You Can Never Hate Them Enough

To great fanfare Julian Assange struck a deal with the American government whereby he would be allowed to leave a British jail and return home to Australia. Reportedly, the deal he accepted was to plead guilty to some charges in exchange for a sentence of time served in the British jail. The full details of the deal have not been released, but most likely he gave the government information they wanted or sufficiently demonstrated that he was not in possession of it.

This was always the primary issue. Secret documents and information leak out of the government all the time, but the government knows who leaked it. Most of the time the leaks are official leaks. Someone with authorized access to something hands it over to someone in regime media to publish. Once in a while the people at the top of the regime get mad about this habit and demand to know the source, and the regime reporter puts on a show of resisting but gives in at the end.

Generally speaking, what the regime cares most about in the case of these leaks is the source of the leak and the method they used. If regime information is getting into the public through unknown channels or by unknown figures, it can not only lead to things in the public the regime does not want made public, but it threatens the legitimacy of the regime for the people inside the regime. Blackmail, for example, only works when the victim is sure the blackmailer has control of the information.

A big part of what makes the managerial system of the Global American Empire work is the trust the people in the system have in the system. The yawning gap we see between the confidence of regime figures and their ability is due in large part to their trust in the system. For them, the system works, so they naturally assume their elevation inside the system is due to merit. A loss of control of the system could lead to a loss of trust and the whole thing spins apart.

Putting that aside, the only good thing about Assange getting released is that the worst people can no longer wave around that bloody shirt. For close to two decades, fringy irritants have been using the Assange case to demonstrate their moral purity and to defend the crackpot idea that journalism is a priesthood. Their defense of Assange always rested on the dubious claim that journalists have special rights and therefore must not be subject to the laws governing the rest of us.

You see, once you call yourself a journalist, you get to ignore the rules of decency, the laws governing private property and declare yourself a moral authority. You get to betray confidences and deceive people about your intentions. You also get to steal the property of others and use it for personal gain. All the while, you get to wrinkle up your nose as if you caught wind of a bad odor and lecture the rest of us about your moral goodness and our moral failings.

The game here was to hold Assange up as a paragon of virtue because he was upholding the highest standards of journalism. He was doing the same thing major media does all the time, namely revealing secrets about the regime. In reality, Assange was just trying to avoid an American prison. Like every other person calling himself a journalist, Assange was a dirtbag and a thief. He trafficked in stolen goods for personal benefit and when he got caught, he tried to avoid punishment.

If you are clear headed about this, the correct response to the Assange case is the opposite than that of the moralizers. Information is property and people who traffic in stolen information should be treated like any other thief. In fact, they should be treated more harshly. Stolen property can be replaced, but stolen information is often irreplaceable and the damage that ensues from its theft can last a lifetime. Information thieves should be killed on the spot.

In other words, the right response to the Assange case was not to treat him as a hero but to demand that all journalists get the same treatment. Imagine a world where doxers have to flee the country and hide out in embassies to avoid being sent to prison and you will immediately see the logic. Imagine if the people who stole Trump’s tax returns and gave them to the New York Times were sent to the gallows along with the people who agreed to publish them. Nice thought, isn’t it?

The defense of journalism has always been a moral perversion. The worst people a society can produce end up in journalism. The fact that they from time to time do harm to terrible people is not just used as a reason to elevate these garbage people, but a reason to sacralize their gutter morality. Journalists are good people, so the reasoning goes, because they are more degenerate than politicians. Assange was celebrated because he represented the ideal of this gutter morality.

Those calling themselves journalists, but lack a place in regime media, have noted that regime journalists have been silent on Assange. The main reason is regime journalists are moral nullities. They envy the attention Assange is getting, so they use the only power they have to smite him. The main power of regime media is the power to ignore, so they were happy to ignore Assange. There is no honor among thieves, so the thieving weasels of the media can never honor one of their own.

Despite his position at the bottom of the moral hierarchy, Assange was useful as a regime irritant, thus proving no life is entirely meaningless. Hopefully, his final contribution is to sink quietly into obscurity. The moralizers who have used his name to elevate the worst profession and the worst people will have to find a new bloody shirt to wave around in defense of the despicable trade. The rest of us can return to hating the worst people, because you can never hate them enough.


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Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
26 days ago

I disagree with quite a bit here, Z. Assange was useful in that once again the who/whom distinction was brought into sharp focus and the Regime got another black eye. His alleged victims consisted of entities such as the Military Industrial Complex and the intelligence services and their political and Cathedral toadies, all of which work tirelessly to oppress the people they supposedly serve. If Assange had obtained and published private information about, say, the National Rifle Association or Vdare or a young white school boy who said unfashionable things, he would have been the recipient of institutional largesse and… Read more »

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

In the theoretical world, whistleblowers and leakers could be considered heroic.

in the real world, when was the last leak that made any difference?

Snowden was a true believer; caught thousands in government violating privacy laws protecting ordinary Americans daily. Result:

Nothing happened. In fact, it got worse.

There are no more Church Commissions. The men responsible for reigning in government excess are terrified of the beast they created.

Whistleblowing on leviathan is pointless.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  ProZNoV
26 days ago

in the real world, when was the last leak that made any difference?

True as far as a policy change. In the insular world of the elite, though, anything that makes them look bad among their peers is The Worst Thing Ever. Assange managed that.

To your point, though, all the Church Commission did was transfer police state powers totally to the Left. It did make some folks uncomfortable on the D.C. cocktail circuit, so there was some value there.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Jack Dobson
25 days ago

Jack Dobson:His alleged victims consisted of entities such as the Military Industrial Complex and the intelligence services and their political and CATHEDRAL toadies

Somebody mis-spelled,
(((SYNAGOGUE)))“.

Mencius Moldbug, Early Life

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curtis_Yarvin#Early_life_and_education

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  ProZNoV
26 days ago

Eh, I’m highly skeptical of Snowden’s motivations, but certainly not of the results. Snowden is the rare case of an in-place asset of a foreign intelligence getting his cover blown (whether to support or protect other intelligence assets) and being a highly positive outcome for the American public. No way he was working alone. The information he had already leaked implied a package of intel far too voluminous for a guy of his position to be cleared for. My speculation was either the Chinese or Russians were running him, or a joint venture between the two (hey, these are strange… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Forever Templar
26 days ago

Or maybe the GAE’s intel department had gotten so sloppy and incompetent that he really did have access to all that. That’s the other explanation. But yeah, in a properly functioning system he wouldn’t have had that kind of access by himself.

rasqball
rasqball
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
26 days ago

When I saw the PowerPoints that Snowden got his hands on, I knew it was “for reelz,” as the kids say. As Vladimir Vladimirovich said when asked about GAE’s “intel” “I…have nothing but respect….for their fathers and grandfathers…

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  ProZNoV
26 days ago

“Fictional”, not “theoretical”. In theory, whistle blowers became a protected class under, ironically, the Obama administration. Americans largely don’t care about this sort of thing, if how fast they grew bored with Snowden’s song and dance was any indication. There’s been quite a few whistle-blowers aside from Snowflake Snowden and….nothing. hell, if anything, the American public proved itself more than willing to play harder into having their privacy raped.

Chet Rollins
Chet Rollins
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

I think Assange was a true believer, and I can’t hate a guy who gives my enemies a black eye.

However, Assange is obsolete in the modern age. Now any schmuck can easily push all these docs to a distributed network like IPFS and it will be around forever. There is no need for a middle-man to send it to to host.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Chet Rollins
26 days ago

Agreed.

The Greek
The Greek
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

“What are the differences between Mark Zuckerberg and me? I give private information on corporations to you for free, and I’m a villain. Zuckerberg gives your private information to corporations for money and he’s Man of the Year.” — Julian Assange

LineInTheSand
LineInTheSand
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

I agree that who/whom overrides all other concerns in this case.

Values that are very important to traditional whites, like not stealing, fair play, and free speech should only be extended to our own because the out groups won’t reciprocate.
 
Stealing from someone who is not an enemy is wrong but stealing from the enemy is often excellent. Who/whom. In group/Out group.

mikebravo
mikebravo
26 days ago

The U.S regime was initially pissed thet he released a video of the ‘good guys’ brassing a bunch of civvies from a helicopter and then doing the same to passers by that tried to help the victims. Followed by revelations that when more ‘ good guys’ arrived they refused medical attention to the kids in the van that had copped a load of ‘friendly fire’. (Collateral murder).
Apparently that was a national security concern.
I don’t care what kind of douche bag he is. That sort of outright murder should be seen by the tax units that pay for it.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  mikebravo
26 days ago

The Power Structure considers anything that calls its moral legitimacy into question a “national security breach.” Perhaps more than anything, the Power Structure fears that the masses will morally recoil and turn against it, perhaps violently. This explains, to a large degree, its hysterical overraction to the J6 tiff. It also explains the Power Structure’s attempt to destroy Trump. He’s a Big Man with a big megaphone, and he has made a few unfriendly noises about the Power Structure. And we can’t have that now, can we?

mikebravo
mikebravo
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
26 days ago

We most certainly can not have that sort of thing undermining ‘our democracy’.
The next thing you know there would too many of us on this side of the room looking back at them with a glint in our eyes and a rope in our hands.

Bourbon
Bourbon
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
26 days ago

Ostei Kozelskii: “The Power Structure considers anything that calls its moral legitimacy into question a “national security breach.” Perhaps more than anything, the Power Structure fears that the masses will morally recoil and turn against it, perhaps violently.“ It’s the eternal struggle between the Hive Mind of Passive Aggressive Personality Disorder versus the Free Thought of the Active Aggressors. On its own turf [legalism], and playing by its own rules [lawfare], the Passive Aggressive Hive Mind is simply omnipotent. The only thing the Passive Aggressive Hive Mind truly fears is the wrath of the Active Aggressors. That’s why, every century… Read more »

Nick Note's Mugshot
Nick Note's Mugshot
Reply to  mikebravo
26 days ago

It has taken me years to break my programning. Coming to the realization that we have never been the “good guys” has been difficult for me.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Nick Note's Mugshot
26 days ago

You know what’s difficult for me Brother is knowing how few out there want to do anything to stop it…

Neoliberal Feudalism
26 days ago

John Swinton, editor of the New York Sun, had this to say about the profession of journalism in 1883: “There is no such a thing in America as an independent press, unless it is out in country towns. You are all slaves. You know it, and I know it. There is not one of you who dares to express an honest opinion. If you expressed it, you would know beforehand that it would never appear in print. I am paid $150 for keeping honest opinions out of the paper I am connected with. Others of you are paid similar salaries… Read more »

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Neoliberal Feudalism
26 days ago

I worked in newspapers for about 15 years from the mid-’80s up to 2000. Sometimes as a reporter, editor and photographer, and a lot more as a behind-the-scenes guy managing newsroom computer systems. What I learned was that journalism is totally corrupt, even in small towns — maybe especially there. But the mechanism is the same whether it is a small or big market: Most reporters work a beat of some sort — police, courts, statehouse, entertainment, etc., and your regular contacts on that beat are the people who work in those environments. A famous saying in journalism is “The… Read more »

Last edited 26 days ago by Vizzini
Marko
Marko
Reply to  Vizzini
26 days ago

I think there should be a distinction between journalism and journalism, inc. Those autists on Twitter and Substack are technically journalists; they just recoil from the label, as they should. But they are journalling our times, are they not? And they’re doing a useful service…they don’t answer to an editor, and they certainly don’t have friends in high places. Which is one of the fault lines between the local normie/regime hack and real dissidents…we understand and accept bias, and are fine with the proverbial “dudes in their mother’s basements” or “dudes in West Virginia hideaways” since they give a wholistic… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Marko
26 days ago

Z is a pundit. Are pundits journalists? Or are they vernacular philosophers?

Marko
Marko
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
26 days ago

Journalism and punditry is one and the same nowadays, but I get your point. Maybe “columnist” is more apt, for anyone who writes more than 140 characters.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Marko
26 days ago

I agree about the conflation of opinion and fact in journalism today. Sometimes it’s hard to tell whether a piece is an editorial or a news report. However, properly understood, journalism presupposes investigation, or at bare minimum, reportage. Punditry, on the other hand, is opinion, speculation and philosophizing. Nobody will ever mistake Z’s work for news reports.

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Marko
26 days ago

At best they are talking heads, even those whose body of “work” is the written word. Really what they are is propagandists. They put spin on whatever happens to be trending at the moment. They are low rent versions of Bill O’Reilly or Tucker.

Xman
Xman
Reply to  Vizzini
26 days ago

Yep. None of them do any gumshoe “investigative journalism,” they just repeat what they are spoon-fed by the cops and the government at press conferences. My own (somewhat limited, but nonetheless firsthand) experience with “journalists” is that they conceive a “story,” then “interview” people who will give them a one-sentence or one-paragraph blurb to confirm their pre-existing bias. Even that has now become antiquated in the age of feminized journalism. In both print and television “news,” it seems all they do is hire chubby 22-year-old girls straight out of undergrad for $15 an hour to do “news stories” about adopting… Read more »

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Xman
26 days ago

A little thing I like to do on any news story these days is do a search on the reporter — find their personal website (90% of the time they have one), their Twitter, LinkedIn, etc. It is most often as you say — vapid little girls with boutique liberal beliefs in way over their heads. Another thing that is happening a lot in the local news area is that activist non-profits masquerading as organizations interested in promoting “fair” journalism sponsor seats at local papers — paying some or all of the reporter’s salary. This is irresistible to cash-strapped local… Read more »

Last edited 26 days ago by Vizzini
TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Vizzini
26 days ago

The libs complain about Sinclair Broadcasting and the stories they mandate their local stations carry that have more of a right-wing bent. Our local paper is now owned by Gannett and I’ve noticed they do the same thing. I forget the year, but it was within the last few years Gannett decided to do a series on violence against Asians. It was basically the same story recycled in most of their papers. It was comical because even in a newspaper like the Chillicothe, Ohio Gazette they were running stories about how unsafe it is for Asians. Asians can’t walk the… Read more »

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Xman
26 days ago

“Yep. None of them do any gumshoe “investigative journalism,” they just repeat what they are spoon-fed by the cops and the government at press conferences.” To add, this is mostly pragmatic. You know how academia has a “publish or perish” orientation? Well, so does journalism. There’s a tremendous pressure to have a story ready for publication every day, maybe more than one. It is pretty rare to have the luxury to spend months doing deep investigation while being allowed to have your daily output suffer. There are pages to fill. Even newspapers that were flush with cash generally only had… Read more »

Last edited 26 days ago by Vizzini
Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Xman
26 days ago

There is another type of “journalist” or journalistic “practice” that I encountered at my old institution. Damn if I forgot what they called it, but it was the equivalent of academic plagiarism—except seemingly accepted practice in the industry. I got a call from a reporter that they wanted to do a story on the excessive waste in the then current distribution system for software we used in the labs. If we wanted to use a particular program, we’d need to “buy” individual copies of the software for hundreds of PC’s—when in reality, all we needed was one copy of the… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Compsci
26 days ago

Often the story is written before they even contact you. They’ll interview you for 4 hours and then take a 10 second clip of something you say out of context to make you look foolish or dishonest. None of the other footage or questions/answers ever make it into the story. J. Bruce Ismay is one of the most maligned people in maritime history. Every single word printed about him in the press was a lie. All the historians know this, but these lies are repeated even today, over a hundred years later. I use him as an example because it… Read more »

Tars Tarkas
Member
Reply to  Vizzini
26 days ago

“Most reporters work a beat of some sort — police, courts, statehouse, entertainment, etc”

Does this still exist to any real extent? Take the cop beat. Every major police force in the country now has youtube, twitter and an entire press office. Really, it’s a lot cheaper and faster to just reprint press releases than to employ someone who has to go down the police department and hang around and ask questions or monitor the police radio to show up at the scene to take pictures and write a story.

Vizzini
Member
Reply to  Tars Tarkas
26 days ago

Well, economics have affected it a lot, and I got out of the industry before the massive crash of the newspaper business. I talked to a guy a while back who’s a section editor at the paper I used to work for, and things are pretty grim. Massive downsizing, so maybe they don’t have the staff to populate individual beats the way they used to, but I guarantee there is at least some splitting up of topics and responsibilities just because it makes sense organizationally. They used to have multiple people on the cop beat (day and night, city and… Read more »

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Vizzini
26 days ago

I’ve always thought journalists had trouble putting things into perspective. They always used to sensationalize things that are trivial in the whole scheme of things. They frequently never bother to compare what they were writing about to the whole. (Not the best example, but like when there are a dozen people protesting at the state house or city hall and the media tries to make it look like masses of people are angry about something.) But I’ve always intuitively thought what you wrote to be true. But to add to that, you’re also dealing with personal biases, groupthink and, quite… Read more »

Maxda
Maxda
26 days ago

Assange went a long way towards preventing a Hillary Clinton presidency. For that alone, he should be a national hero.

Mencken Libertarian
Mencken Libertarian
26 days ago

Would it be better if we never saw the video from the helicopter or drone, whatever it was, of “brave” Americans blasting away at Iraqi civilians?

Arshad Ali
Arshad Ali
26 days ago

“He was doing the same thing major media does all the time, namely revealing secrets about the regime.” I’m not sure major media in the West does reveal secrets about the regime. Maybe once upon a time. Nowadays they seem complicit in propaganda and covering things up. They are an arm of a regime that governs by fear, surveillance, propaganda, and arbitrary punishment. The Hunter Biden laptop issue, for example, disappeared into a black hole. Likewise for who blew up Nordstream 2. Likewise for the genocide taking place in Gaza. Likewise for the backdrop to the fracas in Ukraine. Most… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Arshad Ali
26 days ago

There’s a reason Z calls it the “Regime media.” It is nothing more and nothing less than the propaganda organ of the power structure. I don’t see how anybody could even question this verity.

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Arshad Ali
26 days ago

You know that Russia or maybe some friendly operatives took out the Francis Scott Key Bridge no matter what they say. The symbolism was simply too convenient.

Mad Celt
Mad Celt
26 days ago

When it becomes a crime to uncover a crime your leaders are criminals

Xman
Xman
26 days ago

I was always somewhat ambivalent about Assange. On the one hand, it was clear that he was a lefty and was celebrated by the lefties who saw him as a latter-day Daniel Ellsberg. On the other hand the Deep State/National Security State clearly saw him as a threat and bared its fangs trying to get him, thereby exposing the First Amendment freedoms as a lie. (Recall that the U.S. executed Julius Streicher, who never personally killed anyone, simply for publishing an anti-Semitic newspaper. “Free press,” LOL). Like Ellsberg, though, I’m not sure the information Assange released did much of anything… Read more »

Last edited 26 days ago by Xman
Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

That indeed was his main “crime.” Assange gave the wrong people the sadz and made them look bad on the cocktail circuit. Notice that specific harms or crimes never were the subject of much focus. No, Assange was A Very Bad Person. His offenses had to remain generalized since the specifics were what normally passes as journalism. If the identical information he released made the Beautiful People look good, he would have received the Medal of Honor.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Xman
26 days ago

With the Left it has always been, “Kto, kogo?” Who, whom? They are unconcerned with principles. Instead, they pragmatically deploy their outrage or approbation based upon whether its target benefits or harms the Left. And, I must say, this is the proper approach. For that reason, whether Assange and journalists in general are dirtballs is immaterial. Using litmus tests such as “theft of information” is a mistake. Rather, we should ask, does the theft of information benefit or harm white people? Arguably, Assange helped us because he harmed, at least fractionally, the most powerful anti-white force on the planet, the… Read more »

Bloated Boomer
Bloated Boomer
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
25 days ago

They are unconcerned with principles. Instead, they pragmatically deploy their outrage or approbation based upon whether its target benefits or harms the Left.

Sounds based, tbh, tbf. Honestly? So much this.

Jack Boniface
Jack Boniface
Member
26 days ago

Mencken was the greatest critic of his profession, branding them “a gang of pecksniffs.” There’s a book by that name collecting his pubic attacks on journalism. Amusing as always. His diaries, released decades later, are even harsher. He also was censored in both World Wars because he opposed them. So much for “freedom of speech” when it really counts.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Jack Boniface
26 days ago

There is more evidence to support the existence of Bigfoot than free speech.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  Jack Boniface
26 days ago

Lots of banger quotes about war propaganda and journalism in general from George Orwell’s “Homage to Catalonia” “Early in life I have noticed that no event is ever correctly reported in a newspaper, but in Spain, for the first time, I saw newspaper reports which did not bear any relation to the facts, not even the relationship which is implied in an ordinary lie. I saw great battles reported where there had been no fighting, and complete silence where hundreds of men had been killed. I saw troops who had fought bravely denounced as cowards and traitors, and others who… Read more »

Last edited 26 days ago by ProZNoV
Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  ProZNoV
26 days ago

Orwell, one of the great writers and thinkers of the 20th century. Most of his stuff is public domain. Search and read. Well worth the small effort.

Neoliberal Feudalism
26 days ago

Also, another question is: why was Assange released now? Here are some theories: – That globohomo no longer sees Assange as a threat given its metastasis/complete takeover in the past decade; – That they expect Trump to win and they want to get ahead of a potential Day 1 pardon giving him credit; – That they’re worried about their horrifically decreasing legitimacy or making Assange more of a martyr; – That they plan to kill him once he’s out; or – they broke Assange and he lost his mind; his prison conditions have been deplorable… And another question is: what… Read more »

Rando
Rando
Reply to  Neoliberal Feudalism
26 days ago

Allegedly the Fed got hacked by a ransomware group around the same time Assange was released. And that his release was part of the ransom, or that his release was to distract from the hack. That’s another theory for ya

Maxda
Maxda
Reply to  Neoliberal Feudalism
26 days ago

Might not be a thought by the Administration people – but a good reminder of how useless Trump can be. He wanted to pardon Assange but let assholes like Pence and Pompeo talk him out of it.

Neoliberal Feudalism
Reply to  Maxda
26 days ago

According to the following article Trump was told behind closed doors that if he pardoned Assange he would likely be convicted by the Republican Senate in the second impeachment:

“Carlson then claimed that he had heard Assange’s pardon was being blocked by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) who sent word to the White House informing Trump that if he pardoned Assange Republicans will be “much more likely to convict you in an impeachment trial.””

https://www.forbes.com/sites/siladityaray/2021/01/20/trump-didnt-pardon-wikileaks-founder-julian-assange-and-his-supporters-arent-happy/

Maxda
Maxda
Reply to  Neoliberal Feudalism
26 days ago

If Trump thinks he’s going to fix anything in a 2nd term, he better be ready to call a lot of bluffs.

Robbo
Robbo
Reply to  Neoliberal Feudalism
21 days ago

If Trump was the man so many of his supporters believe he is, he would have told McConnell to shove his threat up his bracket.

Bloated Boomer
Bloated Boomer
Reply to  Maxda
25 days ago

I’m sure Zed man would agree it was much better to pardon the rampant con-man of coincidental background than let an uncouth up-start like Assange off the hook for his crimes against the Boomer race.

Stephanie
Stephanie
Reply to  Neoliberal Feudalism
26 days ago

They did make it a point that Assange remove and destroy old material he had but also any unknown new material he may have that hasn’t been released yet and they said he needed to prove that it was destroyed. How does he prove he destroyed unreleased material they say they don’t know about? Sounds like he has a lot more that hasn’t been released and they know it and don’t want an election year repeat of the disgusting DNC emails, this time with Joe instead of Hillary. Joe’s brother even has a private island, imagine that. And what could… Read more »

Jannie
Jannie
Reply to  Neoliberal Feudalism
25 days ago

Seems like maybe the Australian government finally went in to bat for him & GAE did not want to p*ss off an important ally in the Pacific theater.

Salmon
Salmon
26 days ago

The only people he “stole” from is the US government. As such, he’s a hero. This is your worst article since the “jew thing” drivel you wrote a few weeks ago.

VinceD
VinceD
26 days ago

Assange revealed American war crimes which the authorities had no right to keep secret. This idea proposed by Z that he stole something – that all information is property – is some weird Silicon Valley thing. 

Hun
Hun
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

Software patents exist.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

So why didn’t you make that argument as well, just to keep it fair and balanced…😉

Last edited 26 days ago by Lineman
Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Lineman
26 days ago

Lineman, I hear ya—but there are dozens and dozens of commenters here, and hundreds (thousands ?) of readers. Z-man gets away with nothing. We’re not stupid and he knows he need not outline/present both sides of an issue. This is an opinion blog, not a textbook presentation.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Compsci
25 days ago

It was a joke Brother thought the winking emoji would of made that clear…

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  thezman
25 days ago

Funny thing. I went down a weird rabbit hole the other day. I wonder what happened to the Pacific Pride commercial fueling stations. So I go on their website and find that many of the affiliates that accept the Fuelman card, I also places that Pacific Pride customers can use. No reason for this, I was just curious what happened to them. I never heard of Fuelman before, so I go to their website and start looking up locations where you can use their card locally. A couple of days ago I got a postcard from them in the snail… Read more »

Zulu Juliet
Zulu Juliet
26 days ago

I went to a Trump rally in 2015 just to check out the show. He started off with a bang; Pointing to the media gallery he began “See those people back there? Those people back there? Those are the WORST kind of people. The WORST!”

Ya gotta love him just for that. And it helps understand why they hate him so much.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Zulu Juliet
26 days ago

Yep. And those sorts of statements, long after the fact, may well put him behind bars. His crimes don’t exist, but his public statements do.

Templar
Templar
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
25 days ago

His crimes don’t exist…

Yet. Remember the Munich show-trials.

mikew
mikew
25 days ago

Being on the same side as Mike Pompeo, Mike Pence, HRC and countless other sleazy neocons is not where I would want to hang my hat.

The guy is a hero. He exposed the USA in it’s foreign policy as a blood lusting regime changing monster.

DFCtomm
Member
26 days ago

I have to disagree with you about this Zman. How can you steal what is by all rights yours? Assange was just delivering to us that which was ours.

Last edited 26 days ago by DFCtomm
Mr. Burns
Mr. Burns
26 days ago

I don’t see why the citizen of a foreign country owes the U.S. anything including the keeping of secrets.   Of course the GAE believes it has global governance and global alliegiance because it is GAE. Australia should take offense at the fact that a foreign government is claiming sovereignty over one it its citizens who never even stood on the foreign government’s land. Definitely GAE. I disagree with the Z-mans sweeping judgement as to “information thieves” deserving our scorn. It’s not that some jornalists and doxers don’t deserve the rope. They do. But the reason is that they are national traitors… Read more »

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
26 days ago

Well there’s journalists and then there’s regime stenographers. Or as Orwell said, “Journalism is printing something that someone does not want printed. All else is public relations.” But I have a hard time classifying Assange as a journalist simply because I can’t tell you one single thing he’s ever written. He is, or was, more of a conduit for information, sort of a (seemingly) freelance intelligence clearinghouse, the nobility of which depended entirely on whose ox was being gored. This being an ostensibly dissident blog, you’d think Assange, being one who not only irritated the regime to the extent he… Read more »

mikebravo
mikebravo
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
26 days ago

He did write a book/pamphlet, setting out his belief system and reasons for wanting to shine a light into the varoius parts of the regimes dirty corners.
Can’t remember the name of it but it improved my respect for him at the time.

mikebravo
mikebravo
26 days ago

‘Information is property and people who traffic in stolen information should be treated like any other thief. In fact, they should be treated more harshly. Stolen property can be replaced, but stolen information is often irreplaceable and the damage that ensues from its theft can last a lifetime. Information thieves should be killed on the spot.’ But who’s info did Assange steal? Do not the gov pukes work under the public purse? Is their time not time paid for by the public. The information they try to hide under spurrious and ridiculous security concerns headings belongs to the people. Assange… Read more »

Coalclinker
Coalclinker
26 days ago

Look at this one positive fact: Every day the national debt continues its exponential growth, the interest paid on that debt does as well. If there is any net economic growth in America, it certainly is not exponential. So what does this mean? Sometime at, or most likely, before that interest consumes every cent of taxes paid, the whole shebang comes apart at the seams. The Government and their entire host of bitches won’t matter, Official Media won’t matter, and Lawfare won’t matter either. When the value of bribe money approaches zero, the bribes and blackmail won’t work anymore. A… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Coalclinker
26 days ago

The accelerated looting is fueled by this possibility. Bribe money is being exchanged for hard assets. The Help and the Hos in elected office get crumbs to do precisely this.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

Exactly just saw Norway is in the process of storing 30000 tons of grain…To bad dissidents don’t have that outlook in wanting to preserve its people…I guess the propaganda really worked on most of its every man for himself…

Hun
Hun
26 days ago

Is there no difference between exposing regime corruption vs someone’s private information?

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

That nails it right there, Hun. That, and intent, is the difference.
Is it a spotlight on the system or a manhunt?

BerndV
BerndV
26 days ago

Journalism generally selects for scumbags. However, they have in the past been a necessary evil. How else to distribute and amplify the Pentagon papers, the crimes Snowden revealed, WikiLeaks, etc. All of these instances, while seeming to change nothing, have been more grist for the mill in furthering the suspected illegitimacy of our system and it’s minions. Conspiracy theories become provable facts. COVID and its aftershocks were perhaps the final blow to the beast that eventually leads to its slow death. The recent Supreme Court ruling regarding government’s ability to pressure social media companies to censor information it doesn’t approve… Read more »

Last edited 26 days ago by BerndV
DaBears
DaBears
26 days ago

We have whistleblower protections to encourage the disclosure of facts of continuing harm so the harm can be reduced and future such acts discouraged by punishing those responsible. On paper. I agree with you generally but while journalists are indeed swine the investigative ones are valuable and deserve protections.

Mencken Libertarian
Mencken Libertarian
Reply to  DaBears
26 days ago

Guys like Seymour Hersh give our overlords a good swift (and well deserved) kick in the balls from time to time.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

That’s the reason I disagree with much of what you wrote today. Assange was not Regime-approved and committed the high crime of making it look worse, if that even is possible now. The man became Public Enemy No. 1 because he gave the wrong people the sadz almost to the point it impacted their cocktail parties.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

The British establishment media campaign against Assange—led by the Guardian, the world’s most “intelligence”-aligned/controlled news outlet—has been more relentless, insane, and dishonest than the American regime’s against Trump. There’s something in what Assange did that uniquely infuriates them. And it continues to. They’re defaming him on his way out, and it doesn’t look like they’ll stop. To me he seems to have been a totally normal amateur “investigative journalist” (pass-through for secrets). All along, his fans and enemies—especially the progressives who switched from one to the other when the tv told them to—have acted like over-the-top caricatures of fans and… Read more »

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Hemid
26 days ago

It is not so much that Assange became a protagonist, even though what you described is exactly what happened, than it is who his antagonists are or eventually became. His enemies often are psychopaths, and his main crime was embarrassing the Beautiful People. The latter is even more the case in Britain, where the intelligence services are even more subservient to the Ruling Class than in the States. Do not for a nanosecond discount that making the Viscount of Upper Cash uncomfortable at a dinner party can result in a MI5 wet job. Assange thought he was doing the left-leaning… Read more »

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

The intel services are part of the ruling class. Some would argue that they are, in fact, the central element of the Power Structure.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
26 days ago

The intelligence services are the government at this point, yes. Their constituency is Blackrock, WEF, etc.

Ukase
Ukase
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

“The latter is even more the case in Britain, where the intelligence services are even more subservient to the Ruling Class than in the States.”

How do you know this? In Britain there has been pushback,legislatively, against the transgender nonsense. Even the Tories have had to concoct a repatriation scheme for the illegals. The US has done what? Maybe you have access to some esoteric knowledge but from where I’m sitting the US looks to be much more servile.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Ukase
26 days ago

Which country is more vile? I don’t think it matters. Both are appalling.

Robbo
Robbo
Reply to  Hemid
21 days ago

Most Guardian readers still believe the rag they consume every day is “counter cultural”

DLS
DLS
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

It’s quite interesting how Woodward/Bernstein, the original muckraking heroes, were actually just regime toadies printing FBI press releases.

Robbo
Robbo
Reply to  DLS
21 days ago

Also interesting how they kept completely silent when the Deep State was trying to take out Trump – behaviour that was 1000x worse than what Nixon did. Funny, that.

pyrrhus
Reply to  DaBears
26 days ago

Revealing the crimes of the US government, no matter how inconvenient for the government’s minions, is protected by the US Constitution…But unfortunately, the Constitutional scheme is too weak on enforcement, so it’s an extremely dangerous right to exercise…No one can convince me that chopper pilots mowing down a dozen Iraqi civilians with a mini-gun and laughing about it, is a lawful activity, or one that needs to be kept secret because it might inconvenience a government….

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  pyrrhus
26 days ago

The Dead Constitution aside, anything that torments an evil Regime is a good thing no matter how loathsome the person is doing it.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

Precisely.

ProZNoV
ProZNoV
Reply to  pyrrhus
26 days ago

I suspect there was a lot more of this kind of thing going on in WWI and WWII (and definitely in Viet Nam…ask any pilot who dropped bombs in Loas) than Americans are prepared to accept.

Something like a quarter of a million Iraqi civilians died during and in the aftermath of GW II. That’s on soldiers hands, following lawful orders.

The mini-gun footage was scandalous because it disrupted the usual propaganda of the American GI handing chocolate bars to grateful children. But that’s just how Americans wage war. Always has been, always will be.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  ProZNoV
26 days ago

Yes. The Regime carefully curates what we see from Ukraine, for example. Regime media notably has few if any “war correspondents” embedded to give up close and personal looks at the supposed heroism of Ukrainians.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  ProZNoV
26 days ago

War is ugly. Period. No matter who is prosecuting it. Those who go looking for sunshine and smiles in a combat zone are engaged in a fool’s errand. American soldiers weren’t much worse or better than other soldiers. The problem is, we’ve been told they’re palladins on white horses. They’re not. And when we see they’re not, the narrative is queered. Of course, these days “queering the narrative” has taken on a whole other meaning…

trowzerkoff
trowzerkoff
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
26 days ago

In a rough paraphrase of a conscripted Vietnam infantry vet: “I learned there there was my hump-the-boonies jungle rot army and the high-higher lifer’s bullshit army. Two entirely separate outfits run on different lines and for incompatible purposes.”

Fred Beans
Fred Beans
Reply to  pyrrhus
26 days ago

Yes indeed. The question, “how many divisions does the Constitution have?” comes to mind.
Mark Steyn, when discussing lawfare games going on these days and in response to the type of ineffective pushback from guys like Mark Levin, often blurts out “Don’t wave that Constitution at me!” 😀

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Fred Beans
26 days ago

Steyn’s evolution and vitriol aimed at the cuckservative blowhards these days is a beautiful thing to behold. i especially liked his recent description of cuck talk radio as “really butch bumper music with low testosterone presenters.” Steyn’s still not Our Guy but he is getting close and will bring a lot of talent to the DR.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

Steyn is one of the few heroes of the pundit class. He has paid a high price in time, treasure and health for defending free speech

mikew
mikew
Reply to  Jack Dobson
25 days ago

He was annoying when guest hosting for Rush. I may have to find his stuff and give him a try now.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  mikew
25 days ago

His voice is grating, and he is not as good speaking off the cuff as he is in his writing.

Fred Beans
Fred Beans
Reply to  pyrrhus
26 days ago

Also:
John Adams believed that the US Constitution was made only for moral and religious people.

“Because We have no Government armed with Power capable of contending with human Passions unbridled by morality and Religion. Avarice, Ambition, Revenge or Gallantry, would break the strongest Cords of our Constitution as a Whale goes through a Net.”

Last edited 26 days ago by Fred Beans
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Fred Beans
26 days ago

He was right Brother those who are not, just use the constitution to wype their asses…

Last edited 26 days ago by Lineman
Jannie
Jannie
Reply to  pyrrhus
25 days ago

No one can convince me that chopper pilots mowing down a dozen Iraqi civilians with a mini-gun and laughing about it, is a lawful activity, or one that needs to be kept secret because it might inconvenience a government.”

You’re right: it’s something that we American citizens need to know about. What is our tax money being spent on? Why are we funding this? Thanks to Assange, we have more clarity.

Tired Citizen
Tired Citizen
26 days ago

Don’t worry, Assange will disappear for a while only to find out that he was “suicided”.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Tired Citizen
26 days ago

The Rose Cherami of the Outback…

Nick Note's Mugshot
Nick Note's Mugshot
Reply to  Tired Citizen
26 days ago

Inspired by the famous canoeist William Colby, the first thing Julian will do when he gets back to Australia is go paddle a river the Northern Territory and “tragically” wind up in the belly of saltwater crocodile.

Filthie
Filthie
Member
26 days ago

We are living through an inflection point in human history. Never before have our noble class and elites been under such close scrutiny. The internet made journalists obsolete overnight. My own mother chides me for being a fool – “normal citizens aren’t smart enough to do their own research and fact checking; that requires a professional journalist!!!” (To be fair… she is a lifelong shitlib ditz and is now an 82 year old harridan). Regardless, no regime on earth can operate in the dark, behind closed doors, or under the table with impunity anymore. The entire citizenry is now in… Read more »

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Filthie
26 days ago

Your mother was not wrong, she just misunderstands what constitutes a professional journalist in this new age of the internet. Walter Cronkite died long ago—and he wasn’t much to begin with.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Filthie
26 days ago

Never before has more information been available, nor have there been such extensive means to collate it. However, never before have the masses been so dull, apathetic and servile. The latter largely cancels out the former.

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
26 days ago

Yea you have to sometimes wonder if this information was available in the early 1900s if all the evil things that happened would of been prevented or would we not even be here…

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Lineman
26 days ago

Oh, no doubt about it. The white man of 1924 would not have put up with the shit that’s going on in 2024.

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Lineman
25 days ago

No third Federal Reserve Bank, that’s for sure.

Pilgrim's Progress
Pilgrim's Progress
Reply to  Lineman
24 days ago

Yeah, well the White citizens’s of 1933 did little, if anything, to prevent Roosevelt’s theft of their gold.

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Filthie
25 days ago

I think we’re we’re able to flesh out the truth is in the comment sections. That’s where the real truth is to be found.

MikeCLT
MikeCLT
26 days ago

What was Assange’s connection to the US? He got the information from Bradley Manning (whom Obama pardoned) but he was not a US citizen. He did not owe any loyalty to the US. Was he in the US or was the data trasnmitted from the US enough for the US to claim jusrisdiction? I guess the GAE claims global jurisdiction as it sees fit.

The first amendment, as interpreted, gives journalists certain privileges which, unfortunately, prevents their summary execution.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  MikeCLT
26 days ago

As we were discussing down below re: Snowden, it’s unfathomable that some E-4 would have had the information access Manning is claimed to have had.

TomA
TomA
26 days ago

In the era of civilization, being a renegade is typically accomplished via the information domain; non-approved speech, non-conforming written words, the expose´of photos, videos, recordings, or documents that the powerful find objectionable or potentially harmful. Assange got railroaded via the judicial process and lost a couple decades of his life, but Seth Rich got shot in the back. More than a few of the Clinton whistleblowers met this fate. They are playing for keeps people. But what they did is not a warning, it’s a challenge.

Last edited 26 days ago by TomA
Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  TomA
26 days ago

Kill a few chickens and the monkeys will fall into line…

Tars Tarkas
Member
26 days ago

Assange is a bit of a weirdo and a degenerate, but he helped expose the immorality/scumbaggery of our ruling class. Between the “Collateral Murder” tapes and the Podesta leaks, he exposed them for what they are. Plus, I always thought it was BS that the US government had any jurisdiction over him. He was a foreigner on foreign soil. Besides, it is probably only a temporary reprieve. I have a hard time believing he will fade into obscurity. He’s a media whore and always has been. He loves being in front of a camera too much. Expect another book soon.

Ede Wolf
Ede Wolf
26 days ago

Trump’s tax returns were indeed Trump’s property.

Government information is the tax payer’s property.

What use is hiding this information from the tax payer other than to further corruption?

David Wright
Member
26 days ago

Surely there are duplicates of the information Wikileaks possesses. Holding the information is easy but releasing it? Not so good as we saw.

He’s definitely not going to fade away but paraded around by those who think he is a hero. The other day Tucker was speaking to a group in Australia and it is evident how Assange’s treatment will be going forward from certain Righties. The celebrity sluts may be queuing up to bang this guy again.

Hemid
Hemid
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

The martyrdom of Saint Seth is the weirdest MAGA guy fantasy.

Its icon is a photo of a gay Jew wearing a dollar-store Independence Day Loser costume in mockery of normal Americans. SAY HIS NAME! And in his name, pretend “Bernie bros” are righteous non-partisan patriots and nobody has ever died in a meaningless violent idiot black attack.

“The Russians did it” is a likelier story.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

Typical Hemid-speak. I never understand a word he says and no longer bother even trying.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Hemid
26 days ago

Hypothetically, Seth was pissed that the DNC rigged it against Bernie. It’s not about him being non partisan. But what he really should have been pissed about is Bernie lying down and taking it.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Hemid
26 days ago

“The Russians did it” is a likelier story.

I was with you until there. If the Regime did not use a cut out to liquidate Rich (pro tip: it probably did, despite his former usefulness), Shitavious did for some unknown reason, and God knows that also doesn’t merit much notice.

Sgt Pedantry
Sgt Pedantry
26 days ago

If you are truly clear-headed, you look for the advantage in this.

What you don’t do is moprh into Chase Oliver and start whining about property.

Compsci
Compsci
26 days ago

“…stolen information is often irreplaceable and the damage that ensues from its theft can last a lifetime. Information thieves should be killed on the spot.” Wow, I predict much controversy in the commentary today. 😉 My first impression/thought is taken from the above quote. The moniker, journalist, does not begin to cover all the information thieves. Just about every startup, and most of the successful ones to be sure, who distribute “free” app’s for your computer use—traffic in “stolen” information. That is to say, your personal information. They are just a tiny bit more circumspect in that they lure you… Read more »

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Compsci
26 days ago

Forging your chains to bind you with or braiding the rope used to hang you…The big question is why do White Men do that to themselves…

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Lineman
26 days ago

True. But I am old and my time is short. I’m going to warn and cajole as best I can, but for the rest enjoy the few years left. I can’t change minds, especially the young and stupid.

Marko
Marko
26 days ago

So…do you think Assange raped someone? That was the catalyst for the whole escape to the Ecuadoran embassy, was it not?

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

Yes, true. I suspect the charge was a pretext so he could be held and killed by the GAE, though.

Hun
Hun
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

She didn’t find him unattractive. She just changed her mind about him after they had sex.

In the West, my default assumption about rape allegations is that they are fake. That includes cases like Harvey Weinstein.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

It depends. If it’s your run of the mill police blotter rape that nobody hears about, then there’s probably some truth to it. But if it’s lead story/top of the page/famous man rape, then I immediately assume shenanigans. After all, if you can get 51 CIA people to lie about a laptop, then you shouldn’t have much problem getting half a dozen women to lie about a sexual assault.

Hun
Hun
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
26 days ago

I suspect false accusation are quite common even in non-publicized cases. Unless the accused rapist is an invader, I assume the woman is lying.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

Not that the FBI should be trusted on anything, but its stats show rape to be the most falsely reported crime. I’m shocked that is still public knowledge. From available information, the majority of reported cases are false.

Hun
Hun
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

We know. Regular public is probably clueless.

DLS
DLS
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
26 days ago

I recall the strange 2011 case of French politician Dominique Strauss-Kahn who was accused of raping a black hotel maid named Nafissatou Diallo in NY. Uh-huh. Charges were eventually dropped, but it was never determined whether he was framed by a French rival, or she made it up to get asylum and money.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  DLS
26 days ago

The notion that any non-negro would rape a sheboon is laughable on its face. The fact that this non-event even went to trial is laughable.

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

True, and this accounts for much of the Incel reality of today’s young dudes.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

She claimed he didn’t wear a condom, a small thing she neglected to notice in the heat of the moment.

Doubtless a honeytrap. Heck, she most likely is the one who took it off.

Hun
Hun
Reply to  Alzaebo
26 days ago

It’s all retarded. She could have just said “no”.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

Sweden has put into national law what US universities basically established under their code of conduct rules. As such, the sexual encounter must be consensual, however if the girl has a few drinks on, you’re screwed. I believe in the Assange case, he (and she) was having a pretty good time and at one point decided another condom was unnecessary. The female half of the trist regretted this afterwards and the charge of some form of rape was filed upon her official complaint. However, I heard that this charge was finally dropped while Assange was taking refuge in his embassy… Read more »

Hun
Hun
Reply to  Compsci
26 days ago

In a normal world, the details of the case would be irrelevant. Her details and explanations are bullshit. She could have just said “no”.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

That’s why my reference to university code of conduct. I should have been clearer. Your “squeeze” having a few drinks on absolves her of responsibility and places you in the crosshairs. I suspect such went as well in Sweden when they charged Assange.

mikebravo
mikebravo
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

Some old slapper wanted the kudos of being seen with a face.
He probably splashed jis load, wiped his dick on her duvet and split. Hence rape. She didn’t agree to being spotted as a cheap slag.

TempoNick
TempoNick
Reply to  Hun
26 days ago

I remember back in the 1980s when I was in college, the popular opinion we were taught by professors was that a woman would never lie about something like rape. I’m sure there are people who still believe that, even though over and over again that has been proven to be BS.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  TempoNick
26 days ago

Apparently the profs never heard of the concept of the Big Lie.

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  TempoNick
26 days ago

Of course that’s pure BS. However a bigger, perhaps biggest, problem is that when a women is caught “dead to right” in a false accusation concerning a man, she has almost a *zero* chance of being charged criminally for the crime of false testimony.

This is the primary reason women are so irresponsible—they are never held accountable for their behavior. Men learn accountability the moment they get punched in the face. Women, not so much…

Zaphod
Zaphod
Reply to  Compsci
25 days ago

As the meme sticker says: ‘Islam is Right about Women’.

Forever Templar
Forever Templar
Reply to  thezman
26 days ago

Oh, it’s weird, you can drop something by accident, go to pick it up and then do a full face-plant in a hot woman’s hindquarters and it’s just apologies and embarrassment all around. If she’s an uggo, you better scoot.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
Reply to  Forever Templar
26 days ago

Heh. That’s how the girlies always did to me. (Still do, thank goodness.)

They don’t say anything, they “bump” into you.
Women speak without words at certain stages, in certain situations, amirite? Body language.

It’s a mating dance, as formal and defined as any animal courtship.
Don’t sqwauk when you should peck, don’t peck when you should flap your wings. That sort of thing.

Last edited 26 days ago by Alzaebo
Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Alzaebo
26 days ago

I don’t actually know very much about women. But one thing I know for certain. When her breast touches you, such as on your upper arm or back when she is near you, it is NEVER an accident.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
26 days ago

Yep. They know exactly where their McGuffeys are at all times.

redbeard
redbeard
26 days ago

Z is pissed today. Asange chose his profession and his acts, he ran into the enemy command post with a satchel charge. So it goes.

Cymry Dragon
Cymry Dragon
26 days ago

Saw Tuckers speech from Australia talking about Assange and how corrupt the PTB and “journalists” in particular were. My bet is that he meets with an “accident” before the November election. Any takers?

Gideon
Gideon
26 days ago

The primary reason for Julian Assange’s release from prison was the election of an Australian Labour government that openly supported it. That and Australia’s eagerness to host American occupation forces. Any journalist will definitely think twice before ever publishing unapproved intel again. And the “conservative” Supreme Court has given the American regime the go ahead to sensor social media (which is practically the only independent journalism currently in existence), so they probably figured they could afford to be somewhat magnanimous.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Gideon
26 days ago

The thing that the court got right about that ruling was that “social media” (big tech in this case) eagerly and willingly wants to be censored, ergo it’s not really censorship. You’ll note that it wasn’t them bringing the case. Which, if they had, would have given it the standing the court ruled that the plaintiffs lacked.

Ostei Kozelskii
Member
Reply to  Jeffrey Zoar
26 days ago

You can’t rape the willing…

Lineman
Lineman
Reply to  Ostei Kozelskii
26 days ago

True that and inaction equals willing in their eyes so I guess we deserve them ruling over us like cattle…I get a kick out of our side that continues to scream that they don’t consent but don’t do anything or even try to do anything to stop it so in essence yes you are consenting…

Jack Dobson
Jack Dobson
Reply to  Gideon
26 days ago

 And the “conservative” Supreme Court has given the American regime the go ahead to sensor social media (which is practically the only independent journalism currently in existence), so they probably figured they could afford to be somewhat magnanimous.

A few months ago cuckservatives were laughing at recently appointed Justice Shanika’s musings that the First Amendment should not interfere with government. Now cuckservative justices are joining with her obsequiousness to power. The clown show never stops.

Jeffrey Zoar
Jeffrey Zoar
Reply to  Jack Dobson
26 days ago

This ruling lined up real neatly with which justices are friends of the regime/deep state and which ones have some independence.

Alzaebo
Alzaebo
26 days ago

How then to deal with regime secrets, Zman? Would this case make Assange one of those “rough and dirty men in the night” to do unpleasant but needful things? To be fair, I admit that consistency is the hobgoblin of small minds.

Last edited 26 days ago by Alzaebo
Tom K
Tom K
26 days ago

Information is property and people who traffic in stolen information should be treated like any other thief. In fact, they should be treated more harshly. Stolen property can be replaced, but stolen information is often irreplaceable and the damage that ensues from its theft can last a lifetime. Information thieves should be killed on the spot.

Right effing on Z, that’s how Europe leapfrogged ahead of Africa. YT stole all their knaw-ledge from the Bantus. Wakanda wants its sheeyit back. 

Compsci
Compsci
Reply to  Tom K
26 days ago

All kidding aside. Here’s a pointer—Xerox Research Parc. Do some searching wrt early history of human computer interfacing and icon use vs command line typing, etc. Folks like Jobs stole ideas shamelessly from them. Apple from Xerox, MS from Apple, and so forth. No one has completely clean hands here.

c matt
c matt
25 days ago

I would agree with Z, mostly, if the information stolen belongs to or is about a private citizen doing private citizen things (e.g., on the doxing, for example).

But if it is about government doing nefarious government things (redundant), then I would have to disagree. IMHO, Assange falls into this category.

Bizarro Man
Bizarro Man
21 days ago

I can see your point about doxers, but Assange didn’t steal private information. He published information that by rights belongs to us, and was kept from us to hide the criminal acts of our rulers. The rulers claim divine right to do what they want without consequences, and think we have no right to do anything about it. We need unauthorized leaks to know what they are doing to us, so we can try to defend ourselves.

KingKong
KingKong
23 days ago

Is it that time of the month for you, Z? This is a real cunt take.

I’ve stated this before in the comments – if you don’t have anything clever to say,don’t say it. Not the first time you’ve made an inane post. Last time was when you disparaged that kid who self-immolated for the Palestinians…a bit ironic considering you don’t have children and one could similarly ignore all of your writing too for the same reasons (you’re a genetic loser).

Epaminondas
Member
25 days ago

Well, let’s see here now, Z. Let’s just suppose that ol’ Assange had managed to find some government mole willing to turn over those locked up FBI files on the Kennedy assassination. And if the information in those files proved conclusively that the FBI was involved, would Assange be considered a bad guy for revealing what the FBI had been desperate to cover up? And what if Assange had been too frightened to reveal the information? Would his cowardice be considered a dereliction of his duty? And what if he took a large amount of money in exchange for silence?… Read more »

Gary Hartman
25 days ago

Interesting thoughts on Assange, thanks.