seem a bit harder to find. I think there will be more in the years to come.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
6 months ago

So who’s jumping on the grenade and sharing this on Breitbart?

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

They hate me there, so it may as well be me.

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  MemeWarVet
6 months ago

The Conservative Treehouse guys are, sadly, just a far gone. The lead today is about Trump’s campaign platform. According to them: 1) Control the border and stop illegal immigration 2) Bring a manufacturing back to the US 3) Decouple with China First, Trump ran on limiting legal immigration as well, though he gave up on that REAL fast. Second, #2 and #3 above are two parts of the same problem. Trump’s real #3 was ending the forever wars in the Middle East, but our greatest ally (and their fellow travelers in this country) have made sure that this plant was… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

Assuming you vote at all, yes/no is a principled position IMHO. Then you’d vote for a demonstrably demented alternative?

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Compsci, Right now I believe that if someone on the anti Wall St. Right and the anti Wars-of-Choice left paired up on a populist platform they’d win in a landslide.

Walt Jeffers
Walt Jeffers
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

How many wars has Trump started? How many US soldiers have been lost in combat in his first term? Far few than any president since Carter. Not as much on immigration but better than HRC amnesty in the first one hundred days of her administration.

Trump is a horrible candidate. You have a better option?

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  Walt Jeffers
6 months ago

He actually was a GREAT candidate, but he’s been a horrible president. And he’s not funny anymore. Biden can do nothing but be funny, so on that score he’d be a WAY better option!

Chad Bigly
Chad Bigly
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

There’s just no pleasing some people. Doesn’t matter what Trump does or doesn’t do, I’m sure you’d find something to bitch about.

E M
E M
Reply to  Walt Jeffers
6 months ago

If Trump wins 2020 he will do a massive amnesty. If you make all illegals legal you solved illegal immigration.

Chad Bigly
Chad Bigly
Reply to  E M
6 months ago

Really? Because MY crystal ball says he’s going to deport all you black pill, defeatist faggots.

Raymond R
Member
6 months ago

Winnie the Flu could clear out a lot of my fellow Boomers;. Rather than be full of grief and anger over the natural termination of our time on the planet, let’s accept reality. As the Blue Oyster Cult sang, Don’t Fear the Reaper

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ClQcUyhoxTg

Drake
Drake
Reply to  Raymond R
6 months ago

Ironic that the Chinese may actually make Social Security solvent.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Drake
6 months ago

SSI is not insolvent, or at least it will not be a drain unless Pol’s vote for such. The current law states that payments must equal revenue in any particular period. The haircut at this time is about a 23% cut when the trust fund dies at the end of the 20’s. Trust fund of course is BS as it is simply Treasury bonds.

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
Reply to  Raymond R
6 months ago

Ah, this boomer is just trying to accept, to get past denial, that he is a kook. I mean, doesn’t everybody just have a basement full of, well, whatever?

Mikep
Mikep
Reply to  Major Hoople
6 months ago

So, Major Hoople, are you telling us that you’re the bastard with all the toilet paper?

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Raymond R
6 months ago

The Corona virus is a blatant Trump machination to destroy the Democratic candidacy of Bernie. 1, The Xer’s get their student debt wiped out by the inheritance from grandma. 2, The housing crisis is solved, they move from Mom’s basement to the newly vacant retirement village. 3, No new Guatemalans will be needed to change all the adult diapers no more of this immigration for jobs Americans won’t do bullshit, 4. The Medicare and Social Security savings negate any need to raise taxes on “The Rich”, i.e. Me and you. As a bonus. it takes care of the Yellow Peril… Read more »

Dr. Dre
Dr. Dre
Reply to  bilejones
6 months ago

My thought today as I received a message from my alma mater (former Seven Sister college, aka Ivy League for women back a few years) that they would be closing next week until mid April, b/c Corona virus. Remote learning was to substitute for live classrooms in the interim. Well, that means that everyone packs up and LEAVES stat and goes home. Got it? Well about 30% of the students in a lot of these schools are from Asia, b/c they are pretty smart and got in with good grades, and most importantly, they pay the full price of admission,… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Dr. Dre
6 months ago

I hadn’t given this aspect of WuFlu much thought but now that you mention it, this could actually turn into a nice convenient way to shut down the more useless parts of “higher education” (i.e. anything that’s not a science or trade). Think of it, millions of young Wammen freed from the burdens of cam-whoring, pole-dancing, and gold-digging their way through school to get that degree in Latin American Feminist History. No more need for this – https://trends.gab.com/item/5e50d9e590e9c2347656cc8e

Yves Vannes
Yves Vannes
Member
6 months ago

Social capital is what we could once exchange through the various institutions of our once robust public commons, both the tangible and intangible which we inherited from eons of civilization building. It involved give and take that operated through rights and duties. Rights and duties within families & extended families & neighborhoods (the core); towns & villages(the polis); cities & regions(A cultural subculture); nations & civilizations(The general common culture). Destroy the core and everything else in the common culture will rot away with no additional effort required. Social capital was the lubricant of culture. Weaken all of those cultural bonds… Read more »

Thursday
Thursday
Reply to  Yves Vannes
6 months ago

Excellent comment. The social bonds you describe are based an an ethical system centered around duty, especially one’s public duty. The Romans had a nice formulation of this: “do ut des” (I give so that you give). I would suggest that Roman Republican ethics are very much worth adopting as model.

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  Yves Vannes
6 months ago

The state of our social capital is best summed up by that video of that big black guy yelling at an Asian guy on a New York subway to move away from him and then spraying him with Fabreze air freshener to “protect himself” from the virus.
Absolute clown world, brought to you by those who converted our social capital into personal wealth.

Mencken Libertarian
Mencken Libertarian
6 months ago

Help me think this through: Let’s say the USA goes into nearly complete lock-down. Everyone is forced to remain at home or within a small neighborhood until the pandemic is “over”. You can only travel if you’re all covered up in a hazmat suit. That limits the ability of the virus to spread beyond that household or neighborhood. Within a few months, Covid-19 is eradicated from the USA. What should the USA do next? Should it end the lock-down? Resume air flights to and from countries that say they have also eradicated Covid-19? What if just one of those countries… Read more »

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Mencken Libertarian
6 months ago

Governments are not attempting to eradicate the virus, only to slow it down so our hospitals and businesses are not overwhelmed. By spreading out the time frame, we avoid a total societal collapse. That’s the strategy. The virus cannot be stopped. You will eventually be exposed to it.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

The panic is the greater danger, by far. It’ll all be blamed on the virus, at any rate.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Epaminondas
6 months ago

If ‘you will eventually be exposed to it’ is true, then why isn’t this true for every other virus ever? Environmental factors play a very large role in the spread of viruses. There is a reason there is a ‘flu season’ and it’s not because the government slows it down.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  BadThinker
6 months ago
Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  BadThinker
6 months ago

This flu is different. You can carry it and expose others to it for two weeks before you show any symptoms. That’s a whole new ballgame.

Glenfilthie
Glenfilthie
Member
6 months ago

Be careful of this and who you discuss it with. One day my elderly shitlib mother was rubbing my nose in her politics, and I made note of how her generation and political peers had taken the most prosperous nations on earth and run them into the ground – and the result was rage. Mom got personal and nasty like she always does and for the first time, I just laughed. Pop, though – pushed away from the table and stormed off, because he knew it was pretty much true. At that point I was sick of them both and… Read more »

David_Wright
Member
Reply to  Glenfilthie
6 months ago

You make my point that the silents were just as bad. To everyone younger all old people are Boomers. Zman makes many good points but I also wonder what kind of world when succeeding generations are at the top. Actually, many are now.

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  David_Wright
6 months ago

The majority of people of all ages who haven’t crossed over to our side believe the same lies. The key to understanding is to identify who it is who is making up these lies.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

Cuo Bono. Of course, but I sadly note that our younger generations are neither taught to think, nor have any historical knowledge to figure it all out on their own. If one has to wait as long as I did to catch wise, you have a perpetrating situation.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

I think most would say that Cicero is a kind of Pizza.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  BadThinker
6 months ago

I now understand you signature. 😉

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

“If one has to wait as long as I did to catch wise, you have a perpetrating situation.”

That’s not an accident, of course.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Glenfilthie
6 months ago

“Pop, though – pushed away from the table and stormed off, because he knew it was pretty much true.”

Don’t know your pop, obviously, don’t mean it personally, but his reaction is telling in an archetypal way, right? Maybe not so much trouble today if more men were willing to check the ladies.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

My Tea Party Boomer friends seem most prone to the “if mama ain’t happy, no one’s happy” mindset. The same Boomer who just told the room how Churchill was right about appeasement in WWII hands the Sudetenland to Momma Hitler every time she raises her voice.

Boomerhate podcast sometime soon, Z?

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Problem is it carries risk today. Do you want be married? I do, but not at the expense of my dignity. Not easy these days.

Both of my grandfathers would take charge when the women were getting hysterical. Looked at them and said ‘That’s how I want to be.’ Oh well, you take your lumps for the cause.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

Painter, I think almost all of us want marriage, but finding a woman you can trust is hard and training a gf/wife from scratch can’t even be publicly mentioned, much less taught. You have to find a “natural” or one who’s already been broken.

Free-range wahmenism is too feral and too well-subsidized for most women to resist the temptation. We’re going to be fishing from a small pond for the foreseeable future.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Not having a prolonged MGTOW phase too. Speaking from experience 🙂

Chris_Lutz
Member
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

It’s all about choosing your battles and realizing she won’t be happy with any decision at first. So, don’t be a petty tyrant. It can’t always be having everything your way. Actually leadership is looking out for the best interest of the family. Now that means standing up to the wife and sometime saying “We’re doing it this way because I think it’s best for all of us.” She’ll pout, yell, cry, or whatever fits her nature. Eventually she’ll be happy as a lark telling her friends how “We’re doing X because hubby thought it was a good idea.” What… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Chris_Lutz
6 months ago

They are happier when someone calls their sh*t-test but a lot of them would rather be miserable than admit it, particularly in the cohort that’s mid-30’s-60’s now, whatever wave(s) of feminentropy they represent.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Chris_Lutz
6 months ago

It’s not about being a tyrant. Many women don’t have the self awareness to know when they’ve crossed the line, or the understanding of men to read the cues. Likewise for men. Intersex communication was a casualty of women’s lib. Not that it wasn’t a challenge but it seems like gender roles at least provided a foundation to build on.

Edit: there’s more to your comment! Agreed.

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Paintersforms
6 months ago

I sympathize with your longing for a public marriage to a loyal woman.

I was divorced by my wife and I wish we were still married.

I’m hanging with a younger male buddy who longs to be married, but the young women are such insufferable, feminist bitches.

We are living in a famine of tolerable, non-cVntish marriageable women.

SidVic
SidVic
Member
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

When I was young I was a most magnificent bastard. I pushed back hard against this idea that being henpecked is cool. in retrospect, probably overdid it at times. I do advise men to set the tone on early in their marriage. Certainly, women are like water and they will eventually we’re down the hardest of rocks. I’ve smoothed and softened considerably. Hehe.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Boomerhate fest podcast seems honest at least. Perhaps it is time to lay it out. I really have no interest in pursuing a group affiliation where such exists and is glorified. Peace is always better maintained through separation. Isn’t that a recurring theme here?

John Smith
John Smith
Member
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Just so, fellas. The women from that generation to this slipped their leashes in the 70’s and age has only made them worse. I dunno about you guys, but I am sick and tired of the crap coming off them and won’t put up with it anymore. I tell them so too. When I do so, the response is (in order) shock, confusion, and then rage. If I were to intrude into the Manosphere – I figure yu could prevent 95% of the frivolous divorces by giving a hard pass to any woman with a neoliberal mindset. I would even… Read more »

ConservativeFred
ConservativeFred
Reply to  Glenfilthie
6 months ago

John Smith, You sound like my brother from another mother. Approximately 10-12 years ago, my father got on this kick of saying, “You don’t know where I’ve been, but I know where you’ve been.” The second time he said that I absolutely lost it, and started ticking-off the advantages they had . . . the conversation ended with me repeatedly asking, “Do you know how good you had it?” He stopped saying that nonsense. A few years later, my parents and in-laws were talking one evening and they all made the comment, “I never thought things would change.” I am… Read more »

John Smith
John Smith
Member
Reply to  ConservativeFred
6 months ago

Yep.

When my grandparents passed from this world, they did so thinking that I would see wonders and worlds they could not imagine.

If I were to have grandkids, I would fear their future is going to resemble the Planet Of The Apes.

Jacques_Lebeau
Member
6 months ago

Boomers’ options in voting were pretty limited in reality. There was no party, no politician who was against massive immigration — anyone who took that stand was quickly stuffed down the memory hole by our unseen Masters, with enthusiastic collusion from the MSM. (Owned, one presumes, by said Masters.) The choice at elections was pretty much “the same” or “a double helping of the same.” Add the lack of real choice to the endless stream of lies spewed by all the traditional media outlets, and the inevitable effects of the Bell Curve on democracy, and it’s not hard to understand… Read more »

Calsdad
Calsdad
Reply to  Jacques_Lebeau
6 months ago

It’s one thing to be hemmed in by a lack of voting options – it’s quite another thing to believe in a line of bullshit so wholeheartedly that you get into knock down drag-out arguments with your kids over the subject of immigration, never-ending wars, the selling out of the country, …… etc.

The fact that there are so many people who believe in the globohomo bullshit and lies right down to their core – makes it impossible for those who don’t believe it – to have access to a better range of voting options.

Jacques_Lebeau
Member
Reply to  Calsdad
6 months ago

Agreed. It is terrifying how many of my friends — good people, not dumb, not ill-educated, not all Boomers by any means — still believe the bullshit. It is very painful to take the red pill, and it runs counter to all our years of indoctrination. But slowly, slowly, more people are coming to see the truth. Whether we can do anything about it is another question.

“Those who laugh have not yet heard the terrible news.”

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
Reply to  Jacques_Lebeau
6 months ago

Boomers are a easy target for every social critic who needs a patsy to blame for what went wrong. The problem is our country is run by money and insiders and if you don;’t have the money or access to those who are players you have no influence. The average voter has no real say so and the ruling class goes out of it’s way to make sure they never do. Theoretically the voters do have a say so as Karl Denninger points out but it’s impossible to get them unified enough to actually wield influence. We are not a… Read more »

Wxtwxtr
Wxtwxtr
Reply to  Jacques_Lebeau
6 months ago

In my teens in the 60’s, I wanted to blame my parents. But I understood that they were powerless. And then the grandparents. And then … “Turtles All The Way Down”.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Wxtwxtr
6 months ago

Really, it’s all on Eve, and Adam cucking.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jacques_Lebeau
6 months ago

Boomers serve the function of a modern day, Emanuel Goldstein, for our all too common “two minutes of hate” we seem to love to engage in. Tiresome and unproductive. All that is wrong with society today has its roots in Boomer decisions of yesterday. Even worse, all Boomer decisions resulted in their achieving an unfair share of the economic pie, which still persists to this very day through corrupt institutions such as Medicare, SSI, 401K’s, stock market, and the like. It follows then, as night follows day, that Boomer deaths should be looked forward to as a just reward for… Read more »

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Jacques_Lebeau
6 months ago

Well said. People vote for Candidates, whose platforms dissolve like mist in the hot sun once they’re elected. Then policy pivots to what the Banksters, Donors, and MIC want. We fall for it every single time.

Damian
Damian
Reply to  Jacques_Lebeau
6 months ago

I think that’s a good point. Back then the only way to hear an opposing view was through talk radio or a regular booklet you received every month or so. The Boomers have fixed neurological pathways that are hard to change. I think the anger they show is that a different world view has to reset their entire mind. Something we have evolved to not do. Hence cognitive dissonance and anger when their brain is forced to accept a different reality. We have the luxury of the internet and the free trading of ideas between people we’d never interact with… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
6 months ago

If this is a preview it looks like the locust system is finished. So there’s that. I can deal with some poverty if it means something is left.

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
6 months ago

For us Boomers, our parents’ and grandparents’ generations imposed on us legalized contraception, abortion and porn; and promoted feminism, homosexualism and going childless. The birth rate dropped from 4 in the 50s to below 2 in the 70s — 1.6 for whites. And it keeps dropping. Combine that with open borders and — whatever.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Jack Boniface
6 months ago

Good point: where does the buck stop?

The wonder was not that the Boomers rebelled – all young people do – the wonder was that their parents – The Great Generation – didn’t call them to order.

Damian
Damian
Reply to  Felix Krull
6 months ago

There is a wonderful book called ‘Forgotten Warriors’ and it’s really a book of letters from the Great Generation about what they did in the war (it’s UK centric btw), how they adapted to civvy street and what they think of UK society. In summary, 80% said had they known what society was going to turn into they wouldn’t have fought. 5% said they’d wished that Hitler had won. So I wondered about how the post WWII society had betrayed them. Then I had to ask myself if they had committed a sin though their blind faith of the narrative… Read more »

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Damian
6 months ago

Would you have an author for that one? I can find the title, but it’s about the US 1st Marine brigade in the Korean War.

https://www.amazon.com/Forgotten-Warriors-Provisional-Brigade-Studies/dp/0700618929

The WWI-generation was called The Lost Generation due to their war trauma-induced anomie, but the impact on the WWII-generation hasn’t been studied much.

Wxtwxtr
Wxtwxtr
Reply to  Jack Boniface
6 months ago

“… imposed …” ??? Jan Irvin and Joe Atwill argue that it was a weaponized anthropology experiment – sub-project 58 of the mk-ultra program by our “friends” in the C_A. A guy named Besmenov claims the same credits for the KGB. Deliberate cultural destruction. Or was it conquest?

Drake
Drake
6 months ago

Sailer is spot on with his curves. If we can stretch out the infection over time and prevent the health system from being overwhelmed, we come out okay. Everyone gets sick at once – most of the serious cases die because they won’t get care. The race is over when there is an effective vaccine.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Drake
6 months ago

Tell that to the media. The enemy of the people.

BFYTW
BFYTW
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

…every bit of data I’ve seen suggests Wuhan virus is significantly more infectious than the common flu. R0 for influenza is ~1.4. R0 for coronavirus…with preventative measures (masks, social distancing) is apparently 2.5? I’ll let somebody else find the cites – withstanding that, I’m fairly sure your assumptions are badly off.

Drake
Drake
Reply to  BFYTW
6 months ago

Unfortunately I agree – what’s going on in Italy is way beyond a flu outbreak in terms of transmission and severity of illness.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  BFYTW
6 months ago

Have a look at this graph. The world is following the same pattern as China. This is how infections tend to work. They are *not* exponential.

There may be a 3rd peak of new cases, depending on the spread, but this is not The Black Death.

https://imgur.com/f8CaAhS

Homer Hinkley
Homer Hinkley
Member
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

What would you do? Do you support the following:

Cancel flights from Europe.
Cancel spring semester at US universities, high schools.
Cancel indoor sporting events.
Techies work from home (Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Facebook, Apple, Twitter).
Federally mandate paid sick leave for people who can’t work from home.
Quarantine cruise ships with a known COVID19 infection.
Mandate deep cleaning of trains and buses every 72 hours.
Mandate deep cleaning of buildings where infections have been detected.
Trump’s $8 billion for detection kits, supplies, vaccine development, research.
Trump’s $50 billion SBA loans and deferred taxes.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Homer Hinkley
6 months ago

Well, Europe used to have a chamber in the train station where the entire car was dusted with Zyklon-B after the passengers got off, to kill the body lice and fight typhus.

Americans dusted every Mexican who crossed our border.

And look how that turned out, since white people are genocidal, murderous savages.

Maus
Maus
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I don’t dispute your implication that mortality concentrates the mind. Hell, my own darkest thought is how this virus seems particularly fatal to diabetics, hypertensives and the obese. It’s almost like it was designed to eliminate a known population of people who place a heavier (pun intended) strain on future resources. But, your analysis is based on an as-yet unfounded assumption that infection rates for COVID-19 are roughly equal to influenza. It seems to me that it would be wiser to assume a higher rate and act accordingly to limit social interaction. I’d be happy to be proven wrong at… Read more »

Drake
Drake
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I thought people were basically locked in their cabins once the ship was quarantined?

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  Drake
6 months ago

The staff who brought food and performed other tasks weren’t.

Dinothedoxie
Dinothedoxie
Reply to  Drake
6 months ago

The air on those ships is recirculated and unfiltered.

Mike_C
Mike_C
Reply to  Maus
6 months ago

EVERYTHING carries greater risk to the hypertensive, obese diabetic. It’s as Warren Zevon’s doctor is supposed to have said: Well, I went to the doctor I said, “I’m feeling kind of rough” “Let me break it to you, son: Your shit’s fucked up.” Medically speaking, if one is a fat diabetic, then one’s shit’s fucked up. Switching to the somewhat facetious (though not necessarily untrue): If a disease was designed to eliminate the bulk (in terms of number of bodies) of strains on society it would select for low IQ, low impulse control and lack of future time-orientation. (There may… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Mike_C
6 months ago

“…it would select for low IQ, low impulse control and lack of future time-orientation.”

Sickle-cell for $500?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

There’s a reason they banned DDT in Africa.

BadThinker
BadThinker
Reply to  Mike_C
6 months ago

“You talk like a fag and your shit’s all retarded. Don’t worry scro, there lots of tards out there living kickass lives! My first wife was ‘tarded. She’s a pilot now.”

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I’m an old man as well. But I accept my mortality. But as to “we do nothing for the flu”, perhaps correct, but there is also the fact we can do little wrt the flu—unless closing off the country and quarantining the population every winter is made de rigueur. If I had bouts of the flu seasonally, I’d quarantine myself. That would be my recommendation to Cochran. The flu has a life cycle which runs itself through animal species, so there is always a repository which mutates and emerges to spread. That’s why we have new vaccines each season, which… Read more »

Nobody In Particular
Nobody In Particular
Reply to  thezman
6 months ago

I’m a big fan of Zman but this is probably his most uniformed post and comment by far. I get the impression that his perception arises from all the previous disease scares that ended up as busts. Relying on past performance is no guarantee about the future as the financial legalese goes. To a certain extent, it is just like the guy playing Russian roulette saying that the last 5 trigger pulls didn’t kill himself, why should the next. But to specifics. He claims Osterholm in that Rogan interview is not based on any evidence whatsoever. Well, if you expect… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Nobody In Particular
6 months ago

If it gets in the homeless camps, starts mutating, and cleans up San Francisco, well, guess who’ll claim the credit.

Won’t be us, but you knew that.

Tarstarkusz
Tarstarkusz
6 months ago

The ‘not all boomers are like that’ boomer-crowd never feels the need to say ‘not all blacks are like that’ or ‘not all browns are like that’ It’s always fun watching people’s identity crash with subjects like this. They assume it is obvious that NAXALT applies when talking about different identities, but not the one they identify with. Frankly, I never understood the generational identity. I’m glad I never had it and I’m glad nobody ever pushed it on my generational cohort. Whatever ends up happening, I really hope this event puts the brakes on all the magical thinking. 20… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
6 months ago

I’m starting to think it’s meta: every asshole is a boomer, every outcast an Xer, every pajama boy a millennial, every mope a zoomer. Or something like that, I’m not up on the lingo.

And re: magical thinking, people overlook a lot when it’s profitable.

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
6 months ago

“Whatever ends up happening, I really hope this event puts the brakes on all the magical thinking. 20 years ago when China joined the WTO, people understood that globalization comes with serious risks, especially for disease.”

Your hope may be fulfilled: It takes a pretty big shock to end magical thinking stupidity, but reality eventually gets the job done. The Wuhan virus may be just such a dose.

Exile
Exile
Member
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
6 months ago

Generational cohorts are a natural consequence of factory-farm public schooling and mass-media culture. Like a store-bought laptop, they come pre-installed with whatever firmware Shlomo was programming with in those years. A scaled-up society requires a lot of template-generated NPC’s.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
6 months ago

Not all Boomers are like that as compared to say Blacks or Browns is because we have stat’s which show evidence for the numbers of Blacks and Browns which are “like that”. No one here seems very concerned with producing any data wrt “all Boomers are like that”. They just spout the same old tired clinches. Evidence based inquiry need not apply.

Basically, it’s class envy at its worse. Actually, just plain old envy, since it’s can be shown that Boomers as a whole are not that different in status and wealth from the general population.

Tarstarkusz
Tarstarkusz
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Stereotypes don’t have to reflect a large segment of the stereotyped population. You just have to see a certain traits or behaviors that are more often (even if rarely) seen in one identifiable demographic than others. It ain’t for nothing that the meme of boomers waiting in line to take selfies with the based black guy is so popular. Diamond and Silk have cashed in on this trait that is so prevalent among boomercons. Go to any website with an older conservative demographic and you will find this. Even if only a very small % of Boomers do this, it… Read more »

george 1
george 1
6 months ago

Yep. On Conservative Tree house I commented about Trump’s 2nd, I believe, State of the Union Address. He said that he wanted even more immigration but it had to be legal immigration.

I pointed out that more immigration, of any type, legal or illegal meant more socialism and less freedom. I never make snarky comments and am always respectful. I was immediately attacked for criticizing Trump. I am a mid boomer and I have noticed that many of my generation just do not want to hear the truth. They lost or never had the ability to reexamine their beliefs.

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  george 1
6 months ago

I had a similar experience during the Ukrainegate hoax. I thought I was defending (for the last time!) Trump by commenting that he surely knew exactly what Guilianni was up to, rather than assuming he was stupid (maybe I was wrong!), and BOY did they hate me. I haven’t been back. Those folks are drowning in the their own sycophancy.

Dutch
Dutch
Reply to  george 1
6 months ago

People figure out what they believe, and then go collect support for it from the places they visit, the things they read, and the people they talk to. The essence of figuring out the truth of things is to instead approach matters as a blank slate, observe carefully, and fill that slate up with the things you observe (and what someone tells you, that they say is the truth, is not one of those things).

Bill_Mullins
Member
6 months ago

We have no vaccine for the Chinese Flu and no one is sure we can get one. Why? From what I have read, Covid-19’s genome is neither long nor especially complex. I also read that some biotech house in Kali had a vaccine (at least a preliminary version) ready within a day of the virus’arrival in North America. What is so different/challenging about THIS particular strain of coronavirus? Do I smell fish? eradicating this virus, without vaccine, will require a massive reorganization of society. Which anybody with more than one-and-a-half brain cells freaking well KNOWS isn’t gonna happen. That sort… Read more »

Tarstarkusz
Tarstarkusz
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

At least one previous Coronavirus vaccine resulted in a “cytokine storm” response in the vaccinated animals when exposed to the live virus. Creating a vaccine may or may not be “simple,” but the cure cannot be worse than the disease. This means it has to be tested and this takes time. It’s been 40 years and unprecedented amounts of money and effort (money and effort wasted, IMHO) have gone to fighting HIV and still we have nothing in the way of vaccines. They could probably significantly cut the time, but that also raises the risk. Even if they can cut… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Tarstarkusz
6 months ago

Well said. A vaccine may not work if the virus is found to live outside of human infection and mutate accordingly. Then we’d need to track it and sample it for yearly updates as we do the flu.

H I
H I
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

We’ve had colds forever yet no vaccine for rhinovirus. Why not? Because it mutates a lot and we haven’t been able to identify a common part that we can vaccinate against. You can immunize someone using one variant and they’ll get something slightly different next year (if you want fancy language, there’s no cross-protection between serotypes/versions). I don’t know if coronavirus has the same problem, but that’s one possibility. Flu is somewhat more predictable so we have flu vaccines.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Bill_Mullins
6 months ago

I only disagree with “enough to spark AR/CW 2.0.”

No, I see this as a Reset.

Like replacement migration, the knock-on effects will accomplish what occupation would look like after a war- except all the shooting and mess won’t be necessary.

Deliberate or accidental, who will know?
Hyped or real, who cares?
Only Victory matters in the end.

Vegetius
Vegetius
6 months ago

I expect to see a wide range of crimes against the elderly federalized, perhaps even a whole new agency dedicated to ensuring white baby boomers face none of the consequences of their actions and inactions.

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago
Judge Smails
Judge Smails
Reply to  Bunny
6 months ago

Soylent Green was a documentary.

Lorenzo
Lorenzo
Reply to  Vegetius
6 months ago

If it’s not Jews giving you the sadz, it’s boomers. What a world.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Bunny
6 months ago

Day of the Pillow!
“Someday, they’ll thank us.”

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Lorenzo
6 months ago

Boomer Jews for the win!

Paul
Paul
6 months ago

Modern America, in contrast, is a multicultural amalgamation of low-trust clusters.

Shit, a lot of us ain’t even got a cluster.

King Tut
King Tut
Reply to  Paul
6 months ago

“Shit, a lot of us ain’t even got a cluster.” Well, in that case, it’s a multicultural amalgamation of low-trust clusterf*cks.

Bill_Mullins
Member
Reply to  King Tut
6 months ago

I prefer the term “goat hump” m’self.

UFO
UFO
6 months ago

“It is an old country now, a country run by old people just coming to terms with their mortality.” Old atheist/materialist people. Nothing is scarier than death for those who do not follow a religion. Death is even worse for those who follow the religion of materialism. Boomers are realizing that their cheap stuff hasn’t brought satisfaction, or eternal life. They are now trapped in a corner, the inevitable corner of death without salvation. And when people are trapped in a corner they do crazy and stupid things. I wouldn’t be surprised to see increasingly erratic and panicked behavior from… Read more »

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

“A proper response to death is quiet acceptance, and acknowledgement that it is part of life. And satisfaction knowing you left something behind to your people, or did something useful, and knowing you are going to heaven (it may be a cope but it’s a very good one). I don’t want to die but if it happens, well that’s just the way it is.”

Nicely said.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Jim Smith
6 months ago

I’m a “Rage, Rage against the dying of the light” type myself.
Think of the loss to humanity!

Wxtwxtr
Wxtwxtr
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

And of course, belief in the nonexistent is a … benefit?

Lorenzo
Lorenzo
Reply to  Wxtwxtr
6 months ago

How do we know it’s non-existent? (Indifferent agnostic here).

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Lorenzo
6 months ago

Good point, Lorenzo!
Religious atheist, here.

Though, Wxtwxtr gave me a good chuckle.
That’s the spirit, lad!
A Bile in the making, although the entire world shall mourn. As they should.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

Quiet acceptance? Someone should have told the poet Dylan Thomas about such acceptance, he’d have saved himself some rage.

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Dylan Thomas was a natural born rager-alcoholic, serial infidelities, sponger, rude and provocative, drank himself to death. Pretty good poet, tho.

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

Even among those who have religious faith, I see this desperate, clawing, clinging at shreds of life that I cannot understand. I have no particular death wish, but death comes to all of us – I just don’t want to become helpless and dependent and suffer extreme pain for a long time. Yet I know people whose parents have spent the past five years in and out of hospitals, utilizing hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of health care – and they are still essentially bed-ridden, limited to watching t.v. and taking pills, and burdening their own children with providing… Read more »

Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Nunnya Bidnez, jr.
Reply to  3g4me
6 months ago

Sooner or later, everyone dies.

Well, not everyone all at the same time.

So far.

Member
Reply to  UFO
6 months ago

My wife tells me that she feels a sense of panic in people at the office in a way she hasn’t seen before. Granted the office is in the heart of Portland, OR, possibly the most generally unhinged place in the country. This is where people rioted for weeks after Trump was elected. As for myself I almost never go into town and things around where we live in the suburbs don’t seem too crazy yet. I’m starting to wonder if this thing will ultimately turn out to be more scary for what it shows about how psychologically fragile people… Read more »

ToiletPaperThief
ToiletPaperThief
6 months ago

‘threatened by the great brown wave’
It’s either that or brown shirts. It always comes down to that .

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  ToiletPaperThief
6 months ago

Heh. Without the one, you don’t get the other- but that’s too hard for a 115 IQ.

Update, just now-
New York radio: “they pour bleach on them, just like they used to”. Racists never quit.

KunioKun
KunioKun
6 months ago

The sentiment I get from the comments at CTH feels like it came from the Bush2.0 era. I haven’t encountered anybody in real life with this sentiment in over a decade. I assume most of the comments are fake or paid for. I keep thinking that one limiting factor on the madness all around us is that everybody participating is going to have their hand out asking for a payment and soon or later the bosses run out of money to pay for it all. However, I also have a strange feeling that our overlords can just print up as… Read more »

Sleepy
Sleepy
Member
Reply to  KunioKun
6 months ago

I know a fair number of people who are Red team v. Blue team types and are all in for Trump and would make similar arguments to those in the CTH comment section, so not sure about them being paid.
My default assumption is that these are Red team folks who had been demoralized since the second Bush II term (and through the McCain/Romney/Ryan years), and they will believe anything and say anything to keep it 2016 forever.
But I wouldn’t be stunned by learning that money had a lot to do with it…

Obake158
Obake158
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

If you think CTH and Breitbart commenters are GRUG, go check out the comment section at Citizen Free Press. I dared to say that CPAC is a con and call Charlie Kirk as a sellout fake conservative that just sells people Leftism and Antiwhite retardation from 10 years ago and got attacked by a posse of people I didn’t know still existed, it was like 30 Sean Hannitys hadn’t taken their blue pills that day and I had just killed their new puppy. How dare you challenge CPAC and the Kosher Conservatives?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Obake158
6 months ago

TPUSA is selling Latino Activism Kits.
Not kidding. Get yours now!

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Sleepy
6 months ago

Trump is Bush done right.

Obake158
Obake158
Reply to  KunioKun
6 months ago

I have commented a few times at CTH, super normie tier tame stuff and my comments don’t make it out of moderation and are deleted. TRS is the same, go make a comment on FTN’s site, if it’s not hair on fire black pills or JOO JOO JOO hate they will mod it, then delete it. My comment at FTN was along the lines of “why so much focus on the Demshevik shit show, why so much blackpills? I miss Halberstram”…they deleted the I miss Halberstram bit, then modded my comment, then finally deleted it completely. TRS is proving to… Read more »

Jurgus
Jurgus
6 months ago

I feel like I should use this historic opportunity to take some sort of really intelligent, low-time preference type actions, but I barely have $500 to my name. I guess I’ll just buy a 50LB bag of oats and pat myself on the back.

Official Bologna Tester
Official Bologna Tester
Reply to  Jurgus
6 months ago

Jurgus
Don’t forget the beer! 😀

Rwc1963
Rwc1963
6 months ago

Once again Z is beating up on a bunch of old white duffers because it’s all their fault. Sure dude. The average Boomer had squat in terms of voting options all through the7-‘s until now. We had a choice between two organized crime groups. The GOP – the party of big business and the Democrats the party of moochers and criminals. There were no major pols opposing immigration, LBO’s or resisting the mega-mergers that created cartels . Wall Street was allowed to run amok and gut our corporations and decimate their work forces in the name of LBO’s. Later came… Read more »

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  Rwc1963
6 months ago

Bitch, bitch, bitch…but you know what? It appears Rwc is right.

dhill
dhill
Reply to  Rwc1963
6 months ago

Too expensive bullshit. How is the rest of the world managing it?

ReturnOfBestGuest
ReturnOfBestGuest
Reply to  dhill
6 months ago

I just saw where India and El Salvador are shutting down to foreign travel. True Quarantines.

bilejones
Member
Reply to  Rwc1963
6 months ago

The generally accepted year for the peak is 1970. The oldest boomer was then 25, They were not the ones making choices or decisions.
The decline was done unto them, not by them.

theRussians
theRussians
Member
6 months ago

I find it inconceivable that our replacements will vote for giving the government the power to confiscate my retirement savings.

Judge Smails
Judge Smails
Reply to  theRussians
6 months ago

I am sure AOC and her squad will look at those trillions just sitting there in the 401K’s of Whitey and magnanimously allow us to keep 5%.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  theRussians
6 months ago

The way it (confiscation 401k’s) has been proposed (by liberal economists) is for the government to step in and save you from the evil stock market, which has been shown to be too volatile to depend upon for retirement. What will happen is that congress will propose some sort of scheme where your 401K’s value is replaced by Treasury Notes—what could be safer than the full faith and credit of the US Treasury? 😉 Of course, once converted (401K to IOU’s) the government has your real assets and you have a promissory note for cash—which they will subject to inflation… Read more »

Exile
Exile
Member
6 months ago

When it comes to altruism and community, the “me generations” who grew up in the 60’s-80’s are like the famous kids raised without language. They have little vocabulary or skills to cope with collective action, other than to damn it as socialist. It’s been months since I’ve seen a genuine socialist or commie – I don’t hang our on campus. I can’t find a true Marxist-collectivist hippie dirtbag. Even the true believer Bernie Bros have 401k’s and financial advisors. Forgive our fathers, for they really know not what they do. 60’s vintage Boomer bootstraps didn’t come with instructions or a… Read more »

Range Front Fault
Range Front Fault
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Exile—a note from daughter of Commies. Commies shapeshift ad infinitum. Even during the Russian revolution they broke into different factions. Then an incomplete list: The Frankfurt School Critical Theory, Herbert Marcuse, Saul Alinsky, Obama, The Hildabeast, Central/South American Marxism, African Marxism, Che/Castro Marxism, North Korea, Russia, Bernie (like Ruskie oligarchs he’s in it for the dacha, retirement, stuff, maybe even the 17 YO gymnast, the ones at the top put others in charge of takin’ it to the streets) and so on and on and on. The head of the hydra. Cut one off and three reappear and shapeshift. Delusional:… Read more »

Member
Reply to  Range Front Fault
6 months ago

You could add Antonio Gramsci to your list. That is one Eye-talian whose ideas should have been quarantined.

BTW, given the choice of Bernie’s ux or the 17 YO gymnast…………

Member
Reply to  Range Front Fault
6 months ago

The only consistent stable plank of the modern Leftist “platform” is power and wealth for Leftists. Specifically it’s power and wealth for some inner core group of them. There might even be an element of evolutionary psychology in this. It’s been noted that humans evolved to have a social group of about 150 people. This may explain, for instance, the chaos of the Russian Revolution with Mensheviks, Bolsheviks, Trotskyites, etc… all violently contending for dominance. Viewed in this light, different Leftist factions are just trying to construct a political machine that funnels wealth from the productive to whatever little in-group… Read more »

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  Range Front Fault
6 months ago

All true, Range Front. And yet every single splinter faction in the Leftist/Marxist continuum struggled toward the same end: POWER OVER OTHER HUMAN BEINGS. For them, that’s the brass ring, the ultimate victory, the ne plus ultra. It is why all Leftists should be seen and dealt with as vicious, dangerous feral animals.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

Heck, Grampa got a gold watch at his retirement.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Exile
6 months ago

“Learning new stuff at 50 sucks, no doubt about it. But refusing to learn at 50 sucks more” Exactly, brilliantly put. There were a spare few who learned early, though. The Boomers who were subjected to busing got the biggest red pill ever delivered by the fedrul gubmint. The people they thought were just like the Jeffersons turned out to be more like the rapist in “Birth of a Nation;” it was Lagos comes to Mayberry, or, even worse, vice versa. Many of those later formed the backbone on the Buchanan Brigades and/or were Perot supporters. Some, even earlier, pushed… Read more »

Member
6 months ago

We are surrounded by idiots.

Maus
Maus
Reply to  JMDGT
6 months ago

Make mine a Brawndo, it’s what plants crave. Now with more electrolytes.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  JMDGT
6 months ago

Idiots who outnumber you. And can vote.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
6 months ago

Totally true! I was thinking about this last night. The country is locking itself down to protect boomers from the grim reaper. The same boomers who were banging everything that moved without a condom in their hey day. Now that they feel vulnerability suddenly the world has to turn on a dime once again to suit their in the moment needs. I even saw an article yesterday that blames millennials for being super spreaders. Given the state in which the boomers have left the county, “Super spreader” is pretty much the highest status job many of these millennials can get.… Read more »

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  JR Wirth
6 months ago

“As far as the last month has gone it’s clear that God saw the Super Bowl half time show and decided to pull the plug on this shit show, ” lol. It was the abortion and gay marriage what done it. The heart wants what it wants.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=iRlt_yA8pnM

Josh
Josh
Reply to  JR Wirth
6 months ago

Funny thing is, many of the ones with the highest risk are set up to self isolate, yet expect the majority of society to do so. I’m prepared, but it’s going to hit the manufacturing and any sector that uses their hands pretty har.

Compsci
Compsci
6 months ago

“The data says Boomers collectively vote their interest.” So what? What data says that there is any cohort that does not vote its interest? Also, the implication of the statement is demonstrably wrong. The Boomer cohort you speak about is overwhelmingly White. But the White vote is pretty evenly split between the parties as we’ve discussed in the past. One party, the Dem’s, has recently turned against Whites and now is becoming pretty much the “colored” party as it’s Boomers age/die or run off. However, in the recent past such Whites/Boomers in that party voted for all sorts of pernicious… Read more »

Lorenzo
Lorenzo
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

It’s ironic that the wannabee founding fathers of Honkeytopia are hot for the dying off of the whitest population cohort they will ever see.

The boomers even have paleface descendants whose future oppression-by-diversity the geezers would like to prevent.

James O'Meara
James O'Meara
6 months ago

But but but….Steve Sailer and Greg Cochran are High IQ individuals and indeed ArchPriests of the IQ Fetish! They are smarter than us and our society must be shaped to their requirements!

Jay
Jay
6 months ago

As a Boomer, I want to absolutely agree with all those observing that this filthy cohort destroyed the world. A rigorous study of history clearly shows that life was pretty sweet before the arrival of the Boomers. Now it’s a hellscape. The Boomers destroyed paradise. Damn them to eternal fire.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Jay
6 months ago

If this is not sarcasm. Then you need to explain why certain paths were taken toward hell’s fire before the Boomer cohort reached the age of majority.

Jay
Jay
Reply to  Compsci
6 months ago

Of course it’s sarcasm. Seems the only way to combat this virulent slur (that even Z himself appears to support) is through sarcasm. Make the absurdity of the slur easier to appreciate.

Mikep
Mikep
6 months ago

I’m beginning to think that this corona virus thingy could be quite serious, it’s completely driven St Greta off of the BBC. It’s certainly a godsend for the armies of “experts” who have cropped up all over the shop, but then it’s an ill wind that blows nobody any good. Of course there is an argument that you want to get in early and catch the infection now before the rush and while the health care system is still functioning.

Bunny
Bunny
Reply to  Mikep
6 months ago

“On the whole it is scarier to believe in a world plague than creeping sea levels.”
~Bruce Charlton

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Bunny
6 months ago

Bunny and Bruce nail it, nailed that sucker right into the ground.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Mikep
6 months ago

Now if only these people would commit mass suicide when their spaceship fails to land.

Wxtwxtr
Wxtwxtr
6 months ago

“… execute …” para 3. Where’s my ROFL?!? Or was that a Freudian slip?

bilejones
Member
6 months ago

The Wiki piece linked on Simpson perfectly encapsulates in this one sentence why the US is fucked beyond redemption:
“The research paper by Bickel et al.[15] concluded that women tended to apply to competitive departments with low rates of admission even among qualified applicants (such as in the English Department), whereas men tended to apply to less-competitive departments with high rates of admission among the qualified applicants (such as in engineering and chemistry). ”

STEM is perceived as “less-competitive” the English.

Fucking Doomed.