Incorporated America

Media Note: I have a column up at Taki. This will be a regular thing, but how regular is unknown at this point. We’ll see how it goes. I will be on the Killstream this Wednesday to celebrate the life and times of Abraham Lincoln. The show starts somewhere around nine eastern and runs for a couple of hours.


The old left-wing critique of post-war America was that it was rampant consumerism resulting from the embrace of unfettered capitalism. Everything is commercialized and that which cannot be turned into a reason to buy stuff is discarded. The old right-wing criticism is that America is not free enough. Everywhere the tentacles of the state invade the normal activity of society. Both are correct in that America now operates like a giant corporate entity, rather than a country.

A country in the modern sense is a collection of nations. France is not a unified nation, as its regions are quite distinct with unique histories. Those nations are held together by a shared history and a common interest in being French. The same was always true of the United States, hence the name. The states reflected the nations of the country, held together by a common origin story and common interest. Those regional differences turned up in the language and culture.

The distinguishing characteristic of the America that emerged from the Cold War is that it is losing its regional variety in favor of a bland, corporate sameness. Everywhere you go you see the same corporate brands, which are often owned by the same corporate parent, providing the illusion of choice. Housing developments are all based on the same styles and patterns, because the builders are all the same. A new development in North Carolina looks just like one in Dallas or Cleveland.

America is often described by critics as nothing more than a shopping mall, where the only connection the people have to one another is the choice of product. This is not a right-wing critique, even though the dissident right has embraced it. This is more of an old left-wing critique of America. Capitalism is to blame for transforming America into a giant open-air marketplace. Instead of a culture based on organic institutions and a shared experience, it is based on buying stuff.

There is truth to it, but it misses what is really going on. America is now a corporation, rather than a country. It is why the public space is being transformed into something that looks like a corporate training center. You don’t go there to express an opinion or advance your interests, but to learn the latest policies. The person in charge sees herself as a facilitator, using behavioral techniques she learned in graduate school, in order to help you reach your potential an employee.

Just look at how the big social media platforms censure people. It is not traditional censorship we would see in an ideological state. Instead, the first violation gets you a day off to think about what you have done. The next violation gets you a longer bit of time off, which everyone knows means you’re on the list. The next downsizing means you get let go, regardless of your performance. Finally, like an employee that never fit into the corporate culture, you’re fired from the platform.

Note too that the enforcers at these firms clearly share information with one another about violators. One day the problematic user wakes up and his Twitter has been suspended, his Facebook is deleted and his YouTube channel nuked. This happens for the same reason the HR department ticks the box “Not eligible for rehire” when you’re riffed out of the place. It is not about you. You’re dead to them now. It is a service to their peers, so they can avoid hiring the same mistake.

This is why our radicals now sound like every human resource department and our politicians look like everyone at a corporate retreat. The managerial elite is imposing its corporate sensibilities on the country. The dreary sameness we see all around us is what you see inside every corporation. Everything must serve the point of the enterprise, even the aesthetic. Everything is subject to the quest for efficiency, so everything that makes life interesting is removed.

The regions of the country are no longer unique cultures with unique histories, but subsidiaries that must be normalized into the cooperate culture. Movies and television are repetitive and shallow, because corporate culture eschews creativity as risky and embraces banality because it is predictable and safe. Sports are drenched in identity politics because cross-marketing says the way to promote a new product is to attach it to the most successful product in the catalog.

Corporations travel a well-known arc. They start with a frontier mentality, in which the creative and daring control the enterprise. They are trying to develop a new market or subvert an existing market, so they can’t follow old rules. This attracts people who are goal oriented, not process oriented. This is the culture of every start-up, which is why they can find new ways to attack the market and maneuver the company around larger, better established competitors.

That success eventually outgrows the capacity of the start-up culture. Eventually, the people being hired to do the things the enterprise needs doing need to be managed and that means managers and rules. A new type of employee is brought in, the sort who enjoys the process. They enjoy creating employee manuals. Soon they are joined by another type of employee, who values conformity. Her job is to make sure everyone follows the rules and does so with enthusiasm.

This is the current phase of Corporate America. The thing that matters most to the managers is not ideology. In the corporate state, ideology is about as authentic and meaningful as corporate culture. It is just a veneer to decorate the latest HR effort to boost morale. What matters to them is the quest to assimilate the wide range of assets now under corporate control. If you step back and look at the current crisis, it is not an ideological battle, but a war on variety and exception.

This is, in part, why the elites hate Trump. It’s not his politics, as his politics, stripped of the carny act, are rather conventional. They hate Trump because he is the guy who laughed at the white diversity trainer when she shared her painful experiences of oppression at Princeton. They hate him because he just wants to do his job and have a life and an identity outside the company. For the champions of the corporate state, nothing can exist outside the state.

You see this corporate mentality most strongly in foreign policy. Russia is the arch enemy, not because they are a genuine competitor, but because they refuse to embrace the latest fads from HR. If the issue was the alleged authoritarianism, then America would invade China, but that’s an important vendor relationship, so their tyrannical system is no problem. In the corporate state, values and principles are just pretty lies to justify executive bonus packages.

Modern America is now an incorporated entity, run by a managerial elite, policed by the human resource departments of the corporate nodes within it. As the assimilation of all the corporate assets continues, it is increasingly difficult to see the divisions within the managerial class. The media, corporations, the academy and the state are blending into one amorphous blob that sits over us like a dome. Everything is in the corporate state, nothing is outside it and nothing can be against it.

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marcberez
marcberez
8 days ago

Congratulations! Taki has great writers and now you are part of a great site. I’ve been reading you since you wrote mostly about sports. So glad your writing is getting wider circles

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  marcberez
8 days ago

Taki’s has been going downhill for a long time. I find it a bit surprising that Zman is joining them when Jim Goad left because he couldn’t stand the bs and censorship from Taki’s daughter who now runs the site. For those who are interested, Counter Currents had an excellent podcast with Jim (and I, who do not listen to podcasts, actually listened to the whole thing).

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  thezman
8 days ago

You mean to say those chimps you had a picture of last week really don’t help?

Citizen of a Silly Country
Citizen of a Silly Country
Reply to  thezman
8 days ago

Agreed. Expand the audience when you can. Taki’s is still a worthwhile place.

Btw, is it me or did you employ a slightly different style in the Take’s piece?

Epaminondas
Member
Reply to  Citizen of a Silly Country
8 days ago

Heh. Someone corrected it before it went up. And that’s a good thing. Here, we don’t care about the grammar and spelling errors.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  thezman
8 days ago

Well I certainly hope Mandolyna is tossing some filthy lucre your way.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

“Hey Z, here’s a gyro, now get lost”

Lanky
Lanky
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

Her gyro expired long ago.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Lanky
8 days ago

So says her gyrocologist…

Sid
Sid
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
7 days ago

Z really needs to start moderating comments. Fkig barbatians.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  3g4me
8 days ago

Takimag has no vision, as Goad noted. I guess it used to be a conservative version of Esquire or even a de-sexed Playboy with its mix of smart society chat and intellectualism. All it needed was a few good short story writers, but never went that route. Maybe it should give it a try and form a fiction department. I bet there would be a lot of good stories coming from people on our side.

Kudzu Bob
Kudzu Bob
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

Guys like Delicious Tacos and Brian Eckert could produce first-rate fiction content.

GetBackUp
GetBackUp
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

Zman left the safety of the DR corner and took control of the center of the ring with his Taki article, at least for a round or two. Tribute where tribute’s due. Keep your hands up Z!

Last edited 8 days ago by GetBackUp
Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  GetBackUp
8 days ago

Just read the Taki piece. Brilliant. An underused type of writing is the sarcastic humor. Think old National Lampoon. Or today’s Onion or Babylon Bee. We could spread our messages via short stories. Such fiction would have stiff competition from the absurdities that come from today’s politicians, like the cited Steve.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  3g4me
8 days ago

Great podcast on CC. Chucked at the “writing easier after a few drinks”.

(Editing, however, is best done sober)

Last edited 8 days ago by ProZNoV
Independant_George
Independant_George
Reply to  3g4me
5 days ago

Yeah right, did not know that. I’ve noticed a lack of articles coming out at taki’s lately. I’ve listened to a few podcasts with Jim as well. Interesting bloke. Hopefully he’ll still be writing somewhere.

A plus for takimag if Zman throws an article their way. I’d much prefer to read Z here though, too many good commenters to miss.

usNthem
usNthem
Reply to  marcberez
8 days ago

I used to read taki regularly until they did away with the comment section which I always thought was pretty good. Still read occasionally but will be reading Z’s missives for sure. The additional exposure can only result in wider readership. Best of luck.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  marcberez
8 days ago

I read Taki’s for Taki and Goad. Can you imagine if talent like the Zman and Nick Fuentes became the Limbaughs and Tuckers?

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

Or even do something like the Howard Stern show. That would be a riot.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
8 days ago

It’s not a coincidence even places of worship now represent corporate offices.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Chet Rollins
8 days ago

Who ever thought it was, though? The guys who found cults and religions drive Bentleys for a reason.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Chet Rollins
8 days ago

What do you mean?

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
8 days ago

“Everything is in the corporate state, nothing is outside it and nothing can be against it.”
So they’ve updated Mussolini now. Damn, it turns out the commies actually are the Real Fascists.

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Major Hoople
8 days ago

Hear hear Major! Who knew?!
My exact thought.

Major Hoople
Major Hoople
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 days ago

The “Resistance” turns out to be simply another brand name, doesn’t it? Marxist cultural identity politics as the sheepskin covering, corporate state “soft” tyranny as the quiet wolf underneath

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  Major Hoople
8 days ago

Antifa is just H&M mannequins come to life. At sunrise they go back to the store and take their places again. Notice that all Antifa rioting takes place within five blocks of an H&M. In a few years they’ll have their own precise VALS marketing demo, Experiencer/Agitator and no longer be moved to violence.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Major Hoople
8 days ago

Yep, a government-approved brand name along with BLM and Antifa

Won’t be long before BLM and Antifa have their own government-decided dress code

Memebro
Memebro
Reply to  Major Hoople
7 days ago

Think Animal Farm. The pigs putting on the clothes of the farmer and sitting at his dinner table.

billrla
Member
Reply to  Major Hoople
8 days ago

Major Hoople: Turns out this was always the case. One needs the other to perpetuate the lie.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Major Hoople
8 days ago

Anti-white, black supremacist fascism. This is “America’s” current disposition.

David Wright
Member
8 days ago

Here’s part of it:
https://www.53.com/content/fifth-third/en.html
Notice the three important and so called relevant corporate officers. This is everywhere.

What happens here if instead of Alaska Chaga as a sponsor you get a sweet deal from say, Apple, Target or Chase. You show up on their radar and either get attacked or deplatformed or just maybe co-opted. I pray for you.

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  thezman
8 days ago

You never know. Who’d have thought Kaepernick would end up being the face of the NFL?

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  thezman
8 days ago

That will mean the sentence “I am on iTunes, which means the Apple Nazis can listen to me on their Hitler phones.” has become trendy.

“I’m the Z Man, the original Apple Nazi. Listen to me on iTunes with your embedded iChip! Think ‘Z Man’ really hard when you order for a 10% discount on your next Apple purchase!”

Last edited 8 days ago by Vizzini
billrla
Member
Reply to  thezman
8 days ago

Zman: Beware the arctic fungus activists.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  billrla
8 days ago

Indeed! They drink their own urine.

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  David Wright
8 days ago

Centuries (seemingly) ago I actually interviewed there, but I do remember two things. First, I would have had to wear a suit coat over a certain floor number, and second, they paid about 25% less for grunt-level IT work than anyone else in the city. I’m sure by this point their IT staff is 100% East Indian.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
8 days ago

their IT staff is 100% East Indian.

Heh. The manager just got such a chap in as a contractor. Upon hearing of this, I did not say anything; I just remembered all the other times I have dealt with them. The shaking of the head when they agree with you, the broken English, the tendency to complete sentences for you…

Member
Reply to  OrangeFrog
8 days ago

My theory about the Indian invasion is that they get the jobs precisely because of their incomprehensible gibberish. The HR bimbos who now control hiring think “I can’t understand a word he says, he must be sooper smart”. Interestingly, they also think this when interviewing a white computer guy. The difference is that the white guy is hard for them to understand because he’s actually talking about technology subjects you don’t learn in Wammen Studies programs. They can’t tell the difference between the Pajeet’s word salad and the grammatically correct tech-speak the white guy is using. Add in that most… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
8 days ago

How in hades did a regional bank, Fifth Third, end up buying the colossus, Bank of America?

USA Corp has some really spooky stuff happening at the top tier. This is fabulous, best-ever stuff by the Zman.

Last edited 8 days ago by Alzaebo
Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
8 days ago

I kind of miss the suit jacket or sport coat as common workplace attire. Since I did a lot of customer-facing visits I did wear a sport coat a lot and I look good in one! I worked from home for more than 20 years but at company meetings I usually made a point of wearing dress pants, shoes, shirt and jacket (though rarely a tie. I have my limits).

Also, sport coats and suit jackets are great for concealed carry.

Last edited 8 days ago by Vizzini
OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
8 days ago

Finally, like an employee that never fit into the corporate culture, you’re fired from the platform.

The writing has been on the wall for a long time. When I first started out, people returning from interviewing a candidate would always talk about if ‘they fit with the company culture’. At the time, I thought we ought to be recruiting based on merit; but this technique is exactly what we ought to apply whenever letting anyone into one of our circles – do they fit with our culture.

Drake
Drake
8 days ago

“This is why our radicals now sound like every human resource department and our politicians look like everyone at a corporate retreat.”
https://babylonbee.com/news/counter-cultural-rebel-believes-everything-athletes-reporters-actors-ceos-believe

MIA
MIA
Reply to  Drake
8 days ago

The Putin interviews by Oliver Stone are very insightful, and yes Russia is the enemy because it will not bow down to HR.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  MIA
8 days ago

The Russian refusal to sufficiently celebrate sodomites is inexcusable.

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
Reply to  Drake
8 days ago

“”Yeah, I’m pretty much a free thinker,” said Keeblesmush when interviewed at a protest rally sponsored by Kinko’s. “I would say my ideology is an eclectic mix of Vox, Marvel comics, Starbucks’ Twitter feed, and whatever my Sociology 101 professor says. There’s a lot of hate and misinformation out there, so it’s important that I get my life’s moral compass entirely from multi-billion dollar corporations and celebrities. The only exception is dead German philosophers like Marx. They’re cool too.””

(((German))) philosophers….

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
8 days ago

They enjoy creating employee manuals.

It is hard to believe these people exist. Yet the corporate world keeps surprising me in the most mundane way possible.

Gunner Q
Reply to  OrangeFrog
8 days ago

The mind-numbing length of those employee manuals is indisputable proof.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Gunner Q
8 days ago

Which literally no one reads. Until they need to find a reason to fire someone for violating “the handbook”.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
8 days ago

And next, the part where they kill us without consequence begins…

TomA
TomA
Reply to  MemeWarVet
8 days ago

Typically, the non-conformists are exiled first, then it’s off to the re-education camps next, and if that doesn’t work, starvation and disease are useful tools of elimination with a less guilty conscience. Overt genocide is often the last resort because sometimes the victims will fight back when there is no alternative. And none of the above happens without a Jackboot Corp.

Last edited 8 days ago by TomA
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  MemeWarVet
8 days ago

Liquidate.

The anesthetic corporate term will be liquidate.

Judge Smails
Judge Smails
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
8 days ago

Liquidate is such a harsh term. Consider it the phase out of the Heritage America line and the introduction of the Somalian Summer Collection.

Carl B.
Carl B.
Reply to  MemeWarVet
8 days ago

White men killing White men while the brown hordes and the Ruling Class laugh.

Tom K
Tom K
8 days ago

Corporations should be chartered by special act of the legislature of a state, not through a registration system. That way there would be way fewer of them and we’d all be better off. Each city would have its own unique culture and the wasteland wouldn’t be dominated by the national brands which are a cancer.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Tom K
8 days ago

Some say the Federal Reserve, I look with the evil eye at the Clayton and Sherman Anti-Trust Acts.

A CEO explained to me that a board is made up of outsiders who can conspire to get rid of the guy who started the joint. Perfect recipe for hostile takeover, aka piracy, fueled by LBO “finance”.

I’m making a special pleading that those familiar with actual corporate mechanics start educating the rest of us, fast.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

(Plus, a small special thanks to the host: I am sick to death of my own rut, stuck solely in narrow-minded anti-J mode, and have forgotten how said mechanics used to fascinate.

A return to such business contemplation would help break the mind out of the J-rut, it’s not the whole picture. Time to start building a practice ‘paper portfolio’, a pretend account, fellow anti-J rebels, let us heed today’s missive.)

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

PSS- I make that special pleading because this is the key, the way to predict the enemy’s playbook.

Imagine if corporate machination became as popular as Limbaugh’s sports model applied to politics (the teams, the players, the plays!), or as eagerly pursued as, ahem, post-Wiemar reconstructions.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

I got into an argument couple years ago at another website. This guy was telling me that you needed corporations to organize things like plumbers and bike shops and bakeries. What a nimrod. But he may have just been trolling me idk.

Judge Smails
Judge Smails
8 days ago

They seem to be forcing a mass exodus from the cities into the countryside. Is this just part of the corporate homogenization of America, filling Texas with Californians and Alabama with New Yorkers?

Peabody
Peabody
Reply to  Judge Smails
8 days ago

Ironically this is the opposite direction of migration envisioned by the UN corporate toadies who hatched Agenda 21. It’s no wonder why the closer they get to missing this deadline the more frenzied and obvious the machinations of the Cloud People.

B124
B124
Reply to  Peabody
8 days ago

My guess is that this is temporary

Depopulate the cities. Regain ownership on the cheap.

Force everyone back into cities organized the way they want. Or, they will pump the empty cities full of refugees and immigrants to take full power.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  B124
8 days ago

I’ve posted this before, but the Boston Housing Authority sent out letters to the Projects’ Residents trying to persuade them to move out to the suburbs where the “schools are better.” The truth is the developers are salivating at having property w/o a three-hour commute.

David Davenport
David Davenport
Reply to  B124
8 days ago

Or, they will pump the empty cities full of refugees and immigrants to take full power.”

Seems like that’s already happened.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Judge Smails
8 days ago

Yes, those I’m not sure that was an intended consequence of Beer Flu.

Not sure it matters at this point.

miforest
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
8 days ago

the fact that they missed this in their plans is hopeful.
I don’t think the cascading economic damage the started to get reduced price assets can be stopped as easily as they think.

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  Judge Smails
8 days ago

Makes me happy I live in a state that is considered a shithole by the elites. Especially the rural part of my state.

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
8 days ago

I’m in one of those locales myself. Where might yours be? (asking for a friend)

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 days ago

Rural Oklahoma. How about you?

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
8 days ago

Upstate SC

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
7 days ago

I’ve never been there but I hear it’s beautiful country. Foothills of the Appalachians?

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
8 days ago

Another Florida resident! 👹

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Judge Smails
8 days ago

Absolutely no clue as to why this was done. I’ve considered every theory out there and none makes sense. There are still areas of the country that are culturally distinct and perhaps Z is right and the purpose is to homogenize them (with, among other things, diversity, ironically), but I don’t know if that is the reason. Maybe there isn’t a rational explanation. Some of this stuff has been insane with no apparent logic behind it.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Jack Dobson
8 days ago

And they’re still talking about “extending the lockdowns until…”

None of this will return to normal.
None of it. What are they thinking?

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

 What are they thinking?

They aren’t. They’re insane NPCs operating in a gynocentric social order and they think this is just great.

Imagine a stiletto heel stamping on a human face forever, Winston.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
8 days ago

It’s simply the latest instantiation of white flight. As the negroes and their white pets burn, loot and murder with especial intensity, urban whites with any sense flee to more hospitable climes.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Jack Dobson
8 days ago

I know the old hippy artists, Mexicans, blacks and so forth are really pissed off at professional class millennials for coming in and making everything so expensive through gentrification that they had to pack up and move.

Downtown Los Angeles had a thriving artist district back before the mass gentrification. Those people had a great life, huge cheap industrial lofts, local mom and pop bars and markets, etc. Could do whatever you wanted.

Then came the hipsters. And everyone hates the hipsters.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Jack Dobson
8 days ago

Follow the money. The asset/wealth transfer that happened circa 2008 was nothing compared to what we’re about to see. A lot of people whose livelihoods and small businesses have been shut down through no fault of their own stand to lose everything, while the Fed is printing money to bail out global corporations who engage in outsourcing, H1-B hiring, and stock-buybacks for the C-suite crowd.

chedolf
chedolf
8 days ago

Cato Institute’s director of immigration studies: “We’re an economy with a country, not a country with an economy.”

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  chedolf
8 days ago

One of the legendary moments in Twitter was when MorlockP beat that guy to death with his own study.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  chedolf
8 days ago

Killing Them Softly is a sleazy, depressing progtard film, but the last scene is spot on about Current Year America:

https://youtu.be/5V6GHnxEJjg

“America is a business. That’s all it is.”

Annex Station
Annex Station
Reply to  chedolf
8 days ago

There’s a huge problem with the line of logic that says America is just an economy with a country, one that our corporate owners never consider: people don’t sacrifice for corporations to the same degree they would a nation-state. Thus, such economies with countries tend to be much less stable over the long term as the likelihood of disaster increases (a war, a pandemic, etc. … all are inevitable with time). When disaster does strike a nation-state, the masses often come together as one for the benefit of all. We saw this wiliness to sacrifice for the greater good during… Read more »

Vizzini
Vizzini
8 days ago

Everything is in the corporate state, nothing is outside it and nothing can be against it.

From the corporate training manual of Benito Mussolini, Chief Executive Officer

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Vizzini
8 days ago

Except, Benito loved Italy and her history.

whitney
Member
8 days ago

Or the elites could hate Trump because they’re all Satanist pedophiles and he’s not? It helps explain their unhinged rage.

Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  whitney
8 days ago

But they’re “people of faith” don’t you know.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Tom K
8 days ago

More branding, eh? Kubrick was Breitbarted two months after “Eyes Wide Shut” got out.

Breitbart was Breitbarted after he alluded to pizza! The DC Madame was found hanging in her mother’s garden shed- I doubt it was because of good old fashioned cisnormative rub-a-dub.

Last edited 8 days ago by Alzaebo
Tom K
Tom K
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

Well, Kamala Harris said they were “people of faith too” the other night at the debate, Alzaebo. That’s what I was referring to.

Speaking of pizza, you wouldn’t believe what I saw the other night when I went to pick up some milk at the supermarket. Maybe I’ll write about it some time but not now. People will think it’s my imagination. But it confirms my belief that yes, there are children out there being trafficked.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  Tom K
8 days ago

Satanism is a faith!

Annex Station
Annex Station
Reply to  whitney
8 days ago

American elites are like the managers of a lower-tier department store. They hate their jobs, and their customers by extension, because it reminds them of their own mediocrity. That’s something these ivy grads just can’t take. Shouldn’t they be celebrated for doing important stuff, they think to themselves. Like saving the world (The Green New Deal) or something or other tech (Tesla). Instead, they’re stuck doing things they consider beneath them — selling Martha Stewart bed sheets and La-Z-boy recliners to the unwashed masses. They hate Donald Trump for the same reason they’d hate a wealthy hillbilly who walks into… Read more »

Diversity Heretic
Member
8 days ago

I’m reminded of the money (the world is a business) speech from the movie Network.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V9XeyBd_IuA

Scipio
Scipio
8 days ago

Zman. I just sent you a message via your contact page to inform you of a subject regarding your recent Taki magazine article and your personal privacy. Hopefully my concerns are unfounded but if not you will probably want to address.

GoCambridge!
GoCambridge!
Reply to  Scipio
8 days ago

It’s still there, a common mistake. Now I apprehend the blog name. Impressive background according to LinkedIn, even more impressive familial associations it appears.

Nick
Nick
Reply to  Scipio
8 days ago

Yep somebody screwed up

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Scipio
8 days ago

Dang. I’d love to know, but I respect the mans privacy.
Besides, I understand he’s approachable at publicized events of similar thinking dissidents.

Only have to have the courage to show up at one. It’s not a large price to pay, nor unreasonable to ask. Masculine, actually.

Vizzini
Vizzini
Reply to  ProZNoV
8 days ago

I knew a guy who failed to approach the Zman with sufficient respect at an event once. He was never heard from again. They say if you play an episode of The Z Blog Power Hour backward, you can still hear his cries of anguish.

Are you feeling masculine enough, man? Well, are ya?

Last edited 8 days ago by Vizzini
ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Vizzini
7 days ago

Snort! I’m more worried about being caught at an Am Ren Or HL Mencken Conference and being put up on some sort of ADL or SPLC haters list.

It’s the crazy years, and we’re in peak silly season

Joey Jünger
Joey Jünger
8 days ago

It’s an old argument that the die was cast once people no longer needed to worry about getting enough food to eat. The managerial state birthed the therapeutic state, and instead of worrying about bread and butter or roads and bridges the job of government is to make sure people never have bad thoughts (white people, that is). This is why comedy is such a battlefield (and why the German state security apparatus can say with a straight face that there is an internal extremist organization in the Police Department merely because officers share off-color jokes on their cellphones). Laughter… Read more »

Paintersforms
Paintersforms
8 days ago

Final stage: the company is no longer competitive but the brand still has value, so the money men buy it up on the cheap and carve up the carcass. If nothing changes, America will soon be a Walmart brand.

Fortunately the nation is the people, not a brand. This will (I think and hope) ultimately foil tptb’s designs.

Bilejones
Member
Reply to  Paintersforms
8 days ago

“Fortunately the nation is the people, not a brand”

And the people are being changed while the Brand supposedly remains the same.

Last edited 8 days ago by bilejones
Paintersforms
Paintersforms
Reply to  Bilejones
8 days ago

We’re still here. Getting swamped is all.

G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
8 days ago

So how do we fight this corporate blob?
My thoughts today.
Throw wrenches in it when we can.
Laugh at it when we can.
And eventually we are gonna have to live in a community like Rocky Top.
Once two strangers climbed ole Rocky Top looking for dissident Bill strangers ain’t come down from Rocky Top recon they never will.

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
8 days ago

Home sweet home to me….

Drew
Drew
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
8 days ago

The specific problem with America is that the government is extremely hamstrung by the political charter written by slave-owning agrarians that didn’t have electricity or instantaneous communication networks. Moreover, the charter curtails federal power rather severely by leaving lots of veto options to lots of parties at multiple points in the process. In contrast, businesses in America can be as unfettered in their decision making structure as they want to be, and can thus be more assertive and responsive. Thus, people who want to make a difference would do well to start off in the corporate world rather than the… Read more »

Horace
Horace
Reply to  Drew
8 days ago

Our system was designed for the republican governance of independent-minded European Christians. It will not and can not work well in governing a multiracial empire. There are no examples in human history of successful multiracial governance that did not involve authoritarianism. That is why globalists and their minions are constantly pushing gun control.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Horace
8 days ago

Insofar as man is an animal, forcing different sub-species or races to live in the same cage is a form of animal cruelty. If the zookeeper did that he’d be in jail for professional neglect and animal cruelty.

Din C. Nuttin
Din C. Nuttin
Reply to  Drew
8 days ago

The Charter works pretty well when it isn’t ignored. The Bible was also written by slave-owning agrarians, that charter also still works pretty well when it isn’t ignored.

miforest
Member
Reply to  Din C. Nuttin
8 days ago

Yes

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
8 days ago

Great to see a Rocky Top mention. About 20 or 25 years ago I saw the group who wrote Rocky Top, the Osborne Brothers. Their persona and the music they performed were quintessentially Appalachian-American. Music that came from somewhere, reflecting a culture, and a heritage. As they left the stage, one of the Osbornes, after telling everyone to drive safely home, urged everyone to “buy American.” It struck me as kind of sad, a guy doing his best to fight against the rising tide of globalization.

Last edited 8 days ago by Wolf Barney
G Lordon Giddy
G Lordon Giddy
Reply to  Wolf Barney
8 days ago

My favorite story from Appalachia is the story of Bill Monroe visiting the White House and waiting to see the President. A man approached Bill Monroe and told him that he always wanted to meet him, Bill looked at the man and said in his southern drawl “ now what is your name?” The man said my name is Frank Sinatra after which Bill responded “ I think that I might have heard of you?” The other famous story about Bill Monroe was when he stayed in a Hotel serving a kosher breakfast. Someone came to his room and asked… Read more »

David Davenport
David Davenport
Reply to  G Lordon Giddy
8 days ago

And eventually we are gonna have to live in a community like Rocky Top.”

In other words, a safe space for timid, defeated Rightists.

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
8 days ago

Another congrats on the Taki article, I hope that becomes ‘a thing’. The comments section here, in fact, is sort of a throw back to the Taki comments section of yesteryear which was some of the best bantz on the internet. Top tier erudite comments with just the right amount of BadThink / sh1tposting stirred into the mix.
The site is not what it use to be at it’s peak but it is still on my weekly read list. Great job.

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Apex Predator
8 days ago

This, yeah. Needs to do the Sailer thing of “Read it there, post on it here”. I used to read Taki’s all the time for the comments, but now I only make it over there a couple times a year.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
8 days ago

Get a Dissenter browser, or an extension to your whatever browser.

https://dissenter.com/

I’m surprised Torba doesn’t push Dissenter harder; Gab is an alternative to Normie social media, but Dissenter is revolutionary, disruptive: a comment section on each and every page on the internet, one that can’t be censored, except by Team Torba.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Felix Krull
8 days ago

The problem with Dissenter is that your comments only show up on Dissenter, and the folks that have Disssenter are already singing from the same hymnal.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  RoBG
8 days ago

Yes, good point. But still…

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
8 days ago

Coincidence or not, the managerial elite and globohomo benefits from the pandemic where the small companies lose, shifting money to multinational corporations.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Wolf Barney
8 days ago

At this point that appears to be by design.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
8 days ago

I don’t think this outcome was foreseen at the onset of Kovid, but I don’t doubt for a New York minute that the corporations recognized the possibilities very soon thereafter. Government, too, quickly realized how it could use the hysteria to extend its reach and heighten its power.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

Certainly it’s hard to know exactly what was or was not planned.

It is startlingly clear these people are experts at taking advantage of a crisis.

Stranger in a strange land
8 days ago

Taki – a formerly great site. Comments section truly were best ever! Then his daughter took over.
All past tense now

Johnny
Reply to  thezman
8 days ago

Get more fish over to this site Zman. I feel like you should get over the 300,000 viewers mark soon. We could use more Taki users coming over here to view this site.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Johnny
8 days ago

One caveat: it’s getting really hard to keep up with the great commenters here. Especially for us working class- heck I should’ve been gone an hour ago.

CompscI
CompscI
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

Yep. Reading the comments here is beginning to be a “guilty pleasure”. Unfortunately, one I must attempt to break myself of.

There are things to do and life to live outside of a virtual world.

Ben the Layabout
Ben the Layabout
Reply to  CompscI
8 days ago

Speak for yourself 😎 . I wish a better commenting section were possible: easier sub-topics, bookmarks, know when new comments added, etc. As is, you just have to read the latest scroll and see what changed.

Last edited 8 days ago by Ben the Layabout
Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  thezman
8 days ago

Your blog the closest thing I’ve found to the site formerly known as Takimag

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 days ago

Hear, hear. That’s why I’m here.

MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 days ago

It was better when Richard Spencer edited it. Funny and also true.

OrangeFrog
OrangeFrog
8 days ago

As the assimilation of all the corporate assets continues, it is increasingly difficult to see the divisions within the managerial class. Is the end goal of this the complete assimilation of all business; right down to Joe the plumber? If it is, the tools are in place for such a push – demonizing capitalism is only a step away from demonizing small business; once the people have been sufficiently conditioned to hate such enterprises then they give the state licence to confiscate and maybe redistribute. This scary situation can only be offset by a selection of ‘frontier’ type risk takers;… Read more »

Wolf Barney
Wolf Barney
8 days ago

Streamlining and efficiency have invaded pop music. There’s a guy named Rick Beato, who’s worked in the music industry for many years as a musician and producer. He has a popular youtube channel where he talks about and analyzes music. He claims that currently there are only the same 4 chords used for virtually every popular song produced today. It’s a result of corporations figuring out which chords are most popular. He notes that the Beatles only used these 4 chords one time (Let it Be) among their 27 biggest hits. He says it’s killing innovation and originality and killing… Read more »

Peabody
Peabody
Reply to  Wolf Barney
8 days ago

It’s been around a while but here it is in action:
https://youtu.be/oOlDewpCfZQ

Evil Sandmich
Reply to  Peabody
8 days ago

That’s funny, and depressing. Reminds me what my musician acquaintance said in regards to two of the more popular modern religious tunes in that you couldn’t play them back to back because then people would notice that they sound the same. “Why’s that?”, I asked. To which he replied: “Because it IS the exact same song, but with different words”.

KGB
KGB
Reply to  Evil Sandmich
8 days ago

If you listen to pop, country, and Christian stations consecutively, you’ll be amazed at how similar the music is. It reminds me of the Simpsons episode where Homer toured the Duff Brewery and overhead was one giant pipe that split into three smaller pipes that fed vats labeled Duff, Duff Lite, and Duff Dry. In this case, the music is all the same but one kind sings about blue jeans and beer, one sings about how great their God is, and the third sings about how wet their love purse gets.

Mis(ter)Anthrope
Reply to  KGB
8 days ago

I have noticed the same thing. I love old country music, but every damn song put out in today’s “country” music sounds exactly the same.

Like a pop song from the 1980’s sung with a phony Southern accent.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Mis(ter)Anthrope
8 days ago

And silly rap percussion.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Wolf Barney
8 days ago

Rick Beato is a great, talented guy. His song breakdowns are incredible.

As for chords, I can remember taking a beginner online guitar course, and the instructor had posted a huge list of pop songs based on three, two, and even one chord.

The other issue with popular music is that almost every track is built around the 4/4 time signature.

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
8 days ago

In the corporate state, ideology is about as authentic and meaningful as corporate culture. It is just a veneer to decorate the latest HR effort to boost morale.

comment image

“Yeaaaaaah, so Peter, I’m going to need you to go ahead and worship black people this Saturday.”
“And Peter, before I forget, why don’t you go ahead and worship gays on Sunday too. Yeah…. okie dokie, have a nice weekend Pete!”

Last edited 8 days ago by Apex Predator
skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Apex Predator
8 days ago

If that movie were sequelled today, HR would have to have a prominent role. With Queen Latifah playing the Director of Diversity and Inclusion.

MIA
MIA
8 days ago

You are missing vast swathes of America and life outside the office and the popular culture- but you have correctly described the program.

To quote the 19th century Russians; What is to be Done?

*Lenin stole that phrase, its from an 1863 RU story.

MBlanc46
MBlanc46
8 days ago

In the Taki’s piece, can “pace holder” be edited to “place holder”?

Member
8 days ago

One thing to advocate that would keep the corporations in line would be the concept of natural death. Corporations claim the human right of free speech, so they should therefore accept the human fate of eventual death after 70 – 80 years or so. Any corporation that reached the age of natural death should be wound up, it’s assets auctioned off and the proceeds distributed among the creditors and shareholders. New companies can operate with the assets purchased from the dead corporation. Also, no corporate bailouts, ever.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Raymond R
8 days ago

Corps used to be severely limited, state charter for a specific purpose, say, build a bridge, and then wound up.

That was back when your children were your social security. FDR allowed the kids to leave Ma and Pa on the farm (although many had no farm or land, as well), and go to work for FDR’s big city factory friends.

No immortal umbrella corporations, no pensions? No, I think your idea resolves the impasse. Kudos.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Raymond R
8 days ago

Maybe when they get to be a certain size or market share, they should be declared public utilities and regulated as such.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  skeptic16
8 days ago

And multi-billionaires should be taxed punitively and mercilessly. No single person, based upon his wealth, should have more influence than half the countries on earth, even if most of those countries are scheisslochs.

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

I definitely agree with that. My way of thinking is that you can’t become a billionaire without being ruthless, amoral, stealing an idea or government help. These traits don’t disappear when one becomes a billionaire. They are enabled.

Higgs Boson
Higgs Boson
8 days ago

Social media is a surveillance tool created for the purpose of eradicating wrongthink. Behavior modification gets reinforced every time someone gets fired and exiled for wrongspeech. The next step is to brainchip everyone. Behold the transhuman race.

Higgs Boson
Higgs Boson
8 days ago
TomA
TomA
8 days ago

Yes, the quest to impose hive-mindedness on the plebs is sacrosanct; and at it’s core, it’s only tangentially about corporate efficiency. It’s real purpose is the prevention of an uprising. Worker bees must made into docile automatons that perform their function without question or complaint, not free thinkers. Free thinkers might do the unthinkable.

Higgs Boson
Higgs Boson
Reply to  TomA
8 days ago

Killer bees are the unintended consequence of the architects of the hive mind, deplatforming the Borg with their own device. Nature abhors a vacuum.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  TomA
8 days ago

Right around when I was graduating college in late 80s, the academic mission was still to teach critical thinking skills. I guess that became too dangerous or “problematic” as Corporate Karen would say, and the new mission became indoctrination. Even then, being a liberal meant you would study in Paris or Rome for two semesters and immerse yourself in the best Western Civilization had to offer. That too would become a big no no.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

Critical thinking was and is a loaded term. Critical thinkers were never adjured to scrutinize the building anti-white consensus. Instead, their charge was to rhetorically disembowel western civilization. Critical thinking springs from Frankfurt School Critical Theory.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

That was more the “deconstructionist” side of things, which became a rigid system if not an ideology. Most professors in America operated outside of that and merely taught critical thinking skills in the sense of it being part of our Western intellectual tradition and could be encapsulated as “we are teaching you to vote smart and to make reasonable decisions.” There was a pervasive “pro Western bias” and pragmatism that had nothing to do with the Frankfurt School or spiritual successors in the Humanities like Derrida or Foucault.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  TomA
8 days ago

And yet BLM, which is the unofficial enforcement arm of the anti-white fascist state, threatens to “burn the system down if [they] don’t get what [they] want.” These people are not free thinkers because they cannot think to begin with. Nevertheless, they do possess a primordial rage impulse that could destabilize everything the Diversity Despots have built. It’s an odd paradox.

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
8 days ago

Zman’s article at Taki’s Magazine contains extraordinary observations, even for that site, e.g. “People complaining about racism are simply ungrateful. If not for white people, they would be living Neolithic lives. Like everything else about their lives, their ungratefulness is only possible through the generosity of the white man. If anyone has a grievance in this age, it is Occidentals who stand waiting for a thank-you that never comes. The demographic age question is what will become the genuine alternative to the progressive orthodoxy.” Answer: “A passive ethno-nationalism organized around group identity and rights.”

Last edited 8 days ago by Jim Smith
MemeWarVet
MemeWarVet
Reply to  Jim Smith
8 days ago

You can lead a horse to water….

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  MemeWarVet
8 days ago

But Meme, you agree that it’s worth leading the horse up to the water so it can see it’s there, right?

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  Jim Smith
8 days ago

Nah, he’s actually right on this one. What constituted anything decent at Taki left a while ago, why preach to a crater?

MIA
MIA
Reply to  Jim Smith
8 days ago

The Passive have no future.
This is a formula for auto-genocide.

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  MIA
8 days ago

Not according to Zman, who has stated that it is the ONLY solution to “the large society problem.”

Last edited 8 days ago by Jim Smith
Falcone
Falcone
8 days ago

Even the citizens are taking on the NPC qualities like those generic models on the covers of the company literature

Judge Smails
Judge Smails
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

You mean the company literature with a picture of10 POC and a blurry visage of a white male far in the background.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

Captain Capitalism has a great rant that for the last 70 years, trillions of dollars and hours have been spent turning women into liberal NPCs, and almost nothing has been spent on teaching them to be good wives and mothers:

https://captaincapitalism.blogspot.com/2018/12/there-are-only-npc-women-to-date.html?m=1

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
8 days ago

Oh amen. Who’s old enough to remember ‘Home Economics’ class.

Johnny
8 days ago

I always thought the ADL and SPLC were like the HR people you speak of. They monitor people’s speech and determine what is correct or not, then they speak to You-tube or Facebook and they cave in every-time. The media then cites the SPLC or ADL study that the right wing commits all the violence and is the biggest threat while the left wing burns down Portland for 100 straight days, and finally the Deep State DHS or FBI determine it is White supremacists doing all the rioting and Joe Biden cites this to undermine Trump bringing up Antifa. Wikipedia… Read more »

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Johnny
8 days ago

Hear, hear! Also remember, the Zman is expanding the /ourthing/ ad campaign to the mainstream.

Well done, nothing scary or offputting here, simply identifying the players.

RoBG
RoBG
Reply to  Johnny
8 days ago

Three years ago Big Tech (Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, Google) officially partnered with the ADL and the SPLC to censor speech with the blessing of the Uniparty. Apple even did a 2:1 match if their employees donated to the SPLC. https://tinyurl.com/yyx3hvso https://tinyurl.com/yyx3hvso

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
8 days ago

HR Nation

Din C. Nuttin
Din C. Nuttin
8 days ago

ZMan is getting too pessimistic. Try a walk in the woods, or fish a stream somewhere. It’s a diverse, beautiful country outside the cities.

Horace
Horace
8 days ago

This corporatism will be the death of the West. We have no institutional civilizational rightwing to oppose this evil because money-first Republicans destroyed it by the end of the 1960’s. The only serious threat to corporatism is from the left. We will soon reach the time when nationalists, even civic ones, cannot get elected and we will have a one-party state. The only elections of consequence at the country-level will be Democratic primaries. We should be voting for whichever leftists will tear down and destroy the system the fastest. Build rightwing local government; destabilize leftwing imperial goverment. I expect that… Read more »

miforest
Member
Reply to  Horace
8 days ago

I don’t think they will put a lid on it , I think they will go full throttle .” rule or ruin” drives them

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  Horace
8 days ago

I don’t believe we would have reached this state without the manic fear of the Soviet Union. We handed all the reigns to corps by the 80s and could never get them back.

miforest
Member
8 days ago

sounds like we are GE at about 2005.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
Reply to  miforest
8 days ago

About the time it actually needed a Wells Notice, not after the looting and fraud.

usNthem
usNthem
8 days ago

I guess we’ll all just become part of the borg collective – resistance is futile. The question for the collective is what to do with all the recalcitrant joggers? They don’t appear to make good little drones.

TomA
TomA
8 days ago

I just read the column at Taki and they do not appear to entertain comments, so here goes. “Steve” is the limp dick that did not die on the savanna fifty thousand years ago (either because he was too slow or too stupid to avoid the lion). Instead of being culled by nature, his DNA now pollutes our genome. That is both tragic and suicidal for the species.

Last edited 8 days ago by TomA
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
8 days ago

The distinguishing characteristic of the America that emerged from the Cold War is that it is losing its regional variety in favor of a bland, corporate sameness.

I can remember attending a talk by the starchitect Rem Koolhaas in the mid-90s where he described researching this phenomenon among the major global cities.

JR Wirth
JR Wirth
8 days ago

Perfect post. Exactly what’s going on. The only addendum is that it’s a corporate state that’s losing money, just as all enterprises at the end of their lifecycles lose money. And it’s losing a lot of it, faster than ever. Retail is the perfect example. A successful retail chain will allow local management to have input as to what it bought for the store. A store in Duluth would have a vast winter coat section, while the one in Miami would have a nice bikini section. Today it’s all identical. Only the format sizes are different. So chain retail is… Read more »

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  JR Wirth
8 days ago

As Hemingway said, “I went bankrupt slowly, then all at once.”

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  The Wild Geese Howard
8 days ago

It’s “Gradually, then suddenly”

And Hemingway never went bankrupt, it’s from one of the characters in The Sun Also Rises – a good candidate for history’s most boring novel.

trackback
8 days ago

[…] ZMan draws a parallel. […]

tarstarkas
tarstarkas
8 days ago

Congrats on the new gig.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
8 days ago

That’s a fascinating take, Z-Man. And much of it sounds like an amalgam of Horkheimer and Habermas, believe it or not. Horkheimer’s conception of the administrative state was that human beings in advanced capitalist societies are not sovereign individuals with rights and lives of their own, but instead are commodities the state manipulates and administers. They are, in a very real sense, subjugated to the capitalist economic system. As for Habermas, he defines modern western society as a dyad of the system (capitalist labor), on the one hand, and the lifeworld (the realm of interactive communication), on the other. For… Read more »

Lanky
Lanky
8 days ago

Being a city boy, I have little to offer when shit hits the fan (like most other middle-class whites). How can I protect my family? How can I prepare now for what’s coming tomorrow? I have bugout bags prepped, a gun, and a place to go, but I feel that I’m not doing enough. Moreover, wife is a head-in-the-sand kind of person. As long as the cellular towers are operational, she’s unperturbed. And it is so frustrating. It’s as though people are offended by the idea that one day, their comfort won’t matter anymore. I watch her piddling on her… Read more »

Last edited 8 days ago by Lanky
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Lanky
8 days ago

Well, you’ve prepped more than I have. Keep going, bit by bit.

Use free resources like YouTube and PDFDrive to learn about canning, homesteading, farming, gardening, permaculture, hunting, fishing, and other relevant topics.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Lanky
8 days ago

Lanky, being working class with severely limited resources, what I did was grab a couple of redoubts. Rome wasn’t built in a day, so start looking for land, old homes, relatives’ homes, or old tax deed sales. (You can put your name on a property with a quickdeed, and put the required probate off for years, or whenever.) You don’t have to abandon what you have, but you can start looking, and building up towards a spot of ownership. I have cheap land and trailers for one, an old relatives home- anchor to a host of redneck network- for another.… Read more »

Last edited 8 days ago by Alzaebo
The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

the rednecks have a ton of skills

Don’t forget redneck engineering.

There are some seriously creative and ingenious dudes around.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
8 days ago

And congratulations on your gig with Taki. Back before Mandolyna destroyed the place by maltreating the commentariat, I was a regular over there. And, as much as I would love to read your columns, I’m afraid I cannot in good conscience, give here a single click.

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

Agreed (RD)

3g4me
3g4me
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

Jim Goad is going to be a regular at Counter Currents. And he indicated Heartiste (of the late and much lamented blog) was willing to write for Taki and Mandolyna was not interested. Greg at Counter Currents indicated he was. If they could get Heartiste to start posting again at their site, it would be a fantastic combo.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  3g4me
8 days ago

Oh wow. Heartiste. Yes. Data-driven, yet changed my life and outlook, he did.

Apex Predator
Apex Predator
Reply to  3g4me
8 days ago

That is criminal if that is true that they turned down Heartiste for a writing gig. Would have added much needed levity and acerbically biting wit to that site. National Review level full retard of wanting be ‘respectable’ when nobody actually cares about respectability.
Also makes me wonder if they are loosening up the reigns finally since Z is definitely not Theodore Dalrymple. 🙂

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Apex Predator
8 days ago

Not that there’s anything wrong with Dalrymple, of course…

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

Yep

I also noticed that right after they got rid of comments that Ann Coulter arrived

I always suspected there was a connection

and/or Taki was cleaning itself up, bringing in big names, so it could find a media company buyer, and the comments were too NFSW

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

Queen Ann only started featuring on Taki recently – this year, I believe – so that connection sounds rather tenuous to me.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Felix Krull
8 days ago

I think you are wrong on this. She came on not long after they got rid of Disqus. I remember because I remember making the connection.

When you say “recently” I think you’d be surprised that she has been there for a few years. All you have to do it go to Takimag and click on her name and see she has been writing there since April 2018

Time flies

Last edited 8 days ago by Falcone
Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

she has been writing there since April 2018 Time flies

Indeed.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

Still, I don’t see the connection. Why would they get rid of the comments because they signed on Ann Coulter?

Mandolyna had been wroth with us for a long time, what with all the bagel baiting. Mind you, I don’t really blame her: a comment section must be a drag at best and infuriating at worst: a whole bunch of disrespectful assholes sat in the back seat, yelling snarky comments at the driver.

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Felix Krull
7 days ago

Guilty as charged, however, any snarky comments were not aimed at the Taki’s directly. I’d have thought the banter to be good for biz.

Falcone
Falcone
Reply to  Felix Krull
7 days ago

Yep lol

And I think Queen Ann told her the commenters were getting a little too risqué and could be construed as anti-Semitic and white supremacist and she couldn’t have that tarnishing her brand. So if you want big league Queen Ann Coulter you have to get rid of bush league court jester commenters.

That’s only my speculation.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  thezman
7 days ago

Why not simply moderate the comments rather than disband without explanation?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

Even WhereAreTheVikings sailed thru here, along with the Good Ship MelBlanc. I feel like cheering whenever I see the old crowd that opened my eyes after my long PJ Media slumber.

Stranger in a strange land
Reply to  Alzaebo
8 days ago

I’ll take some credit for getting WATV over here – at least for a little while. Too many others to mention from those days – the inimitable Celestia Questia stands out.

Jim Smith
Jim Smith
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 days ago

Boris too. Always making observations about himself in the third person.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
7 days ago

The Plain White Rapper.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Alzaebo
7 days ago

WATV and I are still on exceptionally good terms, albeit in different forums.

Felix Krull
Member
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
8 days ago

The funniest thing was that a few months after she’d nuked the Takitariat, she’d have a promo streamer saying, effectively “Give us shekels so you may join the famous Taki comment section”, leaving only the comment section paywalled.

Great thinking there, Mando! First you kick us out, then you try to sell us to the normiecon punters.

So that didn’t work out and then she paywalled the entire site and pulled the defunct comment section. And now she’s torn down the paywall entirely. In a few months, she’ll probably put up the talk board again.

Last edited 8 days ago by Felix_Krull
Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Felix Krull
7 days ago

Trudat. She’s made an incoherent hash of that website and done so unethically. Women in power, wot…

skeptic16
skeptic16
Member
8 days ago

The only positive things large corporations bring to the table are economies of scale and distribution networks. Even when they truly innovate, they often fail to follow up on their innovation. Kodak – digital camera, Xerox – mouse etc.

The Wild Geese Howard
The Wild Geese Howard
Reply to  skeptic16
8 days ago

Kodak had such huge margins and revenue streams from film, paper, chemicals, and processing they were never going to wean themselves off it.

Xerox was a sheer lack of vision on the part of the Rust Belt execs that let PARC give everything away to Gates and Jobs.

Stranger in a strange land
8 days ago

Not that much a film bug, but did this essay cause anyone else to think of movie Metropolis (circa 1920’s)?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Stranger in a strange land
8 days ago

Perfect! I finally understand why the prophet of the Brave New World was sometimes called Ford, and sometimes called Freud.

Trakl
Trakl
8 days ago

This was one of your best. An alpha from a Z. Thanks!

Falcone
Falcone
8 days ago

anyone know the approximate $ price of D-Live currency? Say the “lemon” or “ninjaghinni” etc?

Johnny
Reply to  Falcone
8 days ago

1 or 2 dollars for a lemon 5 or 6 bucks for a Diamond and 15 for a Ninjaghinni approximately. Diamond allows 50 character question while NinjaGhinni allows 100 character question.